medical marijuana and the workplace dmmd iisc 04132018 · medical marijuana and the workplace...

Click here to load reader

Post on 23-Jul-2020

2 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • 3/7/2018

    1

    Medical Marijuana and the Workplace

    Douglas W Martin MD FACOEM FAADEP FAAFPUnityPoint Health – St. Luke’s Occupational Medicine

    Sioux City, Iowa

    Speaker Disclosures

    1. Do not dispense, prescribe, refer or recommend MMJ

    2. Have no financial interest in any entity that grows, procures, processes, sells or dispenses MMJ

    3. Not receiving financial sponsorship for this presentation

    Agenda 

    • History • Cannabinoids • Medical Uses• Medical Marijuana• Policy and Workplace Issues

  • 3/7/2018

    2

    Ancient History• Cannabis sativa plant – origin in Central 

    Asia/Himalayas 36 million years ago• China ‐ Emperor Shen Nung described 

    therapeutic properties 2737 BCE• India – widespread medicinal use 1000 BCE• Spread throughout Asia, Middle East, Africa 

    through 18th Century

    19th Century Use in Western Medicine

    • 1839 ‐ publication by O’Shaughnessy: effective analgesic, appetite stimulant, antiemetic, muscle relaxant, anticonvulsive

    • 1854 ‐ entered U.S. Dispensary; usually available as tincture

    • 1860 ‐ Ohio State Medical Society sponsored conference on cannabis

    • 1900 ‐ >100 scientific pubs. in U.S., Europe• Marketed by Merck, Burroughs‐Wellcome, Bristol‐

    Myers Squibb, Parke Davis, Eli Lilly

  • 3/7/2018

    3

    20th Century Challenges• Difficulty with standardized dosing, water solubility; 

    delayed onset when taken orally• Newer medications introduced for primary indications• 1937 ‐ Federal Marijuana Tax Act severely burdened 

    use by high taxes (AMA opposed Act)• 1942 ‐ removed from US Pharmacopoeia (AMA 

    opposed this action)• 1970 ‐ Controlled Substance Act banned use of MJ• 1971 ‐ Nixon’s “War on Drugs” led to plummeting 

    research funding

    Recent Developments 

    • 1964 ‐ chemical structure of THC identified• 1996 ‐medical marijuana (MM) legalized in CA• 1999 ‐ Institute of Medicine reported scientific 

    and clinical basis for medical use • 2015 – MM legalized in 23 states & DC • 2015 – 9 additional states approved use of CBD 

    oil for childhood epilepsy, other conditions• 2014‐15 ‐ recreational use legalized in CO, WA, 

    AK, DC with expected and unexpected effects

  • 3/7/2018

    4

    Iowa and Illinois• Iowa

    – CBD only– Medical Cannabidiol Board– Controlled Registry

    • Certification of Medical Need (limited conditions) by MD• Controlled dispensary (MedPharm LLC seeking apps)

    • Illinois– Any medical marijuana (limit of 2.5 oz per 2 weeks)– Registry Card with application fees– Limited conditions (advisory board authority)

    • Medical certification by physician– Patient must designate a dispensary 

  • 3/7/2018

    5

    Marijuana Products

    More Marijuana Products

    Ever More Marijuana Products

  • 3/7/2018

    6

    Never Ending Variety

    Main Active Compounds

    • Delta‐9‐Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)– Strong psychoactive effect and analgesic activity

    • 11‐Hydroxy‐THC– Immediate metabolite; 4 times greater psychoactive and 

    immunosuppressive effects• Cannabidiol (CBD)

    – Non‐psychoactive; modulates ion‐channels, receptors and enzyme targets

    – Anti‐inflammatory, antiemetic, anti‐epileptiform, anti‐ischemic, anxioytic, and anti‐psychotic effects

    • Many other components: – e.g., Cannabinol, Cannabigerol, Tetrahydro‐cannabivarian,

    Canabichromene

    Cannabis Components

    • Cannabis contains >450 distinct compounds in 18 chemical classes

    • Pyrolysis yields >2000 compounds• THC is primary psychoactive ingredient• THC and cannabidiol most abundant 

    cannabinoids. THC/CBD ratios vary by strain, preparation, etc.• Charlotte’s Web:    CBD,    THC

  • 3/7/2018

    7

    Agricultural Hybridization

    • THC content of cultivated cannabis has risen dramatically 

    ~3% in 1980s~12% in 2013

    • Potency responsible for growing number of ED visits over last decade (overdose) 

    Exogenous Pharmaceuticals• Dronabinol (Marinol) isomer of THC – DEA Schedule 23

    – 1985 – FDA: nausea and vomiting (chemotherapy‐induced) – 1992 – FDA: anorexia and cachexia (AIDS)

    • Nabilone (Cesamet) – Schedule 3– More potent than synthetic THC– FDA: Nausea and vomiting

    • Nabiximols (Sativex)– Approved in 20 countries, including Canada– In Phase III trials in U.S. for cancer pain

    • Cannador– Orally administered cannabis extract with 2:1 THC:CBD– Current research by European Institute for Clinical Research

    • Pharmaceutical‐grade smoked or vaporized Cannabis– Netherlands, Canada (NOT U.S.)

    Cannabinomimetics

    • Drugs that stimulate cannabinoid receptors and can mimic some of their effects

    • Dozens of chemically‐diverse compounds– K2– Spice– Bath Salts

    • Warning: Benign sounding names  highly toxic effects: have led to death and brain damage

  • 3/7/2018

    8

    Routes of Administration

    • Pulmonary– Smoking (high temp.)– Vaporization (lower temp.)

    • Oral– Medication, e.g., capsule, tincture, oral spray– Edible, e.g., brownie, cookie, pastry– Tea

    • Transdermal– Skin patch

  • 3/7/2018

    9

    Current Medical Use 

    • Not primary drug of choice for any condition• Recommended where standard therapies have 

    been ineffective or intolerable• Often used as adjunct with other medications 

    or therapy (e.g., to lower opiate doses)• Medical indications formalized by states (e.g., 

    NY, CA, MI), Health Canada, Netherlands

    Indications for Medical Use ‐1 

    • Nausea/vomiting from chemotherapy, radiation therapy, or medications for HIV and hepatitis C

    • Pain and palliative Rx for Cancer, HIV/AIDS (stimulate appetite, avoid weight loss, reduce debilitation and wasting syndrome)

    • Disorders of pain and spasticity (intractable spasticity, multiple sclerosis, spinal cord damage or injury, ALS)

    Indications for Medical Use – 2

    • Chronic neuropathic pain (nerve damage, phantom limb, facial neuralgia, post‐herpetic neuralgia)

    • Neurologic disorders (childhood epilepsy,* neuropathy, tics of Tourette syndrome, Parkinson’s disease, possibly PTSD)

    • Autoimmune disease (arthritis, lupus, inflammatory bowel disease, e.g. Crohn’s)

    • Treatment‐resistant glaucoma

    * Five upcoming clinical trials 

  • 3/7/2018

    10

    Acute Side Effects* 

    • Respiratory irritation/cough (if smoked)• Lightheadedness or dizziness (30‐60%)• Sedation/fatigue (5‐40%)• Dry mouth (10‐25%)• Muscle weakness (10‐25%)• Palpitations: tachycardia/hypotenstion (20%)• Cognitive: attention, memory, reaction time

    *Dose dependent; rapidly reversible

    Risks (dose related)• No established lethal dose• Slower reaction time, diminished estimation of 

    time and distance  impaired vehicle operation and motor skills (especially with alcohol)

    • Impaired thinking and memory• Anxiety/panic attacks• Exacerbation of underlying psychological/ 

    psychiatric conditions (acute psychosis?, schizophrenia?)

    • Adolescents: poorer educational outcomes 

    Contraindications and Precautions

    • Hypersensitivity to cannabinoids or smoke• Psychosis – personal or family history• Age 

  • 3/7/2018

    11

    Addictive Potential

    • 32% nicotine• 23% heroin• 17% cocaine• 15% alcohol• 9% recreational marijuana• ??  medical marijuana

    MedicalMarijuana

  • 3/7/2018

    12

    Question??

    • Can doctors in medical marijuana states actually “prescribe” medical marijuana?

    • No. Because MJ is still DEA Schedule 1 drug it cannot be prescribed. A licensed physician can only “recommend” or “refer” a patient. 

    • Person can then get medical cannabis ID card or license at a registry, and/or go to dispensaryto obtain (varies by state). 

    Medical Marijuana Laws ‐ 1

    • Some statutes have general language authorizing medical discretion. Examples:– Patients whose physicians advise in writing that 

    they "might benefit from the medical use of marijuana" (AK) 

    – Qualifying “debilitating medical condition” (CT) – “Debilitating condition; potential benefits would 

    likely outweigh health risks” (HI)

  • 3/7/2018

    13

    Economic Impact of Legalized Marijuana

    • A mature marijuana industry could generate up to $28 billion in tax revenues for federal, state, and local governments, including $7 billion in federal revenue: $5.5 billion from business taxes and $1.5 billion from income and payroll taxes.

    • A federal tax of $23 per pound of product, similar to the federal tax on tobacco, could generate $500 million per year. Alternatively, a 10 percent sales surtax could generate $5.3 billion per year, with higher tax rates collecting proportionately more.

    • The reduction of societal risk in being engaged in the marijuana trade, as well as the inclusion of taxes, will combine to reduce profits (and tax collections) somewhat from an initial level after national legalization.

    • Society pays all the costs regardless of legality but tax revenues help offset those costs.

    Policy Issues ‐ 1

    • Collision of Federal vs. State authority– Illegal under federal law, even in 24 states with 

    medical MJ statutes– Federal law overrides state law, e.g., DHHS/DOT 

    federally‐regulated drug testing– 12/2014 Congress barred Justice Dept. from 

    prosecuting patients and providers who use MM in accordance with state laws

  • 3/7/2018

    14

    Policy Issues ‐ 2

    • Federal vs. State Authority• DEA Scheduling 

    – Currently Schedule 1 – no accepted medical use– Shift from Schedule 1 lower Schedule (2‐5)??– Long urged by IOM, ACP, AMA (11/09)

    DEA Drug Rescheduling Criteria*

    1. Chemistry must be known and reproducible2. Adequate safety studies3. Adequate, well‐controlled efficacy studies4. Accepted by qualified experts (NDA to FDA  

    or scientific consensus)5. Scientific evidence must be widely available

    *  Petitions for rescheduling of marijuana submitted to DEA in 1972, 1995 and 2002

    American College of Physicians

    • "ACP urges review of marijuana's status as a schedule I controlled substance and its reclassification into a more appropriate schedule, given the scientific evidence regarding marijuana's safety and efficacy in some clinical conditions...”

    “Supporting Research into the Therapeutic  Role of Marijuana" 

    February 2008

  • 3/7/2018

    15

    Policy Issues

    • Federal vs. State authority• DEA Scheduling  • Inadequate Research

    – Most medical evidence is largely anecdotal– Need randomized controlled clinical trials– Explore other active components, e.g., CBD– Systems of administration, doses– Social research

    Unproven Myths

    • “Gateway” drug  theory– Most MJ users do not use harder drugs– 25% lower opioid OD mortality in states with MMJ 

    laws (2014 JAMA). Is MJ substitute? Adjunct?• Pulmonary harm

    – 2014 JAMA:  normal FEV1, FVC >20 yr. w small sample• Adverse Immune effects• Cognitive Impairment beyond acute use• Addiction (dependence vs. addiction)

    Former U.S. Surgeon General"The evidence is overwhelming that marijuana can relieve certain types of pain, nausea, vomiting and other symptoms caused by such illnesses as multiple sclerosis, cancer and AIDS ‐‐or by the harsh drugs sometimes used to treat them. And it can do so with remarkable safety. Indeed, marijuana is less toxic than many of the drugs that physicians prescribe every day.“

    Joycelyn Elders, MDEditorial, Providence JournalMarch 26, 2004

  • 3/7/2018

    16

    Institute of Medicine

    “Marijuana's active components are potentially effective in treating pain, nausea and vomiting, AIDS‐related loss of appetite, and other symptoms and should be tested rigorously in clinical trials. But a subpopulation of patients do not respond well to other medications and have no effective alternative to smoking marijuana.” 

    “Marijuana and Medicine: Assessing the Science Base”IOM Report, March 1999

    American Psychiatric Association • “There is no current scientific evidence that 

    marijuana is in any way beneficial for the treatment of any psychiatric disorder.”

    • “Medical treatment should be evidence‐based and determined by professional standards of care; it should not be authorized by ballot initiatives.” 

    • “Further research on the use of cannabis‐derived substances as medicine should be encouraged and facilitated by the federal government.” 

    Position Statement on Marijuana as Medicine, 2013

    Policy Issues

    • Federal vs. State authority• DEA Scheduling   • Inadequate Research • MMJ Contamination (e.g., pesticides)• Diversion to Other States

  • 3/7/2018

    17

    Policy Issues

    • Federal vs. State authority• DEA Scheduling   • Inadequate Research • MMJ Contamination (e.g., pesticides)• Diversion to Other States• Medical Licensing Boards

    – Need Bona Fide PhysicianPatient Relationship, not casual dispensing

    – Mandatory CME for prescribers, parallel to mandatory opiate education?

  • 3/7/2018

    18

    Impairment with Marijuana?

    • Slower reaction time, diminished estimation of time and distance  impaired vehicle operation and motor skills. • Impact on safety sensitive jobs, e.g., machinery, 

    vehicles?

    • Impaired thinking and memory • Impact on mentally‐demanding tasks?

    State Laws

    • CT, RI, ME prohibit discrimination against workers solely based on their status as MM patients

    • AZ and DE bar discrimination against registered MM patients who test positive, with exception of employees who are impaired in the workplace

    Legal Appeals• “the ADA does not protect medical marijuana users who 

    claim to face discrimination on the basis of their marijuana use”  9th U.S. Court Circuit of Appeals 

    • “Private employees are not protected from disciplinary action as a result of their use of medical marijuana, nor are private employers required to accommodate the use of medical marijuana in the workplace.”  6th U.S. Court Circuit of Appeals 

    • Employees who lose jobs due to marijuana positive drug test are entitled to unemployment benefits

    IL & MI Courts of Appeals 

  • 3/7/2018

    19

    Workplace Issues

    • Potential Impact on– Corporate culture– Work quality and productivity– Safety sensitive work – functional impairment

    • Even where medical MJ or recreational MJ legalized, most employers have right to ban

    – Some states upheld firing MMJ users with + UDS (CA, MI, OR, WA)

    – Other states prohibit discrimination against MMJ users with + UDS (AZ, DE, IL, MN) unless used or impaired on job

    – Important not to discriminate against underlying disability

    MRO Reporting of Positive for  Registered Medical Marijuana User

    • Key is “legitimate medical explanation”• DHHS/DOT – always positive; no explanation• Non‐federally regulated – defer to employer’s 

    policy and instructions to MRO– Vast majority of employers do not accept MMJ– No states make MMJ an acceptable explanation– Only 4% of employers accommodate medical 

    marijuana (HireRight survey)

    Professional Society Guidance

    • ACOEM/AAOHN– Report as positive to employer, who must determine employment implications 

    Marijuana in the Workplace, 2015

    • ACOEM MRO and Pharma Sections– “Determine whether the medical facts corroborate valid medical marijuana use.”

    – “Make a written notation on their report whether donor has provided supporting documentation.”

    Medical Marijuana in the Workplace, 2015

  • 3/7/2018

    20

    Subtleties

    • Testing for marijuana provides way for employers to prohibit use on and off the job.

    • Many employers have not adopted policies re: acceptability of medical marijuana and look to MRO for guidance.

    • Difficult to assess appropriateness of use even in doctor‐patient relationship. Extremely challenging in brief MRO telephone interview.

    The Future

    • Situation likely to remain complex.• How will current employer discretion apply to 

    state and municipal employees?• What will happen if DEA shifts marijuana to 

    Schedule 2? If no longer “illegal,” how will this affect employer options? 

    Quick Web Based References

    • Medical cannabis in the United States https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Medical_cannabis_in_the_United_States

    • Medical marijuana laws by state http://healthcare.findlaw.com/patient‐rights/medical‐marijuana‐laws‐by‐state.html

    • Pros and Cons ‐ Compilation of data, charts, arguments pro and con, 60 peer‐reviewed medical studieswww.medicalmarijuana.procon.org

    • Petition to Reschedule Cannabis filed with the DEA, October 9, 2002  www.drugscience.org

    • Canada’s Medical Marijuana Regulations, an overview http://www.raps.org/Regulatory‐Focus/News/2015/08/26/23079/Canadas‐Medical‐Marijuana‐Regulations‐An‐Overview/

  • 3/7/2018

    21

    Scientific Reference List