Meaningful Marketing Strategy

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Customers pay attention when messages mean something to them. Learn how to build meaningful marketing that helps you grow brand, revenue and relationships.

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<ul><li> 1. Meaningful MarketingStrategy Workshop4.17.12 twitter.com/buildingbelief facebook.com/mythologymarketingJeff James linkedin.in/in/jeffjameswv youtube.com/mythologyworkshops </li> <li> 2. The Ten Pillars of Meaningful MarketingUnderstanding EngagementWhat do your employees/customers/partners believe? Campaigns and communication - How, when, where the Ten Pillar DescriptionsWhat do they want to believe? What do you want them story will be told in unexpected, breakthrough waysto believe about you or your product/service?Priority SurpriseChoosing first the ones who will choose you - Unexpected value - emotional and functional thatSegmenting customers and stack-ranking who is most exceeds expectations and builds into a dependence thatvaluable to you they wont be able to live withoutDifferentiation DialogCompetitive strengths that set you apart- Finding the The power of intimacy and the path to loyalty -core of who your organization is and why that is special Interactive communications that lead to relationshipsand unique in both emotional and functional benefitcategoriesAlignment EmpowermentInternal buy-in and readinessare your people ready? Incentive and opportunity to share the great experienceHelping your team see, understand, believe and live out with othersthe visionMythology InnovationYour brand, your story that builds belief and inspires The next surprise - Feeding the addiction of beingaction delighted with new value http://www.mythologymarketing.com/pillars/ </li> <li> 3. What Were Doing Today </li> <li> 4. Agenda The media and marketing world we live in today What it takes to break through with meaning Understanding your customer/constituent segments Building your value proposition Creating sticky stories and meaningful messages </li> <li> 5. TODAYS MARKETINGENVIRONMENT </li> <li> 6. Creating Change The Rider (Intellect, Logic) To effect change, The Elephant you must (Emotion, Desire, address all three Impulse) effectively The Path (Environment, Prompts, Tools)Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard 2010 Chip and Dan Heath </li> <li> 7. Beginning Assumptions </li> <li> 8. Good </li> <li> 9. Not So Good </li> <li> 10. UNDERSTANDING </li> <li> 11. Understanding Market Decision Process and Segmentation Triggers Decision-Makers Competitors Personas Influencers Your Team </li> <li> 12. Sources: FlightView, The WiseMarketer 11/3/11 How Understanding Can Open Doors 78% of airline customers are "often frustrated by the lack of timely, accurate information" about delays 45% of travellers said their biggest frustration was not knowing where their plane was, or when it would arrive. Another 34% said their biggest frustration was not receiving fast enough or accurate enough updates on new departure times. In both cases, the lack of information was felt to create a more stressful travel experience. Implications: 40% said they consider avoiding that airline the next time they fly; 22% say its partly why they dont like flying and may avoid flying, if possible </li> <li> 13. Client Segmentation Industry Region Size - Revenue Historic and potential (Lifetime Value) Reputation? Influence in the area? Industry? Relationship history? Relationship/service cost? Business Philosophy? Risk tolerance? Growth stage? </li> <li> 14. How Do Consumers in YourIndustry Make Decisions? Their buying criteria What is paramount on their list of must haves/nice to haves? Relationship vs. function? Their decision process Whos involved? How is decision made? Where do they gather data? Their influences Industry data/reviews, peers? Their decision calendar Time of year? Frequency? </li> <li> 15. Identifying the Influencers Who They Are Ranking Their Influence Activists: influencers get Market Reach the number of involved, with their communities, people an individual has the ability political movements, charities and to connect with. so on. Quality of Impact the esteem in Connected: influencers have which an individuals view and large social networks opinions are held. Impact: influencers are looked up Frequency of Impact the to and are trusted by others number of opportunities an Active minds: influencers have individual has to influence buying multiple and diverse interests decisions. Trendsetters: influencers tend to Closeness to Decision how be early adopters (or leavers) in near an individual is to the markets decision-makerKeller, Ed and Berry, Jon. The Influentials, Free Press, 2003 </li> <li> 16. Exercise Who are the influencers in your Niche segments Message Key Regions Influencer Influencer Influencer Market </li> <li> 17. #shale Influencers </li> <li> 18. Customer Segmentation MapCustomer Demo- Functional Emotional Affinities &amp; Gathering Decision- Current OtherSegments Graphics Needs Needs Interests Spots Making Beliefs About Process You </li> <li> 19. Audience/Persona SummaryCustomer Segment Awareness/Affinity Primary Needs/Desires #1 Engaged Keys to Success What do We Want Them to Believe? What do We Want Them to Do? </li> <li> 20. Competitive Map Competitor Functional Advantages Emotional Advantages </li> <li> 21. PRIORITY </li> <li> 22. Priority Of your client segments, which are most critical for meeting short and long-term goals? Why? Stack rank segments Stack rank sub-segments within segment Factors to consider Revenue potential Historic revenue Profitability Reputation influencer How are current resources being applied towards these priority segments? What adjustments need made in order to ensure the most important segments receive appropriate investment? </li> <li> 23. DIFFERENTIATION </li> <li> 24. Differentiation Differentiation drives growth What are the core elements of service in your industry? What elements are essential vs. non-essential? What element will you be the absolute best at in your market area Becomes key point of differentiation </li> <li> 25. The Discipline of Market LeadersThe Discipline of Market Leaders, Michael Treacy and Fred Wiersema. Addison-Wesley. 1995 </li> <li> 26. Three Characteristics of a Good Strategy Focus Southwest emphasizes only three factors: friendly service, speed and frequent point-to-point departures Divergence Value curve should stand apart from competitors Southwest offered point-to-point travel between midsize cities vs. hub-and-spoke Compelling Tagline Authentic, clear, memorableBlue Ocean Strategy, Harvard Business School Press. W. Chan Kim and Renee Mauborgne, 2005 </li> <li> 27. Core Elements of CreativeServices? Critical Nice to have Not that relevant (perceived) </li> <li> 28. Defining the Value Proposition For (Target Customer): Who Needs: The (Offering Name) Is a (Category) That (Provides Key Benefit): Unlike (Primary competitive alternative) Because (Our offerings primary differentiation): </li> <li> 29. MYTHOLOGY </li> <li> 30. Mythology mythology a set of stories, traditions, or beliefs associated with a particular group or the history of an event, arising naturally or deliberately fostered What builds belief? Purpose of mythology - What human emotions can you connect with? What should the structure of the story look like? </li> <li> 31. Can You Share the Myth? </li> <li> 32. Newer Examples </li> <li> 33. Emotional Value: Connecting via Archetypes Stability &amp; Control By a factor of three, what you do is not nearly as important as how it makes people feel. - Seth Godin, April 2007 Caregiver Creator Ruler Care for others Craft Exert Control something new Belonging Independence &amp; Regular &amp; Jester Lover Sage Explorer Innocent Enjoyment Have a Guy/Gal Find and Understand Maintain Retain or Fulfillment good time OK as you are give love our world independence renew faithThe Hero and the Outlaw, Margaret Mark&amp; Carol Pearson 2001 Risk &amp; Mastery </li> <li> 34. Emotional Value: Connecting via Archetypes...</li></ul>