mama l’afrique documents authors nicci hayes, jean mike malecaut, baye

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Slide 1Nicci Hayes, Jean Mike Malecaut, Baye Sadiara Fall, Wellington Oboh, Magura Miquitaio, Mohundranathsingh Ujoodha from South Africa, Mauritius, Senegal, Nigeria, and Mozambique and shall Hitherto be refered to as the G5 Pan Africa.
At the end of the project the students should be able to :
Identify important Land mark in the country
Identify people (Heroes and Heroine ) of the country from the past to date
Demonstrate a knowledge of the History, culture and people of the country in a time line using simple computer applications.
Forecast the future of the country 20 years from now
Compare and contrast results of project with other countries in the G5 pan African project, using the Blog tool.
Objectives
Software
Description
Learning Areas
When and why do you have to state your source?
The correct use of sources tells the reader that you have based the VCT on knowledge arrived at by others, that you are trustworthy with respect to the subject matter and that the reader him/herself can learn more about the topic dealt with in your VCT. It is not always necessary to refer to the sources. You do not have to document information that is general knowledge, i.e. that everyone knows. Nor is it necessary to document knowledge that is based on the textbooks you have used, but the textbooks should be listed under textbooks in the list of sources. How should I refer to sources?
Works of fiction and textbooks:
If you quote from a work of fiction or from a textbook, you should include the author’s name, the title, the year it was published and a reference to the page number.
If the source is a whole book, the title should be written in italics.
References to the sources for the VCT must be included in the “Images and other sources form”, but they can also be included in brackets immediately after the quote or in a footnote marked beside the quote.
Images/ works of art:
The photographer/ artist has copyright to the photograph/ work of art and thereby sole right to produce copies of it and make it publicly available.
You must request permission to use the photograph/ work of art. If the photograph/ work of art is taken from a book, you should clear your use of it with the publisher or others listed as contacts. If the image is taken from the internet, the holder of the copyright/ website must be contacted in order to clear its use.
In the “Images and other sources form”, the photographer’s/ artist’s name is listed as well as where the image has been obtained, its source, URL address. Questions concerning copyright or the use of copyrighted works of art can be addressed to the Norwegian Visual Arts Copyright Society, BONO.
On the internet:
It can be difficult to refer to internet sources. The author may be unknown or the page may be undated. If you cannot find the author, you can cite the publisher’s name. If you cannot find the publishing date (document date), you must use the download date.
Some websites contain information about how the material can be used. It will be necessary to request permission if there are restrictions on use.
Images and other sources form
Works of fiction
Author’s name
Teacher Planning and Management
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On this slide, embed the student handouts and the resources created for this project. Some examples are a student project overview, Internet and other resources, directions for art projects, or instructions to students for peer editing of projects. To embed the resources, follow these steps:
Have the resource document available.
From the Insert menu choose Object.
Select Create from File… and click Browse….
Find the file you want to include and click OK.
Select Display as icon and click Change Icon… and add a suitable caption.
Click OK to add the caption and click OK to embed the file.
Position the document icon at the bottom of the slide. You can go to View, Grid and Guides, and click Display Grid on Screen for a grid on which to line up your icons.
Title
School
Include details of your school setting, size of school, type of school, any special focus, how classes are organized, etc.
The teachers
Include details of the teacher or teachers who taught this learning project: experience, areas and levels they teach, and special experience they needed.
Project goals
Include details of the project goals. What were the educational goals of this project, why was it taught, what did you hope the students would learn?
The planning and origin of the project
Include details of where the concept of this project came from and the planning that went into it: what was required to make it be successful?
The curriculum context of the project
Include details of the curriculum context: how did this learning experience fit into the broader curriculum context of the class(es) involved?
The technology context
Include details of the technology context: how is technology organized for this group of students? What access levels are available, where did they access the technology, how was it managed, did that extend beyond the school?
The project management
Include details of how the project was managed: how the class was organized, how the students managed the project and the time, how the teacher(s) managed the project.
Microsoft Innovative Teachers Microsoft.com/Education/InnovativeTeachers
Classroom Images
Include a description of how the classroom was physically laid out. You might want to discuss if the teacher had technology for demonstration and how the students physically worked together. Add images to demonstrate how the classroom was laid out. Note: If you intend to distribute this Virtual Classroom Tour via the Internet, it is required that you do not include images of students.
Classroom Image 1
Classroom Image 2
Teaching Resources
Click the documents below to view the teaching resources used in the teaching of this learning project:
Student Project Overview: An overview of required tasks.
Class Server Resources: Download teaching resources in Class Server format.
<Enter other document details>
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On this slide, embed the student handouts and the resources created for this project. Some examples are a student project overview, Internet and other resources, directions for art projects, or instructions to students for peer editing of projects. To embed the resources, follow these steps:
Have the resource document available.
From the Insert menu choose Object.
Select Create from File… and click Browse….
Find the file you want to include and click OK.
Select Display as icon and click Change Icon… and add a suitable caption.
Click OK to add the caption and click OK to embed the file.
Position the document icon at the bottom of the slide. You can go to View, Grid and Guides, and click Display Grid on Screen for a grid on which to line up your icons.
Microsoft Office Training Resources
Click the links below to access training resources on Microsoft Office and other software:
Microsoft Educator Network – The Microsoft Educator Network provides you with the latest classroom resources, professional development tools, and communities of practice and expertise.
Mama L’Afrique
Assessment and Standards
Click the documents below to see the assessment rubrics and standards cover in this learning project:
Assessment Rubrics: Examples of assessment rubrics provided to students showing how the project was assessed.
Mapping the Standards: Mapping this project’s learning objectives against curriculum standards.
National Educational Technology Standards for Students (NETS): Performance indicators for technology-literate students.
Documents
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Add any assessment materials you developed for the project to this slide.
Have the resource document available.
From the Insert menu choose Object.
Select Create from File… and click Browse….
Find the file you want to include and click OK.
Select Display as icon and click Change Icon… and add a suitable caption.
Click OK to add the caption and click OK to embed the file.
Position the document icon at the bottom of the slide. You can go to View, Grid and Guides, and click Display Grid on Screen for a grid on which to line up your icons.
To include the Standards targeted through your learning project, open the Mapping the Standards document and then add your own standards at the bottom of the document. Links are included to help you search for local curriculum and technology standards.
Mapping Curriculum Standards
The standards for this project are indicated below.
These standards will assist you in mapping the project against your own state or district standards. You may consider using the following Web sites to help you in this process:
When you are mapping activities against standards, it is better to focus on a small collection of critical standards, rather than link activities to a large number of standards, which will broaden the focus and make assessing student work more difficult.
Provide information below on how you mapped this project’s learning objectives against your local and state standards. This information will serve as an example for teachers to use as they map the learning objectives against their region’s standards.
Microsoft Innovative Teachers Microsoft.com/Education/InnovativeTeachers
Assessment and Authenticity
The authenticity of the context in which we develop students’ understandings is crucial to the degree to which those understandings can be applied to new and different situations—a salient difference between simply recounting facts and applying knowledge to new problems. In discussing standards for student work, Sergiovanni refers to the work of Newman, Lopez, and Bryk, which suggests that authentic work involves the original application of knowledge and skills rather than routine use of facts and procedures. It also entails disciplined inquiry into the details of a particular problem and results in a product or presentation that has meaning or value beyond success in school. (Sergiovanni 2001, 91)
For knowledge to be authentic it must have value in some utilitarian, aesthetic or personal way, beyond simply confirming that a school objective has been met. Quizzes, exams, spelling bees may have their place, but the proof of authentic learning is in its relationship to real-world problems and issues; in the ability of students to understand them, to engage them and to offer defensible solutions. (Sergiovanni 2001, 91)
As we develop curriculum for understanding and embed technology within that experience, designing authentic assessment tasks is essential: the proof of authenticity is in its relationship to real-world problems and issues. The Virtual Classroom Tour projects accompanying these guides have been selected because of their authenticity and their relationship to real-world problems and issues—for example, overcoming prejudice and intolerance in a global society.
Assessment needs to be seen as a continuum of assessment methods, including ongoing assessment and informal assessment, to help students achieve understanding and avoid misunderstanding.
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Continuum of Assessment Methods (Wiggins and McTighe 1998, 12)
As the performance task is developed, it is wise to bear in mind the need for a product or presentation that has meaning or value beyond success in school. Wiggins and McTighe suggest that in designing lessons, a teacher needs to think like an assessor, and they acknowledge that this is not a natural or easy process for many teachers. Thinking like an assessor involves considering two basic questions:
· Where shall we look to find hallmarks of understanding?
· What should we look for in determining and distinguishing degrees of understanding? (Wiggins and McTighe 1998, 67)
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Sergiovanni, T. 2001. Leadership: What’s in It for Schools? London: Routledge Falmer.
Wiggins, G., and J. McTighe. 1998. Understanding by Design. Alexandria, Virginia: ASCD.
Microsoft Innovative Teachers Microsoft.com/Education/InnovativeTeachers

Mama L’Afrique
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Use these resources for assistance in working with and learning more about Microsoft Office applications.
Mama L’Afrique
Nigeria
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Mama L’Afrique
Limamoulaye high school is the largest college of Senegal. It is built in the popular suburbs of the capital Dakar since 1979 and it counts meadows of 5000 pupils. The pupils are divided in general, technical and professional levels. The demographic and geographical situation did not prevent it from being the best establishment of Senegal by its brilliances results in the open competition and the baccalaureat.
With the advent of the TIC, the college obtained through policies partnerships, five ICT Lab equipped out of PC, printers, scanner, video projector, numeric camera… All the teaching subject cells has of a computer connected to Internet and a printer. On the whole the school have a hundred computers. The various buildings of the college are connected in an Internet network ADSL high bandwidth. Now, the challenge is to integrate the ICT in classroom, to encourage teachers to use ICT in teaching and learning.
S E N E G A L
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Brief School History and picture of school on the right.
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Brief School History and picture of school on the right.
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Brief School History and picture of school on the right.
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