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derment (not unlike getting your prod- uct to market). Along the way they meet the most fantastic cast of charac- ters, and some become great friends, who buy into her simple desire. The Munchkins in this tale have a single directive – “Follow the yellow brick road” – for it leads to Oz, where she can meet the all-powerful Wizard who will make her wish come true. In Dorothy’s case, one wish (idea) stood alone and shone brightest. Even before the end we all rallied and knew her plea. We became her champions and as such, we cheered her on and understood her message that indeed “There’s no place like home.” That‘s what your ad message needs to do as well – build on your own unique idea. Make it simple, make it understand- able, and make it yours. Present a con- sistently good and passionate message and keep it on the path, one that will win over customers, time and again. But that’s not all Dorothy’s wish accom- plished. When she met the Scarecrow she invited him to join her, for she believed his dream could be realized as well. Ultimately he came along because he bought into her passion and her idea. She won him over. Likewise, the Tin Man and the Lion joined her for the same reason, a simple belief. Though they shared one path, their end needs were different, and Dorothy was able to deliver them their heart’s desire. She gave them what they needed most, a need to feel good about themselves, and their decisions. Ultimately our goal as advertisers is not all that different. The Yellow Brick Road, although fraught with danger and peril, can direct us to success. Deliver your message consistently and never waver. Along the way, make friends who rise to your call. Give your customers one idea that they can grasp onto and hold as their own. Give them one idea that connects them with you, and you with them, just as Dorothy did. In the end you’ll discover what we all look for – a good story well told, with a happy ending will bring your customers home... with Toto, too. WATERCOOLER L inamar Corp., Canada's second- largest auto-parts maker, will spend more than C$1 billion ($900 million) with the help of a government grant to build a research and development centre. The center will be constructed in Guelph, where the company's headquarters are located, and the grant will contribute C$44.5 million to the C$1.1 billion project, the provincial government said in a state- ment on its Website. Linamar will train about 3,000 employ- ees at the center during the next five years. In November, the company said it expect- ed 2006 to be a year of “growth preparation” as factory production is shifted to make new engines and six-speed transmissions now being used in the auto industry. The company operating in Canada, Mexico and Europe, had a profit of C$100 mil- lion, or C$1.41 a share, on revenue of C$2.16 billion last year. Guelph Mayor Kate Quarrie said she is thrilled with Linamar and the provincial government’s announcement about the company’s $1.1 billion expansion. “Linamar Corporation has long been one of Guelph’s outstanding success stories. [This] announcement – and what it means for this community – is extraordinary news for the city.” Quarrie congratulated Linda Hasenfratz, President and Chief Executive Officer of Linamar Corporation, for her receipt of the Business, Labour, and Entrepreneurs Women’s Award as part of the Women of Distinction Awards. A Waterloo Region automobile dealer is making Canadian automotive retailing history. John Hanson is owner of Hanson Chevrolet- Pontiac-Buick-GMC in New Hamburg, Ontario. On June 17, that business celebrated the grand open- ing of the first General Motors “dual showroom franchise” in Ontario. The new Hanson facility includes a full Chevrolet showroom, and a complete Pontiac-Buick-GMC showroom, all under one roof. The attractive, glass- fronted building is graced with two different “towers,” one the Chevrolet entrance, the other, Pontiac-Buick-GMC. Allprint Ainsworth Associates Inc. is celebrating its 30th year in business. Allprint Ainsworth is a Kitchener compa- ny, once known simply as a printing com- pany, but today offering “integrated mar- keting and communication solutions.” Owner Klaus Ertle had served as production manager at Ainsworth Press prior to founding his own company, Allprint, in 1976. He had worked in the printing busi- ness since the 1950s. By 1979, Make it simple, make it understandable, and make it yours. Linda Hasenfratz, Premier Dalton McGuinty and Frank Hasenfratz. John Hanson owner of Hanson Chevrolet-Pontiac- Buick-GMC in New Hamburg Klaus Ertle JULY/AUGUST 2006 l exchangemagazine.com l 39 Volkswagen Waterloo 550 Weber Street North, Waterloo, ON Tel: (519) 884-7470 [email protected] www.vwwaterloo.com 2007 Rabbit What’s up Doc?

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derment (not unlike getting your prod- uct to market). Along the way they meet the most fantastic cast of charac- ters, and some become great friends, who buy into her simple desire. The Munchkins in this tale have a single directive – “Follow the yellow brick road” – for it leads to Oz, where she can meet the all-powerful Wizard who will make her wish come true.
In Dorothy’s case, one wish (idea) stood alone and shone brightest. Even before the end we all rallied and knew her plea. We became her champions and as such, we cheered her on and understood her message that indeed “There’s no place like home.” That‘s what your ad message needs to do as well – build on your own unique idea.
Make it simple, make it understand- able, and make it yours. Present a con- sistently good and passionate message and keep it on the path, one that will win over customers, time and again.
But that’s not all Dorothy’s wish accom- plished. When she met the Scarecrow she invited him to join her, for she believed his dream could be realized as well. Ultimately he came along because he bought into her passion and her idea. She won him over. Likewise, the Tin Man and the Lion joined her for the same reason, a simple belief. Though they shared one path, their end needs were different, and Dorothy was able to deliver them their heart’s desire. She gave them what they needed most, a need to feel good about themselves, and their decisions.
Ultimately our goal as advertisers is not all that different. The Yellow Brick Road, although fraught with danger and peril, can direct us to success.
Deliver your message consistently and never waver. Along the way, make friends who rise to your call. Give your customers one idea that they can grasp onto and hold as their own. Give them one idea that connects them with you, and you with them, just as Dorothy did. In the end you’ll discover what we all look for – a good story well told, with a happy ending will bring your customers home... with Toto, too.
WATERCOOLER
L inamar Corp., Canada's second- largest auto-parts maker, will spend more than C$1 billion ($900 million)
with the help of a government grant to build a research and development centre. The center will be constructed in Guelph, where the company's headquarters are located, and the grant will contribute C$44.5 million to the C$1.1 billion project, the provincial government said in a state- ment on its Website.
Linamar will train about 3,000 employ- ees at the center during the next five years. In November, the company said it expect- ed 2006 to be a year of “growth preparation” as factory production is shifted to make new engines and six-speed transmissions now being used in the auto industry.
The company operating in Canada, Mexico and Europe, had a profit of C$100 mil- lion, or C$1.41 a share, on revenue of C$2.16 billion last year.
Guelph Mayor Kate Quarrie said she is thrilled with Linamar and the provincial government’s announcement about the company’s $1.1 billion expansion. “Linamar Corporation has long been one of Guelph’s outstanding success stories. [This] announcement – and what it means for this community – is extraordinary news for the city.” Quarrie congratulated Linda Hasenfratz, President and Chief Executive Officer of Linamar Corporation, for her receipt of the Business, Labour, and Entrepreneurs Women’s Award as part of the Women of Distinction Awards.
A Waterloo Region automobile dealer is making Canadian automotive retailing history. John Hanson is owner of Hanson Chevrolet- Pontiac-Buick-GMC in New Hamburg, Ontario. On June 17, that business celebrated the grand open- ing of the first General Motors “dual showroom franchise” in Ontario. The new Hanson facility includes a full Chevrolet showroom, and a complete Pontiac-Buick-GMC showroom, all under one roof. The attractive, glass-
fronted building is graced with two different “towers,” one the Chevrolet entrance, the other, Pontiac-Buick-GMC.
Allprint Ainsworth Associates Inc. is celebrating its 30th year in business. Allprint Ainsworth is a Kitchener compa- ny, once known simply as a printing com- pany, but today offering “integrated mar- keting and communication solutions.”
Owner Klaus Ertle had served as production manager at Ainsworth Press prior to founding his own company, Allprint, in 1976. He had worked in the printing busi- ness since the 1950s. By 1979,
Make it simple,
make it understandable,
John Hanson owner of Hanson Chevrolet-Pontiac- Buick-GMC in New Hamburg
Klaus Ertle
Volkswagen Waterloo
550 Weber Street North, Waterloo, ON Tel: (519) 884-7470 [email protected]
www.vwwaterloo.com
2007 Rabbit What’s up Doc?
exchangejulaug06_pgs22-48 6/19/06 4:25 PM Page 39
the company had moved to larger quar- ters twice, and employed 40 people. By 1987, Allprint occupied a 36,000 square foot building on Ontonabee Street.
In 1993, Allprint acquired the shares of the Ainsworth Group from Southam Inc., and the present company, Allprint Ainsworth Associations Inc. came into being. The company now has more than 80 employees in a 50,000 square foot facility.
Klaus Ertle characterizes the printing industry in the 21st century as one of “constant change... the rate of change has escalated.”
Guelph City Councillor Gloria Kovach has been elected President of the Federation of Canadian Municipalities at the Annual Conference and Municipal Expo of FCM held in Montreal. Over 1,500 delegates from communities across the country attend- ed the conference. With Councillor Kovach chairing the event, Guelph was
given the national spot- light.
“I know that C o u n c i l l o r Kovach will be an excellent representative for the City of Guelph to the rest of Canada, and that she will be a strong
president in terms of representing the views and needs of Canadian munici- palities to the federal, provincial, and territorial governments,” Guelph Mayor Kate Quarrie said.
Councillor Kovach is eager to take on this latest challenge. “I am truly hon- oured to be entrusted with the Presidency for the upcoming year and I look forward to working on a multitude of issues including working with the federal, provincial and territorial gov- ernments to find a solution to the fiscal imbalance.”
The Federation of Canadian Municipalities has been the national voice of municipal government since 1901. With more than 1,300 members, FCM represents the interests of munici- palities on policy and program matters that fall within federal jurisdiction. FCM is dedicated to improving the quality of life in all communities by promoting strong, effective and accountable municipal government
The 2006 Guelph Awards of Excellence winners were announced in mid-June, at a gala event hosted by the Guelph Chamber of Commerce. For full informa- tion about all awards, visit www.exchangemagazine.com/XQuarter ly/associations.html
40 l exchangemagazine.com l JULY/AUGUST 2006
Gloria Kovach
Mayor Kate Quarrie presents the Mayor’s Award to Gil Stetler.
Mayor Quarrie presents the Mayor’s Award to Joyce Doyle, who received it in memory of her late husband, Terry Doyle.
Presenter Bill Higgins, left, presents the United Way Guelph and Wellington Campaign Award to Linda Desando and Kristen Harron, repre- senting the Co-operators.
Guelph Mayor Kate Quarrie, right, presents the Mayor’s Award to Mary DuQuesnay.
Photo at right, Sponsor Brent Barr presents the People Focus Certificate Award to Konnie Peet, of the Guelph Community Health Centre.
Mayor Quarrie presents the Mayor’s Award to Ron Asselstine.
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Kitchener’s Environmental Advisory Committee has presented City Council with a comprehensive report to improve Kitchener’s air quality. Staff will now develop a public consultation process to get residents’ feedback on the report's recommendations. The report, which contains over 50 recom- mendations, urges Kitchener to improve local air quality by identifying several, key long term objectives and implementing specific strate- gies and initia- tives to meet them.
“Air quality remains one of the pressing problems of modern cities, and the city of Kitchener is no exception. As
rapid urbaniza- tion continues at an increasing pace, health and env i ronmenta l impacts resulting from air quality d e g r a d a t i o n demonstrate the breadth and mag- nitude of the chal- lenge,” noted the advisory committee’s report.
The report identifies three long-term objectives: 1. Reducing emissions from major
regional sources including cars, trucks, buses, construction and rail equipment and industrial, commer- cial and institutional sources;
2. Development and implementation of local air quality initiatives (including supporting compact urban develop- ment and enhancing green space management);
3. Enhancing air quality information
JULY/AUGUST 2006 l exchangemagazine.com l 41
Sponsor Dr. Christopher McKenna with Tanya Riemann and Andrew MacKay of Platypi Designs, winner of the Planning, and People Focus Certificate Awards.
Peter Hannam, left, received the Guelph Part- nership for Innovation Award from sponsor Paul Anderson.
Kevin Kelly, left, received the Guelph Chamber of Commerce President’s Plaque for for Exem- plary Service, presented by Paul Schmidt.
Riki Westrik receives the Downtown Volunteer of the Year Award, presented in memory of Sherry Hall, from Dennis Deters.
Michael Weinstein, left, presents the United Way President’s Campaign Award to Marino Gazzola, of the Wellington Catholic District School Board.
Suzanne Bone, of Guelph General Hospital, received the University of Guelph Management and Workplace Education Award from presen- ter Fred Kuntz.
DENSO Manufacturing Canada won several Guelph Quality Awards: Planning, Leadership, People Focus, Business Results, Process Management. DENSO President Ken Nagao is shown, centre, with the 2006 Guelph Quality Award Trophy for Business Excellence.
Berry Vrbanovic
Claude Schneider
14 King Street North, Waterloo (519) 886-0886 [email protected]
exchangejulaug06_pgs22-48 6/19/06 1:50 PM Page 41
and public awareness (including educational programs and strategies for students and residents). “I’m really proud of this initiative, it is
moving us toward being an even more responsible, innovative, healthy and energy efficient community,” said Councillor and Environmental Committee Co-Chair Berry Vrbanovic. Claude Schneider also Co-chairs the committee.
The report recommends that the Environmental Committee monitor the City’s progress on the report’s recom- mendations on an ongoing basis and identify five specific initiatives for the City to undertake each year, know as “Best Bets.” The list of “Best Bets” for 2006 include: • Continue work toward the City
becoming certified in the ISO 14001 Environmental Management System.
• Reduce non-residential point-source emissions. This initiative involves exploring potential emission reduc- tion strategies for major sources of
air pollution and will mean changes like “Stop Idling” signs being posted at City facilities and in school zones.
• Increase green space.The City will focus more on planning and building more “green connections” providing greater trail access to public green spaces and more options for walk- ing, biking and other alternative modes of transportation. The report recommends promoting a Natural Yard Care Program to residents.
• Reach out to school boards. Schools need to provide a supportive, healthy environment for students.
• Promote residential energy conser- vation.
The Ontario Global Traders Awards have honoured two Waterloo region recipients. At the provincial Global
Traders Awards, held at the Arcadian Court in Toronto, SlipStream Data Inc. won in the Market Expansion – Product category, and Rebecca Baxter won in the Student Achievement cate- gory. Both were gold level winners at the Southwest region awards held in Cambridge on April 27, and won against gold level winners from the other three regions for the provincial award.
Tax advisors at Ernst & Young cau- tion that Canadian businesses are fac-
ing pressure to prepare for the changes required to handle the 1% reduction in the GST announced in the federal gov- ernment's budget.
"The drop in the GST rate is going to be more complex than originally antici-
pated," says Bruce Goudy, Tax partner with Ernst & Young. "Some systems are simply not set up to handle t r a n s a c t i o n s that straddle the day the GST changes, lead- ing to chal-
lenges for businesses that now have lit- tle over a month before the rate is low- ered. Businesses should be aware of these problems and work quickly to deal with them."
For example, businesses whose accounting systems claim tax credits based on the date a purchase invoice is processed are finding they need to set up a "fix" to capture the proper amount of GST on invoices dated prior to July 1, 2006 (and subject to the higher rate of GST), but processed afterward. Similarly, businesses that collect their revenue using pre-authorized with- drawals from their customers' accounts must adjust the amounts being with- drawn from all of their customers.
"The worry is that businesses could be short-changing either themselves or the government if a structure is not in place that plans for these transactions. Furthermore, employers need to ensure that factors used on expense reim- bursements are accurate based on the tax rate in effect when the expenses are incurred rather than when the expense reports are processed. Businesses that have activity in Quebec face an even quicker turnaround time if revised Quebec factors are announced for expense reports and reimbursements," says Mr. Goudy.
NTT DoCoMo, Inc. and Research In Motion announced that DoCoMo will start marketing RIM’s BlackBerry handheld devices to its corporate cus- tomers in autumn 2006. The BlackBerry handheld devices to be sold in Japan will operate on both W-CDMA (UMTS) and GSM/GPRS networks and will be useable around the world for voice and packet (data) communications. The devices will have QWERTY keyboards,
42 l exchangemagazine.com l JULY/AUGUST 2006
Bruce Goudy
Minister of Small Business and Entrepreneur- ship Harinder Takhar (left), with Lewis Megaw (right), Vice President, Ontario, Export Develop- ment Canada, presents the 8th Annual Ontario Global Traders Award for Market Expansion – Product to Ron Neumann, President, SlipStream Data Inc. of Waterloo, Ontario.
Minister of Small Business and Entrepreneur- ship Harinder Takhar presents the 8th Annual Student Achievement to Rebecca Baxter, a student at the University of Waterloo.
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similar to those of PCs, for fast and easy thumb typing.
COM DEV International Ltd. of Cambridge announced its second quar- ter results for the three-month period ended April 30, 2006. Revenue was $38.2 million, an increase of 17% from $32.6 million in the prior year period. Gross margin was 30%, compared to 22% in the second quarter of 2005. Net income was $5.4 million, or $0.09 per share, compared to $1.8 million or $0.03 per share a year earlier. New orders won in the second quarter totaled $42 million, compared to $29 million a year earlier and $28 million in the first quarter of fiscal 2006.
In late April the Company increased its full-year 2006 revenue growth guidance from 10% to 15%, citing pos- itive market fundamentals and strong execution.
“Our second quarter results demon- strate that our strategy of the past few years is succeeding," said John Keating, CEO. "We have the organiza- tional resources in place to take advan- tage of the cyclical upturn we are see- ing in the commercial satellite market, while at the same time continuing to grow our civil and military business.”
A University of Guelph English pro- fessor is helping to transform online humanities research. Susan Brown and two co-editors at the University of Alberta have created Orlando, a 5.5- million-word history of women’s writ- ing in the British Isles that uses an online search and indexing system with capabilities beyond Google.
“Everyone loves Google, but it’s real- ly not adequate for academics in the humanities because often we need to be able to search more effectively with- out having a specialized search term,” said Brown. “We wanted to push the limits on scholarly research by creating
a resource that uses the power of computing in new ways.”
In creating Orlando, named after the 1928 Virginia Woolf book, Brown and her co-edi- tors designed the content and
the means of delivery of their text simultaneously, allowing researchers to locate answers to precise, complex questions. Whereas most search engines look for keywords without pay- ing attention to content, Orlando allows people to conduct searches that can reflect the ambiguity of the English lan- guage. The site includes entries on the lives and writing careers of about 1,000 writers and allows students or researchers to quickly look at the dis- cussions of a writer’s work and life side by side on their screen. Users can also create customized chronologies, draw- ing on more than 30,000 events, or search more than 20,000 bibliographi- cal references.
MKS Inc. announced its financial results for the fourth quarter and fiscal year ended April 30, 2006. Total rev- enue increased from $41.3 million to $48.3 million. Net income rose from $2.7 million, or $0.07 per share, to $9.1 million, or $0.20 per share ($3.9 million or $0.09 per share, before income tax recovery). "We are pleased to report another year of growth for MKS, high- lighted by record revenue and profits," said Philip Deck, CEO of MKS. "To fuel our continued growth, we are about to release the most significant upgrade of our market leading ALM platform ever – one that will extend our product lead- ership further, accelerate enterprise- wide deployments throughout our growing base of Global 1000 accounts and deliver new levels of value to our
customers' senior management. MKS Integrity 2006 will conclusively demon- strate the advantages of our one prod- uct approach to solving the key busi- ness issues in IT today – application rationalization, service oriented archi- tectures, and IT strategy alignment with business goals."
Since May 2001, Virtual Causeway has been a leading outsource provider of integrated sales and marketing serv- ices for companies worldwide. And to commemorate its fifth anniversary, the firm hosted an exclusive event to thank those who contributed to its success. After all, it wasn’t that long ago that Virtual Causeway – with minimal staff and a rather empty office – opened its doors. But with the continued support of clients and partners, the firm has grown significantly, recently acquiring additional space in UpTown Waterloo that more than quadruples its operating facilities since inception.
Philip Deck, CEO Michael Harris, president and COO and Doug Sawatzky, CFO.
JULY/AUGUST 2006 l exchangemagazine.com l 43
John Keating, CEO of Com Dev
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“Here at Virtual Causeway, we’ve eas- ily exceeded our original expectations,” explains Rick Endrulat, COO and President. “I believe our success can be attributed to our location in Canada’s Technology Triangle, community sup- port from our partners and clients, and a
top-notch work- force – truly an u n b e a t a b l e combination.” In fact, Virtual C a u s e w a y ’ s a c c o m p l i s h - ments over the past five years can only be described as stellar: It was named one of Canada’s hottest
emerging growth companies in PROFIT magazine’s sixth annual HOT 50 (September 2005); it increased revenues by 124% over the past two years; and it has generated more than 100,000 leads
for clients and partners.
Three of Ontario's leading centres for innovation and technology are ushering in a new era of province-wide collabo- ration to foster innovation, promote the commercialization of research, and support entrepreneurs and emerging growth companies. The MaRS Discovery District (Toronto), OCRI (Ottawa) and Communitech (Waterloo Region) have signed a col- laboration agreement to build the MaRS Network – an initiative to joint- ly develop programs, share networks, knowledge and best practices, and sup- port national and international out- reach activities.
"All three organizations share a com- mitment to building robust entrepre- neurial communities, and by creating these unprecedented cross-linkages, we will all be more effective in support- ing innovation and its commercializa- tion," says Iain Klugman, president of Communitech.
The Descartes Systems Group Inc. released financial results for its fiscal 2007 first quarter ended April 30, 2006. Key financial highlights for Descartes include: revenues of $11.7 million, up from $11.3 million in the year-ago quar- ter, and $11.5 million in the previous quarter.
Manulife Financial Individual Insurance will make it easier for advi- sors across Canada to look up their clients' policy information with a new
tool called InfoDirect. This state-of-the-art online tool to support advi- sors with their i n d i v i d u a l insurance busi- ness reflects Manulife's con- tinued commit- ment to bring top-level distri-
bution technology to advisors. With InfoDirect, advisors will get
instant full-time access to: Policy details for more than 1.7 million in-force insur- ance policies; Financial history; Billing information at a glance; 10 online reports; Online updates to outstanding underwriting requirements; and more.
"We're really excited about InfoDirect
and think advisors will be too," said Michael Doughty, Senior Vice President, Individual Insurance. "This is a significant step forward from previous tools and advisors will be amazed how simple it is to find their client informa- tion, and then run reports that are use- ful to their business."
Brick Brewing Co. Ltd. has recorded two wins for the new J.R. Brickman Founders Series' Pilsner from two different, well respected beer competi- tions. J.R. Brickman Pilsner took the gold medal at the Ontario Brewing Awards in the Pilsner category, a major coup for the brewery. As well, the J. R. Brickman Pilsner took the silver medal in the category of Best European Style Lager (Pilsner) at the 4th annual Canadian Brewing Awards.
Competition is steep at the Canadian Brewing Awards, with a total of 225 entries from 48 breweries across the country. "We are extremely pleased with both of these wins," said Doug Berchtold, President and CEO, Brick Brewing Co. "Our team put a lot of work into the new Founders Series and these awards provide a fantastic - and impar- tial - endorsement of our beer."
44 l exchangemagazine.com l JULY/AUGUST 2006
Rick Endrulat
Michael Doughty
Doug Berchtold, President and CEO of Brick Brewing Co. Ltd.
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continued from page 46
MAKING A DIFFERENCE
Aerial Celebration of Canada”. His other books include “Where Light Speaks”, celebrating the indomitable spirit and landscape of Haiti. “This Land I Love: Waterloo County”, is a photographic retrospective of our community, as is “The Grand River: An Aerial Journey”. “Us Little People” is a unique reflection of the lives of Old Order Mennonite children in Waterloo Region. His books clearly illustrate his great passion for his community and his country, and his photos allow observers to see ordinary
things as they have never seen them before.
Hiebert is a recipient of the Vanier Award, the King Clancy Award, the Honorary Guild Shield, Paul Harris Fel- low, the Paul Tessandier Award and an Honourary Doctor of Laws from Wilfrid Laurier University. On May 14, 2006 Hiebert was inducted into the Waterloo County Hall of Fame.
He is also a tireless philanthropist. Several years ago he set a personal goal of raising $1 million for charity. Already well past $800,000, he will undoubtedly reach his goal shortly.
Paul Born, founder of the Tamarack Institute and a friend of Hiebert, com- mented, “Carl dares life and then lives what life gives back on his own terms. If you look at Carl in a wheelchair you might think that life has given him a rough ride. But he is always dreaming about how he might give back. He rais- es money for charity in everything he does, it is part of him. He makes money in the morning and gives it away in the afternoon.”
Retired engineer and financial plan- ner, Tom Jeary, is another kindred spirit to Hiebert. He custom-makes prosthetic devices for physically-challenged chil- dren. Jeary says, “Carl thinks outside the box and marches to a different drummer while expressing his creative genius. The end result of his efforts leaves this world a better place.”
If Hiebert has one regret, he expresses it this way: “I wish I had attained the awareness I have now earlier in life. The accident certainly helped me focus on what is important in life.”
“We live in the most blessed country in the world with endless opportunity,” Hiebert exclaims. “Life is a daring adven- ture or nothing,” he adds, citing his favourite quote from Helen Keller. Hiebert’s life has been a daring adven- ture indeed!
It takes optimism to be a farmer, always struggling against the vagaries of
the weather and the markets. Even though he’s no longer on the farm, Carl Hiebert is the eternal optimist. Stan Rogers’ song concludes, “Put another season’s promise in the ground.” Carl Hiebert does that each spring. This sea- son it’s AgVenture. Next year? “I’d like to do a book about hope regarding AIDS,” he says.
Stay tuned. Hiebert’s example assures us that there will be a “next year”. For more information about Carl Hiebert visit his website at www.agventurecana- da.ca.
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46 l exchangemagazine.com l JULY/AUGUST 2006
Another Season’s Promise Social entrepreneur Carl Hiebert is driving a tractor across Canada to raise awareness about Canadian agriculture and raise funds for charity
BY BR IAN HUNSBERGER
W atch the field behind the plow turn to straight dark rows,” the late Stan Rogers intoned in the opening line of his classic farming song, “The Field Behind the
Plow”. It’s a motif Carl Hiebert, raised by Mennonite parents on a
farm near Port Rowan on the shores of Lake Erie, strongly iden- tifies with. “It’s one of my favourite memories of the farm,” Hiebert nostalgically reflected, “a day of transforming a fading green pasture into straight dark rows. Plowing. After awhile you become part of the machine... And how I loved that engine’s roar, steady and undaunted. There were other tractors my neighbour buddies bragged about, but in my estimation, nothing could touch my dad’s W4 McCormick.”
This indelible adolescent memory, combined with his acqui-
MAKING A DIFFERENCE
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sition of a 1949 McCormick W4 tractor that he retrofitted with hand controls and has christened Ol’ Red, inspired Hiebert’s current AgVenture tractor drive across Canada to celebrate Canadian farmers and raise money for rural charitable causes.
The tractor was purchased from another farm boy, classical singer and Laurier music professor Dan Lichti, who bought it at the Mennonite Central Committee Relief Sale in New Hamburg.
Hiebert left Vancouver aboard Ol’ Red on June 1, 2006 and expects to reach St. John’s, Newfoundland by late August. Travelling flat out at 29 kilometres an hour, he has plenty of time to use his renowned skills as a photographer and story teller to capture the essence of the people and places he encounters. The end product will be a book of stories and pho- tos celebrating Canadian farmers that will be available for sale in May, 2007. Proceeds from book sales will go to support
causes such as 4-H Clubs and Food Banks. Always a risk taker, Hiebert embarked on an around-the-
world adventure as a young man in the 1970s. After returning, he pursued his passion for adventure sports from scuba diving to sky diving, while working as a news reporter, photographer, salesman and entrepreneur. Then on September 18, 1981, a freak hang-gliding accident left him a paraplegic; it changed his life.
Such a tragedy would have destroyed the spirit of most of us, but not Hiebert. Just two months later, while still recovering in hospital, he placed a “Gone Flying” sign on his door and with the help of a friend made his way to a farmer’s field where an ultra-light aircraft was waiting. “As I buzzed the field and saw my empty wheelchair below I was overcome by this serendipi- tous moment,” Hiebert says in the introduction of his book Gift of Wings. “Even if I couldn’t walk, I could still fly.” Within two years he had opened a flight school and become Canada’s first paraplegic ultra-light flight instructor.
In 1986 he became the first person to fly across Canada in an ultra-light aircraft. The flight took 58 days and culminated at Expo 86 in Vancouver. En route he took thousands of pictures. This landmark flight, conducted as a fundraiser for the Canadi- an Paraplegic Association, drew national media attention. Hiebert told Exchange that proceeds from Gift of Wings now top $350,000.
He is a dynamic motivational speaker and the author of sev- eral best selling books in addition to his first, “Gift of Wings: An
Carl Hiebert has moved from his beloved ultra-light to a tractor seat.
“There were other tractors my
neighbour buddies bragged about,
P H
O T
O G
R A
P H
Junior Achievement is proud to present the
22nd Annual Waterloo Region Business Achievement Awards!
Dinner and Presentations are to be held at
7 p.m. Thurs., November 2, 2006 at Bingemans
KEYNOTE SPEAKER: Frank McKenna
former Canadian Ambassador to the United States
and former Premier of New Brunswick
Nominees’ Private Reception: 5:00 p.m. I Open Reception: 6:00 p.m. I Dinner 7:00 p.m.
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