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Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton MAKE IT MOVE IT SHIP IT January 2012

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This report gives an industry overview of air transportation, rail transportation, marine transportation and truck transportation, as well as supply chain management & logistics. The results of a survey with local goods movement sector employers is included.

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  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics

    Sector in Hamilton

    Make It Move It Ship It

    January 2012

  • Workforce Planning Hamilton recognizes and thanks the following individuals that assisted with Make it, Move it, Ship it: Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton.

    Richard Koroscil, John C. Munro Hamilton International AirportJanet Balfour, Hamilton Port AuthoritySylvia Renshaw, City of Hamilton, Economic Development Norm Schleehahn, City of Hamilton, Economic Development

    A special thanks to the employers who took the time out of their busy schedules to contribute to this project with Workforce Planning Hamilton.

    Prepared by Rachelle Moore, Workforce Planning Hamilton

    Acknowledgements

    Make It Move It Ship It

    this document may be freely quoted and reproduced without obtaining the permission of Workforce Planning Hamilton provided that no changes whatsoever are made to the text and Workforce Planning Hamilton is acknowledged as author. the information presented in this report is current at the time of printing.

    The views expressed in this document do not necessarily reflect those of the Government of Canada or the Government of Ontario.

    This Employment Ontario project is funded by the Ontario GovernmentCe projet Emploi Ontario est financ par le gouvernement de lOntario.

  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

    Make It Move It Ship It

    3

    Executive Summary 4

    Introduction 6

    Methodology 8

    Air transportation 10

    Rail transportation 15

    Marine transportation 19

    truck transportation 24

    Supply Chain Management & Logistics 28

    Survey Results 34

    Findings and Recommendations 35

    Summary 36

    Appendix 37

    Endnotes 40

    Table of Contents

    Ship It

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton4

    For skilled workers ready for a rewarding career, Hamiltons Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics sector is a bright prospect. It is an industry that thrives in the exact kind of environment Hamilton provides an established infrastructure with close proximity to major commerce hubs (Niagara region, toronto and the United States border). No other municipality in Canada is so ideally suited to all four major modes of transportation:

    the Supply Chain Management and Logistics subsector, which employs more than 13,000 people in Hamilton, is another key subsector outlined in this report.

    Despite an ideal environment for the Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics companies, employers currently lack what all industries in the country lack today an abundant qualified workforce

    from which to hire. Overcoming the

    following human resources challenges could make the difference between a slowly growing sector in Hamilton and a booming one:

    Lack of awareness: Many job seekers know little about the vast career opportunities in this sector.

    Negative image: Of those who do consider this sector, many forego it because they see it as unglamorous, difficult or not family-friendly, thus missing

    out on rewarding careers.

    Aging workforce: In the subsector of Supply Chain and Logistics, the number of workers approaching retirement (17% in 2006) is slightly above the average for all occupations in Hamilton. this issue is also of particular concern in trucking where almost 60% of truck drivers are over 45 years of age. With low numbers of young workers entering the field, trucking faces

    an alarming labour shortage.

    Low percentage of local residents

    working in the sector. Despite large numbers of Hamilton residents looking for work in the sector, the majority of workers in the citys Air transportation and Marine

    Executive Summary

    Air the 24/7 John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport is the largest courier/cargo airport in Canada.

    Water Hamilton Harbour is the busiest on the Canadian Great Lakes and 8th busiest in the country.

    Road Easy access to several major highways makes Hamilton a gateway for truck transport.

    Rail two prominent railway companies, Southern Ontario Railway and Canadian

    National Railway, currently operate in Hamilton.

  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

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    5

    transportation jobs commute, often in heavy traffic, from Halton/Peel, Toronto

    and other areas.

    Besides identifying gaps, this report by Workforce Planning Hamilton highlights opportunities to address the Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics sectors HR challenges. the following is a summary of WPHs recommendations:

    Tap into local talent. Our research

    indicates an abundance of workers available locally. Figures from the 2006 census reveal there were 725 Hamilton residents working in or looking for work in Air transportation, 290 in Rail transportation and 55 in Marine transportation. Employers have at their ready a pool of skilled graduates from Hamiltons world-class institutions that

    offer apprenticeship, trades certificates or

    diplomas.

    Attract more career-seekers. It is important to promote the variety of high-

    paying careers in Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics. the sector can revamp its image by highlighting the lucrative and interesting jobs, many of which offer opportunities for travel. Employers need to get on the radar of students and new entrants to the workforce.

    Improve transit options for commuters,

    and for people within Hamilton who

    travel to the airport in Mount Hope. How to get to and from work is a major consideration for new entrants.

    Plan for retirements. In Supply Chain and Logistics, an exodus of retirees will create new opportunities for new entrants. Employers must plan for new hires and find ways for experienced workers to

    impart their knowledge to the new workforce. In trucking, employers must find ways to attract skilled young workers

    to replace retirees.

    Workforce Planning Hamilton support workforce development in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics sector. Other key partners are the many

    goods movement related associations, including MITL, Metrolinx, SOGC,

    TransHub Ontario and the Transportation

    Club of Hamilton. By addressing HR challenges, this sector may be poised to enjoy limitless possibilities in Hamilton.

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton6

    Hamilton has many advantages as a transportation hub. Hamilton harbour is the busiest on the Canadian Great Lakes. the citys position as the Niagara Gateway provides access to US markets, as well as direct links to major highways and rail lines. Having all four modes of transportation with the addition of logistics and distribution centres in one city, Hamilton offers many exciting opportunities now and in the future for goods movement industries and the occupations that support them.

    In 2005 the City of Hamilton introduced its Goods Movement Study, which identified this industry cluster as an

    important source for the citys economic growth and demonstrated Hamiltons potential as a regional intermodal transportation centre. In 2006, the provincial government identified Hamilton

    as a regional growth node in its Places to Grow strategy. Hamiltons location, existing industrial base and market accessibility have made it a major North American gateway for goods movement, logistics and supply chain operations. No other municipality in Ontario offers all four

    modes of goods transportation within its borders.1

    the goods movement cluster in Hamilton faces significant human resources

    challenges as we move into the future. While many sectors of the economy are

    faced with a tightening labour market due to retirements, for the Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics industry this issue is compounded by its negative image. the City of Hamiltons Goods Movement Study noted issues concerning the appeal of transportation and warehousing as an occupational choice. the image of transportation, and the lifestyle choices often required, are not attracting young people at an adequate rate.2

    In order to thrive in Hamilton, this sector needs a strong workforce available for employers wishing to establish or expand their business in the area. Workforce Planning Hamilton supports workforce development in this sector.

    Introduction

  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

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    7

    the Workforce Planning Hamilton Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics Report provides detailed labour market information profiles for the five key sectors

    driving the goods movement cluster in Hamilton. these include:

    the following pages delve into these sectors in some detail highlighting key occupations, education and human resources challenges in each sector.

    Air transportation

    Rail transportation

    Marine transportation

    truck transportation

    Supply Chain Management and Logistics, more specifically

    Manufacturing, Wholesale and Retail trades, and transportation and Warehousing

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton8

    For the purpose of this report the goods movement cluster focused on specific

    subsectors of transportation, including air, rail, marine, truck, as well as supply chain management and logistics, in the manufacturing, wholesale and retail trades and transportation and warehousing sectors. Each industry profile includes

    a detailed description of the sector, number of establishments, labour force characteristics, occupational analysis, and a narrative of the trends, opportunities, and challenges of the industry in Hamilton. the labour force characteristics section highlights the number of people employed in Hamilton (opportunities for local employment) as well as how many of those employees live in Hamilton (availability of local talent). this section also compares Hamilton to neighbouring

    communities of Grand Erie, Niagara, Peel-

    Halton, toronto, Waterloo, Wellington, and Dufferin to illustrate the skills available to Hamilton employers.

    to document the status of the Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics industry as it relates to the local economy, data was collected from a number of recognized sources. this reports industry analysis used Canadian Business Patterns (CBP) data from 2007 and 2011.3 the Canadian Business Patterns database provided by Statistics Canada identifies

    the number of business establishments within a Census Division. the database also identifies the number of employers

    by detailed industry and for nine different employee size ranges, including indeterminate employers.4 Industries are categorized using the North American Industry Classification System (NAICS).5

    the number of people employed and the top occupations based on the National Occupational Classification (NOC)6 system are from 2001 and 2006 Statistics Canada Census data. The NOC is a nationally

    accepted reference on occupations that groups over 30,000 job titles into 520 occupational groups, providing a standardized framework for organizing the workforce into a coherent system.

    While the data supplied by Statistics Canada captures Hamiltons unique

    Methodology

  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

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    9

    circumstances, local knowledge can be very useful in complementing this statistical evidence. In this report, Workforce Planning Hamilton engaged key informants across all industries to discuss their experience in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics industry. these interviews proved very useful in uncovering the occupations, skills and key human resources issues in each sector profiled in this report.

    Workforce Planning Hamilton also reached out to local employers, with assistance from advisory members via an online survey. Survey respondents provided additional information about occupations, education, changing demands and skills.the survey was distributed across the

    Hamilton area and resulted in a total of 34 respondents. An estimated 2,500 employers in Hamilton were contacted; however less than 400 companies were confirmed as working in the goods

    movement cluster. Fifty per cent of businesses that responded were small- to

    medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), ranging

    from 1 to 49 employees, while 13% of respondents employed over 200 workers. The specific findings of this survey will be

    discussed in the following sections.

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton10

    Industry Overviewthis subsector includes establishments primarily engaged in for-hire, common-

    carrier transportation of people and/or goods using aircraft, such as airplanes and helicopters. the following are additional subsectors in air transportation:

    Scheduled air transportation (NAICS 4811)

    Non-scheduled air transportation

    (NAICS 4812)

    Industry Presence A total of 625 people were working in the air transportation sector in Hamilton in 2006, an increase of 385 workers since 2001. this sector accounted for

    0.32% of the total workforce in Hamilton, compared to 0.27% across Ontario. The

    comparison of Hamilton to Ontario minus

    toronto reveals that while employment in this sector is relatively low, career opportunities in this sector are similar in Hamilton to elsewhere in the province.

    From 2007 to 2011 the number of businesses registered in air transportation decreased 21% from 14 to 11. In all employee size ranges, there has been no change or a decline in employers over this period.

    today, the John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport (HIA) is Canadas largest dedicated courier/cargo airport. HIA has many strengths including a large market in a catchment area, unrestricted and uncongested 24/7 operations, a proven distinct passenger traffic market

    and a strategic location with strong linkages to other modes of transportation.7 the strength of Hamiltons international airport coupled with the recent growth in qualified labour suggests continued

    expansion and opportunities for those interested in air transportation careers.

    Air Transportation NAICS 481

    QuICk FaCtS

    From 2001-2006 employment grew

    from 240 to 625 people, an increase of 160% in Hamilton

    Local employers report low turnover in this industry

    High demand for transport Canada certifications

    Table #1: Number of people employed in air transportation in Hamilton

    NAICS Hamilton Ontario Ontario Minus Toronto

    481 Air Transportation

    # % # % # %

    625 0.32% 14,780 0.27% 12,930 0.31%

    197,200 5,570,865 4,234,325Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

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    Labour Force Characteristicsthe 2006 Census revealed that 625 people were working in the air transportation sector in Hamilton. the table below shows that of those 625 people, only 140 were Hamilton residents. this suggests that the majority of workers in Hamiltons air transportation sector commute from the neighbouring regions of Peel-Halton or Toronto.

    this is not to say Hamilton does not have people with the necessary skills to work in the air transportation sector. In fact, in 2006 over 700 Hamilton residents were identified as working in or looking for

    work in the air transportation sector. this indicates there is a surplus of workers available to employers in this sector.

    Table #2: Number of residents employed and unemployed in the air transportation sector

    481 Air Transportation Hamilton Grand Erie Niagara Peel-Halton Toronto

    Waterloo-Wellington-

    DufferinTotal

    Number of employed residents 140 25 55 980 1,015 215 2,430

    Labour force of all residents 725 210 260 6,135 4,425 1,010 12,765

    Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

    Occupational analysisthe careers offered in this sector provide competitive salaries and require a variety of skills and education. In 2006, almost 70% of the workers in this sector had attained some form of post-secondary education,

    whether apprenticeship training, college diploma or university degree. In addition, most careers in air transportation are regulated by transport Canada, which

    makes specific certifications and training

    mandatory for many jobs. For example, several air transportation companies employ dispatchers, an occupation found in various other industries. Many of the skills obtained as a dispatcher in one industry can be transferred to the air transportation sector. However, dispatchers entering this sector must complete additional training offered by transport

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton12

    Canada.

    Another finding is that over 80% of

    the current workforce is between 25 to 54 years of age while only 5% are approaching retirement. Interview and survey results confirm this; most

    employers do not expect retirements to affect their workforce in the near future. In addition, many employers reported low turnover among employees which indicates satisfying, healthy and safe work environments among Hamiltons air transportation employers.

    the following table shows the number of people employed and the median income for workers in the air transportation sector. Among these top occupations, four specific jobs have grown tremendously

    since 2001: aircraft mechanics; aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics; technicians and inspectors; air transport ramp attendants; and airline sales and service agents. Interview and survey results confirm the importance of

    FOCuS On COntInuOuS LeaRnInG

    Currently 70% of workers in this sector have post secondary education.

    Most jobs in the air transportation sector are governed by transport

    Canada regulations and require special certifications and training.

    Table #3: Top 10 occupations employed in air transportation in Hamilton

    NOC Occupational title Industry employment Total workforceMedian

    employment income

    Total all occupations 625 197,200 $43,970

    7315 Aircraft mechanics and aircraft inspectors 140 22.40% 195 0.10% $53,483

    2271 Air pilots, flight engineers and flying instructors 95 15.20% 110 0.06% $87,489

    7437 Air transport ramp attendants 75 12.00% 170 0.09% $29,116

    6433 Airline sales and service agents 65 10.40% 75 0.04% $26,357

    2244Aircraft instrument, electrical and avionics mechanics, technicians and inspectors

    40 6.40% 45 0.02% $48,371

    6432 Pursers and flight attendants 25 4.00% 25 0.01% $43,206

    0713 Transportation managers 20 3.20% 225 0.11% $63,617

    0721 Facility operation and maintenance managers 20 3.20% 570 0.29% $59,967

    4131 College and other vocational instructors 15 2.40% 1,160 0.59% $65,603

    0611 Sales, marketing and advertising managers 10 1.60% 1,425 0.72% $80,470

    Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

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    these occupations in the sector. Local trainingthe air transportation industry offers many careers requiring a variety of training and certifications. Local employers

    indicate that entry-level employees are

    encouraged to develop the necessary skills and pursue continued education to qualify for management positions.

    New entrants can expect some form of post-secondary education will be needed

    to work in this field. In fact, in 2006 almost

    70% of workers in this sector had attained either apprenticeship training, a college diploma or a university degree. this suggests jobs in air transportation most likely require higher education.

    these education programs and certifications relate specifically to the air

    transportation industry:

    Aviation technician Aircraft Maintenance

    Business Administration

    Engineering

    travel and tourism

    Certification as an operator of a

    particular mode of transportation include:

    Air Traffic Control (flight dispatcher)

    Aircraft Maintenance Engineer (AME)

    Commercial or Air transport Pilots Licence

    In 2009 the Hamilton Wentworth School Board launched the Aviation and Aerospace Specialist High Skills Major program at Ancaster High School in partnership with the Ontario Aerospace

    Council, John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport and Mohawk College. this program offers students an opportunity to explore and gain hands-

    on experience in a variety of aviation/aerospace careers.

    air transportation in Hamiltonthe John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport was Canadas number one intermodal (i.e providing more than mode of transportation) air freighter gateway in 2007, moving some 101,400 tons, of which 60-70% were via couriers

    and 30-40% cargo.8 From 2001 2006 employment in this sector grew from 240 to 625 people, an increase of 160%. Employment in this sector is expected to remain strong as the airport and businesses located at the Hamilton Airport continue to expand.

    the City of Hamilton selected an area of land surrounding the John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport to examine and develop a concentrated area of employment lands.9 the Airport Employment Growth (AEGD) initiative has been identified as an important economic

    engine for the future of Hamiltons workforce. It is projected that 20,000 30,000 jobs will be created with the development of AEGD.10

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton14

    key HR IssuesInterviews with local employers indicate very few human resources challenges in the air transportation sector. Most employers report low turnover and small numbers of retiring workers in Hamilton. One barrier identified by companies in

    this sector, however, was the location of the airport. the John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport is in Mount Hope, in the southern suburbs of the city. this location offers many advantages to companies operating at the airport but poses a challenge for commuting workers. Interviews with employers suggest the need for increased bus routes and adapted time schedules to reflect the

    hours worked by freight and cargo carrier employees.

  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

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    Industry Overviewthis subsector comprises establishments primarily engaged in operating railways, which include long-haul or mainline

    railways, short-haul railways and passenger

    railways. the following are additional subsectors of rail transportation:

    Short-haul freight rail transportation

    (NAICS 482112)

    Mainline freight rail transportation (NAICS 482113)

    Passenger rail transportation (NAICS 482114)

    Industry Presence In Hamilton, there were 120 people working in the rail transportation sector in 2006, up 9% from 2001. this sector accounted for 0.06% of the total workforce, compared to 0.12% across Ontario. While this sector is relatively small

    in Hamilton these numbers are typical across the province.

    Because of the way that Canadian Business Patterns identify businesses, the data shows that there are currently no registered businesses with offices in

    Hamilton. However, two prominent railway

    companies are currently operating in Hamilton: Southern Ontario Railway and

    Canadian National Railway.11 throughout Southern Ontario there are 22 railway

    companies in operation. CN and CP dominate the network and are supported by many short line railways, freight railroads and commuter operations.12

    Rail Transportation NAICS 482

    QuICk FaCtS

    9% increase in employment from 2001 2006

    Majority of workers employed in transportation

    25% employed in track maintenance jobs

    Table #4: Number of people employed in rail transportation in Hamilton

    NAICS Hamilton Ontario Ontario Minus Toronto

    482Rail Transportation

    # % # % # %

    120 0.06% 6,770 0.12% 5,220 0.12%

    197,200 5,570,865 4,234,325Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton16

    Labour Force CharacteristicsIn 2006, there were 120 people working in the rail transportation sector in Hamilton. Of this total, 40 were Hamilton

    residents, which suggests that the majority of workers tend to commute to work. this is not to say that Hamilton does not offer qualified residents looking to

    work in this sector. In fact, 290 residents were identified as either employed or

    looking for employment in Hamiltons rail transportation sector.

    Additionally, within the economic regions of Hamilton, Grand Erie and Niagara, 510 residents were actively working or looking for work in this sector. this indicates an abundance of skilled labour available to employers operating in Hamilton. the following table shows that Hamilton and Waterloo-Wellington-Dufferin offer a good

    number of qualified residents after Peel-

    Halton and toronto.

    Table #5: Number of residents employed and unemployed in the rail transportation sector

    482 Rail Transportation Hamilton Grand Erie Niagara Peel-Halton Toronto

    Waterloo-Wellington-

    DufferinTotal

    Number of employed residents 40 15 30 190 190 40 505

    Labour force of all residents 290 50 170 1,105 1,190 120 2,925

    Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

    Occupational analysisthe rail transportation sector provides many opportunities for competitive salaries and unique work environments. the majority of workers in this sector have attained a high school diploma, while 40% have completed an apprenticeship

    or trades certificate or college diploma.

    Most workers in this sector are between 25 and 44 years of age while 11% are approaching retirement.

    From 2001 to 2006, six occupations in the rail transportation sector in Hamilton showed positive growth. Five of the six occupations did not exist in 2001: supervisors (railway transport operations), civil engineers, mechanical engineers; contractors and supervisors (metal forming, shaping and erecting trades); railway car men and welders. these occupations require higher levels of education including university and professional certifications. Table #6 shows

    HIGH tuRnOveR Rate FOR neW HIReS

    Individuals who choose a career in the rail industry need to be prepared for

    a physically demanding job and shift work.

  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

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    the number of workers and median income for people employed in the top occupations.

    Local trainingthe rail transportation industry offers many careers from entry-level to managerial

    positions and requires a variety of training and skills. New entrants are expected to have either on-the-job training or some

    form of post-secondary education, most

    commonly apprenticeship training, to work in this field.

    these education programs and certifications relate specifically to the rail

    transportation industry:

    Civil Engineering

    Mechanical Engineering

    Welder - Apprenticeship

    Certification as an operator of a

    particular mode of transportation

    Canadian Rail Operating Rules Certificate

    Certificate of the Railway Employee Qualification Standards

    Regulation

    Rail transportation in HamiltonAccording to the Railway Association of Canada, Canadian railways are among the safest in North America. In 2009, over 30,000 people were employed in rail transportation across the country. the majority of workers were responsible for transportation, while 25% were involved in track maintenance occupations.13 In Hamilton the rail transportation system has played a significant role in the goods

    movement sector for decades. While the dependence on traditional use of rail has declined, the city has embraced new forms of rail transportation.

    In recent years, the GO Transit station

    was redeveloped so that patrons would have access to the rail station located in Burlington. Hamilton continues to develop

    Table #6: Top rail transportation occupations in Hamilton

    NOC Occupational title Industry employment Total workforceMedian

    employment income

    Total all occupations 120 197,200 $43,970

    7362 Railway conductors and brakemen 25 20.83% 35 0.02% $75,718

    7221 Supervisors, railway transport operations 20 16.67% 25 0.01% N/A

    7265 Welders and related machine operators 15 12.50% 2,135 1.08% $47,323

    2131 Civil engineers 10 8.33% 360 0.18% $63,327

    2132 Mechanical engineers 10 8.33% 445 0.23% $63,166

    7214 Contractors and supervisors, metal forming, shaping and erecting trades 10 8.33% 205 0.10% $76,720

    7314 Railway carmen 10 8.33% 50 0.03% $58,126Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton18

    its rail transportation system. Future plans include the creation of the Hamilton Light Rail transit (LRt) system, which will provide a rapid transportation network within the city. this initiative has been supported by the Ministry of Innovations Places to Grow Strategy which aims to support transportation networks that link urban growth centres through an extensive multi-

    modal system.14 As part of this strategy, the Ministry of Innovation suggests that 200 residents and jobs per hectare will be needed to develop the urban growth centre in downtown Hamilton.15

    Even though rail transportation is not generally considered to be robust, it continues to be an important sector in the goods movement in Hamilton. Locally this sector continues to offer many opportunities for new entrants to gain meaningful employment.

    key HR IssuesSurvey results and industry research indicate the following main human resources challenges facing the rail transportation sector:

    Recruitment

    Working on the railroad can be tough work, with long hours and many days away from home. Despite these challenges, the work can be very rewarding. the industry is working toward promoting the rail transportation as an exciting and stimulating work area.

    Organizational Design

    According to Human Resources and Skills

    Development Canada, short line railway companies have an important advantage because they employ fewer people and are flexible in their labour force. Training

    courses specific to various employment

    situations are a main requirement and are encouraged in these companies.16

    Skills sets in demand include the ability to manage change, good leadership and communication skills, strategic intuition and good customer service aptitudes.

    Health and Safety

    If a train derails it can cost up to $1 million. the rail industry understands the consequences for both the industry and its clients and pays close attention to occupational health and safety issues. Major investments have been made in radio equipment and other technology to improve security. Personal safety devices are now compulsory, and ergonomics have improved work methods.17

  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

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    Industry Overviewthis subsector includes establishments primarily engaged in the marine transportation of passengers and goods, using equipment designed for those purposes. Additional subsectors of marine transportation include:

    Deep sea, coastal and Great Lakes water transportation (NAICS 4831)

    Inland water transportation (NAICS 4382)

    Industry Presence According to the 2006 Census, there were 65 people working in marine transportation in Hamilton. this accounted for 0.03% of the total workforce compared to 0.02% across Ontario.

    the June 2011 Canadian Business Patterns reveal that two companies are registered in Hamiltons marine transportation sector. the Port of Hamilton handles the largest volume of cargo and shipping traffic in all the Canadian Great

    Lakes. Many opportunities are available in Hamilton but due to the itinerant nature of the work, shipping businesses are located outside of the city and are not represented in this count.

    Marine Transportation NAICS 483

    QuICk FaCtS

    20% of workers are approaching retirement

    Hamilton is the busiest Canadian Great Lakes port

    Table #7: Number of people employed in water transportation in Hamilton

    NAICS Hamilton Ontario Ontario Minus Toronto

    483Water Transportation

    # % # % # %

    65 0.03% 870 0.02% 5,220 0.12%

    197,200 5,570,865 4,234,325Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton20

    Labour Force CharacteristicsAcross the economic region (including Hamilton, Grand Erie and Niagara) 400 residents were actively working or looking for work in this sector. this suggests an abundance of skilled labour available to

    local employers. the table below shows the number of residents in neighbouring regions either working in or looking for work in the marine transportation sector as of 2006.

    Table #8:Total labour force of residents in water transportation across neighbouring regions

    NAICS Hamilton Grand Erie Niagara Peel-Halton TorontoWaterloo-

    Wellington-Dufferin

    Total

    4823Water Transportation

    55 35 310 150 135 55 740

    Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

    Age of workforce

    In 2006, the majority of workers were prime working age, that is, workers between 25 to 54 years of age, while 20% of workers were approaching retirement. the marine transportation sector does not show any workers between 15-24 years of

    age. According to employer interviews, attracting youth is a tremendous barrier and will continue to impact this workforce as retiring workers leave the sector.

    Chart#1: Age of workforce in marine transportation, Hamilton, 2006

    Occupational analysisHamilton is the busiest Canadian Great Lakes port, and the 8th busiest in Canada as a whole.18 the St. Lawrence Seaway connects the city of Hamilton with Lake Erie and other Great Lakes, as well as international shipping lanes. Hamiltons proximity to the St. Lawrence Seaway offers labour market entrants the opportunity to work among some of the largest vessels travelling through Hamilton and around the world.

    there are two sides of business operations in the marine transportation sector: corporate and shipboard personnel. In Hamilton, 65 people were employed in this industry in 2006. Most of these jobs reflect the corporate, less traditional

    side of the industry. However, interviews with local employers indicate very high demand for shipboard personnel, including captains, marine engineers, deckhands, and cooks.

    100%

    80%

    60%

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    20%

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    87,0

    28

    n 15-24 years oldn 25-54 years oldn 55 years and older

    ALL

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  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

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    21

    the following chart shows the number of people and jobs in the marine transportation industry in Hamilton as of 2006. the sector most commonly employs shippers and receivers, but managers in human resources, purchasing and engineering can also find employment.

    In Hamilton, over 50% of workers in this sector have attained post-secondary

    education, usually completing a college diploma or university degree. the table below shows the number of workers and median income for workers in these occupations.

    Table #9: Top occupations in water transportation in Hamilton

    NOC Occupational title Industry employment Total workforceMedian

    employment income

    Total all occupations 65 197,200 $43,970

    1471 Shippers and receivers 15 23.08% 1,350 0.68% $36,689

    0112 Human resources managers 10 15.38% 320 0.16% $72,950

    0113 Purchasing managers 10 15.38% 155 0.08% $74,259

    0211 Engineering managers 10 15.38% 220 0.11% $91,124

    0431 Accounting and related clerks 10 15.38% 1,885 0.96% $36,880

    6663 Janitors, caretakers and building superintendents 10 15.38% 2,810 1.42% $34,964

    Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

    High Demand Occupations

    Interviews with key industry professionals identified six occupations that are in high

    demand in the marine transportation

    sector. All are shipboard or seafaring employees. While Hamilton does not report a large number of people employed in these occupations, local employers do recruit for them. Most often the head offices of marine transportation

    companies are responsible for hiring in these positions. Once hired, these workers

    have the opportunity to travel throughout the country and abroad.

    the following chart presents the top six occupations in high demand in this sector along with the skills required, education and number of people working throughout the province. Note that the majority of these jobs are located in Central and Western Ontario, which

    includes the Hamilton area.19

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    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton22

    Marine transportation in HamiltonWhile the numbers may be small in terms of direct port/marine-related employment

    in Hamilton, analysis of the broader marine sector in Canada shows significant

    economic and employment activity and impact. Of the 98,000 jobs created in

    Canada by activity of the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway, almost 40% or 38,000 jobs are created by activity in the Port of Hamilton. As noted above, this was borne out in interviews with local employers

    indicating the high demand for marine employees. Furthermore, the economic activity generated by the Port of Hamilton totals over $5.9 billion or 37% of the Canadian activity generated by the Great Lakes St. Lawrence Seaway.

    Research shows that a single ship can transport the same amount of merchandise as 870 trucks.20 Recognizing the strength in marine transportation, the City of Hamilton and the Hamilton Port Authority joined an alliance of

    Table #10: Top in-demand occupations in water transportation

    NOC Occupational title Eastern OntarioWestern Ontario

    Northern Ontario

    Central Ontario Total Ontario

    2148 Marine engineers 230 120 15 295 660

    Skills required: Reading text, writing, computer use, oral communication, money, scheduling or budgeting and accounting, measurement and calculation, data analysis, numerical estimation, job task planning and organizing, problem solving, finding informationEducation: Bachelors degree in marine engineering, mechanical engineering, or ocean engineering

    2273 Captains 80 210 45 185 525

    Skills required: Document use, measurement and calculationEducation: Several years of experience at sea, training at a marine academy

    2273 Marine navigation officer 80 210 45 185 525

    Skills required: Document use, measurement and calculationEducation: Completion of secondary school, certificate of competency issued by Transport Canada is required

    6242 Cooks 9,865 18,020 4,800 23,615 56,305

    Skills required: Oral communication, scheduling or budgeting and accounting, numerical estimation, job task planning and organizing, problem solvingEducation: Completion of secondary school is required.

    7433 Deckhands 10 115 0 65 195

    Skills required: Reading text, document use, oral communicationEducation: Completion of secondary school, on-the-job training is provided

    7433 Seaman 10 115 0 65 195

    Skills required: Reading text, document use, oral communicationEducation: Completion of secondary school, on-the-job training is provided

    Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census; Ontario Skills Passport; Human Resources and Skills Development

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    transportation stakeholders, actively promoting marine transportation on the Great Lakes / Seaway System. Highway H20 is a 3,700 kilometre marine highway that offers shippers direct access to the commercial, industrial and agricultural heartland of North America.21 Recent studies suggest the marine industry will have to replace upwards of 50% of its current workforce due to retirement alone.22 the need to replace retiring workers and increase youth awareness is echoed in Hamilton.

    key HR IssuesInterview and survey results from industry professionals indicate the following main human resources challenges facing the marine transportation sector:

    Attracting Youth

    there has been a mass reduction in the number of young people opting for seafaring as a career. there are many contributing factors to this decline in participation, in particular the extended periods away from home life.

    Lucrative shore-based jobs are proving to

    be a bigger attraction. Local employers are working with Georgian College to recruit youth and provide co-operative

    learning and graduate placement opportunities for those looking to work in this field.

    Lack of Awareness

    When contemplating career options, few individuals understand the wide range of occupations available in the marine transportation industry. Despite many interesting and high paying careers in the shipping sector, awareness of these career opportunities appears to be a problem, making recruitment difficult. Interviews

    with key industry professionals highlight that existing perceptions of the working environment and the associated work life balance are a huge barrier for this sector. the current working environment and associated work life balance are evolving into a much more family friendly form of employment.

    GeORGIan COLLeGe is the major marine trainer in Ontario.

    Find out more about the Great Lakes International Marine training and

    Research Centre at: www.marinetraining.ca

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    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton24

    Industry Overviewthis subsector includes companies primarily engaged in the truck transportation of goods. these establishments may carry general or specialized freight. Specialized freight comprises goods that, because of size, weight, shape or other inherent characteristics, require specialized equipment for transportation. Businesses may operate locally (within a metropolitan area and its surroundings) or over long distances (between metropolitan areas). the following are additional subsectors of truck transportation:

    General freight trucking (NAICS 4841)

    Specialized freight trucking (NAICS 4842)

    Industry Presence According to Canadian Business Patterns, from December 2007 to June 2011 the total number of businesses in this sector decreased 8% from 1,114 to 1,024. Small sized businesses, employing 1-4

    people experienced the greatest change between 2007 and 2011 with an increase of 82 employers. In fact nearly 80% of businesses in the trucking sector are either owner operated or have less than five

    employees.

    Labour Force Characteristicsthere were 1,915 people employed in the truck transportation sector in Hamilton in 2006. this accounted for 0.97% of all employment in Hamilton, compared to 1.12% across Ontario. Overall, the

    employment profile is predominantly full

    time, male, 34 to 44 years of age, non-

    immigrant, and high school educated. the median income for workers in this industry is slightly below average at $39,767 compared to $43,279 for all industries.

    Truck Transportation NAICS 484

    QuICk FaCtS

    80% of businesses are owner-

    operated or have less than five

    employees

    Over 1,900 employed in Hamilton

    20% of workforce is over 55 years of age

    Table #11: Number of people employed in truck transportation in Hamilton

    NAICS Hamilton Ontario Ontario Minus Toronto

    484 Truck Transportation

    # % # % # %

    1,915 0.97% 62,655 1.12% 12,930 0.31%

    197,200 5,570,865 4,234,325Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

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    Occupational analysisthe table below highlights the top 10 occupations in truck transportation in Hamilton. Not surprisingly, the most prevalent occupations include truck drivers, dispatchers and radio operators, and automotive service technicians. twenty per cent of the total workforce in this sector were over 55 years of age. this points to future opportunities coming from the need to replace retiring workers.

    tRuCkInG SeCtOR HIGHLIGHtS

    In 2006, 20% of the total workforce in this sector was over 55 years old.

    truck drivers will need a strong skill set in the future to cope with the new technologies used in daily operations.

    Future demand

    According to the Canadian trucking Alliance, the trucking industry will be unable to rely on its traditional sources of labour in the future.23 truck drivers and other workers in this industry will have to be better trained and have achieved

    higher education levels to cope with the new technologies used in daily operations.

    Interviews and employer surveys with local businesses confirm that the top

    occupations mentioned above will continue to be in demand in the next 3-5

    Table #12: Top occupations in truck transportation in Hamilton

    NOC Occupational title Industry employment Total workforceMedian

    employment income

    Total all occupations 1,915 197,200 $43,970

    7411 Truck drivers 1,100 57.44% 2,610 1.32% $42,728

    1475 Dispatchers and radio operators 115 6.01% 590 0.30% $39,741

    7321Automotive service technicians, truck and bus mechanics and mechanical repairers

    85 4.44% 2,000 1.01% $44,498

    0713 Transportation managers 75 3.92% 225 0.11% $63,617

    7452 Material handlers 70 3.66% 1,830 0.93% $39,798

    1241 Secretaries (except legal and medical) 60 3.13% 2,650 1.34% $34,913

    1411 General office clerks 55 2.87% 3,645 1.85% $36,658

    1431 Accounting and related clerks 45 2.35% 1,885 0.96% $36,880

    0016 Senior managers - goods production, utilities, transportation and construction 40 2.09% 630 0.32% $90,166

    1231 Bookkeepers 20 1.04% 1,465 0.74% $34,034Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

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    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton26

    years in Hamilton. In addition, employers emphasized the importance of entrants having a variety of skill sets to assist with an ever changing workplace. the top skills identified by employers include:

    Technical Skills

    Computer skills Scheduling or budgeting and

    accounting Project management technical ability Safety awareness

    Soft Skills

    Ability to work independently Flexibility/adaptability Customer service Oral and written communication

    Local trainingIn 2006, 34% of workers had obtained a high school diploma while 38% had completed some form of post secondary education.

    to develop or enhance the skills necessary to be successful in this industry may require the completion of a degree, diploma or certification program.

    Educational programs and certifications

    that relate specifically to the truck

    transportation industry are:

    Accounting

    Business Administration and Management

    Construction/Heavy Equipment/Earthmoving Equipment Operation

    Economics

    Logistics and Materials Management

    Purchasing, Procurement/Acquisitions and Contracts Management

    Office Management and Supervision

    Office Administration

    truck and Bus Driver/Commercial Vehicle Operation

    In our online survey, employers identified

    these additional occupations:

    Civil engineer

    Construction manager

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    truck transportation in Hamiltontrucks haul 90% of all consumer products and foodstuffs both locally, regionally and into the U.S. the trucking industry has an important role in supporting value-added

    jobs in the goods producing sector. As noted by the Ontario Trucking Association,

    in the new era of increased reliance on global competitiveness and trade, employment growth will increasingly come from sectors, like trucking, which support or supply other sectors that explore their goods and services.24 Recent data reveals that the total employment produced by commercial trucking activity in Ontario

    creates direct employment for 200,000 workers, of which 75,000 are truck drivers.

    While the economic downturn in the United States had a significant impact

    on the trucking industry, it is expected to rebound. the City of Hamilton anticipates further growth and has invested in major infrastructure developments to support future expansion. these include the completion of the Red Hill Creek Expressway and the opening of the Hwy #6 extension. In addition, the McMaster

    Institute of transportation and Logistics (MItL) was formed in 2005 to facilitate world class research and training at the local level.

    key HR IssuesInterview and survey results from industry participants indicate the following main human resources issues facing the truck transportation sector:

    Aging Workforce

    truck drivers account for 57% of total employment in Hamiltons truck transportation industry. According to the Canadian trucking Alliance, 35% of the current driver pool is between 45 and 54 years of age and almost a quarter of drivers are more than 55 years old.25 A major concern for the trucking industry is replacing retiring workers. Respondents to our local employer survey confirmed

    this concern as truck drivers are and will continue to be the largest occupation in this sector.

    Recruitment

    As mentioned, almost 60% of truck drivers are over 45 years of age. Unfortunately, this occupation shows a lower proportion of young workers entering the field.

    the potential increase of retirements in the near future combined with the low participation rate by youth suggests an alarming shortage of qualified workers.

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    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton28

    Industry OverviewLogistics is the process of planning, implementing and controlling the flow

    and storage of goods and services and related information from the point of origin to the point of consumption. Supply chain management provides supervision and direction for the various parts of the distribution system including production scheduling and inventory control, transportation, warehousing, retailing and brokerage.26 Over the last decade, logistics has flourished as the flow of

    information has become vital to supply chain efficiency across industries.

    Unlike other subsectors of goods movement profiled in this report, the

    supply chain management and logistics (SCL) industry covers a wide range of sectors. For the purpose of this report, SCL will refer to the following sectors: manufacturing, wholesale and retail trades, and transportation and warehousing. Research shows that the majority of

    logistics and supply chain management operations occur in the aforementioned sectors largely because the flow of goods

    is paramount to business operations.

    Industry Presence According to the Canadian Supply Chain Sector Council, there are four subsectors that together make up the supply chain management and logistics industry. Within these four subsectors are additional sectors that are understood as shared corporate services.

    Principal Subsectors of SCL

    Freight Procurement Operations

    Logistics

    Shared Corporate Services

    Information technology Human resources Administration, customer services

    and quality assurance Health and safety Accounting and finance

    Supply Chain Management and Logistics

    QuICk FaCtS

    More than 13,000 people work in SCL jobs in Hamilton

    Most are employed in the transportation and warehousing and wholesale trade sectors

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    the Canadian Supply Chain Sector Council offers a matrix of subsectors and occupations in the supply chain and logistics industry (refer to appendix A). Drawing on this list, WPH found 50 unique occupations and then cross referenced with these occupational codes to the primary sectors of SCL (manufacturing, wholesale and retail trades, transportation and warehousing). the following table illustrates the number of people working in occupations related to supply chain and logistics among the 5 primary subsectors of this industry.

    In 2006, approximately 13,845 people were working in supply chain and logistics occupations in Hamilton. the majority of employment opportunities were found in the manufacturing subsector. to view a list of occupations included in this calculation, refer to appendix A.

    Labour Force CharacteristicsIn Hamilton, the majority of people employed in supply chain and logistics occupations have attained post-secondary

    education. More specifically, 31% have

    completed a college diploma, 19% have attained a university degree, and 5% have completed an apprenticeship or trades certificate program. The chart below

    illustrates the distribution of education among supply chain and logistics occupations compared to all occupations employed in Hamilton.

    Table #13: Number of people employed in supply chain and logistics occupations in Hamilton

    NAICS # employed in industry# employed in supply

    chain and logistics occupations

    % total employment in supply chain and

    logistics

    31-33 Manufacturing 32,905 6,325 46%

    41 Wholesale Trade 7,645 2,695 19%

    44-45 Retail 23,885 2,050 15%

    48-49 Transportation & Warehousing 7,610 2,775 20%

    Total 72,045 13,845 19%Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

    Many eMPLOyeRS OFFeR COntInued eduCatIOn

    OPPORtunItIeS.

    this offers employees from entry-level to management the

    chance to work while developing the skills needed to

    advance.

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    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton30

    Chart#2: Educational attainment in supply chain and logistics occupations, Hamilton, 2006

    Age of workforce

    In 2006, 17% of workers employed in supply chain and logistics occupations were approaching retirement. this number is slightly higher than the average for all occupations in Hamilton. According to employer interviews, retirements will have

    a significant impact on the SCL industry.

    Similar to other industries experiencing higher rates of attrition, new opportunities will become available to existing and new entrants to pursue as a result of this exodus. In addition, many employers fear there is a disconnect between senior management and younger workers, which will impact the knowledge and experience shared within this industry.

    Chart#3: Age of workforce in supply chain and logistics occupations, Hamilton, 2006

    Occupational analysisLocal supply chain and logistics employers identified a broad range of occupations

    currently employed and in demand in Hamilton. these occupations have various requirements for education and experience. the following chart shows a few of the more common occupations in Hamiltons supply chain and logistics industry.

    100%

    50%

    0%

    87,0

    28 n No certificate, diplomaor degree

    n High school certificateor equivalent

    n Apprenticeship or tradescertificate or diploma

    n College diploman University certificate

    or degreeOCC

    UPAT

    ION

    S IN

    SUP

    PLY

    CH

    AIN

    AN

    D LO

    GIST

    ICS

    ALL

    OCCU

    PATI

    ONS

    Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

    100%

    80%

    60%

    40%

    20%

    0%

    87,0

    28

    n 15-24 years oldn 25-54 years oldn 55 years and older

    OCCU

    PATI

    ONS

    IN S

    UPPL

    Y

    CHAI

    N A

    ND

    LOGI

    STIC

    S

    ALL

    OCCU

    PATI

    ONS

    Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census

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    Table #14: Top occupations in supply chain and logistics industry, Hamilton

    NOC Occupational title # employed in SCL industries% of total SCL employment

    Median employment income

    0016 Senior managers goods production, utilities, transportation and construction 385 3% $90,166

    Skills required: Reading text, writing, oral communication, scheduling or budgeting and accounting, job task planning and organizing, measurement and calculation, decision making, problem solving, finding informationEducation: A university degree or college diploma in engineering, business administration, commerce or other discipline related to companys product; several years of experience as a middle manager

    0213 Computer and information systems managers 90 1% $77,536

    Skills required: Reading text, writing, oral communication, computer use, scheduling or budgeting and accounting, job task planning and organizing, data analysis, decision making, problem solving, finding informationEducation: A bachelors or masters degree in computer science, business administration, commerce or engineering; several years of experience in systems analysis, data administration

    0611 Sales, marketing and advertising managers 850 6% $80,470

    Skills required: Reading text, writing, oral communication, scheduling or budgeting and accounting, job task planning and organizing, decision making, problem solving, finding informationEducation: A university degree or college diploma in business administration or a related field with a specialization in sales or marketing; several years of experience in sales or marketing

    1431 Accounting and related clerks 240 2% $36,880

    Skills required: Oral communication, scheduling or budgeting and accounting, job task planning, organizing, problem solvingEducation: Completion of secondary school is usually required; completion of college or other courses certified by the Certified General Accountants Association of Canada, Canadian Securities Institute or Canadian Bookkeepers Association may be required

    2172 Database analysts and data administrators 10 0% $49,841

    Skills required: Reading text, writing, computer use, oral communication, scheduling or budgeting and accounting, measurement and calculation, data analyst, finding informationEducation: A bachelors degree usually in computer science or mathematics or completion of a college program in computer science

    2233 Industrial engineering and manufacturing technologists and technicians

    335 2% $54,870

    Skills required: Reading text, writing, oral communication, money math, scheduling or budgeting and accounting, measurement and calculation, data analysis, numerical estimationEducation: Completion of a two- or three-year college program or equivalent in a related discipline such as engineering technology, pulp and paper technology, industrial engineering technology, manufacturing technology; certification may be required

    2263 Occupational health and safety officer 75 1% $53,641

    Skills required: Reading text, document use, oral communication, measurement and calculation, decision making Education: Bachelors degree in science, engineering or a related discipline, or a related post-secondary diploma; several years of work experience

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    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton32

    the above mentioned occupations highlight a few of the many promising occupations in this industry. In addition, respondents of our employer survey revealed five specific occupations

    expected to be in demand in the next 3-5 years in this industry. These include:

    refrigeration engineer, systems analyst, sales representative, and skilled trades occupations, specifically technicians and

    mechanics.

    Local training Because there are a variety of occupations in the supply chain and logistics industry, several educational pathways are available to those interested in working in this field.

    Depending on the chosen occupation, apprenticeship, college or university may be required. Education programs in business administration, communications,

    computer science, engineering, and science generally apply to different career opportunities in this industry.

    For more specialized training in supply chain and logistics, there are a small number of options available in Hamilton and across Ontario. Mohawk College

    and McMaster University offer several partnership programs wherein candidates gain hands-on experience along with

    theoretical knowledge. these programs are generally offered through the joint Bachelor of technology programs, with streams in Civil Engineer Infrastructure technology; Computing and Information technology; Energy Engineering technologies; Manufacturing Engineering technology. For more information, go to: http://mybtechdegree.ca/home.

    Table #14: Top occupations in supply chain and logistics industry, Hamilton (continued)

    NOC Occupational title # employed in SCL industries% of total SCL employment

    Median employment income

    7414 Delivery drivers 785 6% $33,929

    Skills required: Reading text, document use, oral communication, job task planning and organizingEducation: Completion of secondary school may be required; drivers licence appropriate to the class of vehicle being driven is required; one year of safe driving experience; on the job training is provided; eligibility for bonding and transportation of dangerous goods (TGD) certification may be required

    7452 Forklift operators 1,625 12% $39,798

    Skills required: Reading text, document use, oral communication, measurement and calculation, numerical estimationEducation: Some secondary school education may be required

    7452 Warehouse workers 1,625 12% $39,798

    Skills required: Reading text, document use, oral communication, measurement and calculation, numerical estimationEducation: Some secondary school education may be required; physical strength is required for manual handlers who work with heavy materials

    Source: Statistics Canada, 2006 Census; Human Resources and Skills Development Canada; Ontario Skills Passport

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    Supply Chain Management and Logistics in Hamiltonthe Citys current economic development strategy suggests that continued growth in traffic congestion and resulting gridlock in

    the GtA will increase the number of major warehousing and distribution companies looking to relocate to more effective and cost efficient locations. Hamiltons

    excellent transportation infrastructure and close proximity to the GtA make this area a prime location for SCL businesses seeking to escape the GtA gridlock.27 However there is some uncertainty around the utility of distribution centres as more companies look to ship directly from China to stores, and remove the distribution centres altogether.

    Logistics and supply chain operations will continue to play a large role in the movement of goods all over the world. the SCL industry offers smarter, more efficient ways of doing business. The

    SCL professional must possess a breadth of skills that reflect a balanced blend of

    technical and non-technical skills to meet

    the changing demands of this industry. SCL offers a tremendous opportunity for displaced workers to use the skills gained in other industries in a SCL career.

    key HR IssuesInterview and survey results from industry professionals indicate the following main human resources issues facing the supply chain and logistics sector:

    Youth Attraction

    Key informants and employers surveyed identified the lack of awareness and

    limited number of young people entering the supply chain and logistics industry. Students, new workforce entrants and those in career transition typically do not enter the supply chain and logistics sector by choice but rather by circumstance. there is a distinct lack of awareness of careers in this sector.

    Skills and Training

    the demand for logistics and supply chain operations has grown tremendously over the past decade. the education sector has been slow to catch up with this trend. In Hamilton, skills training opportunities are available through private colleges, Mohawk College and McMaster University.

    Retirements

    According to the Canadian Logistics Skills Committee, the total annual demand for employees to fill new jobs as well as

    vacancies resulting from retirements and turnover is estimated to be approximately 86,330, or 12.3% over the next three to five years across the nation.28

    the concern around retiring workers is due to not only loss of labour but also lack of knowledge transfer between senior management and young workers in this industry. Key informants suggests there is a great need for upper management to work more closely with middle management and entry level employees as a means to impart their knowledge before exiting the sector.

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    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton34

    to gain a greater understanding of the Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics industry, our methodology included a literature review and thorough analysis of the labour market data. From this research we identified 8 industry

    sectors as being important in the goods movement cluster in Hamilton. For a local perspective, we distributed an online survey to companies deemed contributors to this industry. the survey asked participants to comment on their workforce challenges, more specifically

    on occupations, skills, and advice for new entrants.

    Summary of Responsesthe survey distributed throughout Hamiltons Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics industry resulted in a total of 34 respondents, providing a snapshot of this industry in our community. We advise readers to use discretion when examining the results as this information may not necessarily be representative of the broader employer experience.

    the following is a brief summary of the responses collected.

    50% of businesses who responded to the employer survey were small- to

    medium-sized enterprises (SMEs),

    ranging from 1 to 49 employees, while 13% employed over 200 workers.

    Over 65% of respondents have

    been in business for 10 years or

    more. Based on the responses, well established businesses are less likely to have difficulty recruiting qualified

    workers. When asked what worker attribute was

    most difficult to find when recruiting

    new workers, 32% of respondents stated the right attitude is most difficult to find, followed by right skill

    set and experience in their sector. the top 3 technical skills needed to

    work in this industry, according to respondents, are computer skills, project management and technical ability.

    The top 3 soft skills identified by

    respondents are teamwork, ability to work independently, and oral and written communication.

    We also asked employers for advice to new entrants in this field. Their responses are

    below: Complete grade 12, always give your

    best, be reliable. there are many aspects to driving

    a transport truck. the student driver needs to ensure he/she is getting the proper training which should include everything needed to be known for the first day on the job with emphasis

    on safety training. Drivers need to be prepared to work

    under present regulations. Pursue professional development

    through continuous learning. Education and training is key.

    Survey Results

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    Evidence shows that the Goods Movement and Supply Chain and Logistics industry has a strong and increasing presence in our city with expanding opportunities. Key to expansion is a skilled labour force. Based on current research and discussions with local employers, the following recommendations will support future access to talent:

    1. Increase the promotion of traditional goods movement

    careers

    Many employers, specifically in

    marine and rail, report difficulty with

    recruiting workers largely due to the unglamorous image associated with the nature of the work. Increased promotion of traditional goods movement careers would serve to educate young and displaced workers.

    2. Create mentorship opportunities for senior management to connect

    with new labour market entrants

    and youth Interviews with key professionals in the supply chain and logistics industry identified the need for

    senior management to connect and share their knowledge of the industry with younger workers. As with other sectors in this industry, retirements will impact recruitment needs in the near future. Mentorship would give the supply chain and logistics workforce the opportunity to share

    firsthand knowledge of the industry.

    The entire workforce would benefit

    from open discussions around best practices, lessons learned, education, and the skills needed to work and excel in the supply chain and logistics industry.

    3. Expand Specialist High Skills Major (SHSM) to include supply chain and

    logistics careers Specialist High Skills Majors allow high school students to customize their education to fit their career

    interests. Currently the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board and the Hamilton Wentworth Catholic District School Board provide a range of SHSM career exploration programs. SHSM would help increase awareness of the opportunities available in this emerging and expansive industry amongst students in Hamilton.

    4. Expand public transit opportunities to the airport area the John C. Munro Hamilton International Airport is positioned on the southern fringes of the city and most freight and cargo companies operate outside of normal business hours. Interviews with local employers indicated the need for increased public transit routes and hours of operation to help workers in this sector commute to and from work.

    Findings and Recommendations

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    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton36

    this industry presents a considerable opportunity for Hamilton. the citys location, existing industrial base and market accessibility have made this community a major hub for Goods Movement, Logistics and Supply Chain operations. As businesses expand and others relocate to this area, there is a strong need for workforce development to support the industrys evolving skills requirements and future labour force growth.

    In 2005 the City of Hamilton identified

    the goods movement cluster as an important source for economic growth and demonstrated Hamiltons potential as a regional intermodal transportation centre. In 2006 the provincial government highlighted Hamilton as a prospect for its growth in the transportation and logistics industry. For those with the right skills, education and attitude, career options are bright in this sector.

    Summary

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    Appendix A

    Subsector NOC Formal Occupational Title Other Job Titles

    Freight 0016 Senior Managers Goods Production, Utilities, Transportation and Construction

    VP, Transportation

    0713 Transportation Managers Manager, Transportation

    1236 Customs, Ship and Other Brokers Customs Broker

    1476 Transportation Route and Crew Schedulers Transportation Route Scheduler

    1475 Dispatchers and Radio Operators Dispatcher

    1471 Shippers and Receivers Shipper/ReceiverImport/Export Brokerage Clerk

    7414 Delivery and Courier Service Drivers Pickup and Delivery Driver

    1461 Mail, Postal and Related Clerks Small Parcel Clerk

    Procurement 0113 Purchasing Managers Senior Management in Procurement

    1225 Purchasing Agents and Officers Purchasing Agent

    6233 Retail and Wholesale Buyers Retail/Wholesale Buyer

    1474 Purchasing and Inventory Clerks Contract AdministratorPurchasing ClerkPurchasing Assistant

    Operations 0721 Facility Operation and Maintenance Managers

    Plant ManagerProduction Manager

    0132 Postal and Courier Services Managers Postal and Courier Service Manager

    1214 Supervisors, Mail and Message Distribution Occupations

    Foreman, Operations

    1215 Supervisors, Recording, Distributing and Scheduling Occupations

    Team Leader, Operations

    7452 Material Handlers Material Handler, Forklift Operator

    9617 Labourers in Food, Beverage and Tobacco Processing

    1472 Storekeepers and Parts Clerks Order Filler

    7451 Longshore Workers Dock Worker

    Careers in Supply Chain

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton38

    Subsector NOC Formal Occupational Title Other Job Titles

    Logistics 0114 Other Administrative Services Managers Logistics Technical Manager

    1215 Supervisors, Recording, Distributing and Scheduling Occupations

    Logistics Technical Manager

    0713 Transportation Managers Manager, Logistics Planning

    2141 Industrial and Manufacturing Engineers Logistics Engineer

    1474 Purchasing and Inventory Clerks Inventory Planner

    1122 Professional Occupations in Business Services to Management

    Logistics Analyst

    Information Technology

    0213 Computer and Information Systems Managers

    Manager, Electronic Data Processing Manager, System Development/Planning

    2233 Industrial Engineering and Manufacturing Technologists and Technicians

    Inventory Auditor

    2171 Information Systems Analysts and Consultants

    Systems Analyst

    2172 Database Analysts and Data Administrators Systems Analyst

    2175 Web Designers and Developers Programmer

    2281 Computer Network Technicians Network Technician

    2282 User Support Technicians Software Support

    Human Resources 0013 Senior Managers Financial, Communications and Other Business Services

    Vice President, Human Resources

    0112 Human Resources Managers Manager, Human Resources Manager, Employee Relations

    1223 Personnel and Recruitment Officers Benefits CoordinatorHuman Resources Coordinator

    1211 Supervisors, General Office and Administrative Support Clerks

    Time and Attendance Administrator

    1442 Personnel Clerks Human Resources Administrative Assistant / Administrator

    Administration, Customer Service and Quality Assurance

    0611 Sales, Marketing and Advertising Managers Vice President, Sales

    1221 Administration Officers Manager, AdministrationManager, Customer Service

    2141 Industrial and Manufacturing Engineers Manager, Quality Assurance

    Careers in Supply Chain

  • Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton

    Make It Move It Ship It

    39

    Careers in Supply ChainSubsector NOC Formal Occupational Title Other Job Titles

    Administration, Customer Service and Quality Assurance

    0013 Senior Managers Financial, Communications and Other Business Services

    Business Development Manager

    2262 Engineering Inspectors and Regulatory Officer

    Quality Assurance Officer

    1453 Customer Service, Information and Related Clerks

    Customer Service Representative

    1414 Receptionists and Switchboard Operators Administrative AssistantReceptionist

    Health & Safety -- -- Health and Safety Risk Management

    0112 Human Resources Managers Director, Health and Safety

    6465 Other Protective Service Occupations Supervisor, Loss Prevention Officers Trainer, Safety and Hazard Awareness

    2263 Inspectors in Public and Environmental Health and Occupational Health

    Resource Protection Investigator

    3152 Registered Nurses Occupational Health Nurse

    1453 Customer Service, Information and Related Clerks

    Claims Clerk

    6651 Security Guards and Related Occupations Patrol

    1411 General Office Clerks Administrative Assistant

    Accounting & Finance

    0013 Senior Managers Financial, Communications and Other Business Services

    Chief Financial Officer

    0111 Financial Managers Director, Financial Services

    0123 Other Business Services Manager Accounting Manager

    1212 Supervisors, Finance and Insurance Clerks Payroll Administrator

    1112 Financial and Investment Analysts Financial Analyst

    1431 Accounting and Related Clerks Accounts Payable, Payroll and Receivable Clerks

    Source: Canadian Supply Chain Sector Council

  • Make It Move It Ship It

    Careers in the Goods Movement and Supply Chain & Logistics Sector in Hamilton40

    End Notes1 City of Hamilton, Economic Development Strategy 2010-2015, 222 City of Hamilton, Hamilton Goods Movement Study, 2005, 23 Statistics Canada, 2007 and 2011, Canadian Business Patterns Data (CBP). CBP data reflects counts of business

    establishments and locations by 9 employment size ranges, including indeterminate; geography groupings: province/territory, census division, census subdivision, census metropolitan area and census agglomeration; and industry using the North American Industry Classification System.

    4 Statistics Canada, Canadian Business Patterns Data (CBP). CBP data reflects counts of business establishments and locations by 9 employment size ranges, including indeterminate; geography groupings: province/territory, census division, census subdivision, census metropolitan area and census agglomeration; and industry using the North American Industry Classification System.

    5 Statistics Canada, 2007, North American Industry Classification System (NAICS). NAICS is a numeric system that provides common definitions of the industrial structure of Canada, Mexico and the United States, and facilitate economic analysis.

    6 Human Resources Skills Development Canada, 2010, National Occupational Classification System (NOC). NOC is a tool that classifies occupations with a four-digit code according to skill type and skill level.

    7 McMaster Institute for transportation and Logistics, A Sustainable Strategy for Developing Hamilton as a Gateway, 2009, 65

    8 McMaster Institute for transportation and Logistics, A Sustainable Strategy for Developing Hamilton as a Gateway, 2009, 65

    9 City of Hamilton Public Works, Airport Employment Growth District. October 3 2011. .

    10 Airport Employment Growth District. August 15 2011. .11 Canadian Business Patterns reports the number of business establishments in a given area based on the

    location their accounting and administrative paperwork is filed. This discrepancy is especially pronounced with complex units, those companies that have more than one location.

    12 Research and Traffic Group, Southern Ontario Gateway Transportation & Logistics Issues, 2008, 813 Statistics Canada. August 25 2011. . 14 Ministry of Public Infrastructure Renewal, Places to Grow: Growth plan for the Greater Golden Horseshoe,

    2006, 1615 Ministry of Public Infrastructure Renewal, 1616 Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. September 14 2011. .17 Human Resources and Skills Development Canada. September 14 2011. .18 McMaster Institute for transportation and Logistics, A Sustainable Strategy for Developing Hamilton as a

    Gateway, 2009, 6319 Eastern Ontario includes Lennox and Addington, Frontenac, Leeds and Grenville, Hastings, Prince Edward,

    Stormont, Dundas and Glenary, Prescott and Russell, Lanark, Refrew, Northumberland, Peterborough, Kawartha Lakes, Haliburton; Western Ontario includes Elgin, Middlesex, Oxford, Bruce, Grey, Huron, Perth, Brant, Haldimand-Norfolk, Hamilton, Niagara, Lambton, Waterloo, Wellington, Dufferin, Essex, Chatham-Kent; Central Ontario includes Durham, Simcoe, Muskoka, Peel, Halton, York, Toronto; North Ontario includes Algoma, timiskaming, Cochrane, Nipissing, Parry Sound, Rainy River, Kenora, thunder Bay, Budbury, Manitoulin, Greater Sudbury.

    20 Green Marine. December 20 2010. < http://www.green-marine.org>. 21 HWY H20. December 20 2010. < http://www.hwyh2o.com>. 22 Canadas Marine Industry Alliance. Canadas Marine Industry: A Blueprint for a Stronger Future, 2009, 4123 Canadian trucking Alliance, Carrier Business Briefs, 2010.24 Ontario Trucking Association. August 24 2011. . 25 Canadian trucking Alliance, Carrier Business Brief, 201026 Industry Canada. October 4 2011. .27 City of Hamilton, Economic Development Strategy 2010-2015, 22928 Canadian Logistics Skills Committee. Strategic Human Resources, Study of the Supply Chain Sector. 2005.

  • Business, Labour & Community:Planning for Prosperity

    Workforce Planning Hamilton

    Business, Labour & Community:Planning for Prosperity

    Since 1997 Workforce Planning Hamilton has provided

    planning, partnerships and projects that highlight local

    labour market trends and support workforce development.

    WPH is a member of Workforce Planning Ontario, a network

    of 25 labour market planning areas across Ontario.

    Our evidence-based approach relies on key industry sector

    and demographic data combined with local intelligence from

    employers and other local partners to develop a strategic

    vision for Hamilton.

    Log on to WPHs website at www.workforceplanninghamilton.ca and you will:

    Discover our community Projects and Partners that promote labour force development

    Learn about local labour market trends, opportunities, and priorities in our Publications.

    Connect to Links on training, employment, and labour market information.

    117 - 77 James Street NorthHamilton, Ontario, L8R 2K3Telephone: 905-521-5777

    Fax: 905-521-9309Email: [email protected]

    Website: www.workforceplanninghamilton.ca

    Workforce Planning Hamilton is funded by Employment Ontario