ls 705 darrell brewer melissa farrish sarah grose allison pyle

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  • Slide 1
  • LS 705 Darrell Brewer Melissa Farrish Sarah Grose Allison Pyle
  • Slide 2
  • Developed by Thomas Carlyle in the 1840s History and subsequently society is influenced by the actions of great men/women These Heroes rise to the occasion with which they are presented.
  • Slide 3
  • We attribute whole movements/eras to singular historical events shaped by these heroes. This hero worship thusly informs our views about how we perceive our own existence as we search for the greatness that exists within ourselves by modeling our behavior after heroic personalities. (Thomas Carlyle 1993)
  • Slide 4
  • Carlyles Six Classes of Heroes Hero as Divinity A greater omnipotent beingbetter than man himself (A god) Prophet Messenger of a god (Muhammad, Isaiah, Moses, etc.) Poet Men who use their words to inspire and influence (Dante / Shakespeare) Priest The spiritual captain of men (reformers) Man of Letters Men whose reason influences others to act King The embodiment of greatness to which all subjects aspire (Carlyle 1993)
  • Slide 5
  • If the Great Men have certain qualities or characteristics that make them so, then it should be possible to identify them and subsequently emulate them. (Stodgill 1974) Qualities of the Great Men/Leaders facilitate the unlocking of greater potential in those who follow them. (Burns 1978) Greatness is innate rather than instilled. (Carlyle 1993)
  • Slide 6
  • There are certain traits (hereditary) that serve to influence ones potential for greatness. If such traits are present then it stands to reason that great leaders are predisposed to being that way and will emerge when the conditions require their action. Nature decides who is best suited for leadership. (Galton 1925)
  • Slide 7
  • Emotional Stability Behavior is predictable and rational especially when stressed Admitting Error Able to own up to mistakes and avoid cover-ups Interpersonal Skills Ability to persuade others toward a line of thought without being coercive Intellectual Ability The ability to understand and form solutions to a variety of issues and situations (McCall & Lombardo 1990)
  • Slide 8
  • In 1860, Herbert Spencer, an English philosopher disputed the great man theory by affirming that these heroes are simply the product of their times and their actions the results of social conditions. Spencer believed the times produce the person and not the other way around; different situations call for different characteristics. http://www.vectorstudy.com/management-topics/theories-of-leadership
  • Slide 9
  • Emphasizes the importance of the situation in determining who should become and remain the leader of a group.Emphasizes the importance of the situation in determining who should become and remain the leader of a group. According to the early situationalists, there is no such thing as a born leader; it all depends on the situation.According to the early situationalists, there is no such thing as a born leader; it all depends on the situation. (Adair, 2011)
  • Slide 10
  • Put a person in one situation and he or she may emerge as a leader; put him or her in another one and he or she will not. Churchill was undoubtedly a great leader in wartime, but was he so successful in peace? (Adair, 2011)
  • Slide 11
  • Slide 12
  • Created by Dr Paul Hersey, a professor and author of "The Situational Leader" Ken Blanchard, author of the best selling "One-Minute Manager"
  • Slide 13
  • Theory stating instead of using just one style, successful leaders should change their leadership styles based on the maturity of the people they're leading and the details of the task. http://www.thescoopng.com/folarin-sagaya-nigeria-where-one-size-fits-all/
  • Slide 14
  • Telling (S1) Leaders tell their people what to do and how to do it. Selling (S2) Leaders provide information and direction, but there's more communication with followers. Leaders "sell" their message to get people on board. Participating (S3) Leaders focus more on the relationship and less on direction. The leader works with the team, and shares decision-making responsibilities. Delegating (S4) Leaders pass most of the responsibility onto the follower or group. The leaders still monitor progress, but they're less involved in decisions. (Chamberlain, 2013)
  • Slide 15
  • There is no one best way to influence group members. Most effective leadership style depends on the readiness level of group members. Readiness - extent to which a group member has the ability and willingness or confidence to accomplish a specific task. As group member readiness increases, a leader should rely more on relationship behavior and less on task behavior.
  • Slide 16
  • M1 People at this level of maturity are at the bottom level of the scale. They lack the knowledge, skills, or confidence to work on their own, and they often need to be pushed to take the task on. M2 at this level, followers might be willing to work on the task, but they still don't have the skills to complete it successfully. M3 Here, followers are ready and willing to help with the task. They have more skills than the M2 group, but they're still not confident in their abilities. M4 These followers are able to work on their own. They have high confidence and strong skills, and they're committed to the task. http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_44.htm
  • Slide 17
  • Maturity LevelMost Appropriate Leadership Style M1: Low maturityS1: Telling/directing M2: Medium maturity, limited skillsS2: Selling/coaching M3: Medium maturity, higher skills but lacking confidence S3: Participating/supporting M4: High maturityS4: Delegating http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_44.htm
  • Slide 18
  • (Chamberlin, 2013)
  • Slide 19
  • All teams, and all team members, aren't created equal. Hersey and Blanchard argue that leaders are more effective when they use a leadership style based on the individuals or groups they're leading. Start by identifying whom you're leading. Are your followers knowledgeable about the task? Are they willing and excited to do the work? Rate them on the M1 - M4 maturity scale, and then use the leadership style that's appropriate for that rating. http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newLDR_44.htm
  • Slide 20
  • Slide 21
  • Created by Victor Vroom and Phillip Yetton in 1973 Leaders have a direct and clear pattern to addressing problems. Updated in 1988 when Vroom and Jago took the fundamental practices and addressed some of the weaknesses (Hershey, 2001)
  • Slide 22
  • All leadership is contingent upon things within the environment. No leadership model is a be all and end all. It is assumed that situations interact personal characteristics of the leader, resulting in leader behavior that can affect organizational effectiveness. (Hershey, 2001)
  • Slide 23
  • A contingency model is where the leader's possible behaviors are contingent upon the interaction between the questions and the leader's assessment of the situation in developing a response to the questions. It empowers the leader to vary his style to fit the situation. Hershey, 2001 (Hershey, 2001)
  • Slide 24
  • Autocratic (AI)- Solve the problem yourself using available informationAutocratic (AI)- Solve the problem yourself using available information Autocratic (AII)- Obtain necessary information, then solve the problem yourselfAutocratic (AII)- Obtain necessary information, then solve the problem yourself Consultative (CI)- Share the problem with individuals (not in a group), get ideas, then make a decision that may or may not reflect the individuals ideasConsultative (CI)- Share the problem with individuals (not in a group), get ideas, then make a decision that may or may not reflect the individuals ideas Consultative (CII)- Share the problem with a group, obtain their ideas, then make a decision that may or may not reflect the groupConsultative (CII)- Share the problem with a group, obtain their ideas, then make a decision that may or may not reflect the group Collaborative (GII)- Share the problem with your followers and create a solution togetherCollaborative (GII)- Share the problem with your followers and create a solution together (House & Aditya, 1997)
  • Slide 25
  • Overall, studies show the closer the leader can get to being a GII leader, the more likely the subordinates will be content. (House & Aditya, 1997)
  • Slide 26
  • Very direct and clear pattern of questioning and decision making to determine how to work with subordinates and address a problem Leadership is never constant Fluidity must be applied to leadership at all times (House, 2001)
  • Slide 27
  • Group performance relies on leaders orientation Successful leadership relies on 3 stipulations: Good leader-member relationship Tasks with clear goals and procedures Ability of leader to dole out rewards and punishments (Hickson, et. al., 1971)
  • Slide 28
  • Least preferred co-worker scale Measures the leaders orientation Human relations vs. Task Individuals emotional reaction to people Critics argue it is not an accurate measure of leader effectiveness (Hickson, et. al., 1971) (Fiedler, F. & Chemers, M., 1984) Leader-Member Relations Uncooperative12345678Cooperati