Literature and English Teaching Class Workshop Gao Jian College of English Language and Literature, SISU

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Literature and English Teaching Class Workshop Gao Jian College of English Language and Literature, SISU </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Principles of the workshop Literature orientated Relevance to the textbook The highlight of perspectives The share of your golden experience </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Contents Section One: the importance of quotations Section Two: the openness of poetry Section Three: the awareness of cultural comparison Section Four: the essentials of classics </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Section One: the importance of quotations Why are quotations important? How to choose quotations? How to make full use of the quotations? </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Case Study: College life The things taught in schools and colleges are not an education, but the means to an education. --------- Emerson Education is not the filling of a pail, but the lighting of a fire.--------Yeats You cannot teach a man anything; you can only help him find it within himself. --------Gallileo </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Case Study: College life 1 A university is what a college becomes when the faculty loses interest in students. John CiardiJohn Ciardi 2 What we become depends on what we read after all of the professors have finished with us. The greatest university of all is a collection of books. Thomas CarlyleThomas Carlyle 3 The exquisite art of idleness, one of the most important things that any University can teach. Oscar Wilde 4 Colleges are places where pebbles are polished and diamonds are dimmed. Robert Green Ingersoll 5 A man who has never gone to school may steal from a freight car; but if he has a university education, he may steal the whole railroad. Theodore RooseveltTheodore Roosevelt </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Case Study: Parents and Children To understand your parents love you must raise children yourself.-------Chinese Proverb As long as you have the blessing of your parents, it does not matter even if you live in the mountains. ------Greek Proverb My mother had a great deal of trouble with me, but I think she enjoyed it. -----Mark Twain </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Case Study: Parents and Children Children begin by loving their parents; as they grow older they judge them; sometimes they forgive them. Oscar Wilde Your children are not your children. They are the sons and daughters of Lifes longing for itself. They come through you but not from you, and though they are with you, yet they belong not to you. Kahlil GibranKahlil Gibran </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Section Two: the openness of poetry The power of poetry The length of poetry The subject of poetry </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Section Two: The Sick of Rose O Rose, thou art sick! The invisible worm That flies in the night, In the howling storm, Has found out thy bed Of crimson joy: And his dark secret love Does thy life destroy. </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> All Nature is But Art, unknown to thee By Alexander Pope All Nature is But Art, unknown to thee; All chance, direction which thou canst not see; All discord, harmony not understood; All partial evil, universal good; And Spite of pride in erring reason's spite, One truth is clear: whatever is, is right. </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Section Three: awareness of cultural diversity One Word is Too Often Profaned by Percy Bysshe Shelley One word is too often profaned For me to profane it; One feeling too falsely disdained For thee to disdain it; One hope is too like despair For prudence to smother; And pity from thee more dear Than that from another. I can give not what men call love; But wilt thou accept not The worship the heart lifts above And the heavens reject not, - The desire of the moth for the star, Of the night for the morrow, The devotion to something afar From the sphere of our sorrow? </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Section Three: </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> A Widow Bird Sate Mourning For Her Love Percy Bysshe Shelley A widow bird sate mourning for her Love Upon a wintry bough; The frozen wind crept on above, The freezing stream below. There was no leaf upon the forest bare, No flower upon the ground, And little motion in the air Except the mill-wheel's sound. </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> Stopping By Woods On A Snowy Evening Robert Frost Whose woods these are I think I know. His house is in the village though; He will not see me stopping here To watch his woods fill up with snow. My little horse must think it queer To stop without a farmhouse near Between the woods and frozen lake The darkest evening of the year. He gives his harness bells a shake To ask if there is some mistake. The only other sound's the sweep Of easy wind and downy flake. The woods are lovely, dark and deep. But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep. </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> Ode on Solitude By Alexander Pope 1 Happy the man, whose wish and care 2 A few paternal acres bound, 3 Content to breathe his native air, 4 In his own ground. 5 Whose herds with milk, whose fields with bread, 6 Whose flocks supply him with attire, 7 Whose trees in summer yield him shade, 8 In winter fire. 9 Blest, who can unconcern'dly find, 10 Hours, days and years slide soft away, 11 In health of body, peace of mind, 12 Quiet by day, 13 Sound sleep by night; study and ease, 14 Together mixt; sweet recreation; 15 And innocence which most does please, 16 With meditation. 17 Thus let me live, unseen, unknown, 18 Thus unlamented let me die, 19 Steal from the world, and not a stone 20 Tell where I lie </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> Section Four: why classics? What does it mean? How does it mean (what it means)? How does the text acquire its meaning? Why is it valued as it is? </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> Section Four: Case Studies The Importance of Ones Own Language. John Locke The definition of A Gentleman John Henry Newman Companionship of Books Samuel Smiles Beauty Knowledge and Progress My Days Henry David Thoreau </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> Thank you for your participation. </li> </ul>