literary criticism overview

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  • 1. Literary Criticism Getting Started
  • 2. What is Literary Criticism? An interpretation of a literary work or body of work that is debatable A conversation with the written text An analysis and explication of literary work(s) using literary concepts A thesis that presents an arguable perspective of a literary work.Dollar, Mark. Writing about Literature. The Owl at Purdue. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University, 1995-2007. 2 May 2007. Yothers, Brian. Writing the Literary Analysis The Owl at Purdue. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University, 1995- 2007. 2 May 2007.
  • 3. Criticism deals with Literary Elements Theme Point of View Tone Characterization Style Setting Plot GenreYothers, Brian. Writing the Literary Analysis The Owl at Purdue. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University, 1995-2007. 2 May 2007.
  • 4. A Great Topic isResearchable Time Task Relevant requirements Sources
  • 5. Contemplate thetext.Brainstorm ideas.Generate lots ofideas that fit thetask.Choose the ideathat most appealsto you.
  • 6. Read toanswer thesequestions: What sources are available to add to my understanding? What sources help me to develop my argument and support my assertions?
  • 7. Explore toanswer thesequestions: What do I already know? What do I need to know to fully understand this topic? What do experts say about this topic?
  • 8. How do I write a Literary Analysis? Focus on specific aspects of the text Create a clear and arguable point about this feature of the text Defend this position with reasons and evidence drawn from the text Use: Quotes, summaries and paraphrase from the text Other critics opinions and literary theories Historical, political and social context as well as knowledge of the authors own lifeYothers, Brian. Writing the Literary Analysis The Owl at Purdue. West Lafayette, IN: Purdue University, 1995-2007. 2 May 2007.
  • 9. Which and where are thesources for Literary Criticism?
  • 10. R is for Relevance
  • 11. A is for AccuracyCheck your facts.Separate opinions from facts.Credit sources of ideas and opinions.
  • 12. D is for DetailsBe sure to include Develop each mainall the key idea by providingcomponents of the details totopic. explain, illustrate and explore the concepts thoroughly. Piece the ideas together logically, to create a powerful argument.
  • 13. C is for Currency Define the time that is RELEVANT to your topic. Use that information to limit or broaden your search. Be sure to include information and sources that represent the full range of time RELEVANT to your topic.
  • 14. A is for AuthorityHaving or marked by an advanced degree Having or showing skill; expert.of competence, as in an Requiring specialized ability orart, vocation, profession, or branch of training: a skilled trade.learning.
  • 15. B is for BiasPro Neutra Co l n An opinion that deviates from the neutral has bias.
  • 16. Which and where are the sources for Literary Criticism?Search terms to consider: literary criticism criticism, text title, authors name, idea [literary movement, genre, literary element, literary device, concept], critical essay
  • 17. Plot Texts Interest Authors Themes ContextReviews Areas of Historical summary Databases Academic One File World Literature and its Times Novels for Students Drama for Students Short Stories for Students Poetry for Students Twaynes United States Authors Series Twaynes English Authors Gale/Cengage Twaynes Masterwork Studies Twaynes World Authors Series Gale Contextual Encyclopedia of American Literature Books, magazines, academic journals, critical essays, newspaper articles, video, audio, images Gale Contextual Encyclopedia