L'estro armonico, op. IIIby Antonio Vivaldi; Gian Francesco Malipiero;La stravaganza, op. IVby Antonio Vivaldi; Angelo Ephrikian;Il cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione, op. VIIIby Antonio Vivaldi; Gian Francesco Malipiero;La cetra, op. IXby Antonio Vivaldi; Gian Francesco Malipiero

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  • L'estro armonico, op. III by Antonio Vivaldi; Gian Francesco Malipiero; La stravaganza, op. IVby Antonio Vivaldi; Angelo Ephrikian; Il cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione, op. VIII byAntonio Vivaldi; Gian Francesco Malipiero; La cetra, op. IX by Antonio Vivaldi; Gian FrancescoMalipieroReview by: H. C. Robbins LandonNotes, Second Series, Vol. 39, No. 3 (Mar., 1983), pp. 687-688Published by: Music Library AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/940163 .Accessed: 15/06/2014 07:04

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  • Music Reviews Music Reviews

    Flote, fur Oboe und fur Fagott. Vorgelegt von Franz Giegling. Kassel: Barenreiter, 1981. [Notes in Ger., facsims., 15 p., score, 173 p., cloth, DM90.00]

    Flote, fur Oboe und fur Fagott. Vorgelegt von Franz Giegling. Kassel: Barenreiter, 1981. [Notes in Ger., facsims., 15 p., score, 173 p., cloth, DM90.00]

    This latest volume of the great new Mo- zart edition gives us clear scores of the fol- lowing complete works: Concerto in G for flute and orchestra K 313 (285c); Concerto in D for flute and orchestra K 314 (285d); Andante in C for flute and orchestra K 315 (285e); Concerto in C for oboe and or- chestra K 314 (285d); and the Concerto in B flat for bassoon and orchestra K 191 (186e). There are two fragments as well, the first one for a Concerto in F for oboe and orchestra K 293 (416f) which is inter- esting and beautiful, the second a scrap of music for the oboe concerto in C.

    Except for the Andante K 315 and the fragments, these works exist only in sec- ondary copies, and there are textual ques- tions in all of them, but especially in the oboe and bassoon concertos. The editor has produced the best editions that mod- ern musicology can provide, given the not

    This latest volume of the great new Mo- zart edition gives us clear scores of the fol- lowing complete works: Concerto in G for flute and orchestra K 313 (285c); Concerto in D for flute and orchestra K 314 (285d); Andante in C for flute and orchestra K 315 (285e); Concerto in C for oboe and or- chestra K 314 (285d); and the Concerto in B flat for bassoon and orchestra K 191 (186e). There are two fragments as well, the first one for a Concerto in F for oboe and orchestra K 293 (416f) which is inter- esting and beautiful, the second a scrap of music for the oboe concerto in C.

    Except for the Andante K 315 and the fragments, these works exist only in sec- ondary copies, and there are textual ques- tions in all of them, but especially in the oboe and bassoon concertos. The editor has produced the best editions that mod- ern musicology can provide, given the not

    very satisfactory situation of the sources. It is unlikely that the autographs of these works will suddenly materialize, so that some of these problems will never be solved to everybody's satisfaction, but the prob- lems are minor compared with other Mo- zart works that have not survived in auto- graph. They mostly concern "cosmetic" finish.

    The complete concertos are, of course, familiar, but the fragment of the oboe con- certo in F is a magnificent torso, on the level of the unfinished Double Concerto in D for piano, violin and orchestra-another work that Mozart began at Mannheim. (The worst tragedy is that the Mannheim Mass in E flat remained unfinished; only the Kyrie K 322 was composed, or at least put down on paper.) It is good to have these torsos to mourn over.

    very satisfactory situation of the sources. It is unlikely that the autographs of these works will suddenly materialize, so that some of these problems will never be solved to everybody's satisfaction, but the prob- lems are minor compared with other Mo- zart works that have not survived in auto- graph. They mostly concern "cosmetic" finish.

    The complete concertos are, of course, familiar, but the fragment of the oboe con- certo in F is a magnificent torso, on the level of the unfinished Double Concerto in D for piano, violin and orchestra-another work that Mozart began at Mannheim. (The worst tragedy is that the Mannheim Mass in E flat remained unfinished; only the Kyrie K 322 was composed, or at least put down on paper.) It is good to have these torsos to mourn over.

    Antonio Vivaldi. L'estro armonico, op. III. Revisione ed elaborazione di Gian Francesco Malipiero. Milano: Ricordi, for Istituto Italiano An- tonio Vivaldi (Associated), 1965. [Pref. in It., Eng., Ger., 8 p., score, 2 vols., each vol., $15.50] Idem. La stravaganza, op. IV. Revisione ed elaborazione di Angelo Ephrikian. Milano: Ricordi, for Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi (As- sociated), 1965. [Pref. in It., Eng., Ger., 9 p., score, 2 vols., each vol., $13.75] Idem. II cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione, op. VIII. Revisione ed elaborazione di Gian Francesco Malipiero. Milano: Ricordi, for Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi (Associated), 1950. [Pref. in It., Eng., Ger., 8 p., score, 2 vols., each vol., $13.75] Idem. La cetra, op. IX. Revisione ed elaborazione di Gian Francesco Malipiero. Milano: Ricordi, for Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi (As- sociated), 1980. [Notes in It., Eng., Ger., 8 p., score, 2 vols., each vol., $14.25]

    Antonio Vivaldi. L'estro armonico, op. III. Revisione ed elaborazione di Gian Francesco Malipiero. Milano: Ricordi, for Istituto Italiano An- tonio Vivaldi (Associated), 1965. [Pref. in It., Eng., Ger., 8 p., score, 2 vols., each vol., $15.50] Idem. La stravaganza, op. IV. Revisione ed elaborazione di Angelo Ephrikian. Milano: Ricordi, for Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi (As- sociated), 1965. [Pref. in It., Eng., Ger., 9 p., score, 2 vols., each vol., $13.75] Idem. II cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione, op. VIII. Revisione ed elaborazione di Gian Francesco Malipiero. Milano: Ricordi, for Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi (Associated), 1950. [Pref. in It., Eng., Ger., 8 p., score, 2 vols., each vol., $13.75] Idem. La cetra, op. IX. Revisione ed elaborazione di Gian Francesco Malipiero. Milano: Ricordi, for Istituto Italiano Antonio Vivaldi (As- sociated), 1980. [Notes in It., Eng., Ger., 8 p., score, 2 vols., each vol., $14.25]

    It is hard to imagine a concert or re- corded world without these essential con- certos by Vivaldi, but the world existed happily for nearly two hundred years with- out them-roughly from 1740 (a year be- fore Vivaldi died a pauper in Vienna, his music already unplayed and largely for-

    It is hard to imagine a concert or re- corded world without these essential con- certos by Vivaldi, but the world existed happily for nearly two hundred years with- out them-roughly from 1740 (a year be- fore Vivaldi died a pauper in Vienna, his music already unplayed and largely for-

    gotten) until 1940, that magic year when, at a concert in the Palazzo Chigo in Siena, the astonished musical world was reintro- duced to Le quattro stagioni. A few years later, the war over, Cetra made the first complete recording of this work, and peo- ple all over the world were stunned that

    gotten) until 1940, that magic year when, at a concert in the Palazzo Chigo in Siena, the astonished musical world was reintro- duced to Le quattro stagioni. A few years later, the war over, Cetra made the first complete recording of this work, and peo- ple all over the world were stunned that

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  • MLA Notes, March 1983 MLA Notes, March 1983

    music of this originality and sheer beauty could ever have been forgotten.

    The publication of Vivaldi's oeuvre by Ricordi was a great occasion, and these miniature scores are, as it were, a spin-off from the colossal original project. It may be that future editions will give us the oc- casional difference, particularly as far as editorial additions are concerned. The al- ternation of harpsichord and organ within a single concerto (as Ephrikian has done in La stravaganza), the rather busy harpsi- chord right hand he gives to such a work as opus IV, no. 1, the use of accent lines (-) and bowing marks all seem slightly old fashioned. But it must be stressed that they do not really harm the music nor are they always wrong; taste in such matters changes, and it has especially changed since (say) 1940, when the celebrated composer Gian Francesco Malipiero prepared his epochal edition of the Four Seasons for that concert in Siena. Recently Francesco Degrada, a kind of "house musicologist" for Ricordi, has been cleaning up these Vivaldi scores, purging them of the worst Romantic ad- ditions. Probably he was responsible for these "cleanings," in which case he is to be congratulated. These new scores, while not as Urtext as the Vivaldi series for Eulenburg (which often used the great Alfred Einstein as editor), are useful and mostly accurate "diplomatic" transcriptions of the original editions and manuscript parts. It is per- haps a sign of the times in which they were edited that Malipiero and Ephrikian placed

    music of this originality and sheer beauty could ever have been forgotten.

    The publication of Vivaldi's oeuvre by Ricordi was a great occasion, and these miniature scores are, as it were, a spin-off from the colossal original project. It may be that future editions will give us the oc- casional difference, particularly as far as editorial additions are concerned. The al- ternation of harpsichord and organ within a single concerto (as Ephrikian has done in La stravaganza), the rather busy harpsi- chord right hand he gives to such a work as opus IV, no. 1, the use of accent lines (-) and bowing marks all seem slightly old fashioned. But it must be stressed that they do not really harm the music nor are they always wrong; taste in such matters changes, and it has especially changed since (say) 1940, when the celebrated composer Gian Francesco Malipiero prepared his epochal edition of the Four Seasons for that concert in Siena. Recently Francesco Degrada, a kind of "house musicologist" for Ricordi, has been cleaning up these Vivaldi scores, purging them of the worst Romantic ad- ditions. Probably he was responsible for these "cleanings," in which case he is to be congratulated. These new scores, while not as Urtext as the Vivaldi series for Eulenburg (which often used the great Alfred Einstein as editor), are useful and mostly accurate "diplomatic" transcriptions of the original editions and manuscript parts. It is per- haps a sign of the times in which they were edited that Malipiero and Ephrikian placed

    more faith in the old original editions than they did in manuscript sources. One case in point: Le quattro stagioni (the first four concertos of II cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione, opus VIII) was based on the edition by Le Cene of Amsterdam; it formed the basis not only of the 1940 Siena performance but of the first modern edi- tion by Ricordi in 1950. But apart from the (possibly authentic) edition by Le Cene, there is another source which might turn out to be equally authentic: the set of parts from the Library of Cardinal Ottoboni in Rome (of Corellian and Handelian fame) and now in the Henry Watson Library in Manchester (England). Unfortunately we cannot be sure of the chronology: are the differences in the Ottoboni source later or earlier than the text of Le Cene? If in the future it can be proved, or seriously main- tained, that the Ottoboni source is later than Le Cene, the changes may represent Vivaldi's latest thoughts on performing the works. In that case, we ought to be playing the Four Seasons from the Ottoboni source, as they are now starting to do in England.

    One day, then, we may have better crit- ical editions of this music, but until then, we must all be immensely grateful to Ri- cordi, Malipiero, Ephrikian, and Degrada for this corpus of Vivaldi concertos, the cream of his works in that form and the one, ultimately, on which his fame rests.

    H. C. ROBBINS LANDON, University College, Cardiff

    more faith in the old original editions than they did in manuscript sources. One case in point: Le quattro stagioni (the first four concertos of II cimento dell'armonia e dell'inventione, opus VIII) was based on the edition by Le Cene of Amsterdam; it formed the basis not only of the 1940 Siena performance but of the first modern edi- tion by Ricordi in 1950. But apart from the (possibly authentic) edition by Le Cene, there is another source which might turn out to be equally authentic: the set of parts from the Library of Cardinal Ottoboni in Rome (of Corellian and Handelian fame) and now in the Henry Watson Library in Manchester (England). Unfortunately we cannot be sure of the chronology: are the differences in the Ottoboni source later or earlier than the text of Le Cene? If in the future it can be proved, or seriously main- tained, that the Ottoboni source is later than Le Cene, the changes may represent Vivaldi's latest thoughts on performing the works. In that case, we ought to be playing the Four Seasons from the Ottoboni source, as they are now starting to do in England.

    One day, then, we may have better crit- ical editions of this music, but until then, we must all be immensely grateful to Ri- cordi, Malipiero, Ephrikian, and Degrada for this corpus of Vivaldi concertos, the cream of his works in that form and the one, ultimately, on which his fame rests.

    H. C. ROBBINS LANDON, University College, Cardiff

    Thomas Augustine Are. Alfred [an English opera]. Edited by Alex- ander Scott (Musica Britannica, 47). London: Stainer and Bell (Galaxy), 1981. [Notes, introd., facsims., 27 p., score, appendices, 178 p., paper, $67.00]

    Thomas Augustine Are. Alfred [an English opera]. Edited by Alex- ander Scott (Musica Britannica, 47). London: Stainer and Bell (Galaxy), 1981. [Notes, introd., facsims., 27 p., score, appendices, 178 p., paper, $67.00]

    The first performance of Alfred took place on 1 August 1740 at Cliveden on the Thames, the residence of Frederick, Prince of Wales. In the introduction to this pub- lication prepared by Alexander Scott, the editor...

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