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  • LEST

    WE

    FORGET Volume 4

    Getting to know the people who helped shape the

    7th-day Adventist Church

    An integrated Unit by Larry Robbins

    daveb45 Stamp

  • Atlantic Union Conference Teacher Bulletin �www.teacherbulletin.org

    Lest We Forget

    Contents Purpose....................................................................................................................................... 3

    The Problem of the Civil War....................................................................................................... 4

    The Nation................................................................................................................................. ��

    Response to "The Nation"......................................................................................................... �2

    Conscription–Noncombatancy–The Law.............................................................................. �4

    The Civil War–Why??.............................................................................................................. �5

    Just Punishment for Both Sides................................................................................................ �7

    Which Side Was Right?............................................................................................................. 20

    History of the Work Among African-Americans In The Early Years, Part �.............................. 22

    History of the Work Among African-Americans In The Early Years, Part 2................................ 27

    History of the Work Among African-Americans In The Early Years, Part 3................................32

    History of the Work Among African-Americans In The Early Years, Part 4................................36

    The Beginnings of a Magazine–Message............................................................................... 40

    Ellen White and Jim Crow.......................................................................................................... 43

    Charles M. Kinny (Kinney).........................................................................................................46

    The Morning Star.......................................................................................................................48

    The North American Regional Department.................................................................................5�

  • Atlantic Union Conference Teacher Bulletin 2www.teacherbulletin.org

    Lest We Forget

    Contents, cont. Regional Conferences...............................................................................................................54

    Riverside Sanitarium and Hospital.............................................................................................56

    The Utopia Park Affair and the Rise of Northern Black Adventists............................................ 58

    Joseph H. Laurence.................................................................................................................. 73

    Frank L. Peterson...................................................................................................................... 76

    A History of Black SDA Education............................................................................................. 78

    Rosetta Baldwin......................................................................................................................... 80

    Natelkka E. Burrell..................................................................................................................... 82

    Eva B. Dykes............................................................................................................................. 85

    Anna Knight–Pioneer Educator................................................................................................. 86

    B. W. Abney............................................................................................................................... 88

    Thomas H. Branch..................................................................................................................... 89

    Littie C. Blake–First Black SDA Physician................................................................................. 90

    Ruth J. Temple–Public Health Officer........................................................................................ 9�

    Jim Pearson–Judge...................................................................................................................93

    Works Cited...............................................................................................................................95

  • Atlantic Union Conference Teacher Bulletin 3www.teacherbulletin.org

    Lest We Forget

    PURPOSE Lest We Forget is a continuation of a unit about the beginnings of our church's history. More men and women who, through divine inspiration of God, helped establish the Seventh-day Adventist Church as we know it today will be introduced in this unit and future units.

    Ellen G. White told us, "We have nothing to fear for the future, except as we forget the way the Lord has led us, and His teaching in our past history." Life Sketches, p. �96.

    In this unit, we will look at how the Seventh-day Adventist Church dealt with the problems our members faced during the Civil War.

    Much of the unit focuses on the men and women who helped shape the church in the South and among the Black race. We will look at major issues, as well as what part so many people played in spreading the "Good News" to those who were segregated against.

    Each unit may include an overview of the life of the men and women, as well as some of the specific accomplishments each attained. Feel free to add to any area as you use each unit.

    A unit on James White was published in the Teacher Bulletin four years ago. For a copy of that unit or the first two units in this series, please contact the Atlantic Union Conference Office of Educa- tion at www.atlantic-union.org.

    This unit is designed for both junior high and academy students. Activity pages and quizzes/tests have been made for both groups. This unit can be used in its entirety or in sections. Feel free to use what you think will work for your students.

    A source that was quite helpful was the 22 compact disks from the Lake Union entitled Pathways of the Pioneers, Origin of the Seventh-day Adventists. http://luc.adventist.org/pathways. I want to especially thank those who are involved in publishing "Lest We Forget," a periodical published by Adventist Pioneer Library. Some of the material included in this unit has come from that periodical. Their web site is: www.aplib.org. Permission of the publisher has been given for material used.

    A list of resources used can be found at the back of this unit.

    LEST WE FORGET

  • Atlantic Union Conference Teacher Bulletin 4www.teacherbulletin.org

    Lest We Forget

    THE PROBLEM OF THE CIVIL WAR WHEN SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTISTS FIRST FACED WAR

    by Peter Brock

    (Seventh-day Adventists did not have to define their attitude toward the Civil War until the sum- mer of �862. With conscription threatening, James White, editor of the Review and Herald, wrote that "many of our brethren were greatly excited, and trembled over the prospect of a draft." Peter Brock, professor of history at the University of Toronto and a leading authority on pacifism in both America and Europe, analyzes the young church's attempt to define its position on war.)

    Discussion began in August in the Review and Herald with a leading article en- titled "The Nation," written by White. (See the next article to view excerpts from "The Nation.") The article drew attention to the seeming contradiction between their strongly antislavery position and the fact that, until then, they had stood aside from the war. But "the requirements of war" conflicted with both the fourth commandment ("Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy") and the sixth ("Thou shalt not kill"). Nevertheless, White went on, if a brother were drafted, "the government assumed the responsibility of the violation of the law of God, and it would be madness to resist." Refusal to obey might end in the resister being shot by the military: this "goes too far, we think, in taking the responsibility of suicide."

    Two points are worth pointing out in connection with White's arguments. In the first place, he gives prominence to the sabbatarian objection to military service that became of primary importance to the sect in the wars of the twentieth century. Once in the army, it was feared, the Seventh- day Adventist would not be allowed to observe Saturday as his day of rest and prayer. (Were he permitted to do so, and were this to become the only grounds of his objection, the reasons for refusing to serve would naturally disappear.) Secondly, White implied not only that the dispro- portionately heavy cost of a refusal to fight, together with any guilt involved in breaking God's laws resting on the shoulders of the government, made it inexpedient to resist the draft but that the strength of the government's case in the midst of a struggle against "the most hellish rebel- lion since that of Satan and his angels" was a factor to be taken into consideration in reaching a decision on how to act.

    From August until the end of October, week after week, the controversy over White's article filled many colu

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