lansing sidewalks august 2012

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Exploration of Lansing\'s sidewalks needs and possible funding sources.

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  • 1. August 2012 Jessica Yorko, ChairPublic Services Committee Lansing City Council1

2. Presentation and Ballot Language available online atwww.lansingsfourthward.comNews and EventsOr contact our -office at 517-483-4177 2 3. Why Care About Sidewalks 3 4. Sidewalks Increase Property ValuesWalkability [including sidewalks] adds anywhere from $4,000 to $34,000 to home values, according to the [CEOs for Cities 2009] study. www.houselogic.com/home-advice/green-living/does-walkability-raise-property-valueswww.ceosforcities.org/pagefiles/WalkingTheWalk_CEOsforCities.pdf 4 5. Many People Do Not Drive This includes: Many of the 21% of Americans who are over 65 All children under 16 Many low income Americans who cannot afford automobilesMore than 50% of non-drivers stay at home on a given day because they lack transportation options.Sources:Surface Transportation Policy Project. Americans Attitudes Toward Walking and Creating Better Walking Communities. 2003.American Public Transportation Association. 2009 Public Transportation Fact Book.2008 National Household Travel Survey. Non-drivers represent 29.8% of Americans. Of those over 65, non-drivers represent 20.79%.Steven Raphael and Alan Berube. Socioeconomic Differences in Household Automobile Ownership Rates: Implications for Evacuation Policy, paper prepared 5for the Berkeley Symposium on Real Estate, Catastrophic Risk, and Public Policy, March 23, 2006, http://urbanpolicy.berkeley.edu/pdf/raphael.pdf 6. More Americans will be Non-Drivers by 2030Aging Population:50% of Americans will be over 55 in 2030. Photo: Michael Ronkin, ODOT6 August 2012 Presentation from Jessica Yorko, Chair, Public Services Committee, Lansing City Council 7. 7 8. Americans Want to Walk and Bike More 55% of Americans would prefer to drive less and walk more. STPP Poll photos: Dan Burden, pedbikeimages.org 8August 2012 Presentation from Jessica Yorko, Chair, Public Services Committee, Lansing City Council 9. Sidewalks Encourage WalkingResidents are 65% morelikely to walk in aneighborhood withsidewalks.STPP Poll 9 August 2012 Presentation from Jessica Yorko, Chair, Public Services Committee, Lansing City Council 10. Top Pedestrian Complaints Are Incomplete Streets Percentage of Pedestrians Experiencing Problematic Streets302520 Nondisabled15 Disabled1050 Too FewInsensitive Poor SurfaceSidewalks Drivers2002 National Transportation Availability & Use Survey 10 11. Lansing Has Many Non-DriversLansing: 11,132 seniors over age 65 9,594 people with two or more disabilities 20,657 children between age 5 and 16 (Nearly 40% of our total population)Ingham County: 8,713 Ingham County households do nothave a vehicleSource: 2000 Census11August 2012 Presentation from Jessica Yorko, Chair, Public Services Committee, Lansing City Council 12. SafetyOf the 13 pedestrians and bicyclists killed by cars in Lansing between 2001 and 2005, most were children and seniors.12August 2012 Presentation from Jessica Yorko, Chair, Public Services Committee, Lansing City Council 13. MLKCedarPennKalamazooMalcom X/StJoeMichiganSaginawOaklandWillowMt. HopeJollyMiller 13 14. Cost-Savings for Individuals and Government Non-motorized travel options allow people tosave money on gas by making fewer cartrips. Building walk and bike friendlyfeatures leads to more walking andbicycling. Creating non-motorized travel options helps manage traffic demand, saves money on road and parking facilities, reduces congestion.Sources: Igor Vojnovics study reported in Engaged Scholar Magazine, 2007 backs up a 2005 study by John Pucher and Ralph Buehler, reported in 14Transport Policy 13 (2006).. American Journal of Health Promotion, 2003 15. Health 20% of Ingham County adults are obese and 1 in 3 is overweight. The leading cause of death in Michigan is heart disease. 1/3 of all deaths in the United States attributable to coronary heart disease could have been prevented if all persons were highly active. Research continues to show a strong relationship between walkability and bikeability and residents overall physical health.Sources. Michigan Department of Community Health-MDCH, 2000. Centers for Disease Control, 2007. n 2004, Robert Wood Johnson Foundationreported that in Marin, CA, 64% more kids were walking to school within two years of a Safe Routes to School effort that included infrastructure changesand encouragement. In 2007, a RWJF study showed that people living in neighborhoods with a mix of shops and businesses within easy walkingdistance have a 35% lower risk of obesity.Two studies by Lawrence Frank, published in 2006 in the Winter 2005/2006 Journal of the American PlanningAssociation show the relationship between walkability, physical activity, and physical health (taking into account other variables such asage, income, education, and ethnicity), summarized online at www.planning.org/newsreleases/2006/ftp020706.htm. Capital Area Behavior Risk Factor 15Survey. 16. Obesity and Active TransportationObesity is lower in places where people use bicycles, publictransportation, and their feet. Percent of Obesity Percent Walk, Bike,Transit 30 60 25 50 20 40 15 30 10 205 100 0ObesityWalk, Bike, Transit 16Pucher, Walking and Cycling: Path to Improved Public Health, Fit City Conference, NYC, June 2009 17. Diabetes and Active TransportationStates with the highestlevels of biking andwalking have, onaverage, the lowest ratesof obesity, diabetes, andhigh blood pressure.Source:Bicycling and Walking inthe United States: 2010Benchmarking Report, Alliance forBiking and Walking17 18. Financial Benefits for BusinessBusinesses that provide opportunities for employees to walk and bicycle during the workday report a 28% reduction in sick-leave absenteeism, 26% reduction in use of health care benefits, and 30% reduction in workers compensation claims and disability management.If just 1 in 20 sedentary Michigan adults became physically active, Michigan employers would save $575 million per year in healthcare costs and insurance premiums.Walkability features in downtown Lodi, CA have led to a30% overall increase in sales for downtown businesses, adrop in the vacancy rate from 18% to 6%, and theaddition of 60 new businesses.Sources: Quantifying the benefits of non-motorized travel for achieving TDM Goals by Todd Litman, published in Transportation ResearchRecord, No. 1441 (Nonmotorized Transportation Around the World), 1994, pp. 134-140 and online at www.vtpi.org/nmt-tdm.pdf.Also, Economic Value of Walkability by Todd Litman, published in Transportation Research Record 1828, Transportation Research Board(www.trb.org), 2003, pp. 3-11, and available online at www.vtpi.org/walkability.pdf. The Economic Benefits of Walkable Communities, by the18Local Government Commission. Online at www.lgc.org/freepub/PDF/Land_Use/focus/walk_to_money.pdf 19. Environment and Climate ChangeIn Michigan, vehicles create 30% of Michigans ozone-forming pollutants. The more walkable a community, the lower the vehicle emissions.Between 1960 and 2001, Michigans CO2emissions from fossil fuels increasedby 46% primarily as a result of oilcombustion for transportation. Sources. United States Environmental Protection Agency. Asthma Initiative of Michigan, 2007. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, www.ipcc.ch. U.S. Public Interest Research Group Education Fund. 2006. The Carbon Boom: National and State Trends in Carbon Dioxide Emissions since 1960. Washington, DC. 19 August 2012 Presentation from Jessica Yorko, Chair, Public Services Committee, Lansing City Council 20. Quality of LifeThe May/June 2012 edition of the Michigan Municipal League magazine cover article is about Place Making: Research shows that placemaking matters more than ever. MML lists 8 placemaking assets, the first one is Physical Design and Walkability.79% of Americans rate sidewalks and places totake walks as a top consideration inchoosing where to live. Recent collegegraduates from Michigan schools say thatsafe streets and neighborhoods, walk-ablestreets, and affordable living are their topfactors in choosing where to live.Complete Streets: Improve Mobility for Older Americans, 2007., Americans Current Attitudes toward Walking and Creating MoreWalkable Communities., The Surface Transportation Policy Project www.transact.org/library/reports_pdfs/pedpoll.pdf MichiganEconomic Development Corporation, 2004 Cool Cities Survey. 20 August 2012 Presentation from Jessica Yorko, Chair, Public Services Committee, Lansing City Council 21. Sidewalks in Lansing540-590 miles of sidewalkSome are great!Some are missing. Some are broken.Photos from http://lmb.org/Lansing/Sidewalks.html 21 August 2012 Presentation from Jessica Yorko, Chair, Public Services Committee, Lansing City Council 22. What Residents Said AboutSidewalks During 2009Non-Motorized Planning Sessions22 23. Waverly RoadMost comments were about Waverly Road: Glasgow to Old Lansing: bridge over river is too tight and sidewalk isclosed; needs sidewalks north to Grand River Park; no sidewalk or bikelane at bridge on Waverly at the River. Jolly to Old Lansing: need bike lane & sidewalk Miller to Grand River: needs sidewalks, bike trails Jolly to Saginaw: need regional cooperation on sidewalk maintenance andkeeping bridge open in winter (3 comments)23August 2012 Presentation from Jessica Yorko, Chair, Public Services Committee, Lansing City Council 24. Waverly and Cooley Photos from http://lmb.org/Lansing/Sidewalks.html24August 2012 Presentation from Jessica Yorko, Chair, Public Services Committee, Lansing City Council 25. East and Northeast Michigan: Capitol to Clippert: Michigan Ave atsidewalks need improvement, floods inUS 127winter and spring. Has sidewalks buttheyre in bad shape. Michigan: sidewalks between Fosterand Frandor are unlevel, broken, dirty Marshall and Saginaw: sidewalk endsat this point Clippert and Kalamazoo: badsidewalks, narrow Saginaw and Grand River: no sidew