landscape architecture portfolio_ janet broughton

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Selected projects from work toward master's in landscape architecture

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  • Quick-to-emerge, short lived plants provide early interest.

    Mature prairie species replace the rudurals over time.

    BADGER ROOF

    The American badger hunts for ground squirrels by digging into their burrows.

    Building off a scientific study of the positive effect of badger disturbances on prairie biodiversity, this green roof abstracts the process into an artificial ecosystem of planter bags made with UV-degradable textiles. The planting progresses from a peaky topography to a mellowed, mounded prairie planting. Ruderal and mature prairie species seeds in the bags replicate the growth process in the prairie, where seeds buried in prairie dog burrows, the badgers prey, are brought to the surface by the badgers digging.

    Their digs uproot or bury existing vegetation and leave mounds of bare soil.

    Prairie ruderals colonize the mound.

    SUCCESSIONAL MODULAR GREEN ROOF

    NATURAL PRECEDENT Badger dig spoils in dry prairie evolving, mounded vegetated roof

    SEED MIX STRATEGY

    0 1-2 years

  • Adjacent plants colonize via root propagation. Plant communities on the mound resemble those of mature prairie.

    3-4 years 20 years

  • NORTH 1 PROSPERITY GARDENSTA PRODUCTIVE YOUTH TRAINING GARDENIn addition to managing the operations (and the youth workers) of the garden in its inaugural year, I assisted with its design and construction. Contributions include: Planting design around the base of the concrete retaining wall Selection of fence, red shelter, and shed to the left of the existing building Minor adjustments to the design during construction Selection of locally available red decomposed granite as an affordable paving option.

  • 1. Excavate the home site.

    3. Add materials to the open source brick press.

    2. Harvest the soil.

    2. Sort gravel from fine particulates

    SOIL FIBER CEMENT

    SEEDS

    GRAVEL

    SOIL

    SOIL

    SOIL

    FIBER

    FIBER

    CEMENT

    SEEDS

    SEEDS GRAVEL

    4. Sort and stage bricks for home and landscape construction.

    (sub)URBANISMDIRT BRICK DWELLING This team project with an architecture student is intended as a relief home for the Joplin, Missouri tornado survivors. The home is constructed below the surface as an adaptation of the American prairie vernacular sod house. Compressed soil bricks are used in the construction of both the home and the landscape. The landscape bricks create analogous microclimates of those found in the nearby chert glades.

    slopemimics chert prairie

    mimics stream banksrain garden

    mimics chert surfaceroof

    +

    +

    + + +

    +

  • Plant selections exist natively in the nearby chert glades and also grow well in the garden.

    Construction diagrams (all, far left)Vegetation and effects on plan, section, and perspective renderings (all this page)

    GRAPHIC CONTRIBUTIONS

    Construction process designEcological conceptGradingPlanting plan

    DESIGN CONTRIBUTIONS

    N0

    5 1020

    1. Excavate the home site.

    3. Add materials to the open source brick press.

    2. Harvest the soil.

    2. Sort gravel from fine particulates

    SOIL FIBER CEMENT

    SEEDS

    GRAVEL

    SOIL

    SOIL

    SOIL

    FIBER

    FIBER

    CEMENT

    SEEDS

    SEEDS GRAVEL

    4. Sort and stage bricks for home and landscape construction.

    (sub)URBANISMDIRT BRICK DWELLING This team project with an architecture student is intended as a relief home for the Joplin, Missouri tornado survivors. The home is constructed below the surface as an adaptation of the American prairie vernacular sod house. Compressed soil bricks are used in the construction of both the home and the landscape. The landscape bricks create analogous microclimates of those found in the nearby chert glades.

    slopemimics chert prairie

    mimics stream banksrain garden

    mimics chert surfaceroof

    +

    +

    + + +

    +

  • 60 X 30chipboard, paper (printed, handmade, found), foam, nails detail of orchards along boneyard creek

    detail of municipal composting and aquaculture operation

    CU(d)scape AGRICULTURAL PUBLIC WORKSThe CU(d)scape creates infrastructure to support local agricultural production at a significant scale. Sited in typically underutilized land, it is a replicable model for supporting local food-based economies while creating unique open space.

  • Summer Seeded Brassicas

    Stockpiled Tall Fescue

    Orchardgrass

    Bluegrass & White CloverDecemberNovemberOctoberSeptember

    Bull

    Pregnant Cow

    Cow

    Calf

    Steer or Heifer

    Billy Goat

    Pregnant Goat

    Nanny Goat

    Nursing Kid Goat

    Kid Goat

    Ram

    Pregnant Ewe

    Ewe

    Nursing Lamb

    Lamb

    Boar

    Pregnant Sow

    Sow

    Piglet

    Hog

    aquaculture productively cleans composting runoff

    pasture and livestock raised in the CU(d)scape numbers generated in a custom-made calculator

    Pre-Grazing,Rotational

    Continuous Grazing

    Post-Grazing, Rotational

    1.2.

    3.4.

    1.

    2.3.

    4.

    rotational grazing builds soil quality

    Phase one of the CU(d)scape is a pastured meat operation that uses rotational grazing to improve the land while producing over 80,000 pounds of high quality meat annually. As the soil becomes amenable for crop production, entrepreneurs are backed through CU(d)scape infrastructure, which connects small operations with the efficiencies of cities, large-scale agriculture, and natural systems.

    Farms

    Pastures

    Aquaculture

    City food wasteCommunity kitchen wasteFarm waste

    Goats browsebrushand fertilize.

    Cows or sheep graze grass.

    Cows and sheep fertilize.

    Chickens eat grubs in manure and fertilize.

    Deep roots grow and improve soil structure.

    Pigs root up pasture and fertilize.

    Farmer enjoys fertile, prepared seed bed.

    Repeat

    Fertility increases

  • integrate materialsmosswaterairrootsalgae

    selectivelyfilterwaterair

    sedimentorganic matterseeds

    diffuse energyerosional (wind, water

    TECTONIC SITES

    discarded carpet found while creek stomping

    a curved weft makes pockets to collect materials from flows

    STRUCTURING THE LANDSCAPE WITH TEXTILE-DERIVED CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUESSASAKI DAY PRIZE FOR TOP THESIS

    Tectonic theory describes the relationship between construction and expressive intent. Such a theory has yet to be developed in land-scape architecture. Through historical and theoretical research of architectural texts, making textiles, and analyzing existing projects in landscape architecture, I inductively generated a seedling tectonic theory for my thesis.

    Textiles are porous and flexible, uniquely suiting them to integrating, responding to, and even structuring landscape contingency. Textiles visibly entwine and integrate contingent forces, displaying an inher-ent quality of landscape construction: landscape architects, by inserting materials into the environment, change the contingent forces acting there. Textiles structure the small spaces in which these contingent forces can act, suggesting that these impacts might be made strategically.

    A tectonic theory based on this aspect of the constructive practice of landscape architecture could serve as a forum for the collective development of best practices for structuring contingent forces in the environment and exploration of the expressive potentials of such techniques.

  • woven vellum models

  • textile windbreaks work better than solid

    Naturaires felt supports microbes

    PEG landscape + architecture laser cut weed fabric to create a patterned planting

    a textile can capture water from fogBiohavens textile hosts water-cleansing microbes

    PUMP

    10-20h

    h

    h 2h 5h

    h

    filter fabric on prefabricated vertical drains excludes sediment to drain water and consolidate soils

  • FOODS RAISED AT EAST SIDE HEALTHF.R.E.S.H. GARDENThe comic on the following pages tells the story of this garden project.

  • a model with movable components helped us to collaboratively design with our community partners.

    After ESHD contacted the East St. Louis Action Project (ESLARP), I was assigned to lead the project. I recruited five other students and a faculty advisor.

    OK, I guess I need to get back to the office!

    Thank you for helping me today. Its nice to spend time with you.

    I just wish sue had come. Ill have to ask her what happened during the WIC class later.

    These peppers are from the cookout! We have to plant these next year.

    I cant wait to kick those tires over and harvest the potatoes.

    Ruby, I am so pleased that the healthy dinner cookout was such a success!

    together, we designed the garden:

    I wonder where Ruby is with those greens. We just sold out!

    East side health district (ESHD) is a public health organization with clinics serving the East St. Louis area. ESHD wanted to improve a lot adjacent to their administration building and one of their clinics to support their mission of preventative health and education services.

    F.R.E.S.H. (Foods Raised at East Side Health) garden combines a venue for health education classes and events, multiple options for community gardening, and a safe place for employees to exercise during their lunch hour.

  • After the trip with ESLARP students, I planned another day to take the design team down to plant flowers and tie up loose ends.

    we took a quick break for a photo op...

    do you think we can finish all these beds in time?

    we transplanted plants from a local garden and found donations,