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Kansas Substance Abuse Epidemiological Indicators Profile Submitted to: Synectics for Management Decisions, Inc. Submitted by: Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services

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  • Kansas Substance Abuse Epidemiological Indicators Profile

    Submitted to: Synectics for Management Decisions, Inc.

    Submitted by: Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services

  • Acknowledgements This document was funded through a grant awarded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention under contract through Synectics for Management Decisions, Inc. This report was made possible through the contributions and collective expertise of individuals representing the many agencies and organizations that comprise the Kansas Substance Abuse Profile Team, who offered their time and expertise in the service of completing this project. Additional thanks are extended to the Kansas Epidemiological Profile Design Team, who contributed to the data collection, technical writing, and facilitated development of this document. We gratefully acknowledge the contributions of the Kansas Substance Abuse Profile Team:

    P. Allison Minugh, Ph.D., President and Chief Executive Officer,

    DATACORP*

    Nicoletta Lomuto, Director of Operations,

    DATACORP*

    Marva Williams, Community Relations and Grant Specialist,

    Kansas Department on Aging

    Mike Scalise, Special Agent, United States Department of Justice,

    Drug Enforcement Administration

    Shelley V. Bearman, Synar Coordinator/SEOW Facilitator,

    Governors Grants Program* Lisa Chaney, Research Analyst,

    Greenbush Data and Information Systems Group*

    Darren Dawson, Program Director,

    Greenbush Data and Information Systems Group*

    Rachelle Hazelton, Research Analyst,

    Juvenile Justice Authority

    Tanya Keys, Director of IT and Research,

    Juvenile Justice Authority

    Danielle Dempsey-Swoops, Executive Director,

    Kansas African American Affairs Commission

    Joshanna Smart, Special Assistant,

    Kansas African American Affairs Commission

    Mary Roth, Crime Analyst, Associate Director,

    Kansas Bureau of Investigation

    Bill Reid, Research Analyst,

    Kansas Bureau of Investigation

    Kirk Thompson, Associate Director,

    Kansas Bureau of Investigation

  • Kathie Harris, Intervention Team Supervisor, Programs Division,

    Kansas Department of Corrections

    Patricia B. Berry, Corrections Manager,

    Kansas Department of Corrections

    Mark E. Keating

    Kansas Department of Corrections

    Roger Hayden, Deputy Secretary for Programs and Staff Development,

    Kansas Department of Corrections Harlen D. Hays, Advanced Epidemiologist, Kansas Substance Abuse Epidemiological Profile Workgroup Program , Office of Health Promotion, Kansas

    Department of Health and Environment* Paula Marmet, Director, Office of Health Promotion,

    Kansas Department of Health and Environment Ghazala Perveen, Ph.D, Director of Science and Surveillance/Health Officer II,

    Office of Health Promotion, Kansas Department of Health and Environment* Mike Padilla, Chief of Enforcement,

    Kansas Department of Revenue, Alcoholic Beverage Control

    Stephen Halbett, Program Consultant,

    Kansas Department of Transportation

    Karen Seals, Ph.D., Education Program Consultant,

    Kansas State Department of Education Ted Carter, Data Coordinator,

    Kansas State Department of Education

    Heather Winklepleck, CYDS Project Coordinator,

    Regional Prevention Center of Northwest Kansas Hays

    Eric Van Allen

    Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services Steve Fawcett, Ph.D., Kansas Health Foundation University Distinguished Professor, Applied Behavioral Science Department, Director, Work Group for Community

    Health and Development, University of Kansas Jerry Schultz, Ph.D., Associate Director, Work Group for Community

    Health and Development, University of Kansas

    Other contributors that assisted with the development of this report include Juliene Maska, Administrator, Governors Grants Program, Kelly Peak, Director of Prevention, Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services; Hope Sullivan McMickle, SPF-SIG Coordinator, Kansas Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services; Rich White, Senior Applications Developer, Greenbush Data and Information Systems Group; and Melissa McCracken, Senior Administrative Assistant, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Office of Health Promotion. * Denotes members of the Kansas Epidemiological Profile Design Team

  • Table of Contents Executive Summary I Introduction 1 Alcohol Indicators 4

    Consequences

    I) Mortality

    Chronic Liver Disease 5 Acute Alcohol Poisoning 8

    Alcohol Related Vehicle Deaths 10

    II) Morbidity

    DSM-IV Alcohol Dependence or Abuse 13

    Youth Suspensions and Expulsions 15

    III) Crimes

    Minor in Possession 16 Driving Under the Influence 17 Community Supervision for 4th time DUI arrest 19 Alcohol Related Domestic Abuse 21

    Consumption

    I) Adult

    30-Day Prevalence 23 Binge Drinking 26 Heavy Drinking 29

    Drinking During Pregnancy 32

    II) Youth

    30-Day Prevalence 35 Binge Drinking 38 Age of Initiation 41

    Tobacco Indicators 44

    Consequences

    I) Mortality

    Lung Cancer 45 COPD and Emphysema 48 Cardiovascular Disease 51 II) Morbidity

    Youth Suspensions and Expulsions 54

  • III) Crimes

    Consumption I) Adult Current Smokers 55 Current Smokeless Tobacco Users 58 Current Smokers during Pregnancy 60 II) Youth 30 Day Prevalence Cigarettes 63 30 Day Prevalence Smokeless Tobacco 66 Age of Initiation - Cigarettes 69

    Illicit Drug Indicators 72 Consequences

    I) Mortality Deaths due to Illicit Drugs as Underlying Cause 73

    II) Morbidity DSM-IV Illicit Drug Dependence or Abuse 75 Youth Suspensions and Expulsions 77 III) Crimes Possession, Consumption, or Sale of Illicit Drugs 78 Meth Lab Seizures 80

    Community Supervision for Possession of Drugs 83 Drug Related Domestic Abuse 85

    Consumption

    I) Adult 30 Day Use, Past Year Use, and Lifetime Use 87 Marijuana, Cocaine, Crack, Heroin, LSD, Ecstasy,

    Inhalants, Non-medical Use of Psychotherapeutics, Pain Relievers, Tranquilizers, Sedatives, Stimulants, Methamphetamine

    II) Youth

    30 Day Use and Lifetime Use 90 Marijuana, Cocaine, Heroin (lifetime only), LSD, Ecstasy, Inhalants, Methamphetamine, Steroids (lifetime Only), Illegal Drugs via Injection (lifetime only) Age of Initiation Marijuana 101 Youth Who Have Sold Illegal Drugs 104

  • Overall Substance Abuse Indicators 107

    Consequences

    I) Mortality

    Suicide 108 Homicide 111 II) Morbidity

    III) Crime

    Simple and Aggravated, Sexual Assaults, and Robberies 114 Prostitution 116 Property Crimes 118

    Appendix A: Data Sources 119

    Appendix B: Data Definitions

    Mortality 122

    Morbidity 123

    Crimes 124

    Consumption 126

    Appendix C: Data Limitations 131 Appendix D: Data Gaps 133 Appendix E: Methodology 135

  • EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

    INTRODUCTION Substance abuse is the most preventable underlying cause of disease and death in Kansas. Thousands of individuals lose their lives to substance abuse each year. Health care costs for treating substance abuse related complications have reached a staggering amount. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, cigarette use alone accounts for over $700 million in direct health care costs per year in Kansas. Illicit drugs continue to be the driving force behind many criminal activities. With many correctional facilities already at capacity, substance abuse related crimes are draining public resources. Tax revenues currently collected on alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs are currently substantially lower than estimated health care costs.

    This document provides an in-depth look at substance abuse related consequences and consumption patterns. Information is presented from health agencies, treatment agencies, law enforcement agencies, and revenue agencies. The goal is to provide a comprehensive look at the current state of substance abuse so that priority areas may be identified and addressed. Utilizing information from multiple agencies and partners allows for a more complete picture of substance abuse related consequence and consumption pattern. During the compilation of various data sources, specific data gaps have been identified in the realm of substance abuse prevention. These data gaps, while not as significant as the information available, provide examples of possible improvements to build a completely comprehensive picture of substance abuse in Kansas.

    ALCOHOL RELATED CONSEQUENCES AND CONSUMPTION Alcohol is the most commonly consumed substance with the potential for dependence or abuse by both adults and youth. Among adults, alcohol consumption in a controlled manner may even produce some health benefits. However, 13.1% of adults aged 18 years and older report binge drinking in the past 30 days. Binge drinking is highly correlated with acute alcohol deaths as well as alcohol related motor vehicle deaths. Additionally, nearly 4% of adults aged 18 years and older are classified as heavy drinkers. Heavy drinking over a prolonged period of t