Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy

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Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy Vol 1 No 3 The Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy (JHOP) seeks to provide hematology and oncology pharmacy practitioners and other hematology oncology professionals with high-quality peerreviewed information to help them optimize drug therapy for patients.

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<ul><li><p>HEMATOLOGYONCOLOGYPHARMACY</p><p>JOURNAL OFVOL 1 I NO 3</p><p>SEPTEMBER 2011</p><p>THE PEER-REVIEWED FORUM FOR ONCOLOGY PHARMACY PRACTICETM</p><p>2011 Green Hill Healthcare Communications, LLCwww.JHOPonline.com</p><p>EDITORIALBrother, Can You Spare Some Chemotherapy? No End in Sight for Drug Shortages Timothy G. Tyler, PharmD, FCSHP</p><p>ORIGINAL RESEARCHIfosfamide Neurotoxicity in Pediatric Patients: A Multi-Institutional Case Series Report Amy Lee, MD; David W. Henry, MS, BCOP, FASHP; John Szechung Ng, PharmD; Kerry Parsons, PharmD, BCOP; Betsy Bickert Poon, PharmD, FCCP; Jeff Schwartz, MD; Tara Smith, PharmD; Chatchawin Assanasen, MD</p><p>Carboplatin Dosing in Overweight and Obese Patients: A Single-Center ExperienceGinah Nightingale, PharmD, BCOP; James A. Trovato, PharmD, MBA, BCOP, FASHP; Myounghee Lee, PhD, PharmD; Jennifer Thompson, PharmD, BCOP</p><p>COMMENTARYDosing Chemotherapy in Obese Patients: No Clear Answers, YetScott Soefje, PharmD, BCOP</p><p>From the LiteratureConcise Reviews from the Literature Relevant to Hematology Oncology PharmacyRobert J. Ignoffo, PharmD, FASHP, FCSHP</p><p>1-Cover_Layout 1 9/13/11 11:10 AM Page 1</p></li><li><p>www.bonehealthinfocus.com</p><p>Visit bonehealthinfocus.com to download a free educational report</p><p>BONE HEALTH IS A CRITICAL ISSUE FOR PATIENTS WITH CANCER</p><p>NOW IS THE TIME TO PUT BONE HEALTH IN FOCUS</p><p>MC54496</p><p>2-EditBoard_Cover 9/13/11 11:09 AM Page 2</p></li><li><p>3www.AHDBonline.com l American Health &amp; Drug Benefits lVol 1, No 3 l September 2011</p><p>EDITORIAL BOARD</p><p>CLINICAL CONTROVERSIESChristopher Fausel, PharmD, BCPS, BCOP Clinical DirectorOncology Pharmacy ServicesIndiana University Simon Cancer CenterIndianapolis, IN</p><p>PRACTICAL ISSUES IN PHARMACY MANAGEMENT Timothy G. Tyler, PharmD, FCSHP Director of PharmacyComprehensive Cancer CenterDesert Regional Medical CenterPalm Springs, CA</p><p>ORIGINAL RESEARCH Gary C. Yee, PharmD, FCCP, BCOP Professor, Department of Pharmacy PracticeCollege of Pharmacy, University of Nebraska MedicalCenter, Omaha, NE </p><p>REVIEW ARTICLESR. Donald Harvey, PharmD, FCCP, BCPS, BCOPAssistant Professor, Hematology/Medical Oncology Department of Hematology/Medical OncologyDirector, Phase 1 UnitWinship Cancer InstituteEmory University, Atlanta, GA </p><p>FROM THE LITERATURERobert J. Ignoffo, PharmD, FASHP, FCSHPProfessor of Pharmacy, College of Pharmacy, Touro UniversityCalifornia Mare Island Vallejo, CA</p><p>Patrick J. Medina, PharmD, BCOPAssociate ProfessorDepartment of PharmacyUniversity of Oklahoma College of PharmacyOklahoma City, OK </p><p>Val R. Adams, PharmD, BCOP, FCCPAssociate Professor, Pharmacy Program Director, PGY2 Specialty ResidencyHematology/OncologyUniversity of Kentucky College of PharmacyLexington, KY </p><p>SECTION EDITORS</p><p>CO-EDITORS-IN-CHIEF</p><p>Sandra Cueller, PharmD, BCOPDirectorOncology Specialty ResidencyUniversity of Illinois at Chicago Medical CenterChicago, IL</p><p>Sachin Shah, PharmD, BCOPAssociate ProfessorTexas Tech University Health Sciences CenterDallas, TX</p><p>Scott Soefje, PharmD, BCOPAssociate Director, Oncology PharmacySmilow Cancer Hospital at Yale New HavenYale New Haven HospitalNew Haven, CT</p><p>Steve Stricker, PharmD, MS, BCOP Assistant Professor of Pharmacy PracticeSamford University McWhorter School of PharmacyBirmingham, AL </p><p>John M. Valgus, PharmD, BCOPHematology/Oncology Senior Clinical PharmacySpecialistUniversity of North Carolina Hospitals and ClinicsChapel Hill, NC</p><p>Daisy Yang, PharmD, BCOP Clinical Pharmacy SpecialistUniversity of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer CenterHouston, TX</p><p>EDITORS-AT-LARGE</p><p>2-EditBoard_Cover 9/13/11 11:10 AM Page 3</p></li><li><p>4 l Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy l www.JHOPonline.com September 2011 l Vol 1, No 3</p><p>Senior Vice President, Sales &amp; Marketing</p><p>Philip Pawelkophil@greenhillhc.com</p><p>PublisherJohn W. Hennessy</p><p>john@greenhillhc.com732.992.1886</p><p>Editorial DirectorDalia Buffery</p><p>dalia@greenhillhc.com732.992.1889</p><p>Associate EditorsBrett KaplanLara J. Lorton</p><p>Editorial AssistantJennifer Brandt732.992.1536</p><p>Directors, Client ServicesJoe Chanley</p><p>joe@greenhillhc.com732.992.1524</p><p>Jack Iannacconejack@greenhillhc.com</p><p>732.992.1537</p><p>Production ManagerStephanie Laudien</p><p>Quality Control DirectorBarbara Marino</p><p>Business ManagerBlanche Marchitto</p><p>blanche@greenhillhc.com</p><p>Editorial Contact:Telephone: 732.992.1536</p><p>Fax: 732.656.7938E-mail: JHOP@greenhillhc.com</p><p>TABLE OF CONTENTS</p><p>SEPTEMBER 2011 VOLUME 1, NUMBER 3</p><p>Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy, ISSN applied for (print); ISSN applied for (online), is published 4 times a year by Green Hill Healthcare Communications, LLC, 241 Forsgate Drive,Suite 205C, Monroe Twp, NJ 08831. Telephone: 732.656.7935. Fax: 732.656.7938. Copyright 2011 by Green Hill Healthcare Communications LLC. All rights reserved. Journal ofHematology Oncology Pharmacy logo is a trademark of Green Hill Healthcare Com munications, LLC. No part of this publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by anymeans now or hereafter known, electronic or mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any informational storage and retrieval system, without written permission from the Publisher.Printed in the United States of America.</p><p>EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE should be addressed to EDITORIAL DIRECTOR, Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy, 241 Forsgate Drive, Suite 205C, Monroe Twp, NJ08831. E-mail: JHOP@greenhillhc.com. YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION RATES: United States and possessions: individuals, $105.00; institutions, $135.00; single issues, $17.00. Orders will bebilled at individual rate until proof of status is confirmed. Prices are subject to change without notice. Correspondence regarding permission to reprint all or part of any article published inthis journal should be addressed to REPRINT PERMISSIONS DEPARTMENT, Green Hill Healthcare Commun i cations, LLC, 241 Forsgate Drive, Suite 205C, Monroe Twp, NJ 08831.The ideas and opinions expressed in Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy do not necessarily reflect those of the Editorial Board, the Editorial Director, or the Publisher. Publication ofan advertisement or other product mention in Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy should not be construed as an endorsement of the product or the manufacturers claims. Readers areencouraged to contact the manufacturer with questions about the features or limitations of the products mentioned. Neither the Editorial Board nor the Publisher assumes any responsibilityfor any injury and/or damage to persons or property arising out of or related to any use of the material contained in this periodical. The reader is advised to check the appropriate medical lit-erature and the product information currently provided by the manufacturer of each drug to be administered to verify the dosage, the method and duration of administration, or contraindi-cations. It is the responsibility of the treating physician or other healthcare professional, relying on independent experience and knowledge of the patient, to determine drug dosages and thebest treatment for the patient. Every effort has been made to check generic and trade names, and to verify dosages. The ultimate responsibility, however, lies with the prescribing physician.Please convey any errors to the Editorial Director. </p><p>EDITORIAL7 Brother, Can You Spare Some Chemotherapy? No End in Sight for Drug Shortages</p><p>Timothy G. Tyler, PharmD, FCSHP</p><p>ORIGINAL RESEARCH12 Ifosfamide Neurotoxicity in Pediatric Patients: A Multi-Institutional Case Series Report </p><p>Amy Lee, MD; David W. Henry, MS, BCOP, FASHP; John Szechung Ng, PharmD; Kerry Parsons, PharmD, BCOP; Betsy Bickert Poon, PharmD, FCCP; Jeff Schwartz, MD; Tara Smith, PharmD; Chatchawin Assanasen, MD</p><p>18 Carboplatin Dosing in Overweight and Obese Patients: A Single-Center ExperienceGinah Nightingale, PharmD, BCOP; James A. Trovato, PharmD, MBA, BCOP, FASHP;Myounghee Lee, PhD, PharmD; Jennifer Thompson, PharmD, BCOP</p><p>COMMENTARY26 Dosing Chemotherapy in Obese Patients: No Clear Answers, Yet</p><p>Scott Soefje, PharmD, BCOP</p><p>FROM THE LITERATURE32 Concise Reviews from the Literature Relevant to Hematology Oncology Pharmacy</p><p>Robert J. Ignoffo, PharmD, FASHP, FCSHP</p><p>PUBLISHING STAFF</p><p>MISSION STATEMENTThe Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharm -acy is an independent, peer-reviewed jour-nal founded in 2011 to provide hematologyand oncology pharmacy practitioners andother healthcare professionals with high-quality peer-reviewed information rele-vant to hematologic and oncologic condi-tions to help them optimize drug therapyfor patients. </p><p>THE PEER-REVIEWED FORUM FOR ONCOLOGY PHARMACY PRACTICETM</p><p>3-TOC_Cover 9/13/11 11:04 AM Page 4</p></li><li><p>3-TOC_Cover 9/15/11 11:32 AM Page 5</p></li><li><p>6 l Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy l www.JHOPonline.com September 2011 l Vol 1, No 3</p><p>The Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy is the nations first peer-reviewed clini-cal journal for oncology pharmacists. As pharmacy practice and research become integral to improvingboth the clinical care of cancer patients as well as expanding the research literature in contemporaryoncology pharmacy, new avenues are necessary to ensure this information gets disseminated to the pro-fession. </p><p>The recently launched Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy provides a new avenue for the publica-tion of peer-reviewed, high-quality pharmacy reviews and original research to help oncology pharmacypractitioners and other hematology oncology professionals optimize drug therapy for patients with cancer. </p><p>Readers are invited to submit articles addressing new research, clinical, and practice management issuesin oncology pharmacy. All articles will undergo a blind peer-review process, and acceptance is based onthat review.</p><p>ORIGINAL RESEARCH Clinical Basic science Translational Practice-based Case reports Case series</p><p>CLINICAL CONTROVERSIES Point and counterpoint Roundtable discussions How I treat</p><p>COMMENTARIES</p><p>REVIEW ARTICLES New drug classes Disease states Basic science Pharmacology Pathways and the drugs targeting them</p><p>PRACTICAL ISSUES IN PHARMACY MANAGEMENT Logistics Economics Practice-influencing issues</p><p>LETTERS TO THE EDITOR</p><p>Manuscripts should follow the Author Guidelines on pages 29-30 and available at www.JHOPonline.com. For more information, call 732-992-1536.</p><p>CALL FOR PAPERS</p><p>4-CallforPapers_Cover 9/14/11 11:34 AM Page 6</p></li><li><p>EDITORIAL</p><p>7www.JHOPonline.com l Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy lVol 1, No 3 l September 2011</p><p>It was on the front page of my newspaper. It is in thedata services I subscribe to for the American Societyof Health-System Pharmacists and the AmericanSociety of Clinical Oncology. It is the feature of a newsurvey from the Hematology Oncology PharmacyAssociation and is the lead-in for the PharmacistsNewsletter. It is on the nightly news, and it was exploredin depth in the last issue of the Journal of HematologyOncology Pharmacy (JHOP). </p><p>What exactly is this it, you may wonder. The drugshortage, of course. For pharmacists involved in anyway with drug procurement, this shortage has been asource of extreme consternation, fear, apprehension,and frustration. Even the general population is becom-ing alarmed by drugs that are no longer readily avail-able. We have an advanced civilization, but we appar-ently cannot figure out how to reliably provide some ofthe cheaper drugs that have significant impact onpatient care. Or at least that seems to be the messagethat is promulgated today. </p><p>During a 30-minute newspaper interview on thisissue at the end of August, I had to redirect the inter-viewer on 3 separate occasions to avoid inaccurateand sensational tendencies in the story. I reiterated 3times that this was a national issue not unique to mycenter, and all the regional centers around us had the exact same (and in some cases worse) scenario.Nevertheless, what appeared on the front page of thepublished article was that my hospital was unable totreat patients with cancer, because of my inability toget drugs. Ironically, the day the story appeared inprint, I received shipments of the main 2 drugs (lipo-somal doxorubicin and paclitaxel) that had caused usserious problems. </p><p>I have read stories about drug mark-ups in the gray market, and about the concern with the safety of the cur-rent drug supply. Michael R. Cohen, RPh, MS, presidentof the Institute for Safe Medication Practices(www.ismp.org), has just presented a teleconference onthis subject. MSNBC posted a story on the drug shortageonline in late August, and the more than 600 reader com-</p><p>ments were vitriolic, bashing everyone from the currentand past federal administrations to the evils of capitalism,and complaining that hospitals and doctors are stickingit to patients. Having now been involved as a SectionEditor of JHOP and the author of the article on this topicthat ran in the June 2011 issue of the journal, I believe Ihave some credibility in this regard. As such, the vastmajority of the comments in the media were off base. </p><p>The drug shortage problems are complex and multi-factorial; no single issue can be blamed alone. TheCenter for Drug Evaluation and Research is planning apublic workshop titled Approach to Addressing DrugShortage for September 26, 2011, but to date, the onlyexpedient solutions appear to be focused on givingmore authority to the government. Knowing that aproblem is forthcoming may allow professionals to havebetter communication and planning, but giving morecontrol to those in government who cannot balance asingle budget (eg, the US Postal Service Office, Med -icare, Social Security) makes me uneasy at best. </p><p>In addition, some colleagues in the pharmaceuticalindustry are worried that confidential marketing plansand strategies would be required to be divulged to fed-eral agencies. Finally, although the US Food and DrugAdministration (FDA) is not the primary culprit, it iscertainly playing a role in this crisis with the increasedregulatory scrutiny. Furthermore, the FDA has admittedthat it only has 4 employees who are dedicated to work-ing with generic approvals. </p><p>Brother, Can You Spare SomeChemotherapy? No End in Sight for DrugShortagesTimothy G. Tyler, PharmD, FCSHP, Section EditorDirector of Pharmacy Services, Comprehensive Cancer Center Desert Regional Medical Center, Palm Springs, CA</p><p>For pharmacists involved in any way with drug procurement, this shortage has been a source of extremeconsternation, fear, apprehension, andfrustration. Even the general population is becoming alarmed by drugs that are no longer readily available.</p><p>5-TylerCommentary_Cover 9/13/11 11:05 AM Page 7</p></li><li><p>EDITORIAL</p><p>8 l Journal of Hematology Oncology Pharmacy l www.JHOPonline.com September 2011 l Vol 1, No 3</p><p>The pharmaceutical companies also have some bur-den to bear, but in a capitalistic system such as ours, theproblem arises from taking a product that has littleprofit and removing whatever remains of that profitincentive, by imposing new rules and increased regula-tory compliance. Add to the mix the unstable world inwhich many of these drugs are sourced and manufac-tured, and the situation gets even worse. Many genericmanufacturers can no longer afford to compete if thedrugs are manufactured in the United States, with laborcosts being more...</p></li></ul>

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