january 19, 2016 navnet-nlhhn navigating systems workshop

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We believe every person has a right to safe, appropriate housing and supports tailored to their strengths and needs. To develop and implement an integrated, coordinated community plan to prevent, reduce and end homelessness. As the backbone for the Plan, our Board in partnership with the City of St. Johns is entrusted with resources from the Homelessness Partnering Strategy and others to translate this belief into meaningful, concerted action.

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January 19, 2016 NAVNET-NLHHN Navigating Systems Workshop We are a community- led, multi-stakeholder Board founded in 2000, committed to ending homelessness. We have a plan not a dream to achieve this. As the only designated community in NL under Canadas Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS), weve levered provincial, municipal, business & philanthropic investment with $21.8 million from HPS towards local solutions. We believe every person has a right to safe, appropriate housing and supports tailored to their strengths and needs. To develop and implement an integrated, coordinated community plan to prevent, reduce and end homelessness. As the backbone for the Plan, our Board in partnership with the City of St. Johns is entrusted with resources from the Homelessness Partnering Strategy and others to translate this belief into meaningful, concerted action. In 1998, St. Johns joined municipalities across Canada calling for national action to address Canadas growing homelessness. In 1999, Canada announced the $119M/year Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS), to be delivered by 61 designated communities through Employment & Social Development Canada. St. Johns is the only designated HPS community in NL. (HPS) Homelessness Partnering Strategy is recognized by UN Habitat as a best practice for addressing homelessness. Community Plans, plus resources, based on local priorities. Canadas 10 big communities share 80% of HPS national funding. 51 other communities (including St. Johns) share 20%. In Atlantic Canada: NS Halifax, Sydney PE Charlottetown, Summerside NB Moncton, Saint John, Fredericton, Bathurst NL St. Johns NL - Rural & Remote: Grand Falls-Windsor) 237 supportive housing beds (163 units). 37 transitional housing beds (22 units). 63 emergency shelter units Thats 337 spaces to date Plus a range of initiatives to engage partners, raise awareness, mobilize knowledge, and build capacity (including investments in the Citys housing action). 8 Under the HPS model, Community Entities are invited by the Community Advisory Board to administer the federal funds based on the CABs Community Plan priorities. The Community Entity or CE enters into an agreement with Service Canada to perform this role in exchange for receiving up to 15% of the total HPS community allocation to offset administrative costs. The City of St. Johns was a founding member of End Homelessness St. Johns & became its CE in 2012. Community Services Department manages the CE Agreement: Employs a contractual Community Development Worker with HPS funds. Provides in kind administration through its Non Profit Housing Manager. Judy Tobin, Non Profit Housing Manager Bruce Pearce, Community Development Worker Starting January 2016, Andrew is our Local Coordinator for EHSJs Housing First System Coordination Framework initiative. Part-time contract, and we intend to grow this to full-time in May 2016. Prior to consulting, Alina was the Vice President of Strategy for the Calgary Homeless Foundation where she led program investments of more than $35M annually, system planning and integration, the Homeless Management Information System, research and policy. Dr. Stephen Gaetz Communications & Fund Development CommunicationsFund Development 15 Rosalie Courage Patrick Martin 16 Community Planning Forum, May 2014 Housing First: Homelessness strategy headed in a new direction: The Telegram, May 28, 2014 1. End chronic and episodic homelessness. 2. Re-house and support homeless persons, and prevent homelessness for those at risk. 3. Reduce the average length of stay in emergency shelters. 4. Develop a coordinated homeless-serving system. 5. Enhance the integration of public systems to reduce discharging into homelessness. 6. Align resources and funding across diverse sectors to support the St. Johns Plan to End Homelessness. 17 Organize the homeless-serving system. Implement coordinated access & assessment. Develop discharge planning measures. 1. System Coordination Implement an integrated information system. Build partnerships with the research community. 2. Information & Research Support measures to increase housing affordability & reduce homelessness risk. Introduce & ramp up a range of Housing First programs. Tailor supports to meet the needs of diverse groups. Support the enhancement of service quality & impact. 3. Housing & Supports Develop the infrastructure necessary to implement the Plan. Coordinate funding to maximize impact. Champion an end to homelessness. 4. Leadership, Resources & Engagement Priorities in detail: St. Johns aims to be the 1 st Atlantic Canada community to end chronic & episodic homelessness by Once weve ended chronic homelessness, it will never return to our community. 2014 Establish a solid foundation 2015 Housing First ramp-up to end chronic & episodic homelessness 2016 Moving upstream: Homelessness prevention & rapid re-housing 2017 Maintain focus 2018 Focus on sustainability 20 Guided by Housing First principles. Meaningfully engaging our communities. Through inclusion, collaboration & consensus. Having each others back. Leaving our hats at the door. Learning & doing together. Celebrating our milestones, acknowledging & overcoming our hurdles. Assessing our progress, using ground truth. Board System Coordination Information & Research Housing & Supports Leadership, Resources & Coordination Executive Community Entity (City) End Homelessness St. Johns Priority Teams End Homelessness St. Johns Meet our Board Shawn Skinner (Chair) To be recruited Rotary Club St. Johns Northwest Elizabeth Davis, Co-chair, The Gathering Place Tammy Davis, Executive Director, United Way of NL Aisling Gogan, Coordinator, Poverty Reduction Strategy, Dept. of Seniors, Wellness & Social Development Adrice King, Acting Senior Development Officer, Service Canada (Ex-officio) Cynthia King, Director, Income & Social Supports, Dept. of Advanced Education & Skills Bruce Pearce, Community Development, End Homelessness St. Johns (Ex-officio) Sheldon Pollett, Executive Director, Choices for Youth Colleen Simms, Special Advisor to the Minister, Mental Health & Addictions, Department of Health & Community Services Gail Thornhill, Director of Supportive Housing, Stellas Circle Gail Tobin, CEO, Iris Kirby House Judy Tobin, Manager, Non Profit Housing, Community Services Dept., City of St. Johns (Ex-officio) Madonna Walsh, Manager, Affordable Housing, NL Housing Jenny Wright, Executive Director, St. Johns Status of Women Council/Womens Centre A closer look During 2012: 1,685 individuals required emergency shelter (this includes domestic violence shelters) 141 Individuals experienced unsheltered homelessness (people living on streets, in wooded areas, etc..) 3,743 individuals experienced hidden homelessness (temporarily living with friends or relatives) An estimated total of 5,569 persons in NL experienced homelessness. 25 A breakdown of the 1,685 sheltered homeless estimate: 26 Region St. Johns854 Rural Avalon154 Burin124 Clarenville & Gander114 Grand Falls- Windsor34 Stephenville92 Corner Brook- St. Anthony 143 Labrador170 Total1,685 80% transitional ~ % episodic ~ % chronic ~40 St. Johns homeless population ~800 27 A chronic shelter user is one that has stayed at shelters for more than 180 days in the past year. An episodic shelter user is one who has three or more episodes of homelessness in the past year. A single stay or stays within 30 days of each other are considered an episode. (A new episode is counted when a user stays at a shelter after 30 days since their last stay at a shelter). Our Plan (including ICM) must start here and house 90% of these populations first then we can shift our focus upstream. Chronic: Those who have either been continuously homeless for a year or more, or have had at least four episodes of homelessness in the past three years. In order to be considered chronically homeless, a person must have been sleeping in a place not meant for human habitation (e.g., living on the streets) and/or in an emergency homeless shelter. Episodic: A person who is homeless for less than a year and has fewer than four episodes of homelessness in the past three years. Transitional: A person who experiences homelessness for a short time and infrequently in their lifetime. Usually, this is a result of lack on income or housing affordability challenges. Most of these persons exit homeless with minimal or no intervention. 61.5% males 38.5% females 17.7% families 9.2% youth 16 30% youth Data not available for: Aboriginal or ethnic identity, migration, rough sleeping, those with No Fixed Address (institutions, hotels). 61.5% males 38.5% females 17.7% families 9.2% youth 16 30% youth Data not available for: Aboriginal or ethnic identity, migration, rough sleeping, those with No Fixed Address (institutions, hotels). St. Johns shelter use 31 Main reasons for service: Partner abuse, eviction, personal safety, lack of housing, family/relationship breakdown. Contributing factors: Mental health issues, substance use, conflict with the law, lack of housing (eviction, unsafe, etc.), family/relationship breakdown. To better understand the homeless population, communities are doing Point-in-Time Counts. St. Johns will conduct its first Count during Fall EHSJ has also recruited the NL Statistics Agency in partnership with NL Housing & the NLHHN to develop data sharing & coordination. Commitment to evidence-based decision-making and planning, a Homelessness Research Agenda will be built into our community's approach to system planning. 35 The cost of intensive service use by just 12 individuals with complex needs in St. Johns (the chronic homeless, including people with addictions & mental illness): $1,345,000 in 6 months Eastern Health cost analysis From managing homelessness