ITIL V3 Foundation Training - MT IMTS1 - Student Handouts3

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<ul><li><p> Mindtree limited 2012 Mindtree limited 2012 </p><p>IT Infrastructure Library (ITIL) V3 </p><p>Foundation Training </p></li><li><p>I - Page 2 </p><p>The History of ITIL </p></li><li><p> The first two ITIL versions grouped content according to process. </p><p> In V2 there are 12 main concepts ( 11 process and 1 function) which are divided between Service Delivery and Service Support set. </p><p> Service Support Set </p><p> Service desk ( the only function in ITIL V2) </p><p> Configuration Management </p><p> Incident Management </p><p> Problem Management </p><p> Change Management </p><p> Release Management </p><p> Service Delivery Set </p><p> Service Level Management </p><p> Availability Management </p><p> Capacity Management </p><p> Security Management </p><p> IT Service Continuity Management </p><p> Financial Management for IT Services </p><p>I - Page 3 </p><p>ITIL V2 Processes &amp; Function </p></li><li><p> ITIL v3 focuses on the entire service life cycle, taking the ultimate consumer of the services the business into consideration. </p><p> All the original concepts of V2 has remained in V3 and are divided between 5 life cycle phases. </p><p> Service Strategy </p><p> Service Design </p><p> Service Transition </p><p> Service Operation </p><p> Continual Service Improvement </p><p> In addition to the original 12 concepts, there are additional 20 new concepts (3 Functions and 17 Processes) </p><p> In total, ITIL V3 has 28 Processes and 4 Functions. </p><p>I - Page 4 </p><p>ITIL V3 Life Cycle Phases </p></li><li><p>I - Page 5 </p><p>ITIL V3 Core Framework </p><p>Service Design </p><p>Service </p><p>ITIL </p><p>Service </p><p>Strategy </p><p>Service </p><p>Operation </p><p>Service </p><p>Design </p><p>Continual Service </p><p>Improvement </p><p>Service </p><p>Transition </p><p>Service Strategy </p><p> Planning and implementation of IT Service Management practices and their alignment to business </p><p>needs. </p><p>Service Design </p><p> Design of appropriate and innovative IT </p><p>infrastructure services </p><p>Service Transition </p><p> Validates the service design against service </p><p>requirements </p><p>Service Operation </p><p> Day to day delivery and control process activities for </p><p>required stable IT services. </p><p>Continual Service Improvement </p><p> Continuous search for improvements as part of the </p><p>promised service quality </p></li><li><p> SS will appeal to those who have the need to understand strategic analysis, planning, positioning, and implementation with respect to service models, strategies and strategic objectives. </p><p> It provides guidance on how to leverage service management capabilities that can effectively deliver value to customers and capture value for service providers. </p><p> Decisions about service portfolios, capability development, operational effectiveness, organizational models and the importance of knowledge assets are some of what Service Strategies will provide guidance on. </p><p>Main Target Audience: </p><p> Senior Leadership of customers and service providers. </p><p>Main Influencers: </p><p> Service Managers and operations managers. </p><p>I - Page 6 </p><p>Service Strategies (SS) </p></li><li><p> SD translates strategic plans and objectives and creates the design and specifications for </p><p>execution through service transition and operations. </p><p> SD will appeal to those whose role is to bring together the infrastructure, applications, systems, </p><p>and processes, along with partners and suppliers, to make feasible a superior service offering. </p><p>Main Target Audience: </p><p> Service Managers and providers. </p><p>Main Influencers: </p><p> IT operational staff, service owners, service providers, vendors. </p><p>I - Page 7 </p><p>Service Design (SD) </p></li><li><p> ST will ensure that the design will deliver the intended strategy and that it can be operated and maintained effectively. </p><p> ST is concerned with managing change, risk &amp; quality assurance and has an objective to implement service designs so that service operations can manage the services and infrastructure in a controlled manner. </p><p>Main Target Audience: </p><p> IT Service Managers, Service Owners, operational staff. </p><p>Main Influencers: </p><p> Customers, Service owners, support staff. </p><p>I - Page 8 </p><p>Service Transition (ST) </p></li><li><p> SO will manage a service through its production life of day-to-day management. </p><p>Main Target Audience: </p><p> Service owners, operational staff, vendors and service providers. </p><p>Main Influencers: </p><p> Customers, end users, business and IT Management. </p><p>I - Page 9 </p><p>Service Operation (SO) </p></li><li><p> CSI will ensure that a service delivers the maximum benefits and measure its performance through its life, suggesting improvements along the way. </p><p> CSI has an overall view of all other elements and looks for ways that the overall process and service provision can be implemented. </p><p>Main Target Audience: </p><p> Service planners, service designers, business ad IT leaders, IT service managers, service owners, operational staff. </p><p>Main Influencers: </p><p> Business leaders, IT leaders, customers and users, service owners, quality and conformance managers. </p><p>I - Page 10 </p><p>Continual Service Improvement (CSI) </p></li><li><p> Service Strategy (5) </p><p> Strategy Management </p><p> Demand Management </p><p> Service Portfolio Management </p><p> Financial Management </p><p> Business Relationship Management </p><p> Service Design (8) </p><p> Design Coordination </p><p> Service Level Management </p><p> Service Catalog Management </p><p> Capacity Management </p><p> Availability Management </p><p> Service Continuity Management </p><p> Information Security Management </p><p> Supplier Management </p><p>I - Page 11 </p><p>ITIL V3 Processes </p></li><li><p> Service Transition (7) </p><p> Transition Planning and Support </p><p> Change Management </p><p> Release and Deployment Management </p><p> Service Asset and Configuration Management </p><p> Service Validation and Testing </p><p> Evaluation </p><p> Knowledge Management </p><p> Service Operation (5) </p><p> Event Management </p><p> Incident Management </p><p> Request Fulfillment </p><p> Problem Management </p><p> Access Management </p><p>I - Page 12 </p><p>ITIL V3 Processes </p></li><li><p> Continual Service Improvement (3) </p><p> Service Improvement (The Seven-step improvement Process) </p><p> Service Measurement </p><p> Service Reporting </p><p>I - Page 13 </p><p>ITIL V3 Processes </p></li><li><p> Service Desk </p><p> Three new functions </p><p> Technical Management </p><p> Application Management </p><p> IT Operations Management </p><p>I - Page 14 </p><p>ITIL V3 Functions </p></li><li><p> Benefits: </p><p> Provision of IT services becomes more customer-focused </p><p> Continuous improvement in the delivery of quality IT services </p><p> Services are described better </p><p> Better management of quality </p><p> Improved communication and better working relationships between IT and the business </p><p> The ability to absorb a higher rate of Change with an improved, measurable rate of success </p><p> Processes and procedures that can be audited for compliance to best practice guidelines </p><p> Risks: </p><p> Can take a long time and require significant effort </p><p> Over-engineered procedures can be seen as bureaucratic obstacles </p><p> No real benefit if there is a fundamental lack of understanding </p><p>I - Page 15 </p><p>Benefits and Risks </p></li><li><p> Improve Resource Utilization </p><p> Be more competitive </p><p> Decrease rework / Eliminate redundant work </p><p> Improve upon project deliverables and time </p><p> Improve availability, reliability and security of mission critical IT services </p><p> Justify the cost of service quality </p><p> Provide services that meet business, customer, and user demands </p><p> Integrate central processes </p><p> Document and communicate roles and responsibilities in service provision </p><p> Learn from previous experience </p><p> Provide demonstrable performance indicators </p><p>I - Page 16 </p><p>Benefits to the Organization </p></li><li><p> Align IT Services with the business needs (current and future) </p><p> Improve the quality of IT services </p><p> Reduce the long-term cost of provisioning IT services </p><p>I - Page 17 </p><p>ITIL Goals </p></li><li><p> ITIL describes what needs to be done but NOT how it should be done </p><p> ITIL does NOT define: </p><p> Every role, job or organisation design </p><p> Every tool, every other equipment, every required customisation </p><p> Every process, procedure and task required to be implemented </p><p> ITIL does NOT claim to be a comprehensive description of everything within IT, but it </p><p>instead contains best practices that have observed and accepted in the industry </p><p>I - Page 18 </p><p>Keep in Mind </p></li><li><p>Service Management As A </p><p>Practice </p><p>19 </p></li><li><p>I - Page 20 </p><p>ITIL V3 Core Framework </p><p>Service Design </p><p>Service </p><p>ITIL </p><p>Service </p><p>Strategy </p><p>Service </p><p>Operation </p><p>Service </p><p>Design </p><p>Continual Service </p><p>Improvement </p><p>Service </p><p>Transition </p><p>Service Strategy </p><p> Planning and implementation of IT Service Management practices and their alignment to business </p><p>needs. </p><p>Service Design </p><p> Design of appropriate and innovative IT </p><p>infrastructure services </p><p>Service Transition </p><p> Validates the service design against service </p><p>requirements </p><p>Service Operation </p><p> Day to day delivery and control process activities for </p><p>required stable IT services. </p><p>Continual Service Improvement </p><p> Continuous search for improvements as part of the </p><p>promised service quality </p></li><li><p> A means of delivering value to customers by facilitating outcomes customers want to </p><p>achieve without the ownership of specific costs and risks. </p><p> What creates VALUE? </p><p> The value of a service resides in the combined effects of two criteria: </p><p> Its Utility </p><p> Its Warranty </p><p>Service </p></li><li><p>Value Creation </p></li><li><p>Product Vs Service </p></li><li><p> Service Management </p><p> Service Management is a set of specialized organizational capabilities for providing value to </p><p>customers in the form of services. </p><p> Service Management is also a professional practice supported by an extensive body of knowledge, </p><p>experience, and skills. </p></li><li><p> An IT organization owns 9 types of assets: </p><p>Assets Types </p><p> Capability is the ability of an organization, person, process, application configuration item or IT </p><p>services to carry out an activity. </p><p> Resources is a generic term that includes IT infrastructure, people, money or anything else that </p><p>might help to deliver an IT service. </p></li><li><p> A set of IT capabilities and resources (including functions and process) used to </p><p> Plan (Plan) </p><p> Implement (Do) </p><p> Monitor and (Check) </p><p> Improve (Act) </p><p> The People, Processes, Products and Partners </p><p> That together deliver Services to Customer that add Value the Business. </p><p>Service Management : The Management </p><p>of Services </p></li><li><p>People Having the right people/mix of people, skill set, attitudes, roles and responsibilities, and leadership abilities </p><p>in place to be successful in achieving expected results. </p><p>Process </p><p>To achieve high availability, processes should be </p><p> Appropriately documented, followed and enforced </p><p> Able to be measured and reported on </p><p> Have clear ownership, communicated, and updated accordingly. </p><p>Technology </p><p> Redundancy, resilience, repeatability, flexibility, capacity in order to support the goals for achieving high </p><p>availability. </p><p> In addition, technology needs to always be on/available and be easily supported and maintained. </p><p>I - Page 27 </p><p>People, Process &amp; Technology The fundamental principle of People, Process and Technology is the foundation for a successful ITIL </p><p>implementation. </p></li><li><p>I - Page 28 </p><p>Four Ps of Service Management </p></li><li><p>Service Assets : A Service Asset is anything that could contribute to the delivery of an IT service. </p><p> A Service providers capabilities &amp; resources </p><p> People, Processes, Knowledge and Infrastructure </p><p>Strategic Assets </p><p> Service Assets that support strategic objectives </p><p> Service Management is a strategic asset </p><p>Service Assets &amp; Stragegic Assets </p></li><li><p>I - Page 30 </p><p>Governance </p></li><li><p>I - Page 31 </p><p>Quality : Demings Cycle </p></li><li><p> Process </p><p> A structured set of activities designed to accomplish a specific objectives. </p><p> A process may include any of the roles, responsibilities, tools and management controls </p><p>required to reliably deliver the desired output. </p><p> Function </p><p> A team or group of people and the tools they use to carry out one or more process or activities. </p><p> Functions are Self-Contained units of an organization </p><p> Role </p><p> A set of responsibilities, activities and authorities granted to a person or team. </p><p> A role is defined within a process. </p><p> Group, Team, Unit or person perform tasks connected to a relevant processes </p><p> Scope of role &amp; trigger is defined by relevant process, agreed by management </p><p>I - Page 32 </p><p>Process - Function Role </p></li><li><p> They are measurable </p><p> They have specific results </p><p> Processes have customers </p><p> They respond to specific events </p><p>I - Page 33 </p><p>Process Characteristics </p></li><li><p>I - Page 34 </p><p>RACI Model </p></li><li><p>I - Page 35 </p><p>Key roles in Service Management </p></li><li><p>I - Page 36 </p><p>Best Practice &amp; Good Practice </p><p> Best Practice provides a set of generic guidelines based on the successful experiences of a number of </p><p>organizations. </p><p> Good practice could be either an application of best practice, or it could be an input into best practice. </p></li><li><p> Faster incident recovery </p><p> Fewer unplanned outages </p><p> Better communication with users </p><p> Information that enables better informed management decisions </p><p>I - Page 37 </p><p>How ITIL best practices can help </p></li><li><p>Service Strategy </p><p>38 </p></li><li><p>Service Design </p><p>Service </p><p>ITIL </p><p>Service </p><p>Strategy </p><p>Service </p><p>Operation </p><p>Service </p><p>Design </p><p>Continual Service </p><p>Improvement </p><p>Service </p><p>Transition </p><p>ITIL V3 Core Framework Service Strategy </p><p>Service Strategy </p><p>Planning and implementation of IT </p><p>Service Management practices and their </p><p>alignment to business needs. </p></li><li><p> To support the organization in transforming service management into a strategic asset </p><p> To provide a clear insight into the relationships between the various </p><p> Systems </p><p> Process </p><p> Functions </p><p> Services </p><p> Business models </p><p> Strategies </p><p> etc, </p><p> and the organization's VISION </p><p>Service Strategy Goals </p></li><li><p> SS will appeal to those who have the need to understand strategic analysis, planning, positioning, and implementation with respect to service models, strategies and strategic objectives. </p><p> It provides guidance on how to leverage service management capabilities that can effectively deliver value to customers and capture value for service providers. </p><p> Decisions about service portfolios, capability development, operational effectiveness, organizational models and the importance of knowledge assets are some of what Service Strategies will provide guidance on. </p><p>Main Target Audience: </p><p> Senior Leadership of customers and service providers. </p><p>Main Influencers: </p><p> Service Managers and operations managers. </p><p>Service Strategies (SS) </p></li><li><p> Business Case : Its a structured document with supporting evidence and references that justifies a project on either financial or strategic grounds </p><p> Capability : The ability of an organization, person, process, application, Configuration Item, or IT services to carry out an activity </p><p> Process Values : A process is a set of coordinated activities combining in order to produce an outcome, which, directly or indirectly, creates value for an external customer or stakeholder </p><p> Resource : A generic term that includes infrastructure, people, money or anything else that might help to deliver an IT service </p><p> Risk : A possible event that could cause harm or loss, or affect the ability of achieved objectives </p><p> Service Catalog : A database or structured document with information about all live IT services, including those available for development </p><p> Service Portfolio : The complete set of services that are managed by a service provider </p><p>Service Strategy (SS) Key Terms </p></li><li><p>Service Strategy : Business Values </p></li><li><p>There are many different strategies and service providers within the organization. </p><p>There are 3 main types of service providers which are: </p><p> Type I </p><p> Internal Service Provider </p><p> Type II </p><p> Shared Services Unit </p><p> Type III </p><p> External Service Provider </p><p>Service Provider Types </p></li><li><p> Internal Service Provider is normally part...</p></li></ul>