Investigating physical activity as a moderator between body mass index and body-related shame, guilt, and pride in adults

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<ul><li><p>abstract | 211</p><p>265</p><p>Motivational Interview (MI) using co-active life coaching skills as a treatement for obesity</p><p>C. Newnham-Kanas, J.D. Irwin, and D. MorrowFaculty of Health Sciences, School of Health Studies, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada</p><p>Introduction: This study was designed specifically to evaluate the impact of Motivational Interviewing, brought to fruition via the skills of Co-Active Life Coaching (CALC), on anthropometric outcomes (waist circumference and BMI), self-esteem, self-efficacy, physical activity, quality of life, and functional health status of adults with obesity. Method: This study targeted a sample of eight women aged 35-55 with a BMI 30. Participants engaged in 18 40-minute sessions with a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach, during which they explored participants desired changes and how to achieve them. Waist circumference, BMI, the 36-item Functional Health Status Scale, the World Health Organization Quality of Life, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, a series of self-efficacy questionnaires, and the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale were assessed at baseline, and again at the end of the intervention. Results of the studys weekly body composition measures were evaluated using visual inspection. Results of the pre and post surveys were interpreted on a group basis, taking into account whether a clinically meaningful difference was achieved. results: BMI decreased for all participants with a more pronounced decrease in participants one, four, five, six, seven, and eight. WC decreased for participants one, four, five, six, seven, and eight, and remained stable for participants two and three. The mainly large- and medium-effect sizes indicated clinically significant improvements in participants self-esteem (Cohens d = 1.85), functional health status (Cohens d = 1.34), QOL (Cohens d = 0.72), self-efficacy (Cohens d = 0.77), and physical activity (Cohens d = 0.6). conclusion: MI via life coaching is associated with clinically significant decreases in BMI and increases in self-esteem, functional health status, self-efficacy, physical activity, and quality of life.</p><p>266</p><p>Qualitative assessment of motivational interviewing (MI) using co-active Life coaching skills as a treatment for obesity</p><p>C. Newnham-Kanas, D. Morrow and J.D. IrwinFaculty of Health Sciences, School of Health Studies, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada</p><p>Introduction: The purpose of this study was to qualitatively assess the impact of Motivational Interviewing (MI), brought to fruition via the skills of Co-Active Life Coaching (CALC), on adults with obesity. Methods: This study targeted a sample of eight women aged 35-55 with a BMI 30. Participants engaged in 18 40-minute sessions with a Certified Professional Co-Active Coach during which they explored participants desired changes and how to achieve them. At the end of the initial meeting with participants, a short semi-structured interview was conducted to gain insight into the lived experience of obese individuals. At the end of the 18 sessions, a post-interview was conducted with each participant to gain insight into whether anything had changed for clients since the beginning of the study and to provide insight into the coaching experience for participants. Six months after the end of the intervention, six participants returned for a focus group to understand what had happened since the coaching ended and how they planned on moving forward. The coach of the study was also interviewed at the end of the intervention to gain insight into the coachs experience in working with individuals with obesity. results: Prior to the start of the study, participants reported that their weight served as a barrier in relationships with others, not recognizing themselves anymore, lack of control over their weight, and a desire to be healthy. At the end of the study, participants reported an increase in daily physical activity and healthier dietary choices, feelings of </p><p>optimism, and greater self-acceptance. Findings from the focus group and the coachs interview will be available for April 2011.</p><p>267</p><p>Investigating physical activity as a moderator between body mass index and body-related shame, guilt, and pride in adults</p><p>Andree L. Castonguay, and Catherine M. SabistonMcGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada</p><p>Introduction: Self-conscious emotions (e.g., shame, guilt, pride) have been linked to a wide range of negative mental health outcomes, and may drive health behaviours such as dieting and physical activity (PA). Body-related self-conscious emotions may be particularly salient in aspects related to the body and driving health behaviours. The current study sought to examine the associations between body mass index (BMI) and body-related self-conscious emotions of shame, guilt, and hubristic and authentic facets of pride. PA was investigated as a moderator of this relationship. Methods: Males and females (n=541; Mage=28.7, SD=14.6, range= 17-68 yrs; 28.1% male; MBMI=24.7, SD=5.3 kg/m2) were recruited via e-mail and posted advertisements, at various community centres and around university campuses in the Montral region. Scientifically supported self-report measures were used to assess BMI, PA, and body-related shame, guilt, and pride. results: Separate hierarchical linear regressions, controlling for socioeconomic status, age, and sex, indicated that having elevated BMI levels were linked to higher levels of shame (=.45, p</p></li></ul>