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  • Intercooperation in South Asia

  • Design: INTENT | www.intentdesign.net

    March, 2007

    Intercooperation in South Asia

  • Intercooperation (IC) is a leading Swiss not-for-profit organisation engaged

    in development and international cooperation. IC is registered as a

    foundation and is governed by 21 organisations representing development,

    civil society and private sector interests. IC is both an implementing and an

    advisory agency, providing professional resources and knowledge

    combined with social commitment.

    IC supports partner organisations in more than twenty developing and

    transition countries on mandates from the Swiss government and other

    donors. In South Asia, IC is present in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, India,

    Nepal and Pakistan.

    IC's working domains are:

    ; soil, water, plant and animal

    resources.

    ; promoting micro and small enterprises, financial

    services and linking the poor with wider markets.

    ; supporting local bodies of

    governance that ensure political rights and liberty for their

    communities.

    In all its work, IC seeks to empower the poor and marginalised by

    supporting gender-balanced, equitable, rights-based development.

    In 2007, IC celebrates its silver jubilee with the motto 25 years of inspiring

    change.

    Natural resource management

    Rural economy

    Local governance and civil society2

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    Intercooperation at a glance

    01

  • India

    Pakistan

    was one of the first countries in which IC started operating in 1982.

    For many years, it remained IC's largest programme. Much has been

    learned from past experience which serves as a guide to other development

    programmes in India and beyond. IC started its work in the Livestock

    Production and Dairy sector establishing a series of bilateral projects that

    built upon its very positive experiences in the southern state of Kerala.

    Gradually, interventions spread northwards up to Rajasthan in the west and

    Sikkim in the east. In tandem, IC developed programmes with over 50

    NGOs across seven states. IC has been registered as a non-profit company

    in India since 2006 and is in the process of diversifying its partner base. Its

    average annual turnover over the last five years has been USD 5.5 million.

    IC has been working in for twenty-five years and implemented a

    total of 19 internationally funded projects. Its first development initiative was

    Kalam Integrated Development Project (1982) in the North West Frontier

    Province. As well as having a strong basis in this province, IC has worked in

    Sindh and on countrywide projects. The original focus was on natural

    resource management, however working on local governance, civil society

    and rural economic issues is gaining greater significance. Since 2006 IC is

    registered in Pakistan as an International NGO with the Economic Affairs

    Division. The current IC portfolio in Pakistan functions with an annual

    turnover of around 2.8 million USD.

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    History of the Programmes

    02

  • In 2000, the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) requested the

    assistance of IC to manage its Sustainable Land Use programme in . IC

    was registered as an international NGO with the NGO Affairs Bureau. The original

    office became an official Delegation from 2002. The initial mandate of involvement in

    natural resource management has grown to include local governance and market

    development, offering a large range of services to different development partners.

    For several years IC intervention focused only on the poorest districts in North-West

    Bangladesh, now it is involved in 80% of the districts. The annual turnover amounts

    to 4.9 million USD.

    In 2000, IC started work in on the fourth phase of the Nepal-Swiss Community

    Forestry Project (NSCFP). This project was started in 1990 by SDC. Besides

    implementing the NSCFP, IC has entered into a joint venture with Helvetas on the

    Sustainable Soil Management Programme. With these two undertakings, IC's

    financial turnover in Nepal was 6.7 million CHF in four years. IC became formally

    registered as an International NGO with the Social Welfare Council in December

    2006.

    IC is a relatively new player in development sector. An exploratory

    mission, sent to the country to assess opportunities and challenges for new rural

    development programmes, concluded that, despite a number of challenges, there is

    still a market niche and comparative advantage for IC to open a country

    representation. In 2006 the Ministry of Economy granted IC legal international NGO

    status. After registration, IC was short-listed for two upcoming projects and also

    selected as a partner of the National Union for Horticultural Development in

    Afghanistan, funded by the World Bank. This will be IC's first practical development

    initiative in the country.

    Bangladesh

    Nepal

    Afghanistan's

    25

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    03

  • Delegation in Pakistan

    Arjumand Nizami, Programme Coordinator and Esther Haldimann,

    Delegate (jointly managing the delegation)

    Saif ur Rehman Bhatti, Head of Finance and Administration

    Iftikhar Hussain, National Programme Officer

    Ijaz Ali, Assistant Financial Administrator

    Abeer Aziz, Programme Assistant

    IC teams in South Asia

    IC strongly supports decentralisation and subsidiary approaches. In South

    Asia, it has 3 Delegations and 2 Representations. Delegations are

    established in countries where IC manages a large number of projects and

    there is strong potential for growth. Each decentralised structure of IC is

    fully capable of project cycle management using thematic and process

    competences.

    Delegation in Bangladesh

    Alain Cuvelier, Delegate

    Shirin Parveen Biswas, Programme Officer

    Azmul Huda, Programme Officer

    Anton Joehr, Adviser

    Jashim Uddin, Finance and Administration Manager

    Shamima Nasreen, Administrative Officer

    Representation in Afghanistan

    Mujibur Rahman, Representative

    Delegation in India

    Rupa Mukerji, Delegate

    C. K. Rao, Livestock Programme Coordinator

    B Ramkumar, Programme Officer

    Devanshu Chakravarti, Programme Officer

    K. V. Sreeram, Finance and Administration Manager

    Sreelatha, Executive Secretary

    Representation in Nepal

    Bharat K. Pokharel, Representative, Project manager-NSCFP

    Brieke Steenhof, Project Advisor-NSCFP

    Juerg Merz, Programme Officer-SSMP

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    04

  • Over the last 3 years, Intercooperation achieved the following in its South-Asia

    programmes:

    Bangladesh

    Socio-economic empowerment of communities

    Private local service providers

    Professional associations of nursery owners

    870 communities, representing 2,800 dynamic groups and 80,000 poor and

    extreme poor rural households are now identifying their development

    priorities, planning activities, acquiring resources and services that affect

    socio-economic development, building linkages with local government

    bodies, addressing gender inequalities, and involving extreme poor in income

    generating activities. Market development and micro or small enterprise

    promotion allowed individuals to generate an additional 1 to 2 US$ income per

    day.

    A network of 2,600 private and commercial local service providers has been

    established. They are accessible and affordable by the poor, contributing to

    the economic development of communities through the provision of advisory

    services. Areas of service include; agroforestry, marketing, non-farm activities,

    and human and institutional development.

    5,700 professional nurseries contribute to the propagation and distribution of

    quality planting material (fruit and timber trees, medicinal plants). They work in

    partnership with national institutions alongside 260 Sub-District and 45 District

    associations.

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    Achievements Facts and Figures

    05

  • IC's work in India has been at three levels in collaboration

    with people's institutions, NGO and cooperatives; at the with

    government service delivery departments and at the with

    research and training institutions and policy making bodies such as central

    ministries and planning entities.

    Cattle breeding, fodder production and dairy development were perhaps the

    programs with the largest direct impacts on the livelihoods of the people. The

    North Kerala Dairy Project (NKDP) alone influenced around 1.3 million

    households who are solely or partly dependent on these activities. The total

    income earned from milk production has risen to 4.6% of State GDP. The per

    capita availability of milk in the region has also experienced a 7 fold increase

    from the 1960s, resulting in improved nutritional gains for young children.

    Pioneering research into systematic cattle breeding using contemporary

    frozen semen technology led to the evolution of improved breeds. One