Information Sharing: Challenges, Trends, and Opportunities

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Information Sharing: Challenges, Trends, and Opportunities. San Diego, CA November 28-30, 2006. The National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan (NCISP). Sharing information in Public Safety. The concept and need is widely accepted, BUT ; Is misunderstood Has obstacles and oppositions - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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<ul><li><p>Information Sharing:</p><p>Challenges, Trends, and Opportunities</p></li><li><p>The National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan (NCISP)</p></li><li><p>Sharing information in Public SafetyThe concept and need is widely accepted, BUT;Is misunderstood Has obstacles and oppositionsData control is an issue (who sees what)Can have legislative restraintsNo longer discipline specificInformation vs intelligenceFunding can be an issue Most initiatives are regional and within state boundaries</p></li><li><p>Information Sharing Methods:Point-to-pointCentralRepositoryMiddlewareMessage Hub</p></li><li><p>Information May Need to Be ClassifiedInformation may be:Incident basedIntelligenceGeneral informationObtained from private sources (Lexis-Nexis, Choicepoint, city, county, etc.) The classification of information will determine who can use it and how it can be used Not all information will be used by all users</p></li><li><p>Making the Jump Across State LinesA few national/multi-state projectsNCICTriple IIINletsNSOPWThe greatest misunderstood project by;The ACLUThe media The public</p><p>BUT not by agencies using itMATRIXRISSHSINEPICCISAnet</p><p>LEON-DExARJISCapWIN</p></li><li><p>MATRIX Lessons Learned:Strong foundation before transitioning into implementation Projects are bound by an understanding among participants Although MATRIX understood its mission and goals, the mission was not formalized and articulated to a wide audience Leadership is extremely critical in the success Involve private-sector privacy experts to assist in developing and vetting a privacy policy;If possible, the privacy policy should be available to the public Describe information collected and how information is stored Ensure all other policies and internal controls are consistent with the privacy policy</p></li><li><p>Fusion Center GuidelinesLaw Enforcement, Public Safety, and the Private SectorGlobal Justice Information Sharing Initiative (Global)Homeland Security Advisory Council (HSAC)</p></li><li><p> What Is a Fusion Center?A collaborative effort of two or more agencies that provide resources, expertise, and/or information to the center with the goal of maximizing the ability to detect, prevent, investigate, apprehend, and respond to criminal and terrorist activity</p></li><li><p>Why Is the Fusion Process Important?Supports an all-source, all-crimes, all-hazards, all-threats approach to intelligence Blends data from different sources, including law enforcement, public safety, and the private sector Supports risk-based, information-driven prevention, response, and consequence management programs Supports intelligence-led policing Fusion is the overarching process of managing the flowing of information and intelligence across all levels and sectors of government and the private sector</p></li><li><p>Privacy Policy Development GuideGeared toward the justice practitioner charged with developing or revising an agencys privacy policy A practical, hands-on resource providing sensible guidance to develop a privacy policy This guide is the next logical step for those justice entities ready to move beyond awareness to actual policy development process It assists agencies in articulating privacy obligations in a manner that protects the justice agency, the individual, and the public and makes it easier to do what is necessary share critical justice information</p></li><li><p>The Design:Distributed modelService Oriented Architecture (SOA)Web ServicesUS DOJ XMLNational search engine, local controlThe Results:Connected 22 sites in 60 daysConnected additional 28 sites in 5 monthsOver 27 million hits in first 48 hoursPeeked at 977 hits per secondAfter 63 weeks over 611 million hits</p></li><li><p>NSOPR Web ServerSearch sent to states repositoriesSearch sent to serverInternetCitizen enters dataServer delivers results to web pageCitizen selects name to view dataSearch resultsback to serverDru Sjodin National Sex Offender Public Website</p></li><li><p>Current status50 States + District of Columbia + Guam</p></li><li><p>Best practices:Identify the stakeholdersLeverage work already completedCleary identify the policy decision makerCleary identify the technical leadAdapt to what already exists</p><p>Lessons learned:Keep policy and technology separateBe open to suggestions from stakeholdersRealize there is no one solutionDesign tool based on abilitiesFederal and state can work together</p></li><li><p>David P. LewisSenior Policy AdvisorJustice Information SharingDOJ/OJP/BJAdavid.p.lewis@usdoj.gov202-616-7829</p><p>The process of developing the Plan began in December 2002The GIWG committees addressed specific issues/needsThe GIWG developed 28 recommendations and action items for implementation of the NCISPVetting process involved local, state, tribal, and federal law enforcement agencies and regional, state, and national organizationsAttorney General Ashcroft accepted and endorsed all 28 recommendations in October 2003A National Kick-Off Event was held on May 14, 2004, at the Great Hall of Justice. The Plan was endorsed by U.S. Attorney General Ashcroft, FBI Director Mueller, and DHS Undersecretary Libutti. The establishment of the Criminal Intelligence Coordinating Council (CICC) was announced at this event</p><p>The National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan is a key tool that law enforcement agencies can employ to support their crime-fighting and public safety efforts.</p><p>The Plan is intended to be a living document and will be periodically updated. Those charged with developing and implementing the Plan will continue to solicit the involvement of the law enforcement and intelligence communities, national organizations, and other government and public safety entities, in order to ensure that the Plan is responsive to their needs for information and intelligence development and sharing. </p><p>DOJ, through Global, created the National Criminal Intelligence Sharing Plan (NCISP).DHS developed the Intelligence and Information Sharing Initiative: Homeland Security Intelligence and Information Fusion.The purpose of both documents is to create an information sharing environment.These documents serve as the foundation for the Fusion Center Guidelines.</p><p>Guideline Developmenta phased approach Law Enforcement Intelligence: Version 1 of the guidelines, law enforcement intelligence, has been completed and has been distributed to state law enforcement agencies, homeland security advisors, fusion centers, etc.Public Safety and the Private Sector: Version 2 of the guidelines will incorporate public safety and the private sector. Version 2 is expected to be completed in early 2006.</p><p>For purposes of this initiative, fusion refers to the overarching process of managing the flow of information and intelligence across levels and sectors of government.Moving to a working implementation involves a number of design considerations, including what information sources to use, what fusion architecture to employ, and communication protocols.Center personnel will utilize fused and analyzed information to provide value-added intelligence products that support the development of performance-driven, risk-based prevention, response, and consequence management programs. </p><p>Geared toward the justice practitioner charged with developing or revising an agencys privacy policy, the Privacy Policy Development Guide is a practical, hands-on resource that provides sensible guidance for developing a privacy policy. Using this Guide is the next logical step for those justice entities that are ready to move beyond awareness into the actual policy development process. It assists agencies in articulating privacy obligations in a manner that protects the justice agency, the individual, and the public and makes it easier to do what is necessaryshare critical justice information</p></li></ul>

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