influence of the monarchy eng 400: british literature unit ii: celebrating humanity

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The year 1485 saw ◦ End of the “War of the Roses” ◦ Founding of the Tudor dynasty Impact of Tudor monarchs ◦ Created stability in England by  Increasing the monarch’s power  Limiting the strength of nobles ◦ Dramatically changed religious practices ◦ Transformed England from a small island nation to a world superpower The Tudor Dynasty Henry VII Henry VIII Edward VI Mary I Elizabeth I James I (James VI)

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Influence of the Monarchy ENG 400: British Literature Unit II: Celebrating Humanity MONARCHS OF THE ENGLISH RENAISSANCE After the War of the Roses, the Tudor monarchs reunited the country and reestablished the power of the monarchy. Celebrating Humanity Influence of the Monarchy The year 1485 saw End of the War of the Roses Founding of the Tudor dynasty Impact of Tudor monarchs Created stability in England by Increasing the monarchs power Limiting the strength of nobles Dramatically changed religious practices Transformed England from a small island nation to a world superpower The Tudor Dynasty Henry VII Henry VIII Edward VI Mary I Elizabeth I James I (James VI) Ended civil war (War of the Roses) and reconciled Houses of York and Lancaster Established Tudor dynasty When crowned, England worn out and exhausted by civil war Accomplishments Rebuilt treasury Established law and order Restored prestige of monarchy Practicing Catholic Henry VII (1485 1509) Henry VII (1485 1509) Began as practicing Catholic Changed religious landscape of England Wanted to annul marriage to first wife (Catherine of Aragon) When Pope refused, chose to remarry anyway and break with Roman Catholic Church Seized Catholic Churchs English property and dissolved powerful monasteries Established Anglican Church (Church of England) and forced country to convert to Protestantism Henry VIII (1509 1547) Marriages of Henry VIII (from Became king at age of nine Was a fragile child who died at age of fifteen Edward Seymour acted as regent and Protector Continued Englands conversion to Protestantism through series of Parliamentary acts English replaced Latin as language used in church rituals Anglican prayer book (the Book of Common prayer) required in public worship Edward VI (1547 1553) Daughter of Catherine of Aragon Was a practicing Catholic and took throne at age 37 Aimed to convert England back to Roman Catholicism Restored Roman practices to Church of England Restored authority of Pope over English Church Ordered execution of over 300 Protestants (nicknamed Bloody Mary) Strengthened anti-Catholic sentiment through actions Died (of ovarian cancer) after only 5 years on throne; many suspected poisoned by her sister, Elizabeth Mary I (1553 1558) Daughter of Anne Boleyn Mother executed when Elizabeth was 2 years old Raised in dangerous and unstable circumstances Learned to be strong, clever, mature and self-possessed Took throne at age of 25, a practicing Protestant Used Virgin Queen persona to great effect Considered Englands most able monarch since William the Conqueror Became a great patron of the arts Instituted policy of religious compromise, ending religious turmoil Withstood threat of Spanish armada Elizabeth I (1558 1603) Mary Stuart (Catholic) Queen of Scotland Queen Elizabeths cousin and next in line for English throne Catholics did not recognize King Henry VIIIs marriage to Anne Boleyn, and therefore considered Elizabeth illegitimate. In response to Marys schemes, Elizabeth imprisoned her for 18 years. In 1587, Elizabeth gave in to Parliament and had Mary beheaded; Mary was regarded as a Catholic martyr. Elizabeth I and Mary, Queen of Scots Mary Stuart, Queen of Scotland Elizabeth Tudor, Queen of England Son of Mary Stuart; was also King James VI of Scotland Named as heir to throne of England by Elizabeth I on her deathbed Established the Stuart dynasty in England Practicing Protestant; commissioned new translation of the Bible (King James Version) Strong supporter of the arts Struggled with Parliament for power Treated legislators with contempt Argued over taxes and foreign wars James I (1603 1625) James I expanded Englands position as a world power; sponsoring Englands first successful American colony (Jamestown, Virginia). King James persecuted the Puritans, some of whom migrated to America and established Plymouth Colony in James I and American History SKILL WORKSHOP: ARGUMENT STRUCTURE Celebrating Humanity Influence of the Monarchy What Is an Argument? An argument Presents one side of a controversial or debatable issue Logically supports a particular belief, conclusion, or point of view Is supported with reasoning and evidence Purposes for writing a formal argument To change the readers mind about an issue To convince the reader to accept what is written To motivate the reader to take action, based on what is written Audience and Purpose Hostile Audience Existing opinion disagrees with major claim of argument Purpose: to change the readers mind Neutral Audience Has no pre-existing opinion on issue; may be unaware, uninformed, or indifferent Purpose: to inform, to interest, and to convince Sympathetic Audience Existing opinion in already in agreement with argument Purpose: to reaffirm opinion; to motivate and inspire action Elements of an Argument Claim (assertion): a debatable statement; what the writer is trying to prove Warrants (justifications): reasons to believe the claim; the link between claim and grounds Grounds (evidence): the support used to convince the reader Evidence may be factual, anecdotal, and/or hypothetical Stating warrants helps the reader follow the course of an argument Strong arguments include multiple types/pieces of evidence Evaluating Claims and Arguments When reading or listening to an argument, critically asses the claims that are made. Identify claims that are based on fact or that can be proved true. Evaluate the reasons and evidence that support the claims. Are the reasons logical and clearly stated? Is the evidence factually accurate or believable? Do the warrants show how the evidence is relevant to the claim? Does the argument address counterexamples? Activity A: Argument Analysis 1. Choose a Room for Debate topic and request your materials When free speech disappears from campus When free speech disappears from campus Are we raising sexist sons? Are we raising sexist sons? Should drug addicts be forced into treatment? Should drug addicts be forced into treatment? Can crime be ethically predicted? Can crime be ethically predicted? Rethinking the way we teach Thanksgiving Rethinking the way we teach Thanksgiving 2. Read the summary of the issue on the first page and record your groups opinion on the lines provided. 3. Select two arguments to read and analyze. 4. Complete the analysis process for each argument. 5. Be prepared to share out one analysis with the class.