Indian railway final report

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  • ELECTRICAL COACHING DEPARTMENT

    A

    REPORT

    ON

    INDUSTRIALTRAINING

    AT

    COACH CARE CENTRE HAZARAT NIZAMUDDIN

    SUBMITTED IN PARTIAL FULFILLMENT OF THE REQUIREMENT

    FOR THE AWARD OF THE DEGREE OF

    BACHELOR OF TECHNOLOGY

    IN

    Electrical & Electronics Engineering

    Submitted By

    ASHWANI KUMAR

    04413304912

    Under the Supervision of SSE Mr. SHIV KUMAR

    HMR INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLGY AND MANAGEMENT

    Plot No. 370, Hamidpur, Delhi Pin code 110036

  • DECLARATION

    I hereby declare that all the work presented in this report in the partial fulfillment of

    the requirement for the award of the degree of Bachelor of Technology in Electrical

    & Electronics Engineering, HMR Institute of Technology and Management, Guru

    Gobind Singh Indraprastha University, Delhi, is an authentic record of the work done

    during the Industrial Internship carried out in Northern Railway under the guidance

    of Mr. Shiv Kumar.

    Date:

    Signature

  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

    I am very much grateful to the authority of the organization for taking initiative for the industrial training to upgrade my knowledge by placing me at Northern Railway (Chg. Depot/HNZM). I owe many thanks to several people who helped and supported me during this training.

    I wish to express my gratitude to the officials and other members of Northern Railway who rendered their help during the period of my training.

    I express my sincere thanks to SSE/Chg./HNZM Mr. SHIV KUMAR, who through her

    expert guidance helped me throughout the course of this training. If it was not her

    motivation and encouragement, I would not have seen through this training course

    in an honest course to the splendor of success.

    ASHWANI KUMAR

    (Electrical& Electronics Engineering)

    HMR Institute Of Technology & Management

  • CONTENTS

    1. DECLARATION

    2. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

    3. CERTIFICATE

    4. INDIAN RAILWAYS

    Introduction

    History

    Diesel Shed

    Shed Layout

    5. TRAIN LIGHTING

    Introduction

    Alternator

    Rectifier Cum Regulator Unit(RRU)

    Batteries

    Carriage Fan

    Carriage Lighting

    6. POWER HOUSE

    Introduction

    Step-Down Transformer

    Alarm/Hooter System(Buccholz Relay)

    Isolator

    Bus-Coupler

    Protective Relays

    Oil Circuit Breaker

    Air Circuit Breaker

  • 7. THE RAJDHANI EXPRESS

    Introduction

    Power Scheme In Rajdhani Express

    Inductive Reactor

    Inter-Vehicular Coupling

    Disconnecting & Earthing Device

    Battery-Box

    Transformer

    Water-Pumps

    Coach Configuration

    Linke-Hofmann-Busch-Coaches

    Pantry-Car

    Air Conditioning System

  • 1. INDIAN RAILWAY

    INTRODUCTION

    Indian Railway is the state-owned railway company of India, which owns and operates most of the country's rail transport. It is overseen by the Ministry of Railways of the Government of India.

    Indian Railways has one of the largest and busiest rail networks in the world, transporting over 18 million passengers and more than 2 million tons of freight daily. It is the world's largest commercial or utility employer, with more than 1.4 million employees. The railways traverse the length and breadth of the country, covering 6,909 stations over a total route length of more than 63,327 kilometers (39,350 mi). As to rolling stock, IR owns over 200,000 (freight) wagons, 50,000 coaches and 8,000 locomotives.

    By 1947, the year of India's independence, there were forty-two rail systems. In 1951 the systems were nationalized as one unit, becoming one of the largest networks in the world. IR operates both long distance and suburban rail systems on a multi-gauge network of broad, metre and narrow gauges. It also owns locomotive and coach production facilities.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_transporthttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ministry_of_Railways_(India)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ministry_of_Railways_(India)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Government_of_Indiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cargohttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rolling_stockhttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Independence_of_Indiahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rail_gaugehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Broad_gaugehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metre_gaugehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Narrow_gaugehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Locomotivehttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coach_(rail)

  • INDIAN RAILWAY HISTORY

    First railway system in India was proposed in 1832 in Madras but it

    never materialized. In the 1840s, other proposals were forwarded to the British

    East India Company who governed India at that time. The Governor-General of

    India at that time, Lord Hardinge deliberated on the proposal from the

    commercial, military and political viewpoints. He came to the conclusion that the

    East India Company should assist major companies from England and private

    capitalists who sought to setup a rail system in India, regardless of the

    commercial viability of their project.

    On September 22nd, 1842, British civil engineer C.B. Vignoles, FRS, submitted

    a Report on a Proposed Railway in India to the East India Company. By 1845, two

    companies, the East Indian Railway Company (EIR) operating from Calcutta, and

    the Great Indian Peninsula Railway (GIPR) operating from Bombay, were formed.

    The first train in India was not a passenger train and was operational on 1851-12-

    22, used for the hauling of construction material in Roorkee. A few years later, on

    1853-04-16,the first passenger train between Bori Bunder, Bombay and Thana

  • covering a distance of 34 km (21 miles) was inaugurated, formally heralding the

    birth of railways in India. Prior to this there was in 1832 a proposal to build a

    railroad between Madras and Bangalore and in 1836 a survey was conducted for

    this line.

    After the first passenger train run between thane and bori bander, almost six

    years later, on March 3, 1859, the first Railway Line in North India was laid

    between Allahabad and Kanpur. This was followed, in 1889, by the Delhi-Ambala

    Kalka line.

    The North eastern Railway was developed rapidly after that. On October 19,

    1875, the train between Hathras Road and Mathura Cantonment was started

    running. By the winter of 1880-81, the Kanpur-Farukhabad line became

    operational and further east, the Dibrugarh-Dinjan line became operational on

    August 15, 1882.

    Developments were fast and effective in South India also. The Madras

    Railway Company opened the first railway line between Veyasarpaudy and the

    Walajah Road on July 1, 1856. This 63-mile line was the first section, which

    eventually joined Madras and the west coast. On March 3, 1859, a length of 119

    miles was laid from Allahabad to Kanpur. Later In 1862, the railway line between

    Amritsar and Attari was constructed on the Amritsar-Lahore route.

    In 1900, the Great Indian peninsular Railways became a government owned

    company. The network spread to modern day states of Assam, Rajasthan and

    Andhra Pradesh and soon various independent kingdoms began to have their own

    rail systems. In 1901, an early Railway Board was constituted, but the powers

    were formally invested under Lord Curzon. It served under the Department of

    Commerce and Industry and had a government railway official serving as

    chairman, and a railway manager from England and an agent of one of the

  • company railways as the other two members. For the first time in its history, the

    Railways began to make a profit.

    In 1907 almost all the rail companies were taken over by the government. The

    following year, the first electric locomotive made its appearance. With the arrival

    of World War I, the railways were used to meet the needs of the British outside

    India. With the end of the war, the state of the railways was in disrepair and

    collapse.

    Indian Railway provided an example of the British Empire pouring its money and

    expertise into a very well built system basically designed for military reasons (after

    the Mutiny of 1857), and with the hope that it would stimulate industry. The system

    was overbuilt and much too elaborate and expensive for the small amount of

    freight traffic it carried. However, it did capture the imagination of the Indians, who

    saw their railways as the symbol of an industrial modernitybut one that was not

    realized until a century or so later.

    The British built a superb system in India. However, Christensen

    (1996) looks at of colonial purpose, local needs, capital, service, and private-

    versus-public interests. He concludes that making the railways a creature of the

    state hindered success because railway expenses had