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    HOXTON

    SQUARESTUDY AREA

    BU1 Transforming local areas: Urban Design for Development

    Susana Arellano Alvarado, Christine S. Ascott , Debeshi Chakraborty, Elizabeth Cowan, Ders Csaba,

    Melissa Garcia Lamarca, Ailbhe Gerrard, Su En Jung, Regan Koch , Panagiota Syrrothanasi, Pooja

    Varma.

    Second submission: Development brief for Shoreditch

    March 24th, 2009

    DEVELOPMENT BRIEF

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    01_Introduction

    02_Aeraanalysis

    03_Objectives,vison

    anddesignprinciples

    0

    4_Detailed

    developmentstrategy

    0

    5_Phasing

    06_C

    onclusion

    00_ Table of contents

    01_Introduction

    1.1_Terms of reference

    1.2_Setting out the physical and socio-economic context

    1.3_Summary of policy and planning framework

    02_Area analysis

    2.1_Urban design characteristics

    2.2_Spatial constraints and opportunities

    03_Objectives, vision and design principles

    3.1_Objectives

    3.2_Urban design principles

    04_Detailes development strategy

    05_Phasing

    06_Conclusion

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    01_Introduction

    02_Aeraanalysis

    03_Objectives,vison

    anddesignprinciples

    0

    4_Detailed

    developmentstrategy

    0

    5_Phasing

    06_C

    onclusion

    01_Introduction

    2

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    the physical and socio-economic context plus

    the key policy and planning frameworks affecting

    the HSSA. Section two focuses on seven spatialelements and design characteristics of the study

    area, highlighting the HSSAs spatial opportunities

    and constraints.

    Building off these two sections, section three

    outlines the specic objectives, vision and urban

    design principles for the HSSA. Section four sets

    out the strategy for achieving the vision, providing

    guidelines and concrete interventions for realising

    the objectives and implementing the urban design

    principles. Phasing, section ve, denes three

    broad stages towards implementing the strategy

    for the study area. Finally, section six provides

    conclusions, including key elements to consider in

    carrying the brief forward.

    This development brief focuses on the Hoxton

    Square Study Area (HSSA) within the assigned

    Shoreditch study areas (Figure 1.1) with an aimto provide guidance to a professional team on the

    types of development appropriate for the HSSA. It

    is built off a comprehensive urban analysis of the

    three study areas undertaken from mid January

    to end of February 2009, whose methodology

    included site visits and secondary research

    sources. Key policy and planning issues and the

    physical, socio-economic and spatial aspects of

    the HSSA were drawn from this research, informing

    the composition of the objectives, vision, design

    principles, development strategy and selected

    development sites.

    The brief consists of six sections, with this rst

    introductory section dening the terms of reference,

    01_Introduction

    Figure 1.1

    3

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    1.1_Terms of reference

    Our terms of reference are dened as follows:

    To draw upon the comprehensive urbananalysis as a basis for formulating this

    development brief with a specic focus on

    the HSSA;

    To prioritise particular characteristics, with

    crime prevention through environmental

    design (CPTED) as an overall objective;

    To maintain, strengthen, improve, upscale

    and modify these characteristics through

    detailing the objectives, vision, designprinciples and development strategies;

    To ensure that the brief covers the urban

    structure, access and public realm,

    illustrated through interventions covering

    building and open space development sites;

    and

    To outline briey outline short, medium

    and long-term phasing and conclusions,

    highlighting elements to be considered inmoving the brief forward.

    Hackney has a long history of suffering relative

    economic disadvantage compared to the rest of

    London although in recent years its economy has

    grown more quickly than the rest of London, withstrong growth demonstrated in the service sector

    (Hackney, 2004). Figures from 2004-2005 showed

    that Hackney Borough had a higher percentage of

    unemployed and economically inactive people in

    conjunction with a lower percentage of employed

    residents than the regional and national average

    (UK National Statistics, 2001; Hackney, 2004).

    Hackney residents earn the second lowest hourly

    rate in inner London, although the number of

    residents gaining qualications is increasing in

    recent years (Hackney, 2004).

    The socio-economic data for the study area reects

    a sharp divide between areas in the north and

    south of HSSA. Hackney is ranked rst as the

    most deprived borough in England, with the area

    in the north of the HSSA within the 10% of the

    most deprived wards in the country (UK National

    Statistics, 2001). Residents here are largely

    classed as struggling families, directly contrasting

    with the inhabitants who live around and south of

    Hoxton Square classed as dynamic couples and

    singles (Hackney, 2004), as illustrated in Figure1.2. Regarding tenure, social rent is markedly

    high in the area north of Hoxton Square, reecting

    the prevalence of social housing estates, while

    private rent and ownership is markedly higher is

    the south of HSSA (Figure 1.3). The proportion

    of socially rented housing has dropped in recent

    years, perhaps a sign of gentrication and poorer

    households being forced out (Hackney, 2006).

    Finally, there is a signicantly high population

    density of residents over 65 in the northern part

    of HSSA and particularly low number of residentsaged 0-19 in the southern area (Figure 1.4).

    Figure 1.2

    1.2_Setting out the physical and

    socio-economic context

    4

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    Figure 1.3

    Figure 1.4

    5

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    1.3_Summary of policy and planning

    framework

    The key contextual planning and policy framework

    issues relating to the HSSA were reviewed and

    assessed at the London Level (Greater London

    Authority) and Hackney Borough Council scalesrespectively.

    The London Plans strategic priorities for

    East London include:

    Identifying opportunities for employment,

    housing and appropriate mixed use

    development;

    Promoting retailing, services, employment,

    leisure and housing;

    Delivering transport infrastructure, including

    public transport, walking and cycling

    connections and

    Ensuring that social and community

    infrastructure is retained, enhanced and

    expanded where needed (GLA, 2004: 242).

    Bishopsgate/South Shoreditch (35 ha) is identied

    as an Opportunity Area with 16,000 planned new

    jobs by 2016 and 800 new homes (GLA, 2004:

    252). The Plan recognises that the Eastern City

    Fringe (containing Shoreditch) contains both some

    of Londons most deprived inner city communities

    as well as afuent new quarters. Shoreditch is also

    recognised as a strategically important commercial

    and cultural attraction along with Spitalelds and

    Brick Lane (GLA, 2004: 247).

    At the Borough level, the strategic policy context

    is primarily framed by the Core Strategy report, tobe released in the spring of 2009. In April 2008,

    the Preferred Policy Options (Hackney, 2008)

    set out a series of 44 key proposals for change

    and development over the next 15 years. South

    Shoreditch is specically identied as a key

    opportunity area, largely due to its location on

    the fringe of the City of London and its increasing

    importance as a cultural and nightlife centre

    juxtaposed with large concentrations of residential

    neighborhoods characterised by socio-economic

    deprivation. Specically, policy option number 44is aimed at strengthening the areas position as a

    major destination characterised by historic heritage

    and identity, good transport links and role within the

    local economy by:

    A managed approach to the northward

    expansion of the City of London through

    supporting its nancial and business

    sectors;

    Ensuring the conservation and enhancement

    of the historic environment;

    Supporting development opportunities to

    realise London Plan targets for new jobs

    and homes;

    Applying the highest urban design standards

    to all new developments;

    Enhancing the unique characters of the

    area and

    Encouragement of mixed-uses and

    sustainable development and regeneration

    (Hackney, 2008).

    6

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    01_Introduction

    02_Aeraanalysis

    03_Objectives,vison

    anddesignprinciples

    0

    4_Detailed

    developmentstrategy

    0

    5_Phasing

    06_C

    onclusion

    02_Area analysis

    7

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    2.1_Urban design characteristics

    Spatial analyses were carried out for the threeareas in the Shoreditch study site, to understand

    the following seven urban design characteristics:

    Urban grain/block structure

    Open space systems

    Urba

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