HOW TO RAISE AWARENESS IN YOUR COMMUNITY Homelessness Awareness Day 2009 Governor’s Committee to End Homelessness.

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> HOW TO RAISE AWARENESS IN YOUR COMMUNITY Homelessness Awareness Day 2009 Governors Committee to End Homelessness </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Presentation Outline PHC Event Objectives/Overview Suggested Committees Successful GCEH PHC Event Other Awareness Events Resources </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Creating Awareness Project Homeless Connect </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Support for Project Homeless Connect Project Homeless Connect is breaking the myth that people do not seek assistance and services and would rather be on the street. The data prove that, when people are approached in a respectful and kind manner and with available resources, they are eager to accept help toward self-sufficiency -Mayor Gavin Newsom, City of San Francisco National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Support for Homeless Project Connect This is the beginning of a new way to address homelessness.... Project Homeless Connect is a one- day, one-stop shop to deliver real services to people experiencing real homelessness in our community. But this is also about a commitment to move from simply managing homelessness towards really ending homelessness -Mayor R.T. Rybak, City of Minneapolis National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Scope of Project Connect Events Project Connect events happen all over the county and beyond. There have already been 330 events in 200 communities including Canada and Australia. There were more than 17 new Project Homeless Connect events in 2008. 77 events were put on in the first half of 2008. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Background What is Project Homeless Connect? Where did Project Homeless Connect Originate? What are the characteristics of Project Homeless Connect? What are specific themes of Project Homeless Connect? Why establish Project Homeless Connect? National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> What is Project Homeless Connect? One-day Event. One-stop for housing, support, quality of life services. One-goal: ending homelessness. City/County or community-led. Consumer-centric. Outcome-oriented. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Where did Project Homeless Connect Originate ? Fall 2004 San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom creates the first connect event to engage and welcome homeless people back into the community. Fall 2005 Communities across the country form temporary one-stops to welcome newly homeless victims of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Winter 2005 The U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness launches the National Project Homeless Connect Partnership. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Homeless Connect Origins Cont. Winter 2006 40 Cities join the National Project Homeless Connect Week in December 2006. Winter 2007 the Third Annual National Project Homeless Connect event ends and over 130 cities have held events during 2007. 2008 Fourth Annual National Project Homeless Connect Week announced for December 1-7, 2008. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Characteristics of Project Homeless Connect Hospitality: Consumers are welcomed guests. Immediacy: Same-day results for consumers. Community: Voluntary civic participation. Partnership: Across agencies and sectors. Excellence: Rigorous Evaluation and Improvement. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> Themes of Project Homeless Connect Not business as usual. No waiting in line. Homeless people do enough of that. Hospitality from the whole community. Immediate access- not simply referrals. Quality of life resources- haircuts, massage and foot care, phone calls, eye glasses, dental and medical care, meals, entertainment, wheelchair repair, etc. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Why Establish Project Homeless Connect? Enhance quality of life for the entire community. Engage civic leaders in solutions to homelessness. Transform homeless service delivery systems. Increase public knowledge and awareness. Debunk myths and stereotypes. Increase investment/momentum towards solutions. Re-engage our homeless neighbors. Offer quality of life resources. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Ten Essentials of Project Homeless Connect 1. Political/Community Will. 2. Partnership. 3. Planning Team. 4. Site Selection. 5. Volunteers. 6. Services. 7. Consumer engagement. 8. Media. 9. Data and results. 10. Event execution. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> 1. Political and Community Will Involve Mayor or County official leadership. Work to re-prioritize local government resources. Involve media and capture interest. Connect agencies in the community. Involve local businesses. </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> 2.Partnership As in the case in the development of 10-year plans, partnership of the public and private sector is essential. They offer resources and access. Government partners include: City agencies, county agencies, State agencies, Federal agencies. USICH Regional Coordinator, find out who is the coordinator for Missouri. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> 2. Partnership Cont. Private sector event partners can include: United Way, businesses, banks, chambers of commerce, downtown associates, housing developers, tourism officials, universities, technical colleges, trade schools, behavioral health providers, transportation agencies, workforce agencies, faith- based organizations, law enforcement, veterans organizations, advocates/non-profits, consumers, libraries, parks and recreational agencies. </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> 3. Planning Team Planning teams should have a director and involve leaders in the city/county. The planning teams decisions should be informed by: homeless/formerly homeless consumers, a representative from each partner group, those who have experienced a successful PHC first-hand. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> 4. Site Selection PHC is not business as usual and a community site that is not associated with homelessness is preferred. The venue should be: large, centrally located, known to the community, indoors, a civic/faith/corporate or university facility, and unusual for the consumer to visit. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> 4. Site Selection Cont. Develop a conscious design for the use of the space. Create a welcoming and festive environment. Post clear signage, floor plans, and maps. Accommodate media and special guests. Assure accessibility for those with special needs. Plan for 2 hours to setup and 2 hours to break down. Ensure that consumers do not wait in lines. Serve meals with musical entertainment. Provide mobile hospitality where ever consumers go. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> 5.Volunteers Volunteers are 1/2 of the connection in PHC. The other are homeless consumers. Ensuring that both sides are comfortable and understand the nature of PHC is vital to success. Set a goal for volunteer to guest ratios. Develop a promotional video or other materials. Enlist partners with ties to local volunteer pools. Target corporate, civic, educational, and faith-based institutions. Conduct open recruitment by advertising. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> 6. Services Key in the provision of services is IMMEDIACY. The direct provision of housing, jobs, benefits, and quality of life services-including haircuts and eyeglasses are what sets PHC apart. Essential Services: Housing/Shelter, Employment, Medicaid, SS benefits, Veterans Benefits, Medical/Dental/Orthopedic, Drug/Alcohol/Mental Health, Legal, Teen/Youth, DMV, Elder Care, Pet Care, Credit Counseling, Transportation, Case Management, Mail/Phone, Food/Beverage, Haircuts/Massage/Foot Care, Showers/Hygiene Kits, Eye Exams/Eyeglasses, Bicycle/Wheelchair Repair, Entertainment, Education, Books/Libraries. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> 7. Consumer Engagement PHC is centered around the consumer, the homeless individual or family. Marketing PHC to them means knowing where they are and what they need. Set a goal for consumer turnout. Create a flyer with date/map/directions to the event. Begin outreach as soon as the date and site are set. Enlist police, direct service providers, and consumers. Deploy engagement teams on the day of the event. Host PHCs regularly and listen to consumers. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> 7. Consumer Engagement Cont. Many communities provide flyers to law enforcement and local businesses to get the word out. Some have used flyers with bus passes attached and maps to bus depots where free transit is available. San Francisco uses an engagement team to inform and engage consumers. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> 8. Media PHC offers an opportunity to welcome homeless individuals and families in the community and debunk myths and stereotypes about them. Public officials offering words of welcome and homeless people actively seeking to move beyond homelessness are messages to the community at- large that media can assist in communicating. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> 8. Media Cont. Partner in National Project Homeless Connect. Appoint and experienced point-person for media. Develop a communications plan and press packet. Invite media to cover the PHC opening rally. Arrange for media to track a willing client during your PHC event. Invite officials to greet homeless consumers as they arrive. Report PHC results to the media same-day. Contextualize your PHC as part of the National Partnership. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> 9. Data and Results Quantifiable results are central to PHC. Each resource provider should keep and report data. Identify a lead to report on the following: Clients/Vouchers engaged, persons housed, persons off the streets, persons employed, social security benefits applications, veteran benefit applications, food stamp/welfare applications, IDs issued, eyeglasses issued, medical/dental care received, wheelchairs/bicycles repaired, citations adjudicated, personal hygiene kits given out, lbs of food distributed, haircuts/massages given, phone calls made. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> 10. Event Execution PHC is NOT about waiting in lines or signing up on long waiting lists, or creating false expectations. PHC IS about delivery, execution, and results. On event day remember to: Be prepared to troubleshoot issues, remain flexible with volunteer and other resources, recognize and include sponsors, partners, and officials, be diligent in obtaining consumer feedback, learn from what worked and what did not, publicize results immediately and celebrate success. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> 10. Event Execution Cont. Develop a plan for the day. For example: Doors open at: ____:____ for volunteers and staff. Set up. Volunteer orientation-review location of services. Match volunteer requests with opportunities. Doors open at: ____:_____ homeless consumers. No lines-homeless people go to meal site and sit at tables with entertainment. Mobile Hospitality Volunteers assisted by specialists escort consumers to resources. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> 10. Event Execution Cont. MHV remains with consumer through every meeting. Typical schedule: 8:30 volunteer registration. 9:00 Rally. 9:30-10:00 service area assignment. 10-3 connecting with the homeless. 11:30-1 lunch served. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> 10. Event Execution Cont. Four Steps to the Day. Step 1: Check-in. Step 2: Getting the services. Step 3: Check out. Step 4: Hygiene kits. Volunteer wrap-up and debrief. Breakdown and clean up. National Project Homeless Connect Toolkit USICH-2008 </li> <li> Slide 32 </li> <li> PHC Sub-Committees Logistics Committee Services Committee Volunteer Committee Media/Donations Committee Coordinating Committee </li> <li> Slide 33 </li> <li> PHC Outcomes Learned more about homeless in the community Learned contributing factors Made stronger connections and built relationships Accessed important services 814 services provided 11 MO photo IDs and Social Security cards 28 Birth certificates 46 Haircuts 14 connections with Head Start Other services Raised awareness Volunteers had personal encounter Volunteers became educated Business community Educated the community through Media coverage </li> <li> Slide 34 </li> <li> Creating Awareness Other Awareness Event Ideas </li> <li> Slide 35 </li> <li> Planning for your Community Events/Activities Proclamation Media Coverage </li> <li> Slide 36 </li> <li> Events/Activities *Most are held within the National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week in November * A truly successful Awareness Week/Event will inspire people to become further involved with the issues of hunger and homelessness. One Night Without a Home Skipping meals Movie night Congressional letters Lobbying Faces of Homelessness Panel Others Awareness Week Manual National Coalition for the Homeless-2009 </li> <li> Slide 37 </li> <li> One Night Without a Home Spend the night outside to discuss, think and learn about homelessness Duration of 12 hours Select site that is appropriate to your community Invite homeless individuals, community leaders and residents Serve an evening meal or coffee/beverages Speakers, candlelight vigil, music, movie, etc. Discussion groups Breakfast and wrap-up discussion Can promote advocacy and education Distribute fact sheets Provide participants with ways to act upon their experience (letter writing, involvement with advocacy organizations, etc.) Awareness Week Manual National Coalition for the Homeless-2009 </li> <li> Slide 38 </li> <li> Skipping Meals One day for community members to skip a meal Have them donate their coffee and/or lunch money to the homeless service programs in your community instead Have them raise funds (pledges) for them to skip their meal They can encourage other friends and family members to do the same Have a coffee shop or restaurant set up a booth Encourage community members to skip their coffee and donate their money instead Encourage community members to match the amount that they spend on break...</li></ul>