How to Give a Good Talk?

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How to Give a Good Talk?. Arnaud Legout INRIA, Sophia Antipolis EPI Plante. Email: arnaud.legout@inria.fr. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-NC-SA License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/. cel-00529505, version 5 - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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<ul><li><p>How to Give a Good Talk?Arnaud Legout</p><p>INRIA, Sophia AntipolisEPI Plante Email: arnaud.legout@inria.frThis work is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-NC-SA License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/cel-00529505, version 5April 2013</p></li><li><p>Presentations are afundamental part ofresearch excellence*Why?</p></li><li><p>Research and MarketingThe best researchers in the world learned how to sell their workTo the community: visibility, impactTo students: attract graduate studentsTo commissions: funding, promotionTo the public: increase attraction of your field, fame </p><p>*</p></li><li><p>Goals of a PresentationGive the audience the intuition of your ideaMake the audience eager To read your paperTo ask you questionsTo discuss with youBuild relationshipCreate a reputationGet feedback*</p></li><li><p>Goals of a PresentationShow you can make great presentationsBig plus in a careerConversely, a poor presentation can kill an application to a new position</p><p>*Each talk is an interview talk</p></li><li><p>Can You Trust Me?Make your own opinionAttend/watch presentationsMimic presentations you understand/likeBig plus if it is not your fieldNever ever consider simplicity and clarity as a proof of weakness: this is talentYou can violate the rules if you have a very good reason to do so*</p></li><li><p>Focus of This TalkBroadly applicable advices for any kind of talks</p><p>Some specifics for scientific talksComplex figuresEquationsMethodologyProof*</p></li><li><p>OutlineWhy should you bother doing talks?How to structure your talk?How to make your slides?How to give your talk?Great talks examples</p><p>*</p></li><li><p>*Tell a Clear and Convincing Story</p></li><li><p>Define First Your MessageThe audience will remember at most one single messageWhich message you want to audience to remember? Can you express this message in less than a minute in an elevator?</p><p>Tailor you talk according to this messageDont sell more, but sell it well*</p></li><li><p>Do Not Present Too MuchCommon pitfallI did a lot and I will present every single bit of my work. They will be impressed!That shows you are unable to deliver a message</p><p>Do not hesitate to cut your resultsBetter to present 10% the entire audience gets than 90% nobody gets*</p></li><li><p>Adapt to the AudienceThe entire audience must understand your talkBetter to explain notions a part of the audience already knows than to lose another part during the talk</p><p>Do not overestimate the knowledge of the audience in your field*</p></li><li><p>Give a Structure to Your TalkGive a backgroundAdapt to the audienceAdapt the technical granularity of your presentationMake it fun and catchyMotivate your workWhy is the subject important and interesting?Focus of your workWhat is this presentation/work about in a single sentence? What is the problem?*</p></li><li><p>Give a Structure to Your TalkShow methodology and toolsShow resultsClearly show your contributionsConclude with a summary of contributionsImpact of this workFuture work rarely makes sense unless you are really planning future work*Tell a story from the background to the conclusion</p></li><li><p>Give a Structure to Your TalkGive an outlineYou can give it first before or after (better) the backgroundRepeat the outline before each new partUse color to show where you areMake clear the structure of your talk to the audienceNo suspense *</p></li><li><p>Give a Structure to Your TalkNo need to go deep into related work (unless it is a survey)Your contributions must be the coreBut, be prepared to discuss related work*</p></li><li><p>Alternate StructuresYou need to know what you are doingMore original means more risks</p><p>Alternate questions and answersAppropriate for tutorials and general talksLess appropriate for technical talksBut, can be used to introduce the problem and each contribution*</p></li><li><p>Alternate StructuresNo slidesNeed to be a very strong speakerNeed a very well structured presentationNeed a very high effort from the audienceYou must transmit energySome (lazy) people dont like such presentation*</p></li><li><p>Make SummariesFor each important resultAt the end of each part of your talk</p><p>*Clearly show the take home messages</p></li><li><p>Anticipate Q&amp;AQ&amp;A are part of the talk, dont underestimate its importancePrepare backup slidesVery impressive when it worksYou can put technical details or results you did not have time to address in themBe prepared to answer questionsRehearse with colleaguesBe prepared to hard questions*</p></li><li><p>Questions You Must Ask Before You Prepare Your TalkMy goal?My single message?Audience?Background, knowledge, size, expectationsDuration?For the talk, for the questionsRoom characteristics?Size, position of the screen, my position *Adapt your talk and material to each context</p></li><li><p>OutlineWhy should you bother doing talks?How to structure your talk?How to make your slides?How to give your talk?Great talks examples</p><p>*</p></li><li><p>*Clarity and simplicityYou give the talk, slides support it. Never compete with them, you will lose!</p></li><li><p>Slide TemplateAvoid overloaded templatesFrequent with some companies that like to justify a costly graphical identityUnless you have a graphical talent, keep it simpleMake a clear distinction between the title and the restDo not use complex headers or footersNo need to give the presentation title, affiliation, authors list, company logo, etc. on each slide March 2013Arnaud Legout How to Give a Good Talk- *How to give a good talk &gt; How to make your slides &gt; Slide Template</p><p>Arnaud Legout How to Give a Good Talk</p></li><li><p>Use Slide NumbersHow do you know which slide it is over 30?The slide whose title is Use Slide NumbersThe slide after Presentation GuidelinesI dont remember, go back, again, again, again, again, stop yes this one!Used to ask questions and to practiceUsed during audio or video conferencesAt least 20 ptEven at the back someone may ask a question</p></li><li><p>Use Slide NumbersIn some cases, it is useful to also add the total number of slidesFor a defense or a short talkEasy way for the jury or the audience to assess whether you are close to the conclusion and will not exceed your allocated timeFor longer talks dont show the total numberA large number of remaining slides might be discouraging*/120</p></li><li><p>Use non-serif fonts (times)Serif fonts are hard to readLine width is not uniformThin lines may not render well with all projector typesHard to read from the backUseArial: looks formal, very (may be too) popularTahoma: plainCalibri: good alternative to arialCentury Gothic: elegant*</p></li><li><p>Use non-serif fonts (Arial)Serif fonts hard to readLine width is not uniformThin lines may not render well with all projector typesHard to read from the backUseArial: looks formal, very (may be too) popularTahoma: plainCalibri: good alternative to arialCentury Gothic: Elegant*</p></li><li><p>Use non-serif fonts (Tahoma)Serif fonts hard to readLine width is not uniformThin lines may not render well with all projector typesHard to read from the backUseArial: looks formal, very (may be too) popularTahoma: plainCalibri: good alternative to arialCentury Gothic: Elegant*</p></li><li><p>Use non-serif fonts (Calibri)Serif fonts hard to readLine width is not uniformThin lines may not render well with all projector typesHard to read from the backUseArial: looks formal, very (may be too) popularTahoma: plainCalibri: good alternative to arialCentury Gothic: Elegant*</p></li><li><p>Use non-serif fonts (Century G.)Serif fonts hard to readLine width is not uniformThin lines may not render well with all projector typesHard to read from the backUseArial: looks formal, very (may be too) popularTahoma: plainCalibri: good alternative to arialCentury Gothic: Elegant*</p></li><li><p>The Ban Comic Sans CampaignSome people hate the comic sans fonthttp://bancomicsans.com</p><p>ReasonsUbiquitousChildish, immature, naveInappropriately usedDesigned at Microsoft*</p></li><li><p>The Ban Comic Sans CampaignSafe side to do not use itBe aware you might upset the audienceDont use it for a job applicationI used it in my lectures starting in 2005I believed it looks less scary than Arial for studentsDropped it in late 2011 (I prefer Calibri now)It is very rare today in academic presentations*</p></li><li><p>Use Large FontsFont must be larger than 24pt (here it is 32pt)Font must be larger than 24pt (here it is 24pt)Font must be larger than 24pt (here it is 20pt)Font must be larger than 24pt (here it is 18pt)Font must be larger than 24pt (here it is 16pt)Font must be larger than 24pt (here it is 14pt)Where do you stop to read it from the back?Consider poor projectors, poor screens, poor eyes</p><p>*</p></li><li><p>Use Large Symbols*</p></li><li><p>Use Thick Solid Lines and Colors*</p></li><li><p>Never Use Camera Ready Figures*</p></li><li><p>Be ConciseDo not write complete sentences as they make your message obfuscated in long lines of textNever forget that nobody can read your slides and listen to you at the same time unless you are reading what is in your slides. But, you must not read your slides, this is boringOmit technical details, there is no chance to explain everything in a single presentation. Instead, you should make the audience eager to read your workDo not believe complexity will impress your audience, it will simply make you look unable to express your idea</p><p>*</p></li><li><p>Be ConciseWrite small sentencesDo not compete with your slidesYou give the message, the slides support itDo not dig into detailsJust deliver a messageGive a preview of your work/paperBe simple in your explanations</p><p>*</p></li><li><p>Should I Show One Bullet at a Time?Perfectly fine to show the entire slide if it is conciseNo need to over animateWhen appropriate, I like to show the title alone to introduce the slideBut, if you feel you compete with your slides, show one (or a few bullets) at a timeRule of thumb: do not animate bullets (or block of bullets) on which you discuss less than 20 to 30s*</p></li><li><p>Should I Show One Bullet at a Time?But, never everAnimateBulletsToo FastBest way to compete with your slideIn case of doubt, dont animateSafe side*</p></li><li><p>Use IllustrationsMake your point clear and simpleGive a mental image people are more likely to remember</p><p>Always use a figure instead of a table*</p></li><li><p>Without Illustrations (Poor)Prior to distributionContent split multiple piecesMetainfo file created by the content providerTo join a torrentPeer P retrieves metainfo file from a well-known websiteP contacts the tracker The tracker responds back with a peer set of randomly selected peersP contacts peers in this set and start requesting different pieces of the content*</p></li><li><p>*With Illustrations (Better)Web serverTrackercoolContent.torrentrandom peer setcoolContent.xvid</p></li><li><p>How Many Colors?No more than three colors on a slideHere I have fourUse easy to distinguish colors like dark Blue, Red, and GreenUse colors to emphasize an important wordMay be used to remind you to develop keypoints*</p></li><li><p>How Many Colors?No more than three colors on a slideHere I have threeUse easy to distinguish colors like dark Blue, Red, and BlackUse colors to emphasize an important wordMay be used to remind you to develop keypoints*</p></li><li><p>Background ColorsNever use light colors or low contrastThey may not render well</p><p>*Never use light colors or low contrastThey may not render wellNever use light colors or low contrastThey may not render wellNever use light colors or low contrastThey may not render wellNoNoYesYes, but ugly</p></li><li><p>Background ColorsI like this oneQuite relaxing to look at such slidesLooks clean and simpleSeems to work well with colors tooRed, Blue, Green (favor light colors)Be careful with contrastWhen there is light in the room, contrast is lowerYou dont have control on it, consider the worst case*</p></li><li><p>Background ColorsDont use thin fontsThey may not render wellI dont have much experience with this backgroundSeems to become more popularTry it and make your own opinion*</p></li><li><p>Colors and ProjectorsThe universal ruleProjectors never render colors as you expectBe prepared toRed that looks pink or orangeBlue that looks purpleYellow that is invisible (never use yellow)Never use colors that are too closeDark green, red, and blue is the safe side*</p></li><li><p>Do Not Over IllustrateDo not use Irrelevant illustrations</p><p>Weak metaphors</p><p>Animated images </p><p>*</p></li><li><p>Do Not Over AnimateIt is disturbingAnnoying</p><p>Useless*You cannot keep the audience focused</p></li><li><p>Use Semantic Animations*Use with caution </p></li><li><p>Use Enlightening AnimationsAnimations must make complex idea simple to graspNo magic, it is a lot of work to make</p><p>Here are two examples*</p></li><li><p>*Use Enlightening Animations: P2P caseP2PClient-server</p></li><li><p>Credit: G. Berry, Collge de France, 25/01/08 * 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3132 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 4142 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 5152 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 6162 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71</p><p>Use Enlightening Animations: Sieve of EratosthenesA number is prime if it can only be divided by 1 or by itself</p><p> *</p></li><li><p> * 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3132 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 4142 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 5152 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 6162 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71</p><p>Use Enlightening Animations: Sieve of Eratosthenes</p><p>Credit: G. Berry, Collge de France, 25/01/08</p><p> *</p></li><li><p> * 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3132 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 4142 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 5152 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 6162 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71</p><p>Use Enlightening Animations: Sieve of Eratosthenes</p><p>Credit: G. Berry, Collge de France, 25/01/08</p><p> *</p></li><li><p> * 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3132 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 4142 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 5152 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 6162 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71</p><p>Use Enlightening Animations: Sieve of EratosthenesCredit: G. Berry, Collge de France, 25/01/08</p><p> *</p></li><li><p> * 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 1112 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 3132 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 4142 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 5152 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 6162 63 64 65 66 67 68 69 70 71</p><p>Use Enlightening Animations: Sieve of Eratosthenes</p><p>Credit: G. Berry, Collge de France, 25/01/08</p><p> *</p></li><li><p> Be neaTDo YOU like slides with sppell check erors Inconsistant:Capitalisation Bullet. Struture, font; Ugly slidespoor use of symbol !!!Poor layout *</p></li><li><p>Be NeatDo you like Slides with spell check errorsInconsistent CapitalizationBulletsStructureFontUgly slidesPoor use of symbolsPoor layout*</p></li><li><p>No Punctuation Mark.No punctuation mark:At the end of sentences:Period (.) ,Colon (:),Semi-colon (;),Comma (,).Apart from:Question marks (?), Exclamation marks (!).</p><p>*</p></li><li><p>No Punctuation MarkNo punctuation markAt the end of sentencesPeriod (.) Colon (:)Semi-colon (;)Comma (,)Apart fromQuestion marks (?)Exclamation marks (!)</p><p>*</p></li><li><p>Use Meaningful TitlesThe title should summarize the slide contentDo not use a same title with an increasing numberIntroduction 1/5Introduction 2/5 Etc.Poor variant cont.</p><p>*</p></li><li><p>Design and Presentation ZenShould you focus on the design of the slides?Question of time and moneyAddress issues by order of priorityA well defined and clear messageA well stru...</p></li></ul>