how to assemble your dining guide chicago dining ?· chicago’s greatest hits 1 8 q chicago’s...

Download How to assemble your dining guide CHICAGO DINING ?· Chicago’s Greatest Hits 1 8 Q Chicago’s Greatest…

Post on 25-Jul-2018

212 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • How to assemble your dining guide

    1

    2

    3

    4

    5

    Print out each page of this PDF on letter-sized (8.5 x 11) sheets of paper.

    Fold the top half of each page down to the bottom, so that the dotted line is on the outside of the crease.

    Then fold each page in half from left to right so the dotted line is on the outside of the crease. Then unfold from left to right to make a set of pages.

    Stack the pages the order they were printed out, making sure the page numbers are in the right order.

    Staple the pages together in the center.Youre done! Now go eat!

    Dottedline

    Dotted line

    CHICAGODINING

    101

  • By Kevin Pang

    Winter 2014/2015

    CHICAGODINING

    101

    Like any world-class city, Chicago presents two simultaneous versions of itself: one as described by the hotel concierge, the other inhabited by those who call it home. The former is defined by deep dish pizzas, cheese-caramel popcorn and architectural cruises in an area triangulated by Willis Tower, the Field Museum and the John Hancock Center. The Chicago of Chicagoans consists of three-flat buildings, beanbag toss on sidewalks, Goose Island Green Line, rib tips grilling on aquarium smokers and tamale-selling abuelas.

    Both Chicagos are valid representations of the city. But many out-of-towners only hear about one.

    So what does it mean to eat like a Chicagoan? Here, now, is our attempt to encapsulate our citys restaurant scene, a Chicago beyond whats perpetuated by guide-books and old Saturday Night Live skits.

    kpang@tribpub.comTwitter @pang

    Welcome to Chicago!

    Contents

    Note on itineraries: Callahead/check website first toconfirm hours of operation

    INTRODUCTION Luxury dining 3 Proletariat food 4 Yuppie dining 5 International 6

    ITINERARIES Chicagos Greatest Hits 1 8 Chicagos Greatest Hits 2 10 River North (no car) 12 Expense Account 14 South Side 16 International 18

    INTRODUCTION 2

    CThe RadlerSerious German for the cool crowd

    Get: Pretzel, German onion pie, any wurst, smoked ham sandwich

    2375 N. Milwaukee Ave.,773-276-0270dasradler.com

    Note: The beer list is mind-boggling and impressive. Dinner nightly, brunch on weekends.

    DLao Sze ChuanThe restaurant that popularized regional Chinese in Chicago

    Get: Cumin lamb, Tonys three-chili chicken, twice-cooked pork, hot pot

    Multiple locations, original restaurant at 2172 S. Archer Ave., 312-326-5040 tonygourmetgroup.com

    Note: Owner Tony Hu has a string of regional Lao restaurants, including Lao Beijing and Lao Shanghai in same complex.

    FSan Soo Gab SanCrowd-pleasing Korean tabletop barbecue

    Get: Kalbi (beef short ribs), bulgogi (marinated beef), kimchee zigae (spicy kimchee/pork stew)

    5247 N. Western Ave. 773-334-1589

    Note: Dont wear cashmere, unless you want it to smell like barbecue forever.

    EChopal Kabab &Steak

    Meat-first Indian/Pakastani BYOB

    Get: Grilled goat chops,chili chicken

    2240 W. Devon Ave.773-338-4080 chopalkababsteak.com

    Note: Overdosed on meat? Consider vegetarian Uru-Swati a half-mile west at 2629 W. Devon Ave., 773-262-5280

    Itinerary: INTERNATIONAL19

  • We begin with restaurants at the top tops in creative verve, critical acclaim and price tag. First some context: Fine-dining in Chicago during the 70s was shaped by chefs like Jovan Trboyev-ich and Jean Banchet, whose cooking philosophies were ensconced in the school of classic French. Then came Charlie Trotter in 1987, who sourced exotic ingredients and preached farm-to-table kitchen before it was en vogue. Trotters kitchen produced a coterie of Chicagos most influential chefs today.

    Among them is Grant Achatz, the man responsible for guiding our citys restaurants to a new stratum of ambition. When he opened Alinea in 2005, his cooking garnered praise that went beyond local adula-tions. Ruth Reichl, in Gourmet magazine, called it the best restaurant in the country. Where Trotters preached refinement and

    tradition, Achatzs food was altogether exacting, playful, interactive and theatrical, influenced by Spains avant-garde cooking move-ment (for example, a green taffy balloon dessert suspended with helium).

    For this genre of restau-rant, where diners can expect to pay $400 and up per person, Alinea continues to be the standard-bearer. Others, like L2O, Sixteen, Tru, Spiaggia and Grace, shoot for multi-Michelin-star status. Any international gourmet with a passing familiarity of Chicagos dining scene will reference these restaurants first.

    One level down in pricing, but with no less decorum, are Chicagos famed steakhouses. Gibsons, Gene & Georgettis and Mortons have long been the go-to beef emporiums for business suits and conven-tiongoers. Here youll find chicken Vesuvio, a Chicago invention bone-in chicken with potatoes sauteed in white wine, garlic and olive oil, then roasted until crisp.

    Luxury dining

    INTRODUCTION 3

    An example of square-cut pizza.

    What is the food of Chicagos Everyman and Everywoman? Each neigh-borhood has its say. In Lakeview, it might be a pub serving a two-handed cheeseburger. On the Southwest Side along Cermak Road, its the fry houses selling breaded shrimp by the paper bag. Youll hear the phrase tip-link combo uttered on the South and West sides, shorthand for rib tips and hot links found in barbecue takeouts.

    Most ubiquitous of all is the corner grill, found in almost every neighborhood, thatll serve a Chicago-style hot dog (mustard, neon relish, onions, pickle, tomato slices, sport peppers, celery salt). Italian beef the irresistibly sloppy bomb of roast beef, hot peppers and jus-soaked roll is Chicagos Everyman sandwich, and finer purveyors (Johnnies, Als #1, chains like Portillos and Buona Beef) still roast

    and slice beef in-house daily.Origins of the gyro

    sandwich are hotly disputed among a handful of Greek-town restaurant magnates along South Halsted Street, but all acknowledge it was introduced to America via Chicago sometime in the mid-60s. As for pizza, theres this false belief that Chicago-ans exclusively consume deep dish pizzas. More representa-tive of Chicagos pizza preference is the thin-crust sausage and cheese party cut: Instead of standard triangle-shaped wedges, the pie is cut crisscross into squares.

    Proletariat food

    INTRODUCTION 4

    EPleasant House BakeryBlue-collar English food with farm-to-table sensibility

    Get: Chicken balti pie, premium pasty, deluxe gravy chips

    964 W. 31st St., 773-523-7437, pleasanthousebakery.com

    Note: Second location now open in Three Oaks, Mich.

    FPunch HouseUnderground VFW Hall ambience, with punch on draft

    Get: Pimms Cup, Pilsen Fish House Punch

    1227 W. 18th St. 312-526-3851 punchhousechicago.com

    Note: Punch House (drinks) is part of the Duseks (restaurant) and Thalia Hall (live shows) triumvirate.

    F

    C

    B

    A

    D

    E

    55

    90

    290

    294

    DETAIL AREA

    Chicago

    Itinerary: SOUTH SIDE17

    1 Mile

    87TH

    95TH

    83RD

    GARFIELD

    31ST

    CERMAK

    ROOSEVELT

    HA

    LST

    ED

    PU

    LAS

    KI

    WES

    TER

    N

    CO

    TTA

    GE

    GR

    OV

    E

    STO

    NY

    ISLA

    ND

    CIC

    ERO

    55

    94

    94

    94 57

    90

    90

    A La ChaparritaSupermarket taqueria of the highest order

    Get: Crispy tripe and al pastor tacos, tepache (fermented pineapple drink)

    2500 S. Whipple St.773-254-0975

    Note: The supermarket makes its own longaniza sausage, which it sells by bulk.

    B Smak-TakHomey Polish cooking in lodge setting

    Get: Pierogis, hunter stew, stuffed cabbage rolls

    5961 N. Elston Ave. 773-763-1123 smaktak.com

    Note: Translation means taste-yes!

    C

    B

    A D

    E

    F

    55

    94

    290

    DETAIL AREA

    Chicago

    LakeMichigan

    Itinerary: INTERNATIONAL18

    1Mile

    BELMONT

    FULLERTON

    LAWRENCE

    CERMAK

    26TH

    OGDE

    N

    FOSTER

    DEVON

    ELSTON

    LINCO

    LNMILWAUKEE

    WES

    TER

    N

    CA

    NA

    L

    MIC

    HIG

    AN

    94

    94

    55

    90

    90

    290

    Chicago

  • TERRENCE ANTONIO JAMES / TRIBUNE PHOTO 2010

    Diners eating al fresco at the Purple Pig.

    For lack of a better term, we use yuppie in its literal sense restaurants frequented by young, urban professionals. This covers a wide swath of establishments, to be sure, but by our definition these restaurants: 1) offer beverage programs; 2) have changing menus that reflect ingredient seasonality; 3) are buzzy spots covered by media; and 4) charge around $100 for

    Yuppie dining dinner for two (by Chicago standards, this is considered a midtier price). Restaurants that fit that bill include: Girl & The Goat, Lula Cafe, The Publican, Hopleaf, The Purple Pig, Cafe Ba-Ba-Reeba, Sunda, Balena, so on and so forth. The overwhelming majority of these restaurants are on the North Side, though in recent years, restaurants like Nightwood and Dusek's have thrived south of Roosevelt Avenue.

    INTRODUCTION 5

    Goat chops at Chopal Kebab & Steak.

    One in every five Chicago-ans is of Mexican descent, representing more Latinos than people from any other country. The largest groups reside on the Southwest Side, in Pilsen and Little Village, neighborhoods where taquerias and carnicerias abound.

    Mexicans are responsible for Chicagos most robust street food scene (in a city where regulations all but stifle the culture), and it can be found Sundays at Maxwell Street Market, a mile south-west of the Loop. You also cant mention Mexic

Recommended

View more >