henry v by william shakespeare eng 400: british literature unit ii: celebrating humanity part ii:...

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Historical Situation in Henry V Act I Court Intrigue King Henry is considering a new law that would allow him to seize half the possessions of the Church. The Archbishops of Canterbury and Ely are looking for a way to avoid this by distracting him. Although King Henry IV was largely successful in defeating his enemies, England still faces unrest and warfare to the north, in Scotland. Salic Law Salic law declared that a woman could not hold the throne in Salic lands. Charles VI, the current king of France, is directly descended from King Phillip III of France, through the male line. Henry V is also descended from Phillip III, but through his great, great- grandmother, who was King Phillip’s granddaughter. In Act I Scene 2, Canterbury argues that Salic law does not apply in France, giving Henry V a valid claim to the lands he desires.

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Henry V by William Shakespeare ENG 400: BRITISH LITERATURE UNIT II: CELEBRATING HUMANITY PART II: DAYS 3 5 Day 3: The Dauphins Gift HISTORICAL SITUATION REVEALING CHARACTER CLOSE READING #1 Historical Situation in Henry V Act I Court Intrigue King Henry is considering a new law that would allow him to seize half the possessions of the Church. The Archbishops of Canterbury and Ely are looking for a way to avoid this by distracting him. Although King Henry IV was largely successful in defeating his enemies, England still faces unrest and warfare to the north, in Scotland. Salic Law Salic law declared that a woman could not hold the throne in Salic lands. Charles VI, the current king of France, is directly descended from King Phillip III of France, through the male line. Henry V is also descended from Phillip III, but through his great, great- grandmother, who was King Phillips granddaughter. In Act I Scene 2, Canterbury argues that Salic law does not apply in France, giving Henry V a valid claim to the lands he desires. Revealing Character Two types of characterization Direct: information about a character is directly stated by the author/narrator Indirect: information about a character is implied through dialogue, thoughts, and actions In drama, almost all characterization is indirect. Throughout the play, information about a character will be revealed through What the character says What the character does What others say about the character How others react to / behave toward the character Close Reading #1 King Henrys Message (I.2) 1.Turn and Talk: discuss the following with your neighbors [1 minute] a)What does the Dauphin mean when he says the king savors too much of [his] youth and that King Henry cannot revel into dukedoms? b)How disrespectful is the Dauphins gift? How do you think the king will respond? 2.As I read lines 270 278, underline all references to a game of tennis. a)Now, under Tennis Game, write 1 3 sentences explaining how King Henry turns the Dauphins gift into a threat. [2 minutes] 3.As I read lines 270 292, pay attention to his personal pronouns. Circle singular pronouns (I, me, my) in one color and plural pronouns (we, us, our) in another color. a)Now, turn and discuss with your neighbors what part of his response is said as a king (plural pronouns) and what part is spoken as a man (single pronouns). [2 minutes] Close Reading #1 King Henrys Message (I.2) 4.Listen as I read lines 285 292. a)Now, under Henrys Promise, summarize the promise that the king makes to the Dauphin. [1 minute] 5.As I read lines 293 301, highlight all references to war and its results. a)Then, turn and talk with your neighbors about what King Henry says will be the effect of the Dauphins joke (mock). [2 minutes] 6.Listen carefully as I read lines 302 310. Then, answer the Final Questions. [3 minutes] Who Is King Henry V? Word Bank AbleAggressiveAmbitiousArrogantArticulateBoastful BoldBraveCalmCautiousCleverConfident DevoutFairForgivingGenerousGrouchyHonest Humble Impulsive JudgmentalKindLoyalManipulative MaterialisticNavePassivePatientPitiful Proper RealisticRebelliousReflectiveReligiousRigidRude SarcasticSelfishSensibleSerious StrongStubborn Thoughtful Timid ToughTrustingWise Day 4: The Tavern Crew PROSE AND VERSE THE TAVERN CREW Prose and Verse in Shakespeare Plays Prose Everyday, informal language Looks like regular language written in sentences and paragraphs lines go to end of the page capital letters occur at beginning of new sentences Spoken by lower class by characters in altered states (drunk, insane, disguised, etc.) in less formal situations (comedic scenes, scenes between close friends or family) Verse Formal language; special occasions / situations Looks like poetry written in lines (dont reach end of page) each line begins with a capital letter Spoken by upper class by characters in love in more formal situations (speaking with superiors) May rhyme for special emphasis Characters The Tavern Crew The tavern crew in Henry V consists of the people with whom Prince Hal (now King Henry) spent much of his time in the plays Henry IV Part I and Henry IV Part II. At the end of Henry IV Part II, Prince Hal finally walks away from his low-born friends, even threatening Sir John Falstaffhis former mentorwith exile. In the play Henry V, Shakespeare alternates scenes of King Henry and his noble officers with scenes of the rowdy tavern crew for comedic (and sometimes dramatic) effect. Sir John Falstaff Prince Hals former close friend and mentor Boy Falstaffs errand boy Mistress Nell Quickly Hostess of the tavern; Pistols new wife Pistol, Bardolph, Nym Prince Hals former companions and fellow troublemakers Day 5: Three Traitors TYPES OF IRONY PARAPHRASE ACTIVITY CLOSE READING #2 Types of Irony Irony is created when there is a disconnect between what is perceived or expected and what actually is true or real. VerbalSituational Cosmic Dramatic Irony Verbal Irony In verbal irony, the author/speaker says one thing, but actually means something else. Verbal irony may be obvious or subtle. Tone of voice, facial expressions, gestures, or other physical manifestations may signal verbal irony. Oh, I couldnt agree more, she said dryly, rolling her eyes. Understatement: downplaying a situation Pun: using words with multiple meanings or similar sounds to create humor Overstatement (hyperbole): exaggerating for effect Sarcasm: using positive words to convey a negative meaning Situational Irony Also known as irony of situation Refers to the disconnect between what is hoped for or expected and what actually happens May be used to fool or mislead the reader (the infamous twist) Cosmic Irony (Irony of Fate) A special kind of situational irony that is based upon the belief that the universe is indifferent to individuals Even if things are going well right now, peoples lives end badly Ex. The lyrics to Alanis Morissettes song Ironic An old man turned 98. He won the lottery and died the next day. Its like 10,000 spoons when all you need is a knife. Its meeting the man of my dreams and then meeting his beautiful wife. Dramatic Irony Dramatic irony occurs when the audience has knowledge / information that characters do not have. It can build humor or tension, depending on the circumstances. Ex.: The partygoer carelessly wanders into the basement or the woods when the audience knows that the axe murderer is there waiting. Close Reading #2 Sentencing the Traitors (II.2) 1.As I read King Henrys speech on lines 173 202, put a box around any references to God. a)Then, under In Gods Hands, list the things that King Henry asks God to do or says that God has already done. [2 minutes] 2.As I reread lines 173 182, circle all of the active verbs that indicate what the traitors have done to merit death. a)Then, under Traitors Crimes, summarize King Henrys justification of the death penalty. [2 minutes] 3.As I reread lines 183 190, highlight the claim that the king makes about what he is not trying to do and his last justification of the death penalty. a)Then, turn and talk with your neighbors about this claim and whether you think it is really true. [1 minute] Close Reading #2 Sentencing the Traitors (II.2) 4.Finally, as I reread lines 191 202, underline any words and phrases that indicate the kings outlook (optimistic? pessimistic? nervous?) on the war with France. a)Then, turn and discuss the following questions with your neighbors. [3 minutes] i.What is the kings outlook on the war with France at the end of this scene? Why does he feel this way? ii.What does King Henry order his men to do? iii.What reaction do you have to the kings final line (202)? What does it make you think of his character?