help your child learn to read this workshop will give you the tools to help you help your child

Download Help Your Child Learn To Read This workshop will give you the tools to help you help your child

Post on 27-Mar-2015

217 views

Category:

Documents

5 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Slide 1

Help Your Child Learn To Read This workshop will give you the tools to help you help your child. Slide 2 Purpose The purpose of this workshop is to help first grade parents gain a better understanding of what they can do at home to help their child learn to read. The purpose of this workshop is to help first grade parents gain a better understanding of what they can do at home to help their child learn to read. It will teach you the tools used in your childs first grade classroom so there will be a consistency and a connection between school and home learning. It will teach you the tools used in your childs first grade classroom so there will be a consistency and a connection between school and home learning. It will give parents a knowledge base of how to select appropriate materials and how to use these materials effectively in order to meet the individual needs of your child. It will give parents a knowledge base of how to select appropriate materials and how to use these materials effectively in order to meet the individual needs of your child. Slide 3 What needs or concerns do you have with helping your child with reading at home? Time To Share Slide 4 From This Workshop You Will Learn the Following: How to: Help prepare your child before reading a book Cue your child when they come to a word they dont know Teach them skills that will help them read independently Select appropriate books for your child Teach your child how to think about what they are reading in order to gain meaning from the books Read orally with them in order to build their vocabulary Find useful websites that support their literacy Slide 5 Taking a Book Walk Before Reading The purpose of taking a book walk is to interest your child in the story, relate it to their experiences, and provide a frame of meaning that will support this. The introduction should be conversational rather than a prescribed story review or series of questions. It should use important vocabulary or proper names that may be difficult. It debugs the book by directing the childs attention to new text features they will need to use as readers. Fountas & Pinnell, 1996 Slide 6 How to Take a Book Walk 1. Read aloud the title and the author with your child. 2. Tell your child what the book is about. 3. Call attention to any difficult words, asking your child to locate it and look at its specific features. 4. Have your child look through the pictures and gain some meaning as to what the story is about. 5. Ask your child to make some predictions. Now They Are Ready to Read Slide 7 During Reading Listen to your child as he/she reads aloud to you. Listen to your child as he/she reads aloud to you. Try not to interrupt and allow him/her time to try and solve difficult words on their own. Try not to interrupt and allow him/her time to try and solve difficult words on their own. Observe what he/she is doing as they read. Pay attention to any errors but do not interrupt. Observe what he/she is doing as they read. Pay attention to any errors but do not interrupt. Allow your child to try and solve any difficulties on their own. Allow your child to try and solve any difficulties on their own. Slide 8 The Three Reading Cue Systems Meaning Cues Meaning Cues A Sense of story A Sense of story Prior Knowledge Prior Knowledge Illustrations Illustrations Meaning Cues come from childrens life experiences. Meaning is represented in their memories and in the language they use to talk about that meaning. (Clay, 1993a) Slide 9 The Three Reading Cue Systems Structure Cues Structure Cues Natural Language Natural Language Knowledge of English Knowledge of English Grammatical Patterns and Language Structures Grammatical Patterns and Language Structures Structure comes from knowing how oral language is put together. Language is rule-governed; words are strung together conforming to rules. (Clay, 1993a) Slide 10 The Three Reading Cue Systems Visual Cues Visual Cues Sounds and Symbols Sounds and Symbols Print Conventions Print Conventions Directionality Directionality Words/Spaces Words/Spaces Letters Letters Beginnings/Endings Beginnings/Endings Punctuation Punctuation Visual information comes from knowing the relationship between oral language and its graphic symbols the letters that are formed into words, divided by spaces, and arranged on the page, as well as the conventions of print such as punctuation. (Clay, 1993a) Slide 11 How To Cue Your Child Ask: What would make sense here? Ask: What would make sense here? (Meaning Cue) Ask: What would sound right here? Ask: What would sound right here? (Structure Cue) Ask: What does it look like? Ask: What does it look like? (Visual Cue) These cues will help them look at the meaning of the text, the letters that make up the word, and what they know about the English language. Slide 12 Lets Try Using Meaning Cues! Correct Sentence: The bear is eating with his paws. Child Says: The dog is eating with his paws. Now, what do you say? 1.Point out: Look at that word again (pointing to bear). Lets look at the picture and think about whats happening in the story. 2.Question: What kind of animal is that? Does it look like a dog or something else? 3.Remind: So when we are reading, we can use the pictures to help us with words we dont know. Slide 13 Lets Try Using Structure Cues! Correct Sentence: I got a new bike. Child Says: I got a not bike. Now, what do you say? 1.Point out: Look at that word again (pointing to new). Lets think about the way we talk. 2.Question: You said I got a not bike. Does that sound right? Do we say it that way? 3.Remind: So when we are reading, we can think about the way we talk to help us understand what the story is saying. Slide 14 Lets Try Using Visual Cues Correct Sentence: I go to school. Child Says: I went to school. Now, what do you say? Point out: Look at that word again (pointing to go). Lets look at the letters in that word. Question: You said went. Does that look right? What would you see at the beginning if it said went? What would you see at the end? What do you see at the beginning of that word? And at the end? What do you think it could be? Remind: So when we are reading, we need to look at the letters in the word to figure out what it is. Slide 15 After Reading Engage your child in a conversation about the story. Engage your child in a conversation about the story. Encourage your child to develop and defend a well- grounded interpretation of their own Encourage your child to develop and defend a well- grounded interpretation of their own Provide opportunities for your child to express their thoughts about characters and events with open-ended discussions Provide opportunities for your child to express their thoughts about characters and events with open-ended discussions These types of aesthetic responses will help your child gain a love for reading and will enhance cognitive aspects. (Murphy, 1998) Slide 16 Key Points Ask your childs teacher what his/her reading level is and if they can send hoe some books at their level. Your local library will also have leveled books or you can search online. Ask your childs teacher what his/her reading level is and if they can send hoe some books at their level. Your local library will also have leveled books or you can search online. Be sure the book you choose to read with your child is something they can handle. If you find them making lots of errors, try a different book. Be sure the book you choose to read with your child is something they can handle. If you find them making lots of errors, try a different book. Do not correct every mistake! Do not correct every mistake! Let them try it first on their own, if they get stuck use appropriate questions to help them figure it out on their own. Let them try it first on their own, if they get stuck use appropriate questions to help them figure it out on their own. After reading, then go point out one or two places where you can use the cues. After reading, then go point out one or two places where you can use the cues. Slide 17 Book Selection If a childs eyes are skimming over the words and he/she finishes the book with no grasp of the plot line and no visual images, then a reading experience can be destructive. If a childs eyes are skimming over the words and he/she finishes the book with no grasp of the plot line and no visual images, then a reading experience can be destructive. Books should provide enjoyment and engage children through humor and interesting stories. Books should provide enjoyment and engage children through humor and interesting stories. If your child is reading well and finding new learning opportunities on a particular level, the selection is probably about right. If your child is reading well and finding new learning opportunities on a particular level, the selection is probably about right. Stories that are characterized by novelty, humor, conflict, and surprise build intrest and intrinsic motivation. Stories that are characterized by novelty, humor, conflict, and surprise build intrest and intrinsic motivation. (Calkins, 2001) (Fountas & Pinnell, 1996) (Elley, 1989) Slide 18 How To Select Appropriate Books Ask your childs teacher what their reading level is. The local library and book stores have leveled books for you to choose from. Ask your childs teacher what their reading level is. The local library and book stores have leveled books for you to choose from. If you are selecting books on your own, look for: If you are selecting books on your own, look for: Clear text layout Clear text layout Clear print Clear print Not too many lines of text on each page Not too many lines of text on each page Sufficient space between words Sufficient space between words Allow your child to select books from his/her level that they find interesting. Allow your child to select books from his/her level that they find interesting. Slide 19 MAKING MEANING Slide 20 How t

Recommended

View more >