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  • Healthy Urban Food Enterprise

    Development (HUFED) Center

    An NGFN Webinar

  • Marty Gerencer

    Program Manager, National Good Food Network [email protected]

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK

    Moving more good food to more people

    John Fisk, PhD Director, Wallace Center at Winrock International

    Marty Gerencer Manager, National Good Food Network

    March 3, 2010

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK: VISION

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK: VISION

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK: VISION

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK: VISION

    Increase small- and medium-sized grower viability

    Add economic vitality to rural and urban areas

    Reach children and families where they live

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK: ACTIVITIES

    ngfn.org

    ngfn.org/sysco2009

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK: GOALS

    Supply Meets Demand • There is abundant good food (healthy, green, fair and affordable) to meet

    demands at the regional level.

    Information Hub • The National Good Food Network (NGFN) is the go to place for regional

    food systems stories, methods and outcomes.

    Policy Change • Policy makers are informed by the results and outcomes of the NGFN and

    have enacted laws or regulation which further the Network goals.

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK: LOCATIONS

    Includes RLTs, Advisory Council, P4 Grantees, contractors etc.

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK: STRUCTURE

    Advisory Council:

    •Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy

    •American Friends Service Committee

    •Michael Fields Agricultural Institute

    •Good Natured Family Farms

    •Food Alliance

    •Appalachian Sustainable Development

    •Sustainable Food Lab

    •SCALE, Inc.

    •SYSCO-Grand Rapids

    •Karp Resources

    •WellSpring Management

    •Agriculture and Land-Based Training

    Association

    •Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture

    •Farm to Table / Southwest Marketing Group

    •NE Sustainable Agriculture Working Group

    •Center for Food and Justice at Occidental

    College

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK: STRUCTURE

    Regional Lead Teams (11 regions):

    West • Agriculture and Land-Based Training Association, Salinas, CA • Center for Food and Justice at Occidental College, Los Angeles, CA Southwest • Farm to Table / Southwest Marketing Network, Santa Fe, NM • American Friends Service Committee, Albuquerque, NM Southeast • Appalachian Sustainable Development, Abingdon, VA Northeast • Northeast Sustainable Agriculture Working Group, Belchertown, MA • Sustainable Food Lab at The Sustainability Institute, Hartland, VT Midwest • Leopold Center for Sustainable Agriculture, Ames, IA • Sysco and NGFN Partnership Regions: in Grand Rapids, Kansas City and

    Chicago

  • NATIONAL GOOD FOOD NETWORK

    John Fisk Director, Wallace Center at Winrock International

    Marty Gerencer Manager, National Good Food Network

    www.ngfn.org [email protected]

    231/638-2981

    http://www.ngfn.org/ mailto:[email protected]

  • Healthy Urban Food Enterprise

    Development (HUFED) Center

    An NGFN Webinar

  • Presentation Outline

    • HUFED Center:

    Overview and Year 1 Update

    • Grantee: ALBA

    • Grantee: DC Central Kitchen

    • HUFED Center:Year 2 Preview

    • Questions and Answers

  • Presentation Outline

    • HUFED Center:

    Overview and Year 1 Update John Fisk, Director &

    Michelle Frain Muldoon, Program Officer

    Wallace Center at Winrock International

    • Grantee: ALBA

    • Grantee: DC Central Kitchen

    • HUFED Center: Year 2 Preview

    • Questions and Answers

  • WALLACE HUFED CENTER:

    IMPROVING ACCESS TO HEALTHY, AFFORDABLE, LOCAL FOOD

    FOR UNDERSERVED COMMUNITIES ACROSS AMERICA

    A National Good Food Network Webinar

    Presented on August 19, 2010

    By John Fisk, PhD, Wallace HUFED Center Director and

    Michelle Frain Muldoon, Wallace HUFED Center Program Manager

  • WALLACE CENTER AT WINROCK INTERNATIONAL

    Winrock International is a nonprofit organization that works with people in more than 65 countries around the world to empower the disadvantaged, increase economic opportunity, and sustain natural resources. Winrock is headquartered in Little Rock, Arkansas, and has a capitol office in Arlington, Virginia, with project offices worldwide.

    Program Units:

    • Empowerment and Civic Engagement

    • Enterprise and Agriculture

    • Environment: Forestry, Energy and Ecosystems Services

  • WALLACE CENTER AT WINROCK INTERNATIONAL

    The Wallace Center supports entrepreneurs and communities as they build a new, 21st century food system that is healthier for

    people, the environment, and the economy.

    • National Focus • Systems Change • Regional Partners •Market Based Solutions

    Key Strategies Applied Research and Knowledge Development

    Foster Replicable Models Intermediary & Capacity Builder

    Networking and Outreach

  • HUFED: HISTORY AND CONTEXT

    • Farm Bill 2008

    • New USDA priorities

    • Let’s Move

    • Trends:

    – Food related disease

    – Cost of healthcare

    – Local and regional supply chain

    – Wheat bread outsells white bread for first time in US history (Washington Post Sunday Paper, 8/15/2010)

    •“The Vision”

  • WHAT IS WALLACE HUFED CENTER?

    A national center dedicated to improving access to healthy, affordable, local food for underserved populations across America by way of:

    • Addressing bottlenecks

    • Market-based, social enterprise approach

    • Grant Making

    • Technical Assistance (TA)

    • Creating new partnerships

  • MORE ABOUT THE CENTER

    •Year 1 of 3 year grant (2010-2012) •National, regional and local (National Good Food Network) •USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture funding •USDA department-wide support of healthy food access •Technical Assistance: tactical, strategic, capacity building •Grant types:

    1. Small Enterprise: specific bottlenecks, smaller in scope • Up to $25,000

    2. Large Enterprise: multi-year, multiple objectives, larger scope • Up to $100,000

    3. Feasibility Studies: • Up to $25,000

  • GOALS & OBJECTIVES

    Goals:

    1. Improved Food Access 2. Increased Farmer Opportunity and Income 3. Market Based Change approach to food insecurity 4. Sharing the Learning

    Objectives: Grantmaking and Technical Assistance to:

    1. Reduce supply chain bottlenecks contributing to food insecurity 2. Increase healthy local food in mainstream distribution channels 3. Increase number of retail sites marketing healthy food 4. Increase availability and volume of healthy food in current retail

  • APPROACH

    •Demonstrated need

    •Market Based Change

    •Urban/Rural linkages

    •Systems approach

    •Not one-size-fits-all:

    • Innovative models

    • Diverse regions

    • Diverse audiences

  • GRANT MAKING PROCESS YEAR 1

    •Demand outweighs the resources

    •LOIs to Grants: 5384713 awards

    •Categories of Enterprises Selected: – Business/social enterprise incubation

    – Value Chain support

    – Equipment Purchases

    – Food Safety/Certification/Labeling

    – EBT/SNAP/WIC

    – (Nutrition Education/Community Outreach)

  • YEAR 1 GRANTS (8 OF 13 SO FAR)

    Small Enterprise Grants:

    1. LA CAUSA: East Los Angeles, California 2. Peta Wakan Tipi: St. Paul, Minnesota 3. Shagbark Seed & Mill Company: Athens City and Southeastern Ohio

    Large Enterprise Grants:

    1. Agriculture & Land-Based Training Association: Monterey County, CA and surrounding counties

    2. DC Central Kitchen, Inc.: Washington DC, Virginia, Maryland 3. GrowNYC: New York City, New York 4. La Cocina, Inc.: San Francisco, California

    Feasibility Study Grants:

    1. Grass Lake Sanctuary: Manchester, Michigan

  • SPOTLIGHT: FROM 2 SIDES OF THE COUNTRY

    1. ALBA (Agricultural and Land-Based Training Association), Salinas, CA:

    – ALBA Organics

    – Food safety, management systems

    – beginning and socially disadvantaged farmers

    – Schools and small-scale retailers in

    – Low-income consumers

    2. DC Central Kitchen, Washington, D.C & surrounding states:

    – Farm to Kitchen, Fresh Start

    – Increased purchasing & consumption of local/regional food

    – Urban/rural linkage

    – Low-income, homeless

  • Presentation Outline

    • Overview and Year 1 Update

    • Grantee: ALBA Brett Melone, Executive Director

    Agricultural and Land-Based Training Institute

    • Grantee: DC Central Kitchen

    • HUFED Center: Year 2 Preview

    • Questions and Answers

  • ALBA owns and operates two organic