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  • Photo: Entrance to Rhyddings Park, Oswaldtwistle, Lancashire

    LOUISA MARY WALLACE: 1886-1910

    *Louisa Mary Wallace (1886-1910)*

    Rose Ann Godwin (1860-1914) John Wallace (1849-1911)

    Albert Wallace (1907-1976) Henrietta Holden (1911-1988)

    CHILDREN

    Jean (1935-2003) Kevin (1949-) William (1943-) Sheila (1936-1942)

    Karen Sara William Tony

    Great Aunt

    Louisa was born in Tomknitter bridge, Oswaldtwistle in 1886. Her parents were John Wallace and

    Rose Ann Godwin and she had 9 siblings: William, Fanny, Augustus, Annie (‘Bella’), Charlie, Margaret,

    Emily, Walter and Arthur. Louisa committed suicide by drowning in 1910 and is buried in Immanuel

    cemetery, Oswaldtwistle.

  • Photo: Entrance to Rhyddings Park, Oswaldtwistle, Lancashire

    NEWSPAPER ARTICLES

    ACCRINGTON OBSERVER: SATURDAY 19 FEBRUARY 1910

    CHURCH GIRL’S BODY FOUND IN A LODGE

    SAD AFFAIR YESTERDAY

    Though but 24 years of age, the dead body of Louisa Mary Wallace of 12 Tomknitter bridge, Oswaldtwistle, was recovered from

    Blythe’s lodge yesterday afternoon under circumstances which point to suicide. She was the daughter of John and Rose Ann

    Wallace with whom she lived.

    According to the information gleaned by the police and reported by them to the Coroner, she on Thursday evening met a

    friend of hers and said, “I thought of drowning myself today, but I will do it before weekend”. Deceased was a weaver and

    though unmarried was a mother. She was employed at Church Bridge Mill and on Monday it is stated she injured her hand

    with a shuttle and complained of it being sore.

    She, however, continued at work until Thursday, when she returned home saying she could not continue to work on account of

    her sore hand.

    At 5.45am yesterday she left home to go to work, bidding her mother good morning as she left. At noon her shawl and dinner

    can were found on the lodge bank by a schoolboy who informed the police. Dragging operations followed and the dead body

    of the deceased was recovered.

  • Photo: Entrance to Rhyddings Park, Oswaldtwistle, Lancashire

    ACCRINGTON OBSERVER: TUESDAY FEBRUARY 22 1910: A YOUNG GIRL’S SUICIDE

    A MOTHER’S STORY AT CHURCH: LOOKING FOR A MOTIVE

    As exclusively reported in Saturday’s issue, the dead body of Louisa Mary Wallace, aged 24 years, was recovered from Blythe’s lodge,

    Oswaldtwistle, on Friday afternoon into which she had evidently thrown herself in a fit of despair. She was the daughter of John and Rose

    Ann Wallace of 12 Tomknitter Bridge, Oswaldtwistle and on Thursday evening she told a friend that she would drown herself before the

    weekend.

    The inquest was held at Church Police Station yesterday afternoon before Mr H J Robinson, coroner.

    Rose Ann Wallace, Mother of the deceased said her daughter left home shortly before 6am on Friday morning to go to her work. About three

    years ago deceased had a child and there had been a good deal of unpleasantness about having to keep the baby as deceased received

    nothing from the child’s father.

    Replying to the coroner witness denied that she had scolded the deceased about her being in a certain condition again. She had not said

    anything to deceased about that. Asked why deceased should tell a friend that she had been having a good deal of trouble at home if it were

    not true, witness replied that she could not account for it and repeated her assertion that there had been no unpleasantness between her

    and her daughter. She had, however, scolded deceased about being a mother and told her to be careful and take greater care of herself.

    Mary Ann Abbott, a weaver, 10 Croft Street, Church, said she saw deceased on Thursday night. Deceased said she was not content at home

    and that she thought of drowning herself that morning and added that she would do so before the week was out. Witness told deceased not

    to act foolishly. Deceased also said she had been accused of being in a certain condition, but denied that it was true.

    A youth named William Chadwick said that he found a shawl and a dinner can belonging to deceased on the bank of Blythe’s lodge and took

    them home. He afterwards informed the Police. PC Sinclair (deposed?) to dragging the lodge and recovering the body. There was a wall

    round the lodge but it was down in places (and lads?) went fishing in the lodge. He learned that deceased did not go to the mill on Friday.

    The Coroner in summing up said it was evident that deceased had had an uncomfortable time at home. She had a baby three years old and

    there was some reason to believe that she was in further trouble. Perhaps the trouble had upset her mind. The foreman pointed out that

    there was no evidence of any motive for the action. It required some strong motive to drive a young person to suicide. There was no

    evidence of cruelty to her condition.

    A verdict of suicide while of unsound mind was recorded.

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