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This is my presentation for the GP3 Group Piano & Piano Pedagogy Conference taking place August 6th in Austin, Texas. I will be presenting the results of 2 pilot studies in preparation for my dissertation. This research focuses on the pianist's transition into the teaching role including challenges they face, solutions/resources they find, reflections and suggestions for the future.

TRANSCRIPT

  • 1. Transitioning from Student to Teacher in the Master-Apprentice Model of Piano Pedagogy: Challenges, Solutions, Reflections, and Suggestions for the Future Melissa M. Slawsky, Ph.D. Candidate Center for Music Education Research, University of South Florida

2. Background *B.M. piano-Florida Southern College *M.M. piano pedagogy- Univ. of S. Florida *Ph.D. music education- Univ. of S. Florida Performance Pedagogy Research 3. Introduction Standard teacher-training program- *Educational coursework *Observations of experienced teachers *Fieldwork experience/internships *Supervised student teaching *Mentored when entering the field Induction- 1-3 year years *sensitive and impressionable period *much research exists 4. Piano Teacher Training A very different framework- *Master-apprentice model *Years of private study *Piano Pedagogy Coursework *Limited support whentransitioning to the teaching role 5. The Field

  • *Lack of consistent guidelines and/or standards(Jacobson & Lancaster, 2006)
  • *Professional development is not mandated(Heisler, 1995; Jacobson & Lancaster, 2006)
  • *Quality of instruction is unchecked and uncontrolled(Heisler, 1995; Wolfersberger, 1986)
  • *Piano teachers operate independently of professional structures(Jacobson & Lancaster, 2006)

6. Master-Apprentice Model

  • The master is the model who demonstrates, directs, comments and inspires and the apprentice is the disciple who watches, listens, imitates and seeks approval. This is still a powerful universal motivating force particularly in conservatoires. It is also afirmly established modelfor the teaching of music in many private music studios(Uszler, Gordon, & Mach, 1993, p.584).

7. Master-Apprentice Model?

  • An apprenticingelectricianstudies with anelectricianto become anelectrician
  • An apprenticingpianiststudies with apiano teacherto become apianist (performer)
  • (Then has to learn how to teach)

8. Research problem

  • How do pianists make thetransition from student to teacher?

9. Cognitive Apprenticeship

  • Merges apprenticeship with formal training
  • Experiences are articulated
  • Increased independence
  • Create authentic experiences
  • Provide expert models
  • Opportunities for collaboration

10. Piano Pedagogy Guidelines

  • National Conference on Keyboard Pedagogys Task Force on Pedagogy Curricula (2004)
  • NASM guidelines cited
  • Recommended-
  • Pedagogical coursework
  • Observations of experienced teachers
  • A supervised internship

11. Implementation Challenges

  • Financial limitations
  • (Fu, 2007; Uszler & Larimer, 1984)
  • Faculty acquisition
  • (Fu, 2007; Uszler & Larimer, 1984)
  • Space, equipment, and library resources
  • (Uszler & Larimer, 1984, p.12)
  • Administration (Uszler & Larimer, 1984)
  • Advocating for piano pedagogy

12. An Uphill Battle

  • Piano pedagogy isnot valuedby some institutions
  • Tension between roles as performers and teachers

13. Purpose

  • Explore how piano teachers learn to teach from and independent of piano pedagogy coursework,
  • -overcome challenges , and
  • - continue to add to their pedagogy knowledge

14. Purpose(continued)

  • b.Explore topics that would bemost usefulin ap i a n o p e d a g o g ycourse or program

15. Qualitative Approach

  • Phenomenology
  • there is an essence or essences to shared experience (Patton, 2002, p. 106).
  • Heuristic Inquiry
  • ". . In heuristic research the investigator must have had a direct,personal encounterwith the phenomenon being investigated. There must have been actual autobiographical connections (Moustakas, 1990, p. 14)

16. Research Questions

  • How do piano teachers make the transition from student to teacher?
  • a. Whatchallengesdo they face?
  • b. Whatsolutions/resourcesdo they find?
  • c. Whatlearning experiences(formal and informal) helped prepare them?

17. Research Questions

  • 2. Whatcurrent challengesdo piano teachers face?
  • a. Whatsolutions/resourcesdo they find to overcome these challenges?

18. Research Questions

  • 3. What do piano teachers suggest for the future of:
  • a. piano pedagogy
  • b. the piano curriculum, in general?

19. Closely Aligned Literature

  • Colleen Conway- Music Education
  • Dissertation:
  • Interviewed preservice music educators
  • Goal- inform music methods courses

20. Induction Challenges

  • Challenges included:
  • a. Classroom management
  • b. Routines for Learning
  • c. Finding & choosing a curriculum
  • d. Re-establishment when moving to a new school
  • e. Advocating for music education
  • (Conway & Hodgman, 2006)

21. Implications for Beginning Music Educators

  • Handbook for the Beginning Music Teacher
  • (Conway & Hodgman, 2006)

22. Implications for Mentors & Administrators

  • Great Beginnings for Music Teachers: Mentoring and Supporting New Teachers(Conway & MENC, 2003)

23. Implications

  • By studying the transition from student to teacher, Conway informed:
  • a variety of music educators
  • (from students to administrators)
  • The framework for teacher education
  • The field for which they will be entering

24. Haddon (2009)

  • Studied the experiences of the beginning applied music instrumental instructor:
  • Commented on lack of support & pedagogical training in the UK
  • Interviewed undergraduate instrumentalists ( N=16)
  • Only 1 had formal training in teaching

25. Haddon (2009)

  • Instrumentalists listed several challenges faced including:
  • communication with students and parents
  • balancing student, teacher, and parent expectations regarding repertoire, pace, and progress
  • maintaining teacher-authority[,] and
  • achieving a balance between fun and
  • discipline (p. 66).

26. Haddon (2009)

  • Teaching developed through instinct and experience
  • Influence of past teachers and materials
  • Unaware of training opportunities and pedagogical literature

27. Haddon (2009)

  • Recommended that pedagogical training be increased
  • Support through mentoring programs

28. Pedagogical Coursework

  • Often theonlyteacher-training experience
  • It iscriticalthat these courses are relevant and effective

29. Piano Pedagogy

  • Relatively new (100 years or so)
  • Developed during a period of much social change
  • Increasing in colleges and universities (Fu, 2007; HEADS, 2007)

30. Relevance & Effectiveness

  • Schons (2005)-
  • Surveys ( N=598)
  • MTNA mailing list
  • Pedagogy Topic Recommendations:
  • Teaching advanced,
  • learning disabled,
  • pre-school, and
  • adult hobby students

31. Pedagogy Topics

  • Schons (2005)-
  • Pedagogy Topic Recommendations:
  • Technology
  • Business practices
  • Professional resources
  • Group lessons
  • Sustaining a viable living

32. Contradictory Findings

  • Sumpter (2008)-
  • Surveys ( N=298)
  • MTNA mailing list
  • Ranked asmostimportant-
  • Traditional aspects
  • Rankedleastimportant:
  • Improvisation
  • Computer-assisted instruction
  • Jazz and rock music

33. Irony

  • Participants age 55 and above
  • 30 years of teaching experience
  • MTNA mailing lists

34. Method

  • Phase 1 & 2-
  • Semi-structured interviews
  • Conducted over the phone
  • Interview transcribed
  • Coded

35. The Interview Guide

  • 22 questions:
  • Piano teachers asked about:
  • Demographics & studioset-up
  • Transition into the teaching role
  • Challenges, Solutions
  • Current Challenges & Solutions
  • Reflections & Suggestions for the future

36. Participants

  • Phase 1-

40+ Collegiate studio D.M.A. piano 65 Dr. Autumn Van Arden 25 Private studio M.M. piano pedag

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