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A Montana Standard Publication

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  • for

    A quick guide to improving your home,community,environment

    A special publication of

    Friday, April 22, 2011

    GO GREEN EARTH DAYGO GREEN EARTH DAY

  • 2 THE MONTANA STANDARD, BUTTE, FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 2011

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    BEAUTIFY BUTTE, ANACONDA, WALKERVILLEB

    eautify Butte, the countys annualcleanup campaign, kicks off todayto mark Earth Day, but the week-

    end warrior gets the real work done.Every weekend from now until May 21residents of Butte, Anaconda andWalkerville are encouraged to clearyards, parks and neighborhoods ofdebris that had settled in from a longwinter.

    The Beautify Butte Campaign pro-vides the vehicle to engage and inspireenvironmental stewardship in ourneighborhoods and in our community its an opportunity for citizens to derivea sense of public ownership, said organ-izer Joe Lee. We are encouraging moreorganizational and civic group partici-pation together with more youth

    involvement,he said.

    Local busi-nesses andButte-SilverBow govern-ment are againdonating timeand materials tohelp in theeffort, fromdiscountedcleaning imple-

    ments, trash bags and collection sites toa host of prizes for the finale collectionday.

    Last year, nearly 80 tons of refusewas collected on the final day; 60 tonscame in at the landfill and 20 tons fromthe Alley Rally collection site, south ofNCAT

    This year, the grand finale day at thelandfill will inlcude: Recycling onsite ofwhite goods such as stoves, refrigerators,appliances. A&S Metals and NordicRefrigerations will help with unloadingappliances, freon gas evacuation ofrefrigerators, partnering with SteelesWarehouse to cover the costs.

    The Chamber of Commerce will haveits cleanup on May 29 at 6 p.m. whenvolunteers will take to the walking trailto clean away debris.

    Walkerville will have Dumpstersavailable at various times to allow resi-dents a convenient to bring their trash.

    In Anaconda: The Smelter City willagain work alongside Beautify Butte tospruce up the community and raisegreen awareness.

    Plans are still coming together,though residents may adopt a lotaround town to pick up trash. Gloves andbags are provided by the AnacondaChamber of Commerce. For a list ofavailable lots, call code enforcementofficer Karen Courtney at 563-7029.

    This year also marks the return of thehousehold hazardous and e-waste col-lection, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday,May 14. Old electronics and toxic chem-icals will be accepted at the landfill,1200 E. Arbiter Road, for specializedrecycling. Clean HarborsEnvironmental, of Washington state,was again hired to properly dispose ofthe items.

    Organizer Paula Arneson, with thecounty Planning Department, said lastyears collection was so popular theydecided to bring it back.

    Anaconda is partnering with theButte-Silver Bow landfill for generalcleanup. Anyone who takes their house-hold waste there will be given a receipt,Arneson said, that may be turned backin to the Planning Department for a $10gas card. The receipt will also be enteredinto a drawing for five $100 AnacondaBucks certificates, redeemable at mostdowntown businesses.

    We just would really like to encour-age people to clean up their neighbor-hood, maybe have a barbecue and makeit fun, Arneson said.

    For more information on events, listsof acceptable e-waste or items acceptedat the Anaconda landfill and transferstation, call the Planning Department at563-4010.

    Helpful tips:Here are some helpful tips for keeping

    our community litter-free andappealing:

    Keep your property clean: Whenworking in your yard, take a few minutesto clean-up the sidewalk gutters, alley-waya and the immediate adjacent area toyour property;

    Important contact numbersTom Loggins: Butte-Silver Bow Public Works Dept. 497-6565Gary Corbin: Code Enforcement Officer, 497-5022Ed Randall: Community enrichment, animal control 782-8450Mark Wilcox: Weed/code enforcement officer 497-6473Butte-Silver Bow Chamber of Commerce 723-3177Butte-Silver Bow Landfill 782-1463

    MONTANA STANDARD FILE PHOTO

    BUTTE VOLUNTEERS line up along highways and byways during past Beautify Buttecleanup campaigns. If it werent for the volunteer effort and the support of local business-es, the annual event would not happen. ON THE COVER: Third graders at HillcrestElementary School take turns shoveling dirt around a Green Ash tree they helped plant inthe school yard to commemorate Earth Day 2010.

    see CLEANUP, Page 7

  • THE MONTANA STANDARD, BUTTE, FRIDAY, APRIL 22, 2011 3

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    Shedding light:

    New bulb law takes effect in 2012

    BByy MMaarryy BBeetthh BBrreecckkeennrriiddggee

    Akron Beacon Journal

    When it comes to the new lighting law, a lot ofpeople seem to be in the dark. Recently Iveencountered quite a bit of misunderstandingand flat-out fear about the new federal lighting stan-dards that will be phased in starting next year.

    For the record: No, the government is not banning all incandes-

    cent light bulbs. No, youre not being forced to switch to fluores-

    cent lighting. No, you wont have to change all your lamps and

    light fixtures.Now, Im not saying we wont notice the changes

    or have to make adjustments. And Im not venturinginto the issue of whether the government is overstep-ping its bounds. Thats a different topic for a differentforum.

    But I do think its important to have the factsstraight both so we can discuss the matter intelli-gently and so we know what to expect when we goshopping for light bulbs.

    Here, then, are some questions and answers that Ihope will shed light on the issue.

    Q: Why is the government regulating light bulbs?A: The new lighting standards are part of the

    Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007,which was signed into law by President George W.Bush. The purpose of the law, in short, was to reduce

    our energy con-sumption and ourdependence on for-eign energy sources.Since lightingaccounts for about14 percent of theelectricity used inbuildings in thiscountry, the law tar-geted lighting as oneof the areas whereimproving energyefficiency couldmake a significantdifference.

    Q: Why are incan-descent bulbs beingsingled out?

    A: Conventionalincandescent lighting the kind were most familiarwith uses energy much less efficiently than otherkinds. Only 10 percent of the electricity used by aconventional incandescent light bulb goes into pro-ducing light. The rest becomes heat.

    The government wants to improve those numbers,at least in general-service bulbs, the kind we usemost often.

    Under the new law, its requiring those bulbs to beroughly 25 percent more efficient.

    Q: Does that mean all incandescent bulbs are beingbanned?

    A: No. The law applies only to general-servicebulbs, the pear-shaped, screw-in bulbs with a medi-um base that fit most standard lamps and lightingfixtures. Whats more, the law affects only 40-, 60-,75- and 100-watt general-service bulbs.

    Even with that type of bulb, youll still have incan-descent options. Manufacturers are coming up with

    more efficient types of incandescent light bulbs thatwill meet the new standards.

    These more efficient bulbs are called halogenincandescent bulbs. Halogen is a form of incandes-cent lighting that uses halogen gas in addition to ametal filament.

    Q: Wont those halogen bulbs produce light thatsmore harsh?

    A: At full power, halogen bulbs produce a brighter,crisper, whiter light than conventional incandescentbulbs. Thats good for tasks such as reading, but noteveryone likes it for ambient lighting.

    But heres a nifty thing about them: The light ofhalogen bulbs can be made softer and warmer byturning them down with a dimmer, said TerryMcGowan, director of engineering for the AmericanLighting Association.

    Dimming the bulb reduces its Kelvin rating, whichmeasures the color of light, McGowan explained. Ahalogen bulb can range from a bright, white 2,930Kelvins to 1,850 Kelvins, the color of candlelight.

    So in effect, a halogen incandescent bulb gives youa variety of lighting options in one bulb.

    Q: Will I still be able to buy incandescent bulbs forthings like appliances and chandeliers?

    A: Yes. The law does not apply to appliance bulbs orcandelabra-base bulbs, the kind with narrow screw-in bases that are often used in chandeliers and elec-tric window candles.

    Nor does the law apply to medium-base bulbsother than the specific general-service bulbs I men-tioned earlier. Among the bulbs it excludes are three-way bulbs, 150-watt bulbs, black light bulbs, buglights, colored lights, plant lights, rough-servicebulbs and shatter-resistant bulbs.

    Q: When do the changes take place?A: The changes will be phased in. Theyll affect general-service, 100-watt bulbs on

    Jan. 1, 2012, 75-watt bulbs a year later and 60- and40-watt bulbs on Jan. 1, 2014.

    Eliminate those leaky pipes Check for leaks. Silent toilet leaks

    can be found by putting a few drops offood coloring into th