GEOTHERMAL DIRECT HEAT UTILIZATION. DISTRICT HEATING

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> GEOTHERMAL DIRECT HEAT UTILIZATION </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> DISTRICT HEATING </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> GREENHOUSE HEATING </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> SWIMMING, BATHING BALNEOLOGY </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> FISH FARMING </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> (a)Categories of Capacity % for 2005 and (b)(b) energy use in %, 2005 (Lund, Freeston and Boyd, 2005). </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Summary of Worldwide Direct-Use Categories (Lund, Freeston and Boyd, 2005). </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> DISTRICT HEATING Distribution of hydrothermal water from one or more wells to several houses, buildings and blocks </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> It is the largest sector of geothermal energy direct use in the world. It involves the distribution of heat (hot water or steam) from a central location, through a network of pipes to individual houses or blocks of buildings. Geothermal Heating Systems are in operation in at least 12 countries. DISTRICT HEATING </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> EXAMPLE-1 </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> DISTRICT HEATING EXAMPLE-1 </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> DISTRICT HEATING EXAMPLE-2 </li> <li> Slide 17 </li> <li> DISTRICT HEATING EXAMPLE-2 </li> <li> Slide 18 </li> <li> DISTRICT HEATING EXAMPLE-3 </li> <li> Slide 19 </li> <li> DISTRICT HEATING EXAMPLE-4 </li> <li> Slide 20 </li> <li> Degree-days = Number of days (Design room temperature-Daily mean temperature) </li> <li> Slide 21 </li> <li> Slide 22 </li> <li> Slide 23 </li> <li> Heat Pump Technology The Earth as a heat source and sink Heating in winter and cooling in summer In the USA and Europe GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP </li> <li> Slide 24 </li> <li> GHPs use the stable temperature of the ground; as a heat source to warm buildings in winter as a heat sink to cool buildings in summer also for water heating by desuperheaters GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP </li> <li> Slide 25 </li> <li> The system includes three principal components: Geothermal earth connection subsystem Geothermal heat pump subsystem Geothermal heat distribution subsystem GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP </li> <li> Slide 26 </li> <li> Earth Connection Subsystem buried in the ground near the building either vertical or horizontal circulates a fluid (water, or a mixture of water and antifreeze) GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP </li> <li> Slide 27 </li> <li> A heat pump is a device which uses heat on a low temperature level, and transfer the heat to a higher, useful temperature level using an external driving force (mechanical energy or high-temperature heat) GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP </li> <li> Slide 28 </li> <li> A heat pump is a device which uses heat on a low temperature level, and transfer the heat to a higher, useful temperature level using an external driving force (mechanical energy or high-temperature heat) Heat flows naturally from a higher to a lower temperature. Heat pumps, however, are able to force the heat flow in the other direction, using a relatively small amount of high quality drive energy (electricity, fuel, or high-temperature waste heat). Thus heat pumps can transfer heat from natural heat sources in the surroundings, such as the air, ground or water, or from man-made heat sources such as industrial or domestic waste, to a building or an industrial application. GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP </li> <li> Slide 29 </li> <li> In order to transport heat from a heat source to a heat sink, external energy is needed to drive the heat pump. Because heat pumps consume less primary energy than conventional heating systems, they are an important technology for reducing gas emissions that harm the environment, such as carbon dioxide (CO2), sulphur dioxide (SO2) and nitrogen oxides (NOx). </li> <li> Slide 30 </li> <li> GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP Almost all heat pumps currently in operation are either based on a vapor compression, or on an absorption cycle. </li> <li> Slide 31 </li> <li> GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP VAPOR COMPRESSION </li> <li> Slide 32 </li> <li> GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMP VAPOR COMPRESSION </li> </ul>

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