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  • FRIENDSHIP FOREST

    FOREST RESOURCES INVENTORY and MANAGEMENT PLAN

    December 15, 2012

    Prepared for:

    City of Clarkston

    3921 Church Street

    Clarkston, GA 30021

    Prepared by:

    Chris Barneycastle

    Barneycastle Forestry Services, Inc.

    1962 Colony Oaks Drive

    Snellville, GA 30078

  • Friendship Forest Resources Inventory and Management Plan

    2

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Introduction.3

    Goals and Objectives for Inventory and Management Plan...3

    Description of Property..3

    Inventory Objectives and Methodology.6

    Inventory Results6

    General Management Objectives and Recommendations..11

    Management Recommendations for Areas 1 - 8..12

    Conclusion...16

    Appendix A: Listing of Trees and Understory Vegetation....17

    Appendix B: Listing of Trees and Shrubs Important to Wildlife.....18

    Acknowledgements.........19

  • Friendship Forest Resources Inventory and Management Plan

    3

    Introduction Friendship Forest is 15.14 acres of stands of trees, open areas, streams and trails located at 4380 East

    Ponce de Leon Avenue in the City of Clarkston. The property was formerly a high use DeKalb County

    park and was donated to the City of Clarkston in 1980. The City of Clarkston received an Urban and

    Community Forestry Grant from the Georgia Forestry Commission and retained Barneycastle Forestry

    Services, Inc. to inventory the resources on the property and prepare a management plan for the property.

    Goals and Objectives for Inventory and Management Plan The Clarkston City Council will be forming an ad hoc committee to determine the future plans for the

    Friendship Forest. This resources inventory and management plan will provide information that will assist

    the ad hoc committee in planning for the future of the forest. At the present time, the primary goal for the

    forest is for it to be a passive use area; therefore, the primary goal of this management plan is to keep the

    forested portions in a natural state with a minimal amount of disturbance, preservation of native species of

    plants, eradication of nonnative invasive species of plants, preservation of riparian corridors, and

    enhancement of wildlife habitat.

    Description of Property This 15.14 acre tract is mostly forested with a mixture of various pine and hardwood species of trees.

    Many of the trees are mature with large diameters (greater than 30 inches diameter at breast height) and

    towering heights (excess of 60 feet). The topography is moderately rolling except for the eastern portion

    of the property, which has some rather steep topography. The highest elevation on the property is 1038

    feet and the lowest is 959 feet. The south fork of Peachtree Creek, which is a relatively large perennial

    stream, flows through the northwest portion of the property. There is a small intermittent tributary stream

    on the property that flows into the creek (see Figure 3).

    The property appears to have been idle with little maintenance for many years as evidenced by some of

    the abandoned fields having been grown over with volunteer vines, shrubs, grasses, and forbs, many of

    which are nonnative invasive species. There are an abundance of old abandoned trails throughout the

    property, some of which are paved (see Figure 4). A paved road is located in the eastern portion of the

    property and extends from the entrance on Ponce de Leon Avenue for about mile into the property.

    There are signs of some management activities as evidenced by planted sapling trees in the large open area

    in the center of the property. The trees were planted by the Friends of Friendship Forest. This area (and

    others) has also been bushhogged to allow access to the south fork of Peachtree Creek and other areas.

    There are several species of nonnative invasive species of plants growing on the property and the

    predominant nonnative species are Chinese privet and English ivy.

    Figure 1 is an aerial photograph depicting the boundaries and the land types of the property. Figure 2 is a

    topographical map of the property with 2 foot contours.

  • Friendship Forest Resources Inventory and Management Plan

    4

    Figure 1 - Friendship Forest Land Types

    Figure 2 Topographic Map with 2 foot Contours

  • Friendship Forest Resources Inventory and Management Plan

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    Figure 3 Aerial Photograph with Stream Corridors (25 feet either side of streams)

    Figure 4 Aerial Photograph Depicting Trails and Roads

  • Friendship Forest Resources Inventory and Management Plan

    6

    Inventory - Objectives and Methodology An inventory of the 15 acres was conducted to determine location, size, and species of trees (naturally

    regenerated) and other vegetation on the property. This inventory provided useful information to

    understand the current condition of the property and for preparation of management recommendations.

    A stand table was developed listing the size, species and number of trees for the property. A listing of

    understory plants (primarily shrubs and vines), including nonnative invasive species, were also identified

    and inventoried for the property.

    To determine the number, size, and species of trees per acre for the tract, 15 sample plots were randomly

    and evenly established over the property. The sample plots were 1/10 acre in size and were circular (37.3

    foot radius). The total number of trees (4 inches in diameter and greater) for each size class and species

    was multiplied by 10 (to produce the total population of trees) and then divided by the total number of

    sample plots to yield the per acre number of trees. This data is listed in Table 1. Some species of trees

    were found on the property, but not in the sample plot. These trees are indicated in the notes for the stand

    table and are noted in the area description.

    Understory species of trees, shrubs, vines, and grasses and forbs were tallied in the sample plot and

    outside the sample plot as well. Some of the understory species are nonnative invasive species, which are

    listed in Appendix A - Listing of Trees and Understory Vegetation.

    An inventory of specimen size trees (30 inches DBH and greater) was performed. These trees have been

    flagged and located. The location of the trees is depicted in Figure 7. The listing of the specimen trees is

    found in Table 2.

    Inventory Results As indicated in the Table 1, the predominant species of trees on the property is sweetgum followed by

    loblolly pine, yellow poplar, water oak, and southern red oak. Other species of trees growing on the

    property include black cherry, box elder, silver maple, magnolia, blackgum, red mulberry, Bradford pear,

    green ash, and hackberry.

    The ground cover on the forested portions of the property is primarily forest duff with a number of

    understory species of plants growing on the property. The primary understory species in the forested

    portions are Chinese privet, English ivy, bamboo, poison ivy, honeysuckle, greenbrier, Virginia creeper,

    and elaeagnus. Species of plants in the open areas include various types of grasses, privet, honeysuckle,

    dogfennel, goldenrod, lespedeza, elderberry, switchcane, nepalese browntop, and multi-flora rose.

    Unfortunately, many of these plants are nonnative invasive species. Figure 8 is an aerial photograph

    depicting the location of the predominant nonnative invasive species of plants.

    Figure 4 shows the breakdown of tree species by percentages. Sweetgum comprises 39 percent of all tree

    species 4 inches and greater in diameter, followed by loblolly pine at 22 percent, and yellow poplar at 15

    percent. While sweetgum, loblolly pine, and yellow poplar comprise 76 percent of the tree species, the

    remaining 24 percent is comprised of 11 different species. While in an ideal situation, no single species

    should comprise more than 10 percent of an urban forest, the species make up of the Friendship Forest

    property is moderately diverse.

    Table 1 also shows that the property has approximately 112 trees per acre (4 inches in diameter and

    greater). This is a relatively healthy density of trees per acre for the property.

    The average diameter of the trees is 16 inches. Figure 5 shows a distribution of the diameters of the trees.

    16 inches is a relatively large tree diameter, which means the trees are fairly mature.

  • Friendship Forest Resources Inventory and Management Plan

    7

    Friendship Forest -- Species %

    5%9%

    10%

    15%

    22%

    39%

    Sweetgum

    Loblolly pine

    Yellow poplar

    Water oak

    Southern red oak

    Other species

    Figure 5 Chart Depicting Percentages of Species Composition of Friendship Forest Trees

  • Friendship Forest Resources Inventory and Management Plan

    8

    TABLE 1 - STAND TABLE FOR FRIENDSHIP FOREST

    Number of Trees per Acre by Diameter Class and Species

    DBH Sweetgum Loblolly pine Yellow poplar Water oak Southern red oak Other species

    4" 11 5 1

    6" 8 4 3 3

    8" 7 1 2 1 1

    10" 2 1 2 1 1

    12" 1 3 1

    14" 3 6 1 1

    16" 2 2 1 1 1

    18" 2 4 1

    20" 2 3 1 2

    22" 1 3 1

    24" 1 1 1

    26" 1 1 1 2

    28" 2 1 1 1