Franz Liszt: Sämtliche Schriften, Vol. 5: Dramaturgische Blätterby Dorothea Redepenning; Britta Schilling; Detlef Altenburg

Download Franz Liszt: Sämtliche Schriften, Vol. 5: Dramaturgische Blätterby Dorothea Redepenning; Britta Schilling; Detlef Altenburg

Post on 21-Jan-2017

212 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

TRANSCRIPT

  • Franz Liszt: Smtliche Schriften, Vol. 5: Dramaturgische Bltter by Dorothea Redepenning;Britta Schilling; Detlef AltenburgReview by: Jay RosenblattNotes, Second Series, Vol. 48, No. 2 (Dec., 1991), pp. 454-456Published by: Music Library AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/942031 .Accessed: 18/06/2014 04:01

    Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

    .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.

    .

    Music Library Association is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Notes.

    http://www.jstor.org

    This content downloaded from 188.72.126.118 on Wed, 18 Jun 2014 04:01:48 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

    http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=muliashttp://www.jstor.org/stable/942031?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

  • NOTES, December 1991 NOTES, December 1991

    tion: "How do I listen?" "Can I verbalize view (pp. 73-76; 101-5), and then answers what I hear?" them (pp. 78-92; 105-23)-a didactically

    This book is quite accessible to non- helpful strategy. With its refreshingly di- philosophers. Apart from adopting a spe- rect approach the book could be used as an cial sense of 'intentionality' from analytic introduction to music aesthetics. philosophy, Kivy avoids technical language. His arguments are very clearly presented. NAOMI CUMMING In both chapters 5 and 6 he systematically The University of Adelaide, puts forward a number of objections to his South Australia

    tion: "How do I listen?" "Can I verbalize view (pp. 73-76; 101-5), and then answers what I hear?" them (pp. 78-92; 105-23)-a didactically

    This book is quite accessible to non- helpful strategy. With its refreshingly di- philosophers. Apart from adopting a spe- rect approach the book could be used as an cial sense of 'intentionality' from analytic introduction to music aesthetics. philosophy, Kivy avoids technical language. His arguments are very clearly presented. NAOMI CUMMING In both chapters 5 and 6 he systematically The University of Adelaide, puts forward a number of objections to his South Australia

    Franz Liszt: Samtliche Schriften, vol. 5: Dramaturgische Blatter. Edited by Dorothea Redepenning and Britta Schilling. Commentary by Detlef Altenburg, Dorothea Redepenning and Britta Schilling. Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Hartel, 1989. [xv, 263 p. ISBN 3-7651-0236-9. DM106.00.]

    Franz Liszt: Samtliche Schriften, vol. 5: Dramaturgische Blatter. Edited by Dorothea Redepenning and Britta Schilling. Commentary by Detlef Altenburg, Dorothea Redepenning and Britta Schilling. Wiesbaden: Breitkopf & Hartel, 1989. [xv, 263 p. ISBN 3-7651-0236-9. DM106.00.]

    Although his great contemporaries Rob- ert Schumann and Hector Berlioz have long been respected for their literary out- put, Franz Liszt remains little read. The perception of Liszt as a crowd-pleasing vir- tuoso and "Don Juan parvenu" continues to stand in the way of his acceptance as a composer, and this resistance surely carries over to his writings. The charge, first se- riously leveled by Emile Haraszti in the 1930s, that Liszt himself was not respon- sible for the articles and books that ap- peared under his name, and that the real authors were Marie d'Agoult and Carolyne Sayn-Wittgenstein, has further diminished his credibility. Despite the evidence that has come to light in recent years suggesting the contrary, the accusation has been repeated often enough in the secondary literature to have acquired quasi-factual status. But per- haps most damagingly, whereas Schumann and Berlioz both attempted to put their respective literary houses in order, Liszt left the editing of his Gesammelte Schriften to his biographer, Lina Ramann. Though still alive at the time of publication (1880- 83), he appears to have had little to do with it, and it is doubtful that the resulting six volumes represented the form in which he wished his literary estate to be left to pos- terity. First, the "collected writings" are in no way complete, lacking several articles, especially from the 1830s. Second, the six volumes are in German, though Liszt wrote for the press almost exclusively in French. Third, Liszt's books on Chopin and the Gypsies, besides being in German, are pri- marily reworkings by Princess Sayn- Wittgenstein of the composer's work from

    Although his great contemporaries Rob- ert Schumann and Hector Berlioz have long been respected for their literary out- put, Franz Liszt remains little read. The perception of Liszt as a crowd-pleasing vir- tuoso and "Don Juan parvenu" continues to stand in the way of his acceptance as a composer, and this resistance surely carries over to his writings. The charge, first se- riously leveled by Emile Haraszti in the 1930s, that Liszt himself was not respon- sible for the articles and books that ap- peared under his name, and that the real authors were Marie d'Agoult and Carolyne Sayn-Wittgenstein, has further diminished his credibility. Despite the evidence that has come to light in recent years suggesting the contrary, the accusation has been repeated often enough in the secondary literature to have acquired quasi-factual status. But per- haps most damagingly, whereas Schumann and Berlioz both attempted to put their respective literary houses in order, Liszt left the editing of his Gesammelte Schriften to his biographer, Lina Ramann. Though still alive at the time of publication (1880- 83), he appears to have had little to do with it, and it is doubtful that the resulting six volumes represented the form in which he wished his literary estate to be left to pos- terity. First, the "collected writings" are in no way complete, lacking several articles, especially from the 1830s. Second, the six volumes are in German, though Liszt wrote for the press almost exclusively in French. Third, Liszt's books on Chopin and the Gypsies, besides being in German, are pri- marily reworkings by Princess Sayn- Wittgenstein of the composer's work from

    the 1850s. Only by ferreting out the orig- inal journals and monographs, many of them obscure, can the conscientious re- searcher read what Liszt wrote.

    The new Sdmtliche Schriften is the first attempt to collect all of Liszt's writings in a scholarly edition, and if the first volume to be issued is any indication, it will meet this need admirably. The editorial policy is state-of-the-art and well reflects the years of experience the general editor of the se- ries, Detlef Altenburg, has spent with the primary sources. Generally the last autho- rized version is taken for the main text, and the original orthography and punctuation are scrupulously maintained-with the ex- ception that the Fraktur type of German periodicals is printed in modern roman, while roman references from these sources are printed in italic. The editors have made it possible to have access to all other ver- sions, however, through a set of markings in the text that refer the reader to the list of variants in the critical apparatus. The system is simple to follow, and it is easy to reconstruct any given version of the text. Where another version differs significantly, the entire document is included as an ap- pendix. In addition, the French originals are translated into German on facing pages. All critical commentary is in Ger- man, but citations from Liszt's letters and other contemporary documents are given in the original languages (some languages, such as Russian, however, are quoted in German translation only). Each volume contains a brief general introduction, an introduction related to the essays within, and the texts themselves. An extensive

    the 1850s. Only by ferreting out the orig- inal journals and monographs, many of them obscure, can the conscientious re- searcher read what Liszt wrote.

    The new Sdmtliche Schriften is the first attempt to collect all of Liszt's writings in a scholarly edition, and if the first volume to be issued is any indication, it will meet this need admirably. The editorial policy is state-of-the-art and well reflects the years of experience the general editor of the se- ries, Detlef Altenburg, has spent with the primary sources. Generally the last autho- rized version is taken for the main text, and the original orthography and punctuation are scrupulously maintained-with the ex- ception that the Fraktur type of German periodicals is printed in modern roman, while roman references from these sources are printed in italic. The editors have made it possible to have access to all other ver- sions, however, through a set of markings in the text that refer the reader to the list of variants in the critical apparatus. The system is simple to follow, and it is easy to reconstruct any given version of the text. Where another version differs significantly, the entire document is included as an ap- pendix. In addition, the French originals are translated into German on facing pages. All critical commentary is in Ger- man, but citations from Liszt's letters and other contemporary documents are given in the original languages (some languages, such as Russian, however, are quoted in German translation only). Each volume contains a brief general introduction, an introduction related to the essays within, and the texts themselves. An extensive

    454 454

    This content downloaded from 188.72.126.118 on Wed, 18 Jun 2014 04:01:48 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

    http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

  • Book Reviews

    commentary follows the texts, with a dis- cussion of all known sources related to their origins, an annotated list of publications, a listing of variants, a catalogue of errors cor- rected in the texts, remarks on reception, endnotes that clarify the texts, and a bib- liography of secondary sources consulted. When complete, the Sdmtliche Schriften will consist of nine volumes. There is no sep- arate index for each volume; presumably the "Register" announced for volume 9 will cover the entire series.

    The Dramaturgische Bldtter that comprise the fifth volume are a set of twelve essays Liszt wrote in 1854 on various operas. Based on contemporary correspondence and the rapid succession with which they appeared in print, it is clear that he thought of them as a unit, although his plan to publish them in book form was not accom- plished until Ramann's edition. Liszt began the series with an unsigned article in the Weimarische Zeitung on Gluck's Orfeo, and in each subsequent essay he discussed an op- era that was currently in production at the Weimar Hoftheater under his direction. Within a few weeks, Liszt must have seen the potential for a more encompassing di- dactic purpose. He revised the articles al- ready written and published them in the Neue Zeitschrift fur Musik, at the same time writing new ones, many of which appeared in both publications. Thus he took the third article in order of appearance in the Wei- marische Zeitung (on Weber's Euryanthe) and placed it in first position in the Neue Zeitschrift fiir Musik, because it set out the issues he intended to address throughout the series. He added four additional arti- cles that never appeared in the Weimar newspaper, and the final article (on Der fliegende Holldnder) had a closing section that also appeared only in the Neue Zeitschrift-a coda that served to sum up the entire series. Thus, what began as program notes to the Weimar opera season became a coherent group of essays presenting the history of modern opera as Liszt saw it, beginning with the reform operas of Gluck and culminating with those of Wagner. Yet another essay that appeared only in the Neue Zeitschrift announced the recent com- pletion of Das Rheingold; it forms in one sense a "codetta" to the Dramaturgische Bldt- ter, but in another sense stands outside the series, as Liszt wrote little descriptive detail

    and was more concerned to mark this work as the new direction of opera.

    Liszt had several reasons for writing these articles at this point in his career. First, he wished to set forth his ideals with regard to programming in a public theater. His goals were unique for their time, and their application can still benefit opera houses today, sensibly balancing the sched- ule with earlier masterpieces, contempo- rary works of all schools, and unpublished works by promising composers. On a more theoretical level, he disagreed with Wag- ner's historical formulation in Oper und Drama, and sought to present his own un- derstanding of the process that led to Wag- ner's conception of musical drama. Wagner had viewed his Gesamtkunstwerk as deriving from Beethoven's Ninth Symphony, and Liszt was at great pains to show other in- fluences on Wagner's art, from Gluck to composers as diverse as Weber and Mey- erbeer. Nevertheless, he was careful to sep- arate Wagner the theoretician from Wag- ner the composer, and another purpose of the series was to promote him as the logical successor to Gluck with respect to operatic reform; thus the lengthy discourse on Der fliegende Holltnder that concluded the se- ries. Finally, the Dramaturgische Bldtter also served an important purpose in Liszt's lit- erary output. Beginning in 1849, he had written extensively on Tannhiuser and later Lohengrin, publishing these commentaries in their final form as a monograph in 1852. The articles of 1854 collectively summed up his thoughts on the subject of opera, a domain he had relinquished as a composer to Wagner. The following year he dealt with program music, most notably in his article "Berlioz und seine Harold- Symphonie"; this would be his territory, and it is no coincidence that the publication of the first symphonic poems followed shortly thereafter.

    As clear as Liszt's intentions may appear in the present volume, they were almost impossible to discern in the earlier edition of the collected writings. Ramann did not print the essays in the order that they ap- peared in either the Weimarische Zeitung or the Neue Zeitschrift fur Musik, devising in- stead her own sequence, and she com- pletely displaced the two Wagner essays, grouping these with the other writings on Wagner. Further, she was not content sim-

    455

    This content downloaded from 188.72.126.118 on Wed, 18 Jun 2014 04:01:48 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions

    http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp

  • NOTES, December 1991 NOTES, December 1991

    ply to reprint the German translations by Peter Cornelius, which Liszt had carefully supervised (the French originals were never published and are consi...