fortitudine vol 34 no 1 - vol 34... · fortitudine, vol.34,no.1,2009 5...

Download Fortitudine Vol 34 No 1 - Vol 34... · Fortitudine, Vol.34,No.1,2009 5 motedtolieutenantgeneralin1975and

Post on 21-Jul-2018

213 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • PASSTHISISSUEON

    TOANOTHERMARINE

    FORTITUDINEHISTORICAL BULLETIN VOLUME 34, NUMBER 1 2009

    IN MEMORIAM:GENERAL ROBERT H. BARROWCOLONEL JOHN W. RIPLEY

    BULLETIN OF THE MARINE CORPS HISTORICAL PROGRAM

    DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for public release; distribution isunlimited.

    PCN 10401220100

  • HISTORYDIVISION

    PRESIDENTMARINE CORPS UNIVERSITY

    MajGen Donald R. Gardner, USMC (Ret)

    DIRECTORDr. Charles Neimeyer

    CHIEF HISTORIANCharles Melson

    HISTORIES BRANCHCharles Smith (Branch Head); Dr.Nathan Lowrey; Dr. Fred Allison;Paul Westermeyer

    HISTORICAL REFERENCE BRANCHDanny Crawford (Branch Head);Robert Aquilina; Lena Kaljot; KaraNewcomer; Annette Amerman;Shelia Boyd

    ORAL HISTORY PROGRAMRob Taglianetti

    FIELD HISTORY BRANCHLtCol David Benhoff; LtCol LarryMcFall; CWO-4 Timothy McWilliams;GySgt Michael Coachman

    EDITING AND DESIGN BRANCHKen Williams (Branch Head); SteveHill; Vince Martinez; WandaRenfrow; Jeannie Riffe; GregMacheak

    Marine Corps History Division3079 Moreell Avenue

    Quantico, Virginia 22134Telephone (703) 432-4877http://www.history.usmc.milhistory.division@usmc.mil

    Motto of the United States Marine Corps in the 1812 era

    Historical Bulletin Vol. 34, No. 1 2009

    TABLE OF CONTENTS

    Cover: Cover drawing by WO-1 Michael D. Fay is of LCplRobinson while he was recuperating at Bethesda NavalHospital after sustaining injuries from an improvisedexplosive device.

    Memorandum from the Director: Marines OwnDr. Charles P. Neimeyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3

    In Memoriam: General Robert H. Barrow, 27th Commandant of theMarine Corps

    Robert V. Aquilina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4In Memoriam: John C. Chapin and Samuel E. Stavisky

    Robert V. Aquilina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5In Memoriam: Colonel JohnW.Ripley,Former Director of Marine CorpsHistory and Museums Division

    Dr. Charles P. Neimeyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6From the Chief Historian: Intelligence Community History

    Charles D. Melson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8Book Review: OnTarget

    Charles D. Melson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .10National Museum of the Marine Corps: In the Wrong Hands: A ColtPocket Pistol

    Alfred V. Houde Jr. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .11Histories Branch: Marines Have Always Believed in this Aircraft:Marine Mechanics Helped Rescue the Osprey

    Dr. Fred H. Allison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12Histories Branch:Marine Innovators and the Creation of Bomb Racks

    Dr. Fred H. Allison . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .13Oral History: Women Marines Train the Sisters of Fallujah

    Sara C. Pappa, Virginia E. Reynolds, Laura J. Thiessen . . . . . . . .16Field History: Marines and the Transformation of al-Anbar Province,20042008

    CWO-4 Timothy S. McWilliams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .18Marine Corps Chronology: Highlights from the 2007 AnnualChronology

    Kara R. Newcomer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .21

    This bulletin of the Marine Corps historical program is published for Marines, at the rate of onecopy for every nine on active duty, to provide education and training in the uses of military andMarine Corps history. Other interested readers may purchase single copies or four-issue sub-scriptions from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. The appro-priate order form appears in this issue.

    We can only know who we are by being certain ofwho we have been. Gen Leonard F. Chapman Jr.

    24th Commandant of the Marine Corps

    2 Fortitudine,Vol. 34, No. 1, 2009

    PASS

    THIS

    ISSU

    EON

    TOAN

    OTHE

    RM

    ARIN

    E

    FORTITUDINEHISTORICAL BULLETIN VOLUME 34, NUMBER 1 2009

    IN MEMORIAM:GENERAL ROBERT H. BARROWCOLONEL JOHN W. RIPLEY

    BULLETIN OF THE MARINE CORPS HISTORICAL PROGRAM

  • Fortitudine, Vol. 34, No. 1, 2009 3

    Memorandum from the Director

    Dr. Charles P. Neimeyer

    Marines Own

    The year 2008 will likely be remem-bered in American history as one ofturmoil and change. It was the year thatAmerica elected its first AfricanAmerican President and the year whenAmericans experienced more financialturmoil than at any time since the GreatDepression. In all the turmoil of theeconomy and excitement of the elec-tion, and little noticed outside theMarine Corps, two legendary Marinespassed awayGeneral Robert H.Barrow, 27th Commandant of theMarine Corps, and Colonel John H.Ripley, former director of the MarineCorps History and Museums Division.Their heroism, service, and devotion tothe Corps will be remembered for yearsto come.I first met General Barrow when I

    was a young first lieutenant recentlyassigned as the Head of the OfficerPromotion Branch at Headquarters,Marine Corps. At the time, the adminis-tration of the officer promotion boardswas an important but fairly mundanejob. What I did not know at the timewas that the Head of the OfficerPromotion Branch was required todirectly walk the board report to theCommandant for his signature, bypass-ing all the usual staff officers who nor-mally screened correspondence goinginto the Commandants office. Thinkingthat I would just hand off the report tothe Commandants military secretaryand wait for the signed report, I wassurprised when the Mil-Sec told methat the Commandant would see meimmediately.At the time, the Commandants office

    was located in the corner of the seconddeck of the first wing of the NavyAnnex, known today as FederalBuilding 2. I walked in with the report,centered myself on the Commandantsdesk, and announced that I had the lat-est officer promotion board report forthe Commandant to sign. I thought hewould simply sign the report, and Icould escape. However, General Barrowstarted to chat, and he motioned me tosit down in a chair next to his desk. Ithought I was in serious trouble and

    was as nervous as I had ever been. ButGeneral Barrow had a way about him.He was a southern gentleman andimmediately put me at ease. As we chat-ted, it was clear that I was talking to agreat man. I never got over the com-mand presence that General Barrowseemed to naturally possess and decid-ed to research why he had this attribute.It didnt take me long during my

    research to determine the reasonsbehind General Barrows commandpresence. Quite simply, General Barrowhad done it all. He left college andenlisted in the Marines in 1942, doingsuch a fine job at boot camp that he wasretained as a drill instructor to trainother new recruits. Not long afterward,he won a spot at Officers CandidateSchool and was in combat in the PacificTheater, leading a team of Americanswho were assisting Chinese guerrillas inJapanese-occupied China. This assign-ment called for initiative and courage,which then-Second Lieutenant Barrowpossessed. During the Korean conflict,then-Captain Barrow led a companyashore at Inchon and was later awardedboth the Silver Star and Navy Cross forgallantry in combat. During Vietnam, hecommanded the legendary 9th MarineRegiment and led the unit to a numberof successes, including OperationDewey Canyon, for which he wasawarded the U.S. Armys DistinguishedService Cross.For all of General Barrows courage

    and combat leadership skills, his great-est contribution to the Marine Corpscame during peacetime assignments.While serving during the mid-1970s asCommanding General Recruit Depot,Parris Island, and later as Deputy Chiefof Staff for Manpower at Headquarters,Marine Corps, General Barrow contin-ued the reforms begun by his mentor,the 26th Commandant, General Louis H.Wilson Jr. His decision to continue thereforms was not overly popular withsome of the old hands at the time, buthe was ultimately proven correct by thelevel and quality of recruits the MarineCorps has produced since that time. AsCommandant, he and General Paul X.

    Kelley were the driving forces behindthe creation of Maritime PrepositionedShipping. As a result of their foresight,Maritime Prepositioned Shippingenabled the Marine Corps to get to thefight during Operation Desert Stormquicker than anyone thought was possi-ble, including Saddam Hussein. In sum,General Barrow was a fearless, princi-pled commander who exuded a naturalcommand presence and immeasurablyinfluenced Marine Corps history.The recent passing of Colonel John

    W. Ripley, a former director of theHistory and Museums Division, wasanother blow to the Marine Corps fami-ly. When I was a second lieutenantgoing through Basic School in the mid-1970s, I heard and remembered thetales of his combat record. At the time,Vietnam was still fresh in everyonesmind, and being new to the Corps, Iheard the older veterans tell storiesabout impressive Marine leaders whomthey knew during the war and after-ward. Names like then-GunnerySergeant Jimmy E. Howard, then-Captains G. Ron Christmas and MichaelP. Downs at Hue City, and then-CaptainRipleys heroism at the Dong Ha Bridgewere frequent subjects of discussion.Years later, Colonel John Grider Millerprovided me with a signed copy of hisbook, The Bridge at Dong Ha, and afterhaving read it, I am still amazed at howconsistently the Marine Corps finds suchsuccessful combat commanders.Colonel Ripley was certainly one ofthose men, and may his story long betold to newer generations of lieutenantsand Marine recruits.

    Both of these outstanding Marinesepitomize the best of the MarineCorps, and they will be missed.However, for every generation of pass-ing warriors,

Recommended

View more >