form b building - university آ  follow massachusetts historical commission survey manual

Download FORM B BUILDING - University  آ  Follow Massachusetts Historical Commission Survey Manual

Post on 27-May-2020

0 views

Category:

Documents

0 download

Embed Size (px)

TRANSCRIPT

  • Follow Massachusetts Historical Commission Survey Manual instructions for completing this form.

    FORM B − BUILDING MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL COMMISSION MASSACHUSETTS ARCHIVES BUILDING 220 MORRISSEY BOULEVARD BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02125 Photograph

    Topographic or Assessor's Map

    Recorded by: W. Maros/C. Weed/C. Beagan Organization: VHB/Pressley Associates Date (month / year): May 2009

    Assessor’s Number USGS Quad Area(s) Form Number

    UMASS No. 81 Williamsburg N/A AMH.106

    Town: Amherst

    Place: University of Massachusetts

    Address: 686 North Pleasant Street

    Historic Name: Goessmann Laboratory

    Uses: Present: Chemistry Laboratory

    Original: Chemistry Laboratory

    Date of Construction: 1922

    Source: University of Massachusetts Facilities Dept.

    Style/Form: Georgian Revival

    Architect/Builder: James H. Ritchie

    Exterior Material: Foundation: Concrete

    Wall/Trim: Brick

    Roof: Slate

    Outbuildings/Secondary Structures: None

    Major Alterations (with dates): Large addition of 1957-59 on North Side

    Condition: Good

    Moved: no | X | yes | | Date

    Acreage: Total Campus Acreage: 1,348 Acres

    Setting: Located between Building #87 Draper Hall and Building #168 West Experiment Station, in the central section of the University campus. In September 2008 the front elevation was partially hidden by paving machinery and construction fencing.

  • INVENTORY FORM B CONTINUATION SHEET [AMHERST] [686 North Pleasant Street]

    MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL COMMISSION Area(s) Form No. 220 MORRISSEY BOULEVARD, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02125

    Continuation sheet 1

    ___ Recommended for listing in the National Register of Historic Places. If checked, you must attach a completed National Register Criteria Statement form.

    Use as much space as necessary to complete the following entries, allowing text to flow onto additional continuation sheets. ARCHITECTURAL DESCRIPTION: Describe architectural features. Evaluate the characteristics of this building in terms of other buildings within the community. Goessmann Laboratory is a 2½ story brick Georgian Revival structure with a high basement and a side gable central section that is flanked by matching front gable ends. The 1922 building has a rectangular footprint. A large addition of 1957 is attached to the building’s north (rear) side. Goessmann Laboratory has a slate roof, stone trim, and a concrete foundation. The building is 15 bays wide and six bays deep. The building has a stone-trimmed water table. The main entry is in at the top of a 13-step stairway, in the nine-bay wide central section of the building’s brick southeast elevation. The door is recessed within a large, classical stone doorframe which has a segmental pediment that is supported by Ionic pilasters. The pilasters have been scored horizontally to resemble individual blocks. The doorframe is surrounded by smooth stone sheathing that rises through the second story, where a 6/6 window is centered above the door frame, with a narrow incised stone panel at either side. The doorframe contains a large ornamental stone shield in the space between the lintel keystone and the segmental pediment. The double-leaf door has 3/4 glazing in its upper two thirds and 3/2 glazing in its lower third. A 3/10 transom is set above the door. Four evenly spaced 6/6 windows are located to either side of the door in each story of the building’s central section, including the high basement. The first and second story windows have stone keystones. The ends of the southeast elevation are comprised of three-bay wide front gable sections, which have slightly projecting brick piers at their corners. Within the brick piers, each front gable section has three pairs of monumental brick pilasters with stone Corinthian capitals, creating three bays between the pilasters. In contrast to the brick pilasters, the intervening bays have smooth stone sheathing. The central bay contains a single 6/6 window on each story, including the high basement. The flanking bays contain paired 4/4 windows on each story. The southwest elevation is six bays wide, with six evenly spaced 6/6 windows on the first and second stories. The high basement contains a central door, set in a stone or smooth concrete frame, which is partially below grade and is reached by a sunken stairway that descends from an adjoining campus walkway. The double-leaf basement door has 2/3 panes in the upper half of each leaf. A 4/2 transom is set over the door.

  • INVENTORY FORM B CONTINUATION SHEET [AMHERST] [686 North Pleasant Street]

    MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL COMMISSION Area(s) Form No. 220 MORRISSEY BOULEVARD, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02125

    Continuation sheet 2

    Landscape – Visual/Design Assessment Goessmann Laboratory is located to the north of the Lincoln Campus Center. A series of bituminous concrete walks that lead to the building’s main entrance on the south side are oriented on axis with the front entrance, diagonal to the front entrance from the southeast, and parallel to the southern façade of the building. Vehicular access to the building is accommodated at the east side of the building from North Pleasant Street via a pedestrian walk that doubles as a service drive. The landscape surrounding the building is dominated by bituminous concrete walks. Between the walks are areas of mature deciduous trees over lawn. Planting at the building’s foundation consists of lawn and shrubs. Two bicycle racks are located along the main approach walk on axis with the front entrance.

    2005 orthophotograph of Goessmann Laboratory (center, bottom) and surrounding landscape, north is up (MassGIS).

  • INVENTORY FORM B CONTINUATION SHEET [AMHERST] [686 North Pleasant Street]

    MASSACHUSETTS HISTORICAL COMMISSION Area(s) Form No. 220 MORRISSEY BOULEVARD, BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 02125

    Continuation sheet 3

    HISTORICAL NARRATIVE Discuss the history of the building. Explain its associations with local (or state) history. Include uses of the building, and the role(s) the owners/occupants played within the community. Overview The University of Massachusetts, Amherst was chartered as the Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1863 but did not accept its first class until 1867. As one of two land grant universities in Massachusetts, the university’s original mission was agricultural education. Its mission, however, evolved within the first 20 years in response to the changing needs of the United States. While agriculture remains, even today, a mainstay of the University’s mission, the University now also supports engineering, science, education, and liberal arts colleges and departments. A full historical narrative of the University of Massachusetts from its founding to 1958 is contained in the survey report. This narrative was prepared in 2009 by Carol S. Weed, Senior Archaeologist with Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc. Shown below are selected highlights from the text of the full historical narrative, along with additional information pertinent to the specific building that is described in this Massachusetts Historical Commission Building Form. This section contains: (1) highlights of the historic periods in the development of the University of Massachusetts, leading up to and including the period when the building was constructed, (2) information about the university in the decade when the building was constructed, (3) information about the circumstances that led to the construction of the building, along with information about its architect, if known, and (4) an analysis of the historic landscape of the building. 1863-1867: Administration and Initial Campus Layout As the educational mission evolved in the years after 1863, so did the university’s approach to its facilities and its landscape. There was no accepted plan for the layout of the college, despite the preparation of various plan proposals in the 1860s, including separate proposals from the country’s preeminent landscape planners, Calvert Vaux and Frederick Law Olmsted, who had formerly worked together on the winning design for New York City’s Central Park. Neither Vaux’s plan, nor Olmsted’s plan to create a campus around a central green, were accepted by the University Trustees. 1867-1916: The Early Growth In the absence of a coordinated plan, the Trustees put existing buildings that were acquired with the campus land into service as agricultural laboratories. Campus development for several decades after 1863 was sporadic and focused on the construction of individual buildings to meet specific functional needs of the fledgling university. It was not until after 1900, during a period of rapid student population growth and resultant new building construction, that the University Trustees again sought proposals for comprehensive campus planning. In 1912, a professional landscaping publication reported that Warren H. Manning, formerly affiliated with the Olmsted firm, had spent over four years preparing a comprehensive plan for the University Trustees. The Trustees had considered it imperative for the college to plan harmonious development th

Recommended

View more >