Folk Songs; For Voice(s) and Harp (Or Piano)by David Watkins

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<ul><li><p>Folk Songs; For Voice(s) and Harp (Or Piano) by David WatkinsReview by: Jane B. WeidensaulNotes, Second Series, Vol. 45, No. 2 (Dec., 1988), p. 397Published by: Music Library AssociationStable URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/941381 .Accessed: 15/06/2014 10:43</p><p>Your use of the JSTOR archive indicates your acceptance of the Terms &amp; Conditions of Use, available at .http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p> .JSTOR is a not-for-profit service that helps scholars, researchers, and students discover, use, and build upon a wide range ofcontent in a trusted digital archive. We use information technology and tools to increase productivity and facilitate new formsof scholarship. For more information about JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.</p><p> .</p><p>Music Library Association is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve and extend access to Notes.</p><p>http://www.jstor.org </p><p>This content downloaded from 194.29.185.251 on Sun, 15 Jun 2014 10:43:40 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/action/showPublisher?publisherCode=muliashttp://www.jstor.org/stable/941381?origin=JSTOR-pdfhttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsphttp://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p></li><li><p>Music Reviews Music Reviews Music Reviews </p><p>Griffes (Ann Arbor: UMI Research Press, 1983) contains much useful information about the composer's song output. Both the Shostakovich cycles have been recorded, although the only version listed in the cur- rent Schwann Catalog is a compact disc containing three of the five songs from Sa- tiren (Olympia OCD-143, with the Sym- phony no. 8). The orchestral arrangement of the Suite with Nesterenko issued by Mel- odiya/Columbia (M2 34594) includes both the romanized Russian and an English translation. </p><p>LAURA DANKNER Loyola University, </p><p>New Orleans </p><p>David Watkins. Folk Songs; for voice(s) and harp (or piano). London: Stainer &amp; Bell (Galaxy), 1984. [25 p.; $8.95.] </p><p>These lovely arrangements were com- pleted in 1980, published in 1984 by Stain- er &amp; Bell, and have only within the last year or two made their way to reviewers in the United States. The four songs-"Scarbor- ough Fair," "Barbara Allen," "Now is the Month of Maying," and "Sumer is Icumen in"-are familiar to most, and represent lovely choices for voice and harp: they are in turn light, transparent, and haunting. (I cannot support the printed suggestion that unison voices can be substituted for the solo singer-ideally a light tenor or soprano- and piano can be substituted for the harp.) </p><p>David Watkins is a British harpist who has several successful publications for the instrument to his credit, including an An- thology of English Music for the Harp, a Com- plete Method for the Harp, and the Petite Suite, a work programmed frequently on solo re- citals. His gifts here lie in his choice of ap- pealing themes readily accessible to any au- dience, set with ingenious, uncomplicated contrapuntal skill. The songs could be per- formed by a folk singer and an interme- diate-level harpist. </p><p>Watkins is principal harpist of the Lon- don Philharmonic Orchestra and professor of harp at the Guildhall School of Music. There can be little doubt that he works in the shadow of Benjamin Britten, whose magisterial folksong arrangements cer- tainly provided inspiration for the present opus. The result is, however, no poor sec- </p><p>Griffes (Ann Arbor: UMI Research Press, 1983) contains much useful information about the composer's song output. Both the Shostakovich cycles have been recorded, although the only version listed in the cur- rent Schwann Catalog is a compact disc containing three of the five songs from Sa- tiren (Olympia OCD-143, with the Sym- phony no. 8). The orchestral arrangement of the Suite with Nesterenko issued by Mel- odiya/Columbia (M2 34594) includes both the romanized Russian and an English translation. </p><p>LAURA DANKNER Loyola University, </p><p>New Orleans </p><p>David Watkins. Folk Songs; for voice(s) and harp (or piano). London: Stainer &amp; Bell (Galaxy), 1984. [25 p.; $8.95.] </p><p>These lovely arrangements were com- pleted in 1980, published in 1984 by Stain- er &amp; Bell, and have only within the last year or two made their way to reviewers in the United States. The four songs-"Scarbor- ough Fair," "Barbara Allen," "Now is the Month of Maying," and "Sumer is Icumen in"-are familiar to most, and represent lovely choices for voice and harp: they are in turn light, transparent, and haunting. (I cannot support the printed suggestion that unison voices can be substituted for the solo singer-ideally a light tenor or soprano- and piano can be substituted for the harp.) </p><p>David Watkins is a British harpist who has several successful publications for the instrument to his credit, including an An- thology of English Music for the Harp, a Com- plete Method for the Harp, and the Petite Suite, a work programmed frequently on solo re- citals. His gifts here lie in his choice of ap- pealing themes readily accessible to any au- dience, set with ingenious, uncomplicated contrapuntal skill. The songs could be per- formed by a folk singer and an interme- diate-level harpist. </p><p>Watkins is principal harpist of the Lon- don Philharmonic Orchestra and professor of harp at the Guildhall School of Music. There can be little doubt that he works in the shadow of Benjamin Britten, whose magisterial folksong arrangements cer- tainly provided inspiration for the present opus. The result is, however, no poor sec- </p><p>Griffes (Ann Arbor: UMI Research Press, 1983) contains much useful information about the composer's song output. Both the Shostakovich cycles have been recorded, although the only version listed in the cur- rent Schwann Catalog is a compact disc containing three of the five songs from Sa- tiren (Olympia OCD-143, with the Sym- phony no. 8). The orchestral arrangement of the Suite with Nesterenko issued by Mel- odiya/Columbia (M2 34594) includes both the romanized Russian and an English translation. </p><p>LAURA DANKNER Loyola University, </p><p>New Orleans </p><p>David Watkins. Folk Songs; for voice(s) and harp (or piano). London: Stainer &amp; Bell (Galaxy), 1984. [25 p.; $8.95.] </p><p>These lovely arrangements were com- pleted in 1980, published in 1984 by Stain- er &amp; Bell, and have only within the last year or two made their way to reviewers in the United States. The four songs-"Scarbor- ough Fair," "Barbara Allen," "Now is the Month of Maying," and "Sumer is Icumen in"-are familiar to most, and represent lovely choices for voice and harp: they are in turn light, transparent, and haunting. (I cannot support the printed suggestion that unison voices can be substituted for the solo singer-ideally a light tenor or soprano- and piano can be substituted for the harp.) </p><p>David Watkins is a British harpist who has several successful publications for the instrument to his credit, including an An- thology of English Music for the Harp, a Com- plete Method for the Harp, and the Petite Suite, a work programmed frequently on solo re- citals. His gifts here lie in his choice of ap- pealing themes readily accessible to any au- dience, set with ingenious, uncomplicated contrapuntal skill. The songs could be per- formed by a folk singer and an interme- diate-level harpist. </p><p>Watkins is principal harpist of the Lon- don Philharmonic Orchestra and professor of harp at the Guildhall School of Music. There can be little doubt that he works in the shadow of Benjamin Britten, whose magisterial folksong arrangements cer- tainly provided inspiration for the present opus. The result is, however, no poor sec- </p><p>ond, and bears favorable comparison with Britten's best. </p><p>JANE B. WEIDENSAUL William Paterson College </p><p>Wayne, NJ </p><p>English Romantic Partsongs. Edited by Paul Hillier. Oxford: Oxford Uni- versity Press, 1986. [Intro., 3 p.; score, 156 p.; notes, 1 p.] </p><p>Renaissance Christmas Motets; for mixed voices a cappella. [S.I.] U.K.: Mapa Mundi (Galaxy), 1986. [Score, 38 p.; $5.50.] </p><p>In his introduction to English Romantic Partsongs, Paul Hillier reminds us that "music is a social activity before it is an ob- ject of cultural homage and critical evalu- ation," and it is with that thought in mind that this new collection from Oxford is highly recommended to lovers of the cho- ral art. Who among us has spent many sat- isfying sessions with friends over Henry Clough-Leighter's The A Cappella Singer, yet is not always eager for new repertoire to read, sing, and enjoy? </p><p>Hillier's introduction walks us through the history of nineteenth-century English partsong, from Samuel Wesley's competi- tion piece for the 1811 Madrigal Society to the songs of Edward Elgar and his contem- poraries, with a fascinating meander past Felix Mendelssohn and his influence on the English glee tradition (hence his inclusion in this volume). Reading about the London singing societies and their encouragement of new compositions, one is reminded that amateur choruses are not really so differ- ent today: groups of "mechanics . . . weavers . . .various trades and occupa- tions" (read "lawyers . . . computer pro- grammers . . . various professions and oc- cupations") pay dues for the pleasures of music, some refreshments, and a release from the increasing industrialization (now, encroaching technology) of everyday life. </p><p>Whether or not the composers repre- sented in this volume have been slighted on concert stages for good reason, the thirty selections encompass a wonderful variety of Victorian-age styles, and the singer can experience each in turn: the backward- looking madrigal, the uniquely English glee, </p><p>ond, and bears favorable comparison with Britten's best. </p><p>JANE B. WEIDENSAUL William Paterson College </p><p>Wayne, NJ </p><p>English Romantic Partsongs. Edited by Paul Hillier. Oxford: Oxford Uni- versity Press, 1986. [Intro., 3 p.; score, 156 p.; notes, 1 p.] </p><p>Renaissance Christmas Motets; for mixed voices a cappella. [S.I.] U.K.: Mapa Mundi (Galaxy), 1986. [Score, 38 p.; $5.50.] </p><p>In his introduction to English Romantic Partsongs, Paul Hillier reminds us that "music is a social activity before it is an ob- ject of cultural homage and critical evalu- ation," and it is with that thought in mind that this new collection from Oxford is highly recommended to lovers of the cho- ral art. Who among us has spent many sat- isfying sessions with friends over Henry Clough-Leighter's The A Cappella Singer, yet is not always eager for new repertoire to read, sing, and enjoy? </p><p>Hillier's introduction walks us through the history of nineteenth-century English partsong, from Samuel Wesley's competi- tion piece for the 1811 Madrigal Society to the songs of Edward Elgar and his contem- poraries, with a fascinating meander past Felix Mendelssohn and his influence on the English glee tradition (hence his inclusion in this volume). Reading about the London singing societies and their encouragement of new compositions, one is reminded that amateur choruses are not really so differ- ent today: groups of "mechanics . . . weavers . . .various trades and occupa- tions" (read "lawyers . . . computer pro- grammers . . . various professions and oc- cupations") pay dues for the pleasures of music, some refreshments, and a release from the increasing industrialization (now, encroaching technology) of everyday life. </p><p>Whether or not the composers repre- sented in this volume have been slighted on concert stages for good reason, the thirty selections encompass a wonderful variety of Victorian-age styles, and the singer can experience each in turn: the backward- looking madrigal, the uniquely English glee, </p><p>ond, and bears favorable comparison with Britten's best. </p><p>JANE B. WEIDENSAUL William Paterson College </p><p>Wayne, NJ </p><p>English Romantic Partsongs. Edited by Paul Hillier. Oxford: Oxford Uni- versity Press, 1986. [Intro., 3 p.; score, 156 p.; notes, 1 p.] </p><p>Renaissance Christmas Motets; for mixed voices a cappella. [S.I.] U.K.: Mapa Mundi (Galaxy), 1986. [Score, 38 p.; $5.50.] </p><p>In his introduction to English Romantic Partsongs, Paul Hillier reminds us that "music is a social activity before it is an ob- ject of cultural homage and critical evalu- ation," and it is with that thought in mind that this new collection from Oxford is highly recommended to lovers of the cho- ral art. Who among us has spent many sat- isfying sessions with friends over Henry Clough-Leighter's The A Cappella Singer, yet is not always eager for new repertoire to read, sing, and enjoy? </p><p>Hillier's introduction walks us through the history of nineteenth-century English partsong, from Samuel Wesley's competi- tion piece for the 1811 Madrigal Society to the songs of Edward Elgar and his contem- poraries, with a fascinating meander past Felix Mendelssohn and his influence on the English glee tradition (hence his inclusion in this volume). Reading about the London singing societies and their encouragement of new compositions, one is reminded that amateur choruses are not really so differ- ent today: groups of "mechanics . . . weavers . . .various trades and occupa- tions" (read "lawyers . . . computer pro- grammers . . . various professions and oc- cupations") pay dues for the pleasures of music, some refreshments, and a release from the increasing industrialization (now, encroaching technology) of everyday life. </p><p>Whether or not the composers repre- sented in this volume have been slighted on concert stages for good reason, the thirty selections encompass a wonderful variety of Victorian-age styles, and the singer can experience each in turn: the backward- looking madrigal, the uniquely English glee, </p><p>397 397 397 </p><p>This content downloaded from 194.29.185.251 on Sun, 15 Jun 2014 10:43:40 AMAll use subject to JSTOR Terms and Conditions</p><p>http://www.jstor.org/page/info/about/policies/terms.jsp</p><p>Article Contentsp. 397</p><p>Issue Table of ContentsNotes, Second Series, Vol. 45, No. 2 (Dec., 1988), pp. 221-456Front Matter [pp. 221-226]Cos Cob Press and the American Composer [pp. 227-252]Songs from Messiah Published during Handel's Lifetime [pp. 253-257]Revising the History of the Miniature Score [pp. 258-261]Notes for NOTES [pp. 262-266]Book ReviewsReview: untitled [pp. 267-269]Review: untitled [pp. 269-272]Review: untitled [pp. 272-274]Review: untitled [pp. 274-276]Review: untitled [pp. 276-277]Review: untitled [pp. 278-279]Review: untitled [pp. 279-282]Review: untitled [pp. 282-283]Review: untitled [pp. 284-285]Review: untitled [pp. 285-287]...And Briefly NotedReview: untitled [p. 287]Review: untitled [pp. 287-288]Review: untitled [pp. 288-289]</p><p>Books Recently Published [pp. 290-305]New Periodicals [pp. 306-309]Music Publishers' Catalogues [pp. 310-319]Index to CD and Record Reviews [pp. 320-374]Music ReviewsReview: untitled [pp. 375-377]Review: untitled [pp. 377-379]Review: untitled [pp. 379-380]Orchestral MusicReview: untitled [pp. 380-381]Review: untitled [pp. 381-382]</p><p>Keyboard MusicReview: untitled [p. 382]</p><p>Instrumental Solo and Ensemble MusicReview: untitled [pp. 383-384]Review: untitled [p. 384]Review: untitled [pp. 384-385]Review:...</p></li></ul>

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