FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MUSIC state university college of music department of musicology graduate student handbook 2015

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FLORIDA STATE UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF MUSIC DEPARTMENT OF MUSICOLOGY GRADUATE STUDENT HANDBOOK 2015 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Contact information4 Getting Started ESSENTIAL INFORMATION.........................................................................7 Activate FSUID and Email Account.7 Health Information....7 FSUCard...8 Residency..8 Voters Registration Card.8 Florida Drivers License...9 Getting Started Timeline: Recap.10 Society for Musicology11 Society Events.11 Society for Musicology Constitution..12 Mentoring Program.19 Funding Opportunities20 Information for Teaching Assistants23 Paperwork...23 Choosing Textbooks...23 Blackboard..26 Creating a Syllabus.27 Gordon Rule/Liberal Studies for the 21st Century.27 Office Hours28 Photocopying..28 World Music and Early Music Ensembles..28 Obtaining Access28 Classrooms/Offices.28 Posting Grades29 Reading/Writing Center..29 Academic Honor Policy..29 Americans with Disabilities Act.30 Class Attendance.30 Free Tutoring from FSU.....31 Syllabus Change Policy......31 Final Examinations.31 Evaluation of Teaching...32 Grade Rosters and Incompletes..32 Your Faculty Mentor...32 PIE (Program for Instructional Excellence)....32 Course Load for Graduate Teaching Assistants..32 Notes for Graduate Teaching Assistants and Readers33 3 Conference Information...36 National Conferences..36 Regional Conferences.36 Funding...37 Course of Study38 Masters Program Timeline38 Ph.D. Program Timeline.....40 General Calendar for Thesis and Dissertation Documents and Defenses..42 Program of Studies Form- M.M. Historical Musicology43 Program of Studies Form- M.M. Ethnomusicology...44 Doctor of Philosophy in Musicology..45 4 CONTACT INFORMATION (Unless otherwise indicated, all professors telephone numbers begin (850) 644-) ADMINISTRATION/STAFF Dr. Patricia Flowers, Dean 4361 HMU202B pjflowers@fsu.edu Dr. William Fredrickson, Associate Dean 3885 HMU 202C wfredrickson@fsu.edu Dr. James Mathes, Associate Professor 5848 HMU204B jmathes@fsu.edu of Music Theory, Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, and Director of Graduate Studies Dr. Stanley C. Pelkey II, 4296 KMU 214C spelkey@fsu.edu Associate Dean for Community Engagement and Entrepreneurship Jennie Carpenter, Sr. Secretary, 3424 HMU 204 Jrh03j@admin.fsu.edu Mail and Copy Room Daniel Halladay, Fiscal 6572 KRB 214 Dhalladay@fsu.edu Stephanie Kemp, Fiscal 0415 KRB 211 skemp@fsu.edu Marah Kirsten, Fiscal (850) 645-7734 KRB 210 mkirsten@fsu.edu Michelle Pohto, Director 9254 KRB 212 mmpohto@fsu.edu of Fiscal Offices Meghan McCaskill, Academic Program 4689 HMU 203 mmccaskill@fsu.edu Specialist/Registration Lauren Smith, Sr. Program Associate Graduate 5848 HMU 204A LMSmith2@fsu.edu Studies Tiawana Meeks, Office Assistant, 4649 HMU 202D tmeeks@fsu.edu College of Music room/key access Brad Rohrer, Program Assistant 2705 HMU 202 brohrer@fsu.edu Recital Hall Scheduling 5 WARREN D. ALLEN MUSIC LIBRARY Laura Gayle Green, Director of Warren D. 3999 HMU 090 Lgreen3@fsu.edu Allen Music Library Circulation/Reserves 7068 HMU 090 AMLCirc@fsu.edu Manager Sarah Hess Cohen, Head of Music 4137 HMU 090 shcohen@fsu.edu Cataloging Sarah Dugas, Assistant for 7624 HMU 090 sdugas@fsu.edu Processing and Binding Sara Nodine, Head of Music 4698 HMU090 snodine@fsu.edu Collection Development, Special Collections inquiries Keith Knop, Associate Music Cataloger 7064 HMU 090 kknop@fsu.edu Avis Berry, Student Supervisor 0417 HMU 090 aberry@fsu.edu MUSICOLOGY Dr. Ruth Akers, 3424 HMU 083 rakers@fsu.edu Adjunct Teaching Faculty Dr. Michael Bakan, Professor of 4255 LON 413 mbakan@fsu.edu Ethnomusicology; Head of World Music Ensembles Dr. Charles Brewer, Professor 6403 LON 415 cbrewer@fsu.edu of Historical Musicology Dr. Michael Broyles, Professor of 3424 LON 401 mbroyles@fsu.edu Musicology Dr. Sarah Eyerly, Assistant Professor 850-645-0638 LON 404 seyerly@fsu.edu of Historical Musicology Dr. Frank Gunderson, Associate Professor 6106 LON 410 fgunderson@fsu.edu of Ethnomusicology 6 Dr. Margaret Jackson, Assistant Professor 0420 LON 307 mrjackson@fsu.edu of Ethnomusicology Dr. Douglass Seaton, Warren D. 6545 LON 408 dseaton@fsu.edu Allen Professor of Music Dr. Denise Von Glahn, Curtis Mayes 3721 LON 309 DVonGlahn@fsu.edu Orpheus Professor of Musicology; Director of the Center for Music of the Americas; Coordinator of Musicology Dr. Chris Witulski, Teaching (850) 645-0961 KRB 313 cwitulski@fsu.edu Faculty I - Ethnomusicology/Distance Learning ENSEMBLE DIRECTORS Pamela Andrews (Viola da Gamba) pandrews@fsu.edu Valerie Arsenault (Baroque Ensemble) varsenault@fsu.edu Charles Atkins (Blues Lab) catkins@fsu.edu Michael Bakan (Balinese Gamelan) mbakan@fsu.edu Jose Carrasco (Salsa) jcarrasco@fsu.edu Jenitha Kameli (African Drumming and Dance Ensemble) jak14k@my.fsu.edu Haiqiong Deng (Chinese ensemble) haiqiongd@yahoo.com Sarah Eyerly (Collegium Musicum; Schola Cantorum) seyerly@fsu.edu Shawn Fassig (Mas n Steel) swf08@my.fsu.edu Aisha Ivey (Old Time Ensemble) asivey@admin.fsu.edu Lynnsey Weissenberger (Irish ensemble) violynnsey@yahoo.com mailto:catkins@fsu.edumailto:catkins@fsu.edumailto:mbakan@fsu.edumailto:mbakan@fsu.edumailto:jcarrasco@fsu.edumailto:jcarrasco@fsu.edumailto:haiqiongd@yahoo.commailto:haiqiongd@yahoo.commailto:asivey@admin.fsu.edumailto:asivey@admin.fsu.edumailto:violynnsey@yahoo.com7 GETTING STARTED Welcome to the Florida State University Department of Musicology! Before you begin your first day of classes, there are several important things that you must do in order to be able to register for classes and to avoid future problems. These tasks can be time consuming and so it is recommended that, if possible, you arrive in Tallahassee at least a week in advance of the start of classes. This should give you plenty of time to obtain the necessary paperwork to begin your graduate career at FSU! ACTIVATE YOUR FSUID AND EMAIL ACCOUNT First things first, you will need to go online and activate your FSUID. This is the magical ID that will allow you to set up your email account, access the University network, register for classes, and pay online fees. Visit the Florida State University Dean of Students FSUID Activation information page (http://dos.fsu.edu/newnole/pre-orientation/activate-fsuid-email-access-myfsu) for step-by-step directions. HEALTH INFORMATION FORMS FSU requires all incoming students to complete a Health History Form, Student Immunization Record Form (this must be filled out by a clinician or records custodian), and a Patient Disclosure Authorization Form. These forms must all be completed, sent to University Health Services, and put on record before you will be able to register for classes. It is recommended that you do this as early as possible in the summer months before your arrival as it can be difficult to obtain an appointment with the University Health Center right before classes begin. For more information visit the University Health Services website at http://healthcenter.fsu.edu. HEALTH INSURANCE All full-time students are required to have health insurance. You must either enroll in the University-sponsored plan or provide proof of comparable health insurance coverage by completing the Waive/Purchase Insurance Form through the University Health Services Student Insurance Management Information System (SIMIS) website at http://studentinsurance.fsu.edu. YOU MUST COMPLETE THIS PROCESS BEFORE YOU WILL BE ABLE TO REGISTER FOR CLASSES. If you already have insurance coverage and wish to waive the University-sponsored insurance, be sure to check with your insurance company to see if your plan provides comparable coverage to that of the University. If you choose to enroll in the University-sponsored plan, charges will automatically be assessed to your student account. *Allow 10 business days for your health and proof of insurance forms to be processed! You may check the status of these forms at the Online Status Check website, https://admissions.fsu.edu/StatusCheck/. 8 FSUCARD All students must have an FSUCard. This is your key to gaining access to the campus libraries, printing services, and public transportation system. To obtain your FSUCard visit the FSUCard Center located next to the bookstore at 104N Woodward Avenue (this is within walking distance of the College of Music). For more information visit the FSUCard Services website at http://www.fsucard.fsu.edu. RESIDENCY If you are a Florida resident you must submit an online Florida Residency Form to the Office of Admissions (see https://admissions.fsu.edu/residency/Residency.cfm) before the first day of classes. If you are an out-of-state graduate student, you may apply for Florida residency by visiting the Clerk of the Circuit Court at the Leon County Court House. This is located at the Bank of America Annex, 313 S. Calhoun Street, Suite 101, Tallahassee, FL 32301. This office is open Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. In order to declare domicile you will need a copy of your lease agreement (or proof of living arrangement) and $15. This is usually a speedy and painless process, but it must be completed PRIOR TO THE FIRST DAY OF CLASSES! It is important that you declare domicile before the first day of classes because at the beginning of your second year you will be required to provide proof of having lived in Florida for 12 consecutive months (with a drivers license, lease, utility bills, bank statements, voters registration card etc.) in order to qualify for in-state tuition. WHY BECOME A FLORIDA RESIDENT? If you have an assistantship and are an out-of-state resident the University will waive your out-of-state tuition fee (though you are still required to pay curriculum and general fees) for the first year. However, after the first year the University will only cover the in-state tuition amount and you will be responsible for the remaining sum. Thus, it is beneficial to become a resident of Florida to avoid paying for out-of-state tuition in your second year. VOTERS REGISTRATION CARD In order to register to vote within the state of Florida, first obtain you declaration of domicile form and then visit the Leon County Supervisor of Elections Office. This is located right next to the Clerk of the Circuit Court in the Bank of American Annex (where you go to declare domicile). You simply fill out the Florida Voter Registration Application and will receive your voter registration card in the mail within a few business days. For more information visit the Florida Division of Elections website at http://election.dos.state.fl.us/voter-registration/voter-reg.shtml. 9 FLORIDA DRIVERS LICENSE In order to obtain a Florida drivers license (which will be necessary to become a resident of Florida and to qualify for in-state tuition in your second year) you must provide proof of identity, social security number, legal residence (2 documents, place and date of birth). You can obtain a drivers license from any Leon County Tax Collector Office. *Make sure that you have all of the necessary documentation ahead of time- lines can be rather long and nothing is worse than waiting in line for an hour only to discover that you do not have the required number of documents. U.S. Citizens may use one of the following: ~Valid, unexpired U.S. passport ~Original or Certified copy of a birth certificate ~Consular report of birth abroad ~Certificate of Naturalization issued by DHS ~Certificate of citizenship Non-Citizens may use one of the following: ~Valid, unexpired Permanent Resident Card- I-551 for Lawful Permanent Residents ~Valid Passport for non-immigrants except for asylum applicants and refugees ~Other government issued document showing your full name ~Departments of Homeland Security document showing proof of lawful presence ~If your name has changed by marriage/divorce, you must have your name changed on your Citizen and Immigration Services (CIS) documents. Citizens and Non-Citizens need to bring one of the following: ~Social Security card ~W-2 form (not handwritten) ~SSA-1099 ~Documentation from the IRS containing your social security number ~Paycheck stub ~Any 1099 (not handwritten) Citizens and Non-Citizens need to bring two proofs of residential address: ~Mail from financial institutions (checks, savings, or investment account statements, not more than two months old) ~Lease/rental agreement, deed, monthly mortgage statement ~Florida Voter Registration Card ~Florida Vehicle Registration or Title ~Utility hook up or work order dated within 60 days of the application ~Utility bills, not more than two months old ~Medical or health card with address listed ~Current homeowners insurance policy or bill ~Current automobile insurance policy or bill ~Educational institution transcript forms for the current school year ~W-2 form of 1099 form ~Form DS2019, Certificate of Eligibility for Exchange Visitor (J-1) status 10 GETTING STARTED TIMELINE - RECAP Early-mid summer ~Activate your email account ~Complete health and insurance forms 1-2 weeks before school beings ~Get FSUCard If applying for Florida Residency: ~Obtain Declaration of Domicile ~Obtain Voters Registration Card ~Obtain Florida Drivers License 1 week before school ~Attend all Orientation events including Theory Placement Exam, Teaching Assistant Orientation, and Musicology Orientation 11 SOCIETY FOR MUSICOLOGY The Society for Musicology (SfM) is a student organization that seeks to promote academic excellence among musicology students by offering opportunities for professional development, creating a positive learning environment for all scholars, and building an academic community based upon collegiality and collaboration. Throughout the year, the officers of SfM organize colloquia, workshops, and presentations by visiting and guest scholars within the discipline. In addition to these academic activities, SfM also hosts periodic social gatherings to give students the opportunity to develop friendships outside of the classroom. Attendance at these activities, both social and academic, is essential to the cohesion and growth of the department and therefore SfM members are expected to be present at all events unless they have a prior conflict. Meetings will take place every Thursday in HMU 125 from 4:00-5:00 PM (unless otherwise noted). SOCIETY EVENTS ORPHEUS LECTURES The Curtis Mayes Orpheus Endowed Chairholders in Musicology Series is funded by the Curtis Mayes Orpheus Endowed Fund. Each year, the Society for Musicology invites a number of esteemed guests in the field of historical musicology to present a lecture on his or her major research area. The scholar also presents additional colloquia, meet one-on-one with students, and attends an informal student luncheon. KREBS SCHOLARS The Society for Musicology presents one visiting lecturer per school year with funding from the Krebs Endowment in Musicology. This scholar is usually an eminent ethnomusicologist, who presents a lecture on his or her major research area. The scholar also presents additional colloquia, one-on-one with students, and attends an informal student luncheon. COLLOQUIA/WORKSHOPS Each year the Society for Musicology members decide on specific activities they feel will enhance their academic careers. Such activities have in the past included rsum preparation, teaching and grading workshops, mock paper presentations, and student research presentations. 12 CONSTITUTION FOR THE SOCIETY FOR MUSICOLOGY Preamble We the members of the Society for Musicology at the Florida State University do hereby establish this Constitution in order that our purpose be realized to its fullest extent. Article IOrganization Name The name of this organization shall be the Society for Musicology at the Florida State University. The organization may also refer to itself as SfM. Article IIPurpose The purpose of the Society for Musicology is to promote academic excellence among musicology students by offering opportunities for professional development, including, but not limited to, colloquia, workshops, and presentations by scholars in the discipline. The Society also seeks to foster collegiality by assisting new students to transition into the musicology graduate program, to create a positive learning environment for all students, and to promote a sense of community among students and faculty. The Society strives to build relationships between music and its sister disciplines, and holds events each year that encourage dialogue between scholars from the Florida State University and other institutions. All activities of the Society for Musicology shall be legal under University, local, state, and federal laws. Article IIIMembership Section 1: Membership Statement Membership is limited to all students who are enrolled with the Florida State University. No hazing or discrimination will be used as a condition of membership in this organization. Information regarding hazing can be found at http://hazing.fsu.edu/. This organization agrees to adhere to the University non-discrimination statement: No university student may be denied membership on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, religion, national origin, age, disability, veterans or marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, gender expression, or any other protected group status. Section 2: Recruitment Recruitment shall take place throughout the academic year, and membership is open at all times. Section 3: Revocation of Membership Membership may be revoked without mutual agreement for non-participation, misconduct, or violations of any provisions of the Constitution. The member will be notified in writing of the possible revocation at least 72 hours prior to the vote and will be allowed to address the organization in order to relate to members any relevant defense prior to the voting for removal. Membership can only be revoked upon a 2/3 majority vote of eligible members. Revocation of membership will be valid for one (1) semester. 13 Section 4: Appeal Process Any student whose membership is revoked will have seven (7) calendar days to appeal the revocation. The appeal must be submitted in writing to the President and must include any relevant information that has not already been presented. The President will submit the appeal to the SfM executive board, which will then render a decision within seven (7) calendar days. Article IVOfficers Section 1: Eligibility All officers of the Society for Musicology shall be enrolled at least part-time as graduate musicology students at the Florida State University College of Music and possess at least a 2.3 grade point average. Section 2: Titles and Duties The offices of this organization shall include a President, Secretary/DSAC Representative, Financial Coordinator, Social Event/Colloquium Coordinator, and Visiting Scholar Coordinator, Guest Scholar Coordinator, and Communications Coordinator. No officer will be permitted to hold more than one officer position. All officers shall retain voting rights, but the President shall only vote in the case of a tie. Officers may be re-elected but may not serve in the same position for more than two consecutive terms. PRESIDENT The presidents duties include supervising the activities of the organization, presiding over all meetings, being one of three signers on financial documents, ensuring that all officers are performing their duties as defined in this Constitution, assigning special projects to officers, and communicating with the faculty advisor and the head of the Musicology area to keep the Society running smoothly. The president will also be responsible for leading the student mentor program and organizing the volunteer committees that support the SfM executive board, which include, but are not limited to: fundraising, publicity, social events, and audio/visual archiving. SECRETARY/DSAC REPRESENTATIVE The secretary informs the membership of current and relevant academic events. He or she is responsible for maintaining an updated membership list and calendar of events, as well as a list of relevant regional and national conferences during the academic year. The secretarys duties include taking notes at Society meetings and sending e-mail reminders about upcoming events. The secretary will also keep a copy of constitution available for all members, assist in special projects as assigned by the president or executive board, and be responsible for the nominating and election procedures outlined in Article V, Sections 2 and 3. Finally, the secretary acts as representative of the Society for Musicology at all meetings of the College of Music Deans Student Advisory Committee (DSAC), keeping a detailed record of the committees proceedings and report this to the SfM executive board. 14 VISITING SCHOLAR COORDINATOR The visiting scholar coordinator manages responsibilities for all lectures, including those for the Krebs and Orpheus Lecture Series, as well as other visiting scholars from outside the university. This includes reserving rooms and obtaining keys, insuring the necessary equipment is present, coordinating the student luncheon with the scholar, and making/distributing posters. The visiting scholar coordinator leads the selection process for the SfM visiting scholar, which includes all financial negotiations, scheduling logistics, and selection of events. The visiting scholar coordinator also assists the guest scholar coordinator with events, as well as special projects as assigned by the president or executive board. The visiting scholar coordinator must also become one of three financially certified officers on the SfM executive board and work cooperatively with the financial coordinator to ensure that all financial documents for visiting scholar events are completed in a timely manner. GUEST SCHOLAR COORDINATOR The guest scholar coordinator manages responsibilities for all lectures involving speakers from within The Florida State University. This includes reserving rooms and obtaining keys, insuring the necessary equipment is present, coordinating the student luncheon with the scholar, and making/distributing posters. The guest scholar coordinator also assists the visiting scholar coordinator with events, as well as special projects as assigned by the president or executive board. The guest scholar coordinator must work cooperatively with the financial coordinator to ensure that all financial documents for guest scholar events are completed in a timely manner. FINANCIAL COORDINATOR The financial coordinator is responsible for all financial matter and for communicating with the Congress of Graduate Students (COGS), the SfM officers, and the faculty advisor about financial needs (see Finances). The financial coordinators duties include collecting membership dues, keeping an accurate account of all funds received and expended including self-generated monies, being one of three signers on financial documents, maintaining witness forms for all financial documents, and being responsible for creating budget reports at the beginning of each Fall and Spring semester and as requested by the president and/or SfM advisor. The financial coordinator is responsible for preparing financial paperwork for all SfM events accurately and in a timely manner, completing all necessary forms at least one week in advance of deadlines required by COGS. The financial coordinator will also assist in special projects as assigned by the president or executive board. 15 SOCIAL EVENT/COLLOQUIUM COORDINATOR The social event/colloquium coordinators duties are twofold: to coordinate social events, which includes offering assistance to visiting students, and to coordinate department colloquia. The social event/colloquium coordinator is responsible for all SfM student social events, visiting and guest scholar receptions, prospective student lunches, and all department colloquia and professional development workshops. This includes purchasing and preparing food and refreshments, reserving and obtaining keys for the reception or colloquium room through the College of Music, providing water and any other needed amenities for guest speakers, and cleaning up afterwards. Purchases for the Visiting and Guest Lecture Series receptions are obtained through purchase orders provided by COGS. This officer also acts as a liaison for visiting students. These duties include securing housing and coordinating social events with the FSU musicology student body. The social event/colloquium coordinator will also manage the social committee, which will assist in preparing for all necessary social events. The social coordinator will also assist in special projects as assigned by the president or executive board. COMMUNICATIONS COORDINATOR The communications coordinator maintains the society website at [http://union.fsu.edu/rso/sfm/] and all outside vehicles of student communication, including Facebook, Twitter, and the society blog at Wordpress.com. The communications coordinator is responsible for making frequent updates of the student member list, student and alumni papers, general information on society events, and maintaining the society listserv. The communications coordinator will also assist in special projects as assigned by the president or executive board. Article VSelection of Officers Section 1: Eligibility to Vote and Hold Office Active voting membership will be limited to all students who are active members in good standing. Only active members who meet the requirements stated in Article IV, Section 1 are eligible to hold offices. Section 2: Nomination Process The nomination of officers shall occur at the end of Spring Semester for the upcoming academic year. Nominations will be submitted to the Secretary. In a call for nominations, society members will have the opportunity to review officer positions and carefully consider who will best serve in each capacity. Students nominated for positions will have the opportunity of accepting or declining. Should there be nominations for one person to multiple positions, the nominee may choose one position for which he or she will be nominated. 16 Section 3: Election Process Elections take place after the call for nominations during the last two weeks of the Spring Semester. The nominated candidates will be given a chance to address the organization to discuss his or her qualifications and reasons why they should be selected. All eligible members (as defined in Article III Section 1) will have the opportunity to vote by secret ballot. The faculty advisor and current highest-ranking officer not running for office will tabulate all votes. The highest-ranking officer not running for office shall announce the officer with a majority of votes cast by at least a 50% quorum of eligible members of the organization. In the event of a tie, the President shall cast the deciding vote for office unless he or she is running for the said office. In that case, the next highest-ranking officer shall make the deciding vote in consultation with the faculty advisor. Section 4: Term of Office The length of one office term is approximately one year, May 1st to April 30th. Newly elected officers shall take office immediately after the announcement of their appointment. Article VIOfficer Vacancies Section 1: Removal of Officers Any officer may be removed from office if deemed necessary by the SfM executive board after consulting the faculty advisor. Upon dismissal, the revoked officer must provide all documents relating to the organization and brief the executive board and faculty advisor of current projects in his or her care. Section 2: Resignation Officers no longer wishing to serve must submit their resignation to the faculty advisor at least two (2) weeks in advance. Prior to the officers final day he or she shall provide all documents relating to the organization and brief his or her replacement regarding current projects in his or her care. Section 3: Filling Vacant Officer Positions In the event an officer is removed or resigns, the faculty advisor and other officers shall find a suitable replacement immediately. The election process will take place as stated in Article V Section 3 at the next scheduled meeting following nomination. The newly elected officers term shall end at the end of the academic year. In the event that a position becomes vacant and requires immediate replacement, the SfM board may appoint a pro tempore officer until an election can be held. Article VIIMeetings Meetings of the Society for Musicology may be called by the officers or may be arranged through the officers. Members must be notified of meetings at least 48 hours in advance and shall be notified via e-mail and/or telephone. The president and/or the faculty advisor shall preside over all meetings. 17 Article VIIIAdvisor Section 1: Nomination and Role The advisor shall be selected yearly by the officers of this organization and must be approved by a simple majority vote of eligible members. The advisor shall serve as a mentor to the organization, providing guidance to the officers and members. The advisor has no voting rights. The advisor position has no term limit other than that he or she must be a current FSU faculty member in the College of Music. Section 2: Removal and Replacement of Advisor Should the Society deem it necessary to replace an advisor in the course of a year, the advisor will be notified in writing of the possible removal at least 72 hours prior to the vote and will be allowed to address the organization in order to relate to members any relevant defense prior to the voting for removal. Upon a 2/3 majority vote of the SfM officers the advisor will be removed from his/her duties. In the event that an advisor is removed or resigns, a new advisor shall be elected within 14 calendar days. Article IXFinances Section 1: Membership Dues Membership dues shall be ten (10) dollars per academic year. Membership dues will be collected at the first meeting of the Fall semester. No membership dues will be collected during Summer terms. No university student may be denied membership due to inability to pay dues. If a member is not able to pay dues, other arrangements will be made. Members required to pay dues are full-time students enrolled in a Musicology graduate degree program at FSU; part-time-student members may pay dues voluntarily. Section 2: Spending Organizations Money For the protection of the organization and its officers it is required that two authorized signatories sign all monetary transactions before they occur. Only the President, Financial Coordinator, and a third designated officer can be signers on the organizations account. Organizational funds, including dues, may be spent on items such as guest lecturers and artists, office supplies, instruments, repairs, parts and supplies, music, etc., but will not be used for any purpose illegal under University, local, state, and federal laws. Section 3: Officer Transition It shall be the responsibility of all account signers to change contact information as well as assist in the update of new account signatures after each election with the organizations financial institution. In addition, the Financial Coordinator will be responsible to pass along all information from previous years budget and current budget. Section 4: Dissolution of Organization In the event that the organization ceases to exist, any funds remaining in the organizations account shall be remitted back to the appropriate funders. Other monies collected shall be kept in a College of Music account for future use, to be opened only in the event that the organization becomes active again. 18 Article XPublications Section 1: Compliance All advertisements of the organization must comply with the University Posting Policy (http://posting.fsu.edu). Section 2: Approval The SfM executive board must approve all publications, flyers, etc., after consultation with the faculty advisor and prior to duplication and distribution. Article XIAmendments Amendments to the constitution must be proposed in writing to the President. The amendment must then be presented to the executive board during a meeting and should include a full explanation and/or rationale for the amendment. The amendment shall not take effect until approved by a majority vote of SfM executive board. History of Constitution Created: 1993 Revised: January 2009 Revised: August 2009 Revised: Twenty-Seventh day of September in the year 2011 Revised: Twentieth day of April in the year 2012 Signature of President and Faculty Advisor President ____________________________________________ Date _____________ Faculty Advisor _______________________________________ Date _____________ 19 MENTORING PROGRAM It has been recognized that incoming students are unaware of many aspects of graduate life as well as musicological study. The purpose of the mentoring program is to welcome new musicologists into the department and to impart important information about student life, course of study, and available resources. In order to orient and provide support for incoming students, each new musicologist will be appointed a student mentor, a willing volunteer who can explain various aspects of life and work at the graduate level. The duties of the mentors are as follows: 1. Acclimate mentee to FSU and the College of Music making him or her aware of the buildings, classroom locations, school policies, etc. 2. Share information regarding the activities of the Society for Musicology (SfM) 3. Encourage the new student to attend all SfM activities, including lectures, colloquia, meetings, and presentations 4. Introduce mentee to other musicologists in the department 5. For new student teachers, impart pertinent information about classrooms and resources (audio/video equipment, keys, combinations, etc.) 6. Assist mentee in any other way necessary The Society of Musicology officers will select experienced students to be mentors for incoming students, though volunteers are also welcome! Mentors will be informed at the beginning of the school year about their responsibilities and the new students they will be mentoring. This is an indispensable program for our department and each mentor should be honored to accept this position. 20 FUNDING OPPORTUNITIES INTERNAL FUNDING Carol Krebs Research Fellow Award These awards, which are expected to range from $500 to $2000 each, are available to graduate students using ethnographic research methods in musicological research, to underwrite research expenses. Examples of appropriate uses of the Award would be for travel for fieldwork or for purchase of essential materials. In addition to receiving the financial award, successful applicants will hold the title Carol Krebs Research Fellow for the academic year to which the Award applies. ELIGIBILITY/PRIORITY: All students in the Musicology area are eligible to apply, and you may receive the Carol Krebs Research Fellow Award more than once. Priority consideration will be given to those applicants who have not already received a total of $2000 from this program. Those who have received $2000 may then be considered for any remaining funds from the annual budget allocation for these awards. FORMAT AND SUBMISSION: Proposals should consist of no more than two pages. A successful proposal will: ~Identify the project for which you would use the Carol Krebs Research Fellow Award ~Explain the projects significance ~Elucidate the projects use of ethnographic methodology ~Outline activities and resources that would be necessary for your project ~Include a clear, well-researched budget SPECIAL NOTE: Students will be considered for either the Curtis Mayes award or the Carol Krebs award, and should not apply for both in the same year. Please list all years and amounts of previous Orpheus/Krebs summer research awards. ADVICE: It is highly recommended that you ask for mentoring from a faculty member as you work on the proposal. The faculty will be happy to discuss ideas and to look over proposals in advance, to assure that they meet the guidelines and to offer any other advice, if you can provide them at least a week before the deadline. Curtis Mayes Research Fellow These awards, which are expected to range from $500 to $2000 each, are available to graduate students using historical methods in musicological research, to underwrite research expenses. Examples of appropriate uses of the Award would be for travel to libraries and archives or for purchase of essential source materials. In addition to receiving the financial award, successful applicants will hold the title Curtis Mayes Research Fellow for the academic year to which the Award applies. 21 ELIGIBILITY/PRIORITY: All students in the Musicology area are eligible to apply, and you may receive the Curtis Mayes Research Fellow Award more than once. Priority consideration will be given to those applicants who have not already received a total of $2000 from this program. Those who have received $2000 may then be considered for any remaining funds from the annual budget allocation for these awards. FORMAT AND SUBMISSION: Proposals should consist of no more than two pages. A successful proposal will: ~Identify the project for which you would use the Curtis Mayes Research Fellow Award ~Explain the projects significance ~Elucidate the projects use of historical methodology ~Outline activities and resources that would be necessary for your project ~Include a clear, well-researched budget SPECIAL NOTE: Students will be considered for either the Curtis Mayes award or the Carol Krebs award, and should not apply for both in the same year. Please list all years and amounts of previous Orpheus/Krebs summer research awards. ADVICE: It is highly recommended that you ask for mentoring from a faculty member as you work on the proposal. The faculty will be happy to discuss ideas and to look over proposals in advance, to assure that they meet the guidelines and to offer any other advice, if you can provide them at least a week before the deadline. Dissertation Research Grants The Dissertation Research Grant is a $750 award paid by The Graduate School to assist doctoral students with expenses associated with research necessary to prepare dissertations. New awards are given each semester. The applicant must complete the online application and submit their CV as well as the major professor's statement form to The Graduate School prior to the deadline. The application deadline is usually the end of the second week of classes each fall and spring semester. See http://gradschool.fsu.edu/. International Dissertation Semester Research Fellowship This fellowship carries a $7,000 stipend per semester (up to two semesters), plus tuition waivers, for advanced doctoral students. These prestigious fellowships for advanced doctoral students are offered by the Graduate School to facilitate research and timely completion of the doctoral degree that requires extended research-time abroad. Recipients must enroll for a minimum number of dissertation hours during the research semester. Recipients must conduct research abroad for the duration of the fellowship. Applications are through the academic department Chair or College Dean as appropriate. See http://gradschool.fsu.edu/. http://gradschool.fsu.edu/http://gradschool.fsu.edu/22 Presser Foundation Grant $10,000 awarded to one graduate music student for an outside project advancing their professional careers. Proposals must be submitted to area coordinators, who then each submit one proposal to the Senior Associate Dean of Graduate Studies in Music. (Details about content of the proposals are distributed late in the fall semester.) From these seven, one is chosen to receive the award. Submission deadline usually end of January or first week of February. EXTERNAL FUNDING *For external funding opportunities visit the Florida State University Office of Graduate Fellowships and Awards website at http://ogfa.fsu.edu. 23 INFORMATION FOR TEACHING ASSISTANTS Congratulations on being selected to teach one of the undergraduate music courses at Florida State University! What follows are some helpful hints about beginning this phase of your graduate career. GETTING STARTED: SIGN YOUR PAPERWORK!! The very first thing you should do as a graduate assistant at Florida State University is to sign your appointment papers in the Music Fiscal Office, located on the second floor of the Kellogg building. Signing your assistantship offer contract does not automatically make you an employee of Florida State University. You must be appointed for work for FSU before you will receive your stipend. To do this, you must fill out a New Employee Forms Wizard if you have not worked for FSU in the past 12 calendar months. You MUST provide a valid, signed social security card. This card is required of every FSU employee and no exceptions can be made nor other forms of identification used in its place. International students must provide the following documents before you can be appointed to work: social security card, I-20 student copy, valid passport and visa, and IAP-66 or its equivalent. All questions concerning the New Employee Forms Wizard must be directed to the College of Music Fiscal Office: (850) 644-0415. If you do not sign your papers immediately, you will not receive a paycheck until much later in the semester. You must complete all paperwork in order to receive a paycheck. CHOOSING TEXTBOOKS Once you know your class number, section, and name (e.g., MUL 2110-01 Survey of Music Literature), you can begin planning the books and other materials that students will use for your class. Below is a list of music courses taught by graduate students along with some suggestions for textbooks. However, teaching assistants should consult appropriate teaching supervisors to ascertain whether the materials listed below are being used for the current semester. To comply with recent federal and state laws, we are required to report textbook selection at the time when students register for the next semester. Most publishing companies will send you desk copies of everything you need to make your decisions. Graduate teaching assistants order their own books and must submit textbook information for each class for which they are an instructor the semester before the class begins. Below are instructions submitting textbook information: -Log in to myFSU (my.fsu.edu) -Click the Student Central link (left-hand side of page). -Click Self Service > Faculty Center > My Schedule. -The courses in which you are listed as the instructor will be listed. -The system may default to this current semester or Summer 2015. In order to see your courses for Fall 2015, click on the change term link located next to 2015 Spring/Summer Florida State University. -Click the book icon next to each course. -If you do not have any books to assign, please click the No textbooks assigned to class box. The system will not automatically default to no textbooks. -To add a textbook assignment, click the spyglass under Course Material ID and use the http://omni.fsu.edu/24 search fields to find your book materials in the textbook database. -Use the search form drop down menus and certain keywords to help with your search. -If the item you are looking for is not in the database, please click the Create Textbook/Course Material tab on the main textbook assignment page. Follow the instructions. -Please do not forget to select the Textbook entry complete option and save after each screen. You will not be in compliance until Textbook entry complete is selected and saved. -To go back to your My Schedule course list, click the My Schedule on the task bar toward the top of the page. -Please do not forget to click the View All link located at the top of the task bar on your My Schedule. -IMPORTANT: DO NOT CLICK THE BACK BUTTON. If you do this, you will have to start all over. MUL 2110 Music Literature The following can be purchased as a package: ~Kristine Forney, ed., The Norton Scores, 11th ed., 2 vols. (New York: Norton, 2011). ~The Norton Recordings, 11th ed., 8-CD set (Sony Music Special Products, 2010). This class has historically required students also to purchase and use ~Michael Randel, Harvard Concise Dictionary of Music and Musicians (Cambridge, MA: Belknap, 2002). MUH 3211 Music History: Antiquity 1750 and MUH 3212 Music History: 1750 Present In recent years this class has required the following combination: ~David J. Rothenberg and Robert R. Holzer, ed., Oxford Anthology of Western Music: Custom Scores and Concise CD Set (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013) ~Douglass Seaton, Ideas and Styles in the Western Musical Tradition, 3rd ed. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2010). MUH 2011 Introduction to Music HistoryMusic Appreciation: 18th and 19th Centuries MUH 2012 Music of Western Culture: 19th20th Centuries Some of the following selections can be purchased as a package with a CD set to accompany the textbook. ~Mark Evan Bonds, Listen to This, 3rd ed. (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Prentice Hall, 2014). ~Roger Kamien, Music: An Appreciation, 10th full ed. (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2011); 7th brief edition (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2011). ~Joseph Kerman and Gary Tomlinson, Listen, 7th ed. (Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2011). ~Kristine Forney, Andrew DellAntonio, and Joseph Machlis, The Enjoyment of Music, 12th ed. (New York: Norton, 2015); 12th shorter ed. (New York: Norton, 2015); 11th ed. (New York: Norton, 2011). ~Thomas Forrest Kelly, Music Then and Now, 1st ed. (New York: Norton, 2013). 25 MUH 2019: Popular Music Some of the following books feature CD sets to accompany the text. ~David Brackett, The Pop, Rock and Soul Reader: Histories and Debates, 3rd ed. (New York: Oxford University Press, 2013). ~Michael Campbell and James Brody, Rock and Roll: An Introduction, 2nd ed. (Belmont, CA: Schirmer, 2007). ~Michael Campbell, Popular Music in America: The Beat Goes on, 4th ed. (Boston: Schirmer, 2013). ~Rolling Stone Magazine, The Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock and Roll, 3rd sub ed. (New York: Random House, 1992). ~David Szatmary, Rockin in Time: A Social History of Rock-and-Roll, 8th ed. (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2013). ~Joseph G. Schloss, Larry Starr, and Christopher Waterman, Rock: Music, Culture, and Business (New York: Oxford University Press, 2012). ~John Covach and Andrew Flory, Whats That Sound?: An Introduction to Rock and its History, 4th ed. (New York: Norton, 2015). MUH 2051: World Music Cultures for Non-Majors and MUH 2512: World Music Cultures for Music Majors The following books all feature CD sets to accompany the text. ~Michael B. Bakan, World Music: Traditions and Transformations, 2nd ed. (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2011). MUH 3053: American Roots Music ~Benjamin Filene, Romancing the Folk: Public Memory and American Roots Music (Cultural Studies of the United States). (Chapel Hill, North Carolina: The University of North Carolina Press, 2000). ~Gary Giddins and Scott DeVeaux, Jazz. (New York: W.W. Norton & Company, 2009). ~David Szatmary, Rockin in Time: A Social History of Rock-and-Roll, 8th ed. (Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2013). ~Elizabeth F. Barkley, Crossroads: The Multicultural Roots of Americas Popular Music, 2nd ed. (New York: Routledge, 2006). 26 WEB-ASSISTED COURSES -- BLACKBOARD All teaching assistants have at their disposal the same computer-based tools available to all FSU faculty. These include a course website based on the Blackboard (Bb) design, which you can set up as soon as you are entered as an instructor in the University system. To establish your class website, start at https://campus.fsu.edu. You will be able to read the overview and instructions and then use the link at Request Bb site to obtain your own site. The College of Music continues to move towards a paper-minimal environment. Bb can be used to post announcements distribute your syllabus and other course documents provide handouts conduct out-of-class discussions receive written work (which can be checked automatically for plagiarism) e-mail students individually or in groups check your class roster maintain student records post grades in a secure environment. It is possible to deliver quizzes and tests via Bb, but security is a serious problem, and it is recommended that significant components of students grades be earned only within a supervised setting. The College of Music will make paper copies of quizzes and tests. Please deliver your originals and filled-out request forms to Jennie Carpenter in 204 HMU at least 24 hours before you need to pick up your copies. Class Roster -Go to my.fsu.edu, and log in. -Click on Student Central. -Click Main Menu, Self Service, Faculty Center, and click on My Schedule. -Check to make sure that you are looking at the current semesters roster list, and if not, click the change term button next to where it says Florida State University in the middle of the screen. -Click on the people icon to the left of each course (next to the red book icon), and your roster should appear. -Dont forget to click the View All link to see all of your courses (see image below for the exact location). 27 CREATING A SYLLABUS In planning a class, the preparation of a syllabus is one of the most important issues. You need not feel as if you have to prepare a syllabus from scratch. The musicology professors as well as your mentor have taught this class recently and can provide you with guidance and/or copies of their syllabi to help you. If you decide to create your own, keep in mind the following necessary components: -Course Information -Instructor Information name, contact information, office hours -Course Description -Course Materials -Course Objectives -Evaluation Procedures -Grading Scale -Topical Outline -Class Schedule -University Attendance Policy Statement -Academic Honor Policy Statement -ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Statement -Free Tutoring from FSU Statement -Syllabus Change Statement -Liberal Studies for the 21st Century Statements Note: Teaching assistants currently teaching courses must provide a copy of her or his syllabus to the department coordinator at the beginning of the semester in which the courses are being taught. This should be sent as an e-mail attachment. GORDON RULE/LIBERAL STUDIES FOR THE 21ST CENTURY Prior to the Fall 2015 semester, many of the classes taught by musicology graduate students were Gordon Rule courses. These classes incorporated a writing component that fulfilled State of Florida requirements for undergraduate students. Some students have been grandfathered into this Gordon Rule requirement. However, all students entering in Fall 2015 and subsequent semesters will be working under the new Liberal Studies for the 21st Century requirements. Due to these changes, as of Fall 2015, the musicology area is currently in a transitional period regarding undergraduate course design and requirements. Details regarding the Liberal Studies for the 21st Century requirements will be explained at the area-wide orientation meeting. All teaching assistants will need to check with their teaching supervisors regarding the latest requirements. 28 OFFICE HOURS You must include office hours on your syllabus. It can be helpful to have these at more than one time of day, so students have a better chance of being able to meet with you (dont offer T/R 10:00-11:00, for instance). You should also include or by arrangement next to the given times. PHOTOCOPYING Any materials you need copied for class must be placed in the copy basket in 204 HMU one full day before it is needed. Do not expect the staff to copy something for you at the last minute; plan on going to Kinkos or Target Copy Center. WORLD MUSIC AND EARLY MUSIC ENSEMBLES Teaching assistants are encouraged to announce the Early Music and World Music ensembles in their classes and to offer extra credit in their courses to students who sign up for these ensembles. Not only does this stimulate enrollment in the ensembles, it also fosters connections between the teachers and the directors that can be advantageous when teaching the music of that period or area. OBTAINING ACCESS In order to access the Musicology Teaching Assistant office, PhD students only will need to obtain a key. You might also need keys for other rooms, depending on special circumstances, although the classrooms in which you teach should be open at regular class time. You may obtain key forms from Ms. Tiawana Meeks (202D HMU), and these will require approval signatures from Dr. Von Glahn. . CLASSROOMS/OFFICES Musicology Teaching Assistant Office This room is located in Kellogg 426 and provides the graduate assistants with a place to prepare lessons and meet with students during weekly office hours. Keys to this office may be obtained by filing a Key Request form with Tiawana Meeks in HMU 202D. 217 HMU: World Music Room This room serves as instrument storage and rehearsal space for a variety of world music ensembles. 223 HMU: Center for Music of the Americas This room serves many purposes: steel band rehearsal room, small ensemble rehearsals, and instrument storage. 229 HMU: Early Music Room This room serves as instrument storage and rehearsal space for a variety of early music ensembles. HMU 125 and 126 These rooms are usually open during the day. However, if you teach at 8:00 a.m., the Instrument Storage assistant may sometimes be late in opening the room in the morning. If you dont find anyone in Instrument Storage (HMU 112), see Dean Fredrickson in HMU 202C or Tiawana Meeks in HMU 202D. 29 Lindsay Recital Hall, Dohnnyi Recital Hall The media cabinets have combination locks. To obtain the combination, check with your mentor or Instrument Storage (112 HMU). Be sure that the cabinet is locked before you leave the room. 201 LON This classroom is controlled not by the College of Music but by the College of Arts and Sciences. Its tech facilities are under the supervision of ACNS. It is extremely important to treat this space with great care, partly because we depend on the generosity of Arts and Sciences to continue to allow us to use it and partly because it also serves as a recital hall. POSTING GRADES The Family Educational and Privacy Rights Act and federal regulations are interpreted to require the student's consent to release non-directory information. It is highly recommended that student grades be posted on exclusively Blackboard, so that each student can access her or his own grades securely. READING/WRITING CENTER The Reading/Writing Center (RWC), located in 222C Williams Building, with a satellite location at Strozier Library, is devoted to individualized instruction in reading and writing. Part of the English Department, the Center serves Florida State University students at all levels and from all majors. The Center is open Monday-Thursday 10:00-5:00 and Friday 10:00-2:00. A student can schedule an appointment by calling 644-6495 or visit their website at http://wr.english.fsu.edu/Reading-Writing-Center. ACADEMIC HONOR POLICY / CHEATING / PLAGIARISM Honor Code--FAC 6C2-3.005 The Florida State University maintains a deep commitment to academic integrity. You should familiarize yourself with the details of the Academic Honor Policy (see http://fda.fsu.edu/Academics/Academic-Honor-Policy) and refer to it whenever there appears to be a case of cheating or any other form of academic dishonesty. If you have a case of cheating, plagiarism, or any other form of violation, consult as early as possible with Dr. Patricia Flowers (850-644-4361, HMU202B, pjflowers@fsu.edu), who will assist you through the appropriate steps. Students report that the strongest deterrence to academic dishonesty is the instructors emphasis on academic integrity. You should stress the Honor Policy in introducing your course and remind students of it with any major test or written assignment. Written assignments should be submitted through your course Blackboard site, using SafeAssign, which identifies likely evidence of plagiarism. http://wr.english.fsu.edu/Reading-Writing-Center30 You MUST include the following approved statement in your syllabus: ACADEMIC HONOR POLICY: The Florida State University Academic Honor Policy outlines the Universitys expectations for the integrity of students academic work, the procedures for resolving alleged violations of those expectations, and the rights and responsibilities of students and faculty members throughout the process. Students are responsible for reading the Academic Honor Policy and for living up to their pledge to be honest and truthful and[to] strive for personal and institutional integrity at Florida State University. (Florida State University Academic Honor Policy, found at http://fda.fsu.edu/Academics/Academic-Honor-Policy). AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT The University is committed to observing the full spirit of the Americans with Disabilities Act. This means that any student who requires special accommodation should receive it, as fully as possible. The Student Disability Resource Center will evaluate needs and report to you what you can do to assist your student. You MUST including the following approved statement in your syllabus: AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT: Students with disabilities needing academic accommodation should: (1) register with and provide documentation to the Student Disability Resource Center; and (2) bring a letter to the instructor indicating the need for accommodation and what type. This should be done during the first week of class. This syllabus and other class materials are available in alternative format upon request. For more information about services available to FSU students with disabilities, contact the: Student Disability Resource Center 874 Traditions Way 108 Student Services Building Florida State University Tallahassee, FL 32306-4167 (850) 644-9566 (voice) (850) 644-8504 (TDD) sdrc@admin.fsu.edu http://www.disabilitycenter.fsu.edu/ CLASS ATTENDANCE You are expected to check attendance in all classes. Note especially that the University has a requirement that students attend the first meeting of every class. If you have on your roster the names of any student who is not in attendance at you first class, you should report that immediately to the College of Music Registrar, Ms. Meghan McCaskill, in 203 HMU. Alternatively, you can report this directly to the University Registrar by means of the Attendance list in the Faculty Course List through Blackboard. This helps to sort out registration errors and often helps a student who is on a waiting list to add an essential class. You may make some allowance for absence occasioned by illness, by trips for the University, or by authorized field trips. Any arrangement to make up work because of class absence is the responsibility of the student. The instructor determines the effect of absence upon grades; at the beginning of the term you must explain the grading policy to the students. The Director of Student Health Services does not issue excuses to students. The student is given a card indicating the time of admission and discharge from the University Hospital. A report will be given the faculty member on request, indicating hour and date of treatment. http://fda.fsu.edu/Academics/Academic-Honor-Policyhttp://fda.fsu.edu/Academics/Academic-Honor-Policyhttp://www.disabilitycenter.fsu.edu/31 You MUST include the following approved statement in your syllabus regarding the University Attendance policy: University Attendance Policy: Excused absences include documented illness, deaths in the family and other documented crises, call to active military duty or jury duty, religious holy days, and official University activities. These absences will be accommodated in a way that does not arbitrarily penalize students who have a valid excuse. Consideration will also be given to students whose dependent children experience serious illness. ADDITIONAL RECOMMENDED LANGUAGE FOR SYLLABI: Free Tutoring from FSU: On-campus tutoring and writing assistance is available for many courses at Florida State University. For more information, visit the Academic Center for Excellence (ACE) Tutoring Services' comprehensive list of on-campus tutoring options at http://ace.fsu.edu/tutoring or contacttutor@fsu.edu. High-quality tutoring is available by appointment and on a walk-in basis. These services are offered by tutors trained to encourage the highest level of individual academic success while upholding personal academic integrity. Syllabus Change Policy: Except for changes that substantially affect implementation of the evaluation (grading) statement, this syllabus is a guide for the course and is subject to change with advance notice. FINAL EXAMINATIONS The Universitys final examination policy provides: 1. Final examinations in all undergraduate courses are discretionary within any given department. If a department chooses to give a final exam, the exam schedule must be followed as published. 2. All students, including graduating seniors and graduate students, enrolled in an undergraduate course having a final examination are required to take the examination. 3. The scheduling of a final examination at any time other than the regularly scheduled final examination period is prohibited by Faculty Senate policy. The final exam schedule is found in the Registration Guide located at http://registrar.fsu.edu 4. Unless an exam is given during the final examination, no test may be given during the last week of classes. Courses meeting every day at the same hour and classes meeting for more than one time period will hold examinations according to the time and day of the first scheduled class meeting of the week. For example, a class meeting at 8:00 a.m. on Tuesday and at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday will hold its examination at the time scheduled for Tuesday 8:00 a.m. classes. We are required to retain copies of students final examinations (or an equivalent culminating assignment) for twelve months after the end of each course. Teaching Assistants are required to confirm whether or not they will be giving an exam at the scheduled location during their designated exam time with Tiawana Meeks. Dr. Von Glahn will send out an email reminding all Teaching Assistants to contact Ms. Meeks with this information. http://ace.fsu.edu/tutoring32 EVALUATION OF TEACHING Every Teaching Assistant is required to administer the Universitys evaluation instruments, including either a paper-based version titled SPCI (Student Perception of Courses and Instructors) or an electronic version called eSPCI (electronic Student Perception of Courses and Instructors), during the last two weeks of the semester. Be sure that you plan for this in your syllabus, as it inevitably comes during a time when the class is under pressure to cover all the remaining course material as time is running short. Read and follow very rigorously the instructions provided in the SPCI or eSPCI packet. Note that the SPCI is to be administered by a proctor, in the absence of the instructor, at the beginning of a class session. GRADE ROSTERS AND INCOMPLETES Before permanently leaving the University for whatever reason (job opportunity, dissertation research, etc.), you must turn in your grade roster to the Coordinator, as well as any incomplete forms (with instructions and materials for the removal of the incomplete), so that in case there is a question regarding a students grade, the Coordinator has your attendance record and quiz, paper, and test scores. YOUR FACULTY MENTOR Each Teaching Assistant will be assigned a faculty mentor who will meet with the student several times throughout the semester and observe the student teaching his or her class on two or more occasions. The purpose of this program is to assist the student in preparing the class and to offer feedback on teaching style. You may expect your faculty mentor to provide assistance on any aspect of your course and your teaching. The evaluations that you receive from your faculty mentors observations are intended to help you improve your teaching skills. In addition, they may later form the core of recommendations that the faculty member may write, when you apply for teaching positions. PIE (PROGRAM FOR INSTRUCTIONAL EXCELLENCE) Visit the PIE website at http://pie.fsu.edu to see how you can participate in learning how to be a better teacher. Workshops are presented during the week before school begins in August. PIE Teaching Training Recognition is presented at the end. Additionally, PIE offers online modules to complete the Advanced PIE Teaching Training Recognition. Participation is strongly recommended! COURSE LOAD FOR GRADUATE TEACHING ASSISTANTS As a teaching assistant you should not register for more than twelve (12) credit hours of classes and seminars per semester. Along with classes and seminars, your course load may include ensembles, DIS (Directed Individual Study), Supervised Teaching, and Supervised Research, depending on the nature of the work involved. 33 NOTES FOR TEACHING ASSISTANTS AND READERS Teaching Assistants: 1. If you did not receive the message including the University policies for all classes, please ask for it again. Be sure to follow those requirements to the letter. (Review them regularly). 2. You will have a faculty supervisor who should serve as a mentor and will evaluate your work for your permanent record. Plan to consult your mentor about everything from your syllabus to the assignment of final grades. Arrange with your mentor for at least two in-class observations each semester. You should receive his or her comments on your teaching in writing. 3. Please give a copy of the syllabus for each of your classes to Dr. Von Glahn for the College of Music files. 4. Be fully prepared and on time for every class session. Set-up should take place before the time when the class begins. 5. University students are entitled by law to 150 minutes of instruction time each week for a three-credit course. It is not appropriate to dismiss them early or to cancel classes on the days before holidays, etc. If you must miss a class meeting, you should provide an appropriate substitute: the Reader assigned to your class, another Teaching Assistant, or a faculty member. 6. If you have any difficulty with classroom technology, call for assistance (644-5786) and cm-helpdesk@fsu.edu for HMU; 644-2811 and classroomsupport@fsu.edu for 201 LON). Get to know the College of Music tech wizards, Michael Strickland and Mike Shapiro, and be very nice to them. 7. If you are teaching a large course, you may have a Reader assigned to work with you. Treat the Reader as a teammate and do not abuse her or his time and energy. a. The Reader should work a total of ten hours per week (average - but dont expect nothing for fours weeks and then fifty hours in one week). Remember that the ten hours is usually divided between two different class sections; it is not ten hours per section. If you do not need the Reader to be present through an entire class session, it is appropriate to let her or him go do something productive. b. Provide very clear instructions to your Reader about tracking attendance and grading, even more than the perfectly clear information that you give to students. 8. The Society for Musicology has a Blackboard site that can be found under the Organizations tab. This site has a wealth of resources for Teaching Assistants including samples of syllabi and lesson plans from various undergraduate courses previously taught by musicologists. 34 Readers: 1. As a Reader, expect to work very closely with the course instructor. To help make the course successful for all parties involved, you should communicate regularly with the course instructor and, as appropriate, with students enrolled in the course. 2. You should plan to attend the class, even as a Reader. If you are not needed for a particular class meeting, the instructor will let you know. 3. Your own classes take priority. Course instructors make every effort to prevent conflicts between your assistantship duties and your course schedule. If there is a serious conflict, please do not hesitate to report this to the instructor. 4. You may occasionally be given the opportunity to teach the class if the regular teacher is ill or must be away for professional reasons. 5. You are both invited and encouraged to contribute ideas toward the courses structure, class management, and various materials/assignments. This gives you the opportunity to develop your own ideas as a possible future instructor. However, bear in mind that the instructor makes final decisions regarding the course. Therefore, if the instructor chooses not to implement your suggestions, please do not feel personally affronted by the instructors decision. 6. Remember, the classroom is a learning environment for Readers and instructors alike. In each class session that you attend, pay close attention to the instructors lesson, as you may be able to develop ideas for your own future teaching. 7. It is imperative that you do not let grading tasks pile up. Take care of them as they come, especially for large classes. Failing to do so will result in difficulties with balancing your own class work and grading. 8. If you need help with Blackboard and entering grades, you should consult the Blackboard tutorial, ask for assistance from the instructor, or consult a faculty mentor. 9. To complete grading tasks on time, you should consult the instructor regarding grading guidelines. 10. Develop a grading strategy to help you work in a more efficient manner. For example, with a class of two hundred students, you may NOT need to read every single word of their assignments. Additionally, while it is important to address students grammatical and writing issues when you are grading, you should not let that take up all of your allotted time for grading. If you find that a student has especially poor writing and grammatical skills, you should discuss the issue with the instructor and possibly direct the student to the Writing Center. 35 11. In addition to grading assignments, you may also expected to participate in logistical aspects of the class. This includes emailing and conversing with students about attendance issues, grade issues, etc. Find out what is expected of you from the instructor. 12. If you have to miss a class or are going out of town, inform the course instructor of the conflict well in advance. 13. Acquire copies of the course syllabus and calendar ahead of time, marking important class dates in your schedule. This will help you anticipate conflicts or heavy workloads. TA Office: 1. Please be considerate when using the office, as you are sharing it with not only musicologists, but also music theorists. 2. Overlap in office hours is inevitable, so it is essential to work with one another to avoid especially conflicting situations. a. If you are giving a make-up exam or need privacy to meet with students, make sure to notify the other TAs as early as possible. b. If you have a problem with a student that calls for a private conversation, you may let your fellow TAs know, and they should accommodate this as much as possible. 3. Please be considerate in how you use the TA office. a. Do not leave your personal belongings on the desks and table (this includes books, textbooks, and other materials). The desks and table are all common space. You can keep personal items in the office, but you must put them away. b. Remember that as you are sharing this space. While you are welcome to socialize with your colleagues in the office, you should not disrupt other colleagues that may be trying to work. Talk quietly and listen to your music with headphones. c. You may eat and talk to your colleagues in the office, but it is intended to be a working space (like other faculty offices). Be as considerate and tidy as possible. 36 CONFERENCE INFORMATION The purpose of national and regional academic conferences is to feature current scholarly research within the discipline and to connect and establish professional relationships with fellow scholars. Students are encouraged to take advantage of the opportunity to attend and present their work at these events. Please note that you do not have to be a member of these societies to attend conferences; however, membership is often required if you are presenting. Membership is encouraged as it not only affords students opportunities to further their professional career through networking and presentation possibilities, but also gives students the chance to actively participate as a member of a professional organization. NATIONAL CONFERENCES AMERICAN MUSICOLOGICAL SOCIETY (AMS) NATIONAL CONFERENCE The national conference for the American Musicological Society is held each fall, usually in early November. For detailed information please visit the AMS website at http://www.ams-net.org. SOCIETY FOR ETHNOMUSICOLOGY (SEM) NATIONAL CONFERENCE The national conference of the Society for Ethnomusicology is held each fall, usually in late October or early November. For detailed information please visit the SEM website at http://www.ethnomusicology.org. SOCIETY FOR AMERICAN MUSIC (SAM) NATIONAL CONFERENCE The national conference for the Society for American Music is held each spring, usually in early March. For detailed information please visit the SAM website at http://www.american-music.org. AMERICAN ANTHROPOLOGICAL ASSOCIATION (AAA) The conference of the American Anthropological Society (AAA) is held each fall, usually in late November. For detailed information please visit the AAA website at http://www.aaanet.org. REGIONAL CONFERENCES AMERICAN MUSICOLOGICAL SOCIETY (AMS) REGIONAL CONFERENCE The regional conference for the Southern Chapter American Musicological Society is held each spring in February. For further information please see the chapter website at http://www.music.lsu.edu/~smi/AMSS/AMSS.html. 37 SOCIETY FOR ETHNOMUSICOLOGY (SEM) REGIONAL CONFERENCE The regional conference for the Southeastern/Caribbean Chapter of the Society for Ethnomusicology (SEMSEC) is held each spring, usually in early March. For more information see the chapter website at http://www.semsec.org. FUNDING FOR STUDENTS ATTENDING CONFERENCES Students who are solely attending a conference have the opportunity to apply for an Academic and Professional Conference Support Grant through the Congress of Graduate Students (COGS). These grants are worth up to $100 in support. Learn more by visiting the Congress of Graduate Students Conference Support Grant page at http://sga.fsu.edu/cogs-attendance.shtml. FOR STUDENTS PRESENTING AT CONFERENCES Students who are presenting at a conference have the opportunity to apply for a Presentation Support Grant through the Congress of Graduate Students (COGS). These grants are worth up to $200 in support if presenting inside the U.S. and $500 if presenting outside of the continental U.S. Learn more by visiting the Congress of Graduate Students Conference Presentation Support Grant page at http://sga.fsu.edu/cogs-presentation.shtml. Applications must be received by COGS completed and accompanied by the required documentation no less than 15 business days prior to your departure. Late applications will NOT be processed, nor will applications submitted after travel has commenced. Please save all of your receipts when you travel. Receipts totaling the amount awarded ($200 or $500) as well as an agenda or program must be turned in to the COGS office within 30 calendar days from the end of the conference. Mailing receipts is done at your own risk! PLEASE NOTE THAT THESE GRANTS ARE AWARDED ON A FIRST COME FIRST SERVE BASIS. THUS IT IS IMPORTANT TO COMPLETE THE ONLINE FORM AND SUBMIT ALL NECESSARY PAPERWORK AS SOON AS POSSIBLE FOLLOWING CONFERENCE REGISTRATION. STUDENTS MUST INCLUDE PROOF OF CONFERENCE REGISTRATION WITH ALL GRANT FORMS. 38 COURSE OF STUDY MASTER OF MUSIC HISTORICAL AND ETHNOMUSICOLOGY TIMELINE First year; first semester During this first semester it is important to be thinking about and researching your thesis topic. It is especially important for ethnomusicology students and historical musicology students who will be conducting fieldwork to decide on a thesis topic during this time. *Though ethnomusicology students can complete their fieldwork during the school year, it is advisable to try to do this in the summer months; this will maximize the time you can spend on the thesis writing process. August Attend all Orientations Register for classes (see Program of Studies Form) NOTE: YOU MAY TAKE ENSEMBLE CLASSES FOR ZERO CREDIT THIS WILL STILL COUNT AS ENSEMBLE CREDIT TO BE APPLIED TOWARDS THE COMPLETION OF YOUR DEGREE. September Classes October Register for Spring Semester classes (see Program of Studies Form) November Classes December Choose your thesis topic and thesis advisor First year; second semester January Classes February Students doing thesis fieldwork involving human subjects must obtain IRB approval before beginning fieldwork. STEP 1: Complete the Responsible Conduct of Research training courses through the Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) Program (see http://www.gradstudies.fsu.edu/Academics-Research/Research-and-Scholarly-Integrity/FSU-s-CITI-Courses for more information) OR the Human Subjects Committee Protecting Human Research Subjects Training Module at http://www.research.fsu.edu/humansubjects/training/index.html for more information) *YOU MUST COMPLETE THESE TRAINING MODULES BEFORE BEGINNING YOUR HUMAN SUBJECTS APPROVAL APPLICATION. STEP 2: Once you have completed these training modules you may begin your Human Subjects Approval Application through the Human Subjects Review System Online (http://www.research.fsu.edu/humansubjects/applications/index.html). 39 *It is important to submit your IRB forms as early as possible. This will give you time to make any corrections to your application that may be required of you by the Human Subjects Committee (ex. revise existing documents; create additional consent forms; secure permission from organizations). OBTAINING IRB APPROVAL CAN TAKE ANYWHERE FROM 2-6 WEEKS DEPENDING UPON YOUR RESEARCH TOPIC. The HSC meets once each month to discuss applications and make recommendations for revisions. For a list of these dates see the Human Subjects Committee Meeting Schedule at http://www.research.fsu.edu/humansubjects/meetings/index.html. Having full IRB approval by March will give you time to solidify your fieldwork plans and apply for grants. March Apply for grants Begin work on Prospectus (this is usually done within the framework of either the Seminar in Historical Musicology or Seminar in Ethnomusicology) Register for Fall Semester classes (see Program of Studies Form) April Form the rest of your thesis committee Summer Complete fieldwork Second Year; first Semester August Classes September Get Prospectus approved and begin work on thesis October Write thesis November Write thesis December Write thesis Second year; second semester January Apply for graduation through Secure Apps on your Blackboard website Have first draft of thesis completed February Send defense draft to committee by February 15th March Defend thesis April Take comprehensive exams Complete final graduation paperwork May Graduate! 40 DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY IN MUSICIOLOGY TIMLINE *After completing the Masters degree, doctoral students must enroll for a minimum of twenty-four (24) graduate (5000-level or above) credits. These credit hours must be earned during any consecutive 12-month period (this can include the Summer semester). This requirement only needs to be fulfilled once.* First year; first semester *Generally assistantships in teaching are conducted for all three years of the Ph.D. August Complete diagnostic exam Attend all Orientations Register for classes (see Program of Studies Form) September Classes October Register for Spring Semester classes (see Program of Studies Form) November Classes December Complete classes and examinations First year; second semester January Classes February Classes March Classes Register for Fall Semester classes (see Program of Studies Form) April Classes May Complete classes and examinations Second year; first semester August Classes September Classes October Register for Spring Semester classes (see Program of Studies Form) *If taking preliminary examinations the following semester, students must register for MUS 8964 (0 credit) November Classes 41 December Complete classes and examinations Second year; second semester January Classes Complete Prospectus February Classes *Must take and pass preliminary examination by the end of the seventh week of classes in order to add or convert dissertation hours for the current semester. See Florida State University Registration Guide for exact dates. March Classes April Classes May Complete classes and examinations Third year Complete additional classes Complete assistantship Write dissertation 42 General Calendar for Thesis and Dissertation Documents and Defenses The Musicology area faculty has drafted a set of guidelines that enables students: *to complete thesis and dissertation drafts and finished defense documents in time; *to circulate documents among committee members as required; *to provide committee members with time to read and offer meaningful comments; *to allow students to incorporate said suggestions; *to schedule a defense date that leaves time to make additional minor revisions as determined at the defense, and to meet university requirements for formatting and graduation. The Musicology area schedule complements the larger College of Music recommendations regarding deadlines and requirements with the exception of an additional requirement: that students engage the services of a copy editor prior to circulating the document to the committee if that is necessary. The need for a copy editor will be determined in consultation with the students committee chair after s/he has read the complete document. Committee members will not act as copy editors. The student is responsible for knowing all university and College of Music deadlines and will plan accordingly. Working backward from the defense date the student, in consultation with their chair, will complete the stated objectives with the following minimum lead-time: X = The defense date. This date and time have been agreed upon by the chair and all committee members a minimum of 5 weeks prior to the actual date. The student has arranged for the room and collected all forms that need signing to bring to the defense. 1 week prior to X: The committee receives a complete defense copy of the document. The document has been checked by the university formatter. All university formatting requirements must be in place. Students need to check with individual committee members whether they prefer to receive a hard copy or a digital copy. 3 weeks prior to X: The student has two weeks to incorporate committee members suggestions before delivering a complete defense copy to committee members. 5 weeks prior to X: The committee receives the document draft and has two weeks to read and comment upon it before returning it to the student. In the case of a dissertation, the expectation is that all committee members, with the exception of the university representative, will read and comment upon the draft. All thesis committee members are expected to read and comment upon the draft. A student should check with committee members to make certain that that is everyones intention. N.B. Plan to defend during the fall or spring semesters. Faculty are not required or expected to be present for summer defenses. 43 44 45 46

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