financing plan (in us$): 20آ  web view spill kits, containment, storage, etc. for argentina:...

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FINANCING PLAN (IN US$):

UNDP Project Document

Government of Argentina, India, Latvia, Lebanon, Philippines, Senegal, Kingdom of Tanzania and Vietnam

United Nations Development Programme

Global Environment Facility (GEF)

World Health Organization (WHO)

Health Care Without Harm (HCWH)

Demonstrating and Promoting Best Techniques and Practices for Reducing Health-Care Waste to Avoid Environmental Releases of Dioxins and Mercury

Brief Description of the Project

The overall objective of the full Project, implemented by the UNDP, is to demonstrate and promote best practices and techniques for health-care waste management in order to minimize or eliminate releases of persistent organic pollutants and mercury to the environment. The Project will demonstrate the effectiveness of non-burn health-care waste treatment technologies, waste management practices and other techniques to avoid environmental releases of dioxins and mercury in seven strategically selected countries – Argentina, India, Latvia, Lebanon, the Philippines, Senegal and Vietnam – representing a range of income and indebtedness classifications, four of the six official U.N. languages and all of the world’s five development regions. In each participating country, the Project will develop best practice health-care waste management models through collaborations with at least one large hospital, as well as with an appropriate combination of smaller clinics, rural health and/or injection programs and pre-existing central treatment facilities. The selected model facilities and technologies represent a range of scenarios that serve to demonstrate the general applicability of the Project’s approach to a diverse set of global conditions.

If replicated nationally and sustained, best practices and techniques initiated during the Project’s implementation are expected to reduce the release of an estimated 187 g TEQ of dioxins and 2,910 kg of mercury to the environment each year from participating countries’ health-care sectors. The Project will also lay the groundwork for sustainability, replicability and the scaling-up of best techniques and practices beyond the model facilities and the Project countries by establishing or enhancing national training programs, pursuing policy reform, developing replication toolkits and awareness-raising materials, and disseminating these materials nationally and globally. An additional component aimed at developing locally-produced, affordable, non-burn health-care waste treatment technologies will be executed in Tanzania. The Project’s global objectives will reduce barriers to the implementation of the Stockholm Convention on POPs, the International Waters Global Programme of Action (GPA), the Strategic Approach to International Chemicals Management (SAICM), and the World Health Organization’s policies on safe health-care waste management and on mercury in health-care. An ancillary benefit of this work will be the improvement of health-delivery systems through the fostering of good health-care waste management practices, thereby supporting the prerequisites for achieving the Millennium Development Goals. The Project’s ultimate goal is the protection of public health and the global environment from the impacts of dioxin and mercury releases.

The Project will achieve: (1) the establishment of model facilities and programs to exemplify best practices in health-care waste management, and the development of materials to facilitate replication; (2) the deployment and evaluation of commercially-available, non-incineration health-care waste treatment technologies appropriate to the needs of each facility or cluster; (3) the development, testing, manufacture and deployment of affordable, small-scale non-incineration technologies for appropriate use in small and medium-size facilities in sub-Saharan Africa, and preparation and dissemination of manuals for their manufacture, installation, operation, maintenance and repair; (4) the introduction of mercury-free devices in model facilities, evaluation of their acceptability and efficacy, and development and dissemination of awareness-raising and educational materials related to mercury; (5) the establishment or enhancement of training programs to build capacity for implementation of best practices and appropriate technologies beyond the model facilities and programs; (6) the review of relevant policies, seeking of agreement by relevant authorities on recommended updates or reformulations if needed, seeking of agreement on an implementation plan, and if appropriate, assistance in holding a policy review conference for these purposes; (7) the distribution of Project results on best techniques and practices to relevant stakeholders, dissemination of materials, and holding of conferences or workshops to encourage replication; and (8) the making available of Project results on demonstrated best techniques and practices for dissemination and scaling-up regionally and globally. The majority of Project activities will be completed in the first three years of the Project.

The Project is consistent with the GEF Focal Area of Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs) under Operational Program (OP) 14, and the GEF OP 10: the Contaminants-Based Operational Program of the International Waters Portfolio. Project activities consistent with OP 14 include: building capacity; strengthening policy and regulatory frameworks; strengthening monitoring capacity; developing capacity to assess technologies and management practices; developing and implementing public awareness, information and environmental education programs; facilitating dissemination of experiences and lessons learned and promoting information exchange; promoting access to, and the transfer of, clean and environmentally sound alternative technologies; and demonstrating viable and cost-effective alternatives to the processes and practices that lead to the release of POPs. OP 10 supports demonstration activities that prevent or reduce releases of mercury, in particular targeting technical demonstration and capacity-building projects to demonstrate alternatives to mercury-containing instruments and proper cleanup and management of mercury wastes; and to help raise awareness and serve as a means for encouraging use of best practices and the formulation of policies for innovative institutional approaches.

The Project is structured so as to allow stakeholder involvement at different levels. Full Project implementation will be carried out under the guidance of a Global Project Steering Committee (GPSC) whose members include one representative from each of the following: UNDP, UNOPS, a senior level official designated by each of the Project participating Governments, one representative each from the World Health Organization (WHO) and the international NGO Health Care Without Harm (HCWH), as well as other major donors and partners. In each participating country, a National Project Steering Committee (NPSC) will assume oversight for national Full Project activities. Typically, the NPSC will include a designated senior representative from the Health and Environment Ministries and from the Ministry in which the GEF Operational Focal Point is located, a representative or a liaison from the authority responsible for Stockholm Convention NIP preparations and from the authority responsible for Basel Convention implementation. The NPSC will also include representation from the national health care sector, the country WHO and UNDP offices, as well as one or more appropriate representative from national NGOs with demonstrated concern and activity in matters associated with health-care waste management. In addition to the NPSC, broad stakeholder participation will also take place through the National Working Group (NWG), composed of individuals from appropriate ministries, agencies and stakeholder groups who have practical involvement or interest in day-to-day Project activities. The NWG may include representatives from UNDP Country Offices, WHO Country Offices, health, environment and other appropriate ministries, NGOs, training institutions, health-care facilities, medical and municipal waste service providers, and health-care related associations. The NWG will advise the NPSC and will assist the National Consultants by providing expertise and advice on project-related policy, economic, scientific and technical issues and by assisting in networking. During the implementation, the Global Expert Team (GET) will provide technical and policy expertise and will have joint responsibility to assure that Project activities are successfully implemented.

Table of Contents

Section 1. Elaboration of the Narrative 8

Part I: Situation Analysis 8

· Context and Global Significance 8

· Threats, Root Causes and Barriers Analysis 12

· Institutional, Sectoral and Policy Context 14

· Stakeholder Analysis..................................................................................... 14

· Baseline Analysis........................................................................................... 15

Part II: Strategy....................................................................................................................... 16

· Project Rationale and Policy Conformity..................................................... 16

· Project Goal, Objective, Outcomes and Outputs/Activities........................... 17

· Project Indicators, Risks and Assumptions................................................... 23

· Expected Global, National and Local Benefits................................................. 25

· Country Ownership: Country Eligibility and Country Drivenness.............. 25

· Sustainability 26

· Replicability...

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