Famous/Infamous/Notorious Famous - to be well known for favorable reasons. Chase Utley is a famous baseball player for the Phillies. Infamous and notorious

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<ul><li> Slide 1 </li> <li> Famous/Infamous/Notorious Famous - to be well known for favorable reasons. Chase Utley is a famous baseball player for the Phillies. Infamous and notorious - to be well known for unfavorable reasons. These words are interchangeable. Milli Vanilli is infamous/notorious for having lip synced their entire routine during a concert. </li> <li> Slide 2 </li> <li> Farther/Further Farther - refers to distance After reaching the finish line in the 5K, Mr. Berger could not go any farther. Further - refers to a degree or extent This topic will be covered further in tomorrows lecture. </li> <li> Slide 3 </li> <li> Flammable/Inflammable/Nonflammable Flammable and Inflammable BOTH mean something that will burn easily and quickly. The pile of oily rags was highly (in)flammable and probably was the cause of the fire. Nonflammable - something that will not burn. The pile of sand is nonflammable </li> <li> Slide 4 </li> <li> Flaunt/Flout Flaunt - means ostentatious display, showy The rapper flaunted his jewelry in his videos, especially his diamond-crusted watch. Flout - to express scorn for, to scoff Many drivers flout the speed limit by driving too fast. </li> <li> Slide 5 </li> <li> Foreword/Forward Foreword - refers to introductory remarks preceding the text in a book. The Nobel Prize-winning physicist was chosen to write the foreword for the textbook. Forward - means moving toward a point ahead, eager to send or advance. The running back kept the ball moving forward. </li> <li> Slide 6 </li> <li> Forward, NOT Forwards Use FORWARD exclusively. FORWARDS is not a word!!! </li> <li> Slide 7 </li> <li> Formally/Formerly Formally - in a manner established through customs or rules We were dressed formally for the prom. Formerly - previously Muhammad Ali was formerly known as Cassius Clay. </li> <li> Slide 8 </li> <li> Former Student/Graduate NEVER say former Graduate! You can be a former student, but not a former graduate. Your student status can change, but your graduate status never will. </li> <li> Slide 9 </li> <li> Gentlemen and Ladies vs. Men and Women Man/Woman is a fact, Gentleman/Lady is an opinion All of the US Presidents were men. Whether they were all gentlemen is up for debate. Therefore, use Ladies/Gentlemen sparingly. </li> <li> Slide 10 </li> <li> Good /Well Good - an adjective He is a good athlete and earned three varsity letters. Well - an adverb He throws the ball as well as anyone Ive ever seen. </li> <li> Slide 11 </li> <li> Gorilla/Guerrilla Gorilla - an animal We saw the gorillas in the zoo. Guerrilla - a member of a small group of fighters that use surprise tactics. The insurgent militia used guerrilla warfare to defeat the nations army. </li> <li> Slide 12 </li> <li> How to format teleprompter trouble </li> <li> Slide 13 </li> <li> Guidelines Make sure your stories are typed Double-Spaced ALL CAPS Use ARIAL or TNR font Use only familiar Abbreviations MR. MRS. F-B-I, C-I-A, Y-M-C-A, Type QUOTE- Dont use </li> <li> Slide 14 </li> <li> Numbers Spell out One to Ten Use numbers for 11-99 Use a combination of both for all large numbers Three hundred 35: (335) 52 Thousand: (52,000) </li> <li> Slide 15 </li> <li> Days/Dates Use the day of the week (within a week) If earlier/later than a week always use this format: February 28-TH For years, always use digits </li> <li> Slide 16 </li> <li> In-class today Work with a partner to peer-review each others stories from the night before Type YOUR story (from yesterday, due today) up using the correct teleprompter format Write five additional new stories: Three @ :15 Two @ :30 Thats only 220 words! Due at the end of class tomorrow! </li> </ul>