fall hazards. roofs methods of roof fall protection safety monitors guardrails and warning lines...

Download Fall Hazards. Roofs Methods of Roof Fall Protection Safety Monitors Guardrails and warning lines Fall Arrest

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  • Fall Hazards

  • Roofs

  • Methods of Roof Fall ProtectionSafety Monitors Guardrails and warning linesFall Arrest

  • Safety MonitorOversees work outside the warning lines. Establishes the procedure to protect. Workers must receive special training.Use should be extremely limited

  • Warning Line Requirementsfor RoofersSet at 34 39 inchesMust be maintained at all times.Workers outside warning lines must be tied-off or have safety monitor.

  • High Roof Warning LineLines too close to edgeLines adequately set

  • Outside Warning LinesParapet up to at least 39"Fall RestraintFall ArrestSafety Monitors

  • Roof Guardrails

  • Roof Fall Arrest Restraint

  • Open Sided Floors & EdgesOpen edges on decks, roof, mezzanines, etc. over 6' high must be protected

  • Stay Back from EdgesStay away from edges unless work requires itAlways face the edgeWork from your kneesFall Hazard

  • Warning Line For Non-Roofing WorkWarning lines for non-roofing work must be at least 15 feet back from holes or edges.These warning lines should only be used temporarily.Workers outside the warning line must be tied off.

  • Guardrails

  • Guardrail CoverageBadBetter

  • HolesCoversGuardrails

  • Material Handling Platforms & Hoist Areas

    Material handling platforms must have guardrailsWhen the guardrails are opened to receive material, workers must be tied off Gates are preferred to removable rails

  • Dont Create a Greater Hazard

  • Practical Implications of Total & Free Fall Distance Added TogetherThis worker is tied to the beam with a basket hitch.How far will he fall?What about swing?

  • Free Fall Distance or Vertical DisplacementAll distances are approximate, and shown for illustration only. This is why it is critical to maintain the safety factor distance!

  • Harness Pressure PointsSpread load across butt strap and belt strap if on the harnessExcess pressure here can cut blood flow to the legsSome studies have indicated permanent damage to the lower extremities when the worker hangs for more than twenty (20) minutes

  • Slip & Trip Hazards- Housekeeping!Watch trip hazardsHere trash creates a trip hazard for everyone in the building

  • StairwaysStair pans should not be used for access until poured, and until guardrails and handrails installedBe sure all debris is removed immediately

  • Scaffolds & Ladders

  • Scaffold RequirementsBe on a firm foundation with base platesBe plumb, square and adequately bracedHave a fully planked work deckHave guardrails over 10 feetBe tied-in over 4:1 height to base ratioHave an adequate means of access and egress

  • Good FoundationsMasons AdjustableHydro-mobileFrames

  • AccessNo access by cross bracesBottom rung can not be more than 24" highYou must use a ladder or frames designed to be used as ladders

  • Proper AccessLadder tied into scaffoldLadderPlatformLadder FrameStairway Frame

  • Baker-type ScaffoldsBaker scaffolds can be unstableNever use a double stack without outriggers

  • Suspended ScaffoldsOutriggers must be properly set and have safety tie-backsEquipment must be regularly inspected and maintained.Workers must have independent lifelinesNo tie-back

  • Falling Object Protection1926.451(h)Toe boards at edges of platforms Use panels or screens when accessed from belowBarricade areas belowUse canopies where walkways cross underneath

  • Fall Protection in Lifts No fall protection required unless he gets off the floorFall protection required.Aerial Boom LiftScissors Lift

  • Ladder TypesType I-AA ladders are extra heavy duty and can handle up to 375 lbs.Type I-A ladders are heavy-duty and can handle up to 300 lbs.Type I ladders can hold up to 250 lbs. Type II ladders can hold 225 lbs. Type III ladders are for light duty only and can hold up to 200 lbs.

  • Read the Warning LabelsLabels are there for a reason!

  • Proper Ladder ClimbingUse both hands to climb a ladder Always face the ladder when climbing, descending or working Avoid the top two steps of a stepladder and the top four rungs on other ladders

  • Dont Lean a Step LadderThe ladder is not designed to be leaned.The angle of the steps is not level when set at 4:1.The support leg can contact the ground causing the step leg to kick out.

  • Do Not Stand On The Top Step!!!NO!Obey the Labels!!

  • Working Above ProtectionsWhen employees work above railings, they must be protected from falling over the railings.

  • Extra Guardrails

  • Proper Access LaddersLadders should be set at 1 horizontal to 4 verticalLadders must be securedLadder access ways must be guardedLadders must extend 3' above the landing surface, or an adequate grabrail must be provided

  • Access WaysOffset guardrails are recommendedWatch for tripping hazards at tops of ladders and stairs

  • Bridges

  • Cap or Beam Setting

  • Falls While DeckingLeading edges must be protected

  • Bridge Fall ProtectionBridge edges must be protectedWhen working over water flotation devices must be worn

  • EquipmentDo not jump from equipmentUse three point contact at all timesBe sure of your footingDo not strain your shouldersBe sure steps are clear of mud and ice

  • Proper SeatsEveryone must be in a proper seat with a seat belt .No riding on steps or running boards!

  • Incident FreePlanning Planning for fall protection in advanceHave appropriate equipment available.Training Workers exposed to falls must be properly trained. Workers must be properly trained to erect scaffolds.Workers must be trained in proper ladder use.InspectionFall arrest equipment must be inspected before each use.Scaffolds must be inspected by a competent person.Ladders must be inspected.

  • Incident FreeOversightEvaluate proper use of fall protection systems.Assure competent persons are overseeing scaffold erection and use.Lessons learnedInvestigate all falls.Develop root causes of fall accidents.Communicate needed changes based on the information obtained.Re-evaluate Fall plans after each project

    Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *We may spend a great deal of time discussing fatal falls, and their affect on the industry, butSusan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *Some things should be painfully obviousSusan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *Employees performing roofing work outside warning lines must be protected by fall restraint or positive fall protection systems.OSHA allows the use of safety monitoring systems in certain limited instances.This practice must be closely supervised, and must comply with all components of the fall protection regulations. Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *These photos illustrate flat roofs and sloped roofs in commercial and residential applications.Each type and application has its own specific requirements and suitable equipment to reduce hazards. Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *This individual is not properly protected and is exposed to a fall in excess of 30 feet. Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *Some work practices, such as precast concrete erection, allow employees to work under a fall protection plan without being positively protected.It is imperative that all employees are properly trained and equipped to work in these instances, and that they follow all recommended procedures.Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *These warning lines are addressed through OSHA interpretation. They are considered a substandard guardrail and a diminimus violation.Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *Gaps at end of rails, extension beyond postsSusan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *Covers must be properly marked, positively affixed, and capable of supporting twice the intended loadAny signage used onsite should be adequately communicated to all employees, including those who may not speak or read English. Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *Material handling and hoist areas should be preplanned along with other site logistics (storage, access, and housekeeping, for instance) to ensure that employees are fall protected at all times.Proper planning will allow for safe loading areas during each phase of construction and on multiple floors at one time. Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *Simply tying off does not necessarily eliminate the hazard of a fall.Poor planning, improper equipment, and lack of coordination and communication can create hazards as well. Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *See interpretations for guidanceSusan Harwood Training Grant Program (2006) Focus Four Hazards in the Construction Industry *See interpretations for additional guidance.Susan Harwood Training Grant Program (