FAGERHULT | LED 2011

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  1. 1. led the future of lighting We know the whole spectrum
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  3. 3. 3 Its a bright new world. LED has revolutionised the lighting landscape; high light flows ensure superb efficiency and economy, with a life span of tens of thousands of hours. From what was previously the domain of decorative ac- cent lighting, LED technology has evolved into a practical, general lighting option. To truly embrace the benefits of LED, and to address the challenges they pose, requires completely new luminaires, rather than just changing the light source. Fagerhult are developing luminaires specifi- cally for LEDs, creating viable solutions across the whole spectrum of a lighting project. Drawing on over half a century of lighting know-how and innovation, this ap- proach has focused on softening the intensity of the light to create a harmony between efficiency and comfort. Whats the point of efficient lighting if no one is there? In the early days of T5 fluorescent tubes it was apparent that high levels of light require new reflector solutions to maximise the efficiency of the light source, while reducing glare. T5 offered an increased luminance from 14,000 cd/ m to 17,000 cd/m. With LED, this has rise to 300,000 cd/ m. LEDs produce an intense light which can be harsh on the eye unless managed correctly. And what is the point of saving money on lighting if no one can stand to be in that room? Fagerhults innovative glare-reduction technology circumnavigates these issues, taking full advantage of the efficiency whilst ensuring user comfort. New concepts in luminaire design Free from the shackles of the specific shape or size of the light source dictating design, luminaires can become smal- ler, slimmer and more unpredictable. Fagerhults Freedom luminaire takes this concept to the extreme. Combinations of linear or circular housing can be used in numerous con- figurations, offering the designer the opportunity to draw their own lines in light. No one would dream of putting a fluores- cent tube in a candleholder And, by the same token, it is not possible to get the best out of LEDs if the luminaire was not designed for that technology. It requires the right design, ballast and cooling, to guarantee the level of efficiency and life span that ma- kes the investment worthwhile. The whole spectrum is what matters From recessed modular fittings and downlights, through to accent lighting and interior design, Fagerhult offers a wide range of LED solutions suitable for various applica- tions. LEDs greatest advantage is also its greatest challenge. Balancing efficiency with ergonomics. Combining good economy and lighting comfort. And were there now. Leif Norrby, Product Development Director, Fagerhult
  4. 4. 4 It provides light, but is not a light source in the traditional sense. It can reproduce all the colours in the light spec- trum, it works best in groups and, in just a few years, has revolutionised the lighting industry. This is LED. An acronym light-emitting diode, an LED is a semiconduc- tor that radiates light when subjected to electrical impul- ses a phenomenon called electroluminescence. An LED runs on direct current (DC) and often requires a separate electrical ballast a driver. The driver converts the mains voltage to an optimal level for the LED. An LED consists of two sections: one with an excess of electrons (n-conducting) and one with a shortage of elec- trons (p-conducting). The light is generated when these electrons strive to achieve balance. The boundary between these two areas is called the p-n junction or depletion layer, and this is where it all happens. When direct current is connected to the diode, the excess and shortage balance out to create light. The wavelength of the light emitted, and thus its colour, depends on the materials the LED is made of. The main colours are red, orange and green, and a variety of shades LED. A brief introduction
  5. 5. 5 The light is generated when the electrons strive to achieve balance. When the current is connected to the diode, the excess and shortage balance out, creating light. of blue. The most common way to create a white light is to apply a phosphor-based coating to a blue diode. The phosphor converts the blue light to white light in a range of colour temperatures. The quality of the white light is affected both by the choice of LED and by the properties of the phosphor. LEDs are very small; the active light-emitting surface is no bigger than 12mm. A single diode can rarely produce enough light for a given lighting situation. For the unit to work, it must be mounted on a circuit board, with multiple LEDs combing in a cluster to form a LED module (not to be confused with retrofitted light sources). LED modules come in many varieties with specially adapted light flow and design to suit specific types of luminaires. The instal- lation and maintenance of most these modules often require professional services, however; some modules are easier to manage and can be taken care of by traditional maintenance methods.
  6. 6. 6 LED. Application areas LED is still in an early stage of development; we can expect a future in which LED is the natural choice for many more applications than today. Indoor In public environments, such as offices and schools, LEDs have previously been used for more decorative purposes, such as accent lighting or colour- shifting effects; replacing low- voltage halogen light sources in these contexts. Now LED technology has achieved sufficient quality, energy efficiency and life span to surpass traditional solutions for general lighting as well. New reflector and anti-glare technology harnesses the huge light flows offered by LED while still making it comfortable for people to be in the room. In corridors, offices, entry halls and conference facilities downlights and T5 solu- tions can be replaced with new LED technology such as Fagerhults downlight range Pleaid G3 and the recessed general lighting system Multilume Flat. Outside of these applications the absence of UV or IR radiation in LEDs safeguards against degradation of works or art, artefacts or food products and their extended lifespan offers the potential to save on the labour and materials costs associated with maintenance. In contrast to traditional light sources, LEDs achieve full brightness immediately and, in fact, the life span of the diode is increased by frequent switching on and off. LED luminaires are an ideal replacement for both downlights and T5 solutions.
  7. 7. 7 Retail The LED technology of today already has many benefits which can help create enhanced dynamic in-store lighting concepts, with the trends and possibilities set to continue to develop in the future. Adjustable, white LED light, which changes the colour temperature between warm and cold (2700K6500K), are already a commonly used solution. Ideal for fittings rooms where clothes can be viewed in different lighting situa- tions, LEDs can be positioned behind the mirror as a more discreet alternative to the fluorescent tubes previously used in this concept. Similarly, the small size of the LED light source makes it very useful to integrate into shelves and displays, as well as for illuminating products in small spaces. Adjustable white LED light is also an asset in the shop itself, allowing staff to adjust the colour temperature to the season. Warm white light creates a welcoming at- mosphere in winter, while cold white light creates a cooler impression in summer. And when it comes to simulating natural daylight within artificial windows and walls, this light source is also superior. The moving fluctuations are far more natural that what any other light source could present. Sometimes a lighting concept may need a little so- mething extra and coloured effect lighting can be just the thing. Using RGB LEDs can create a dynamic and effective lighting concept with feeling. Different colours trigger different emotions; green signals well-being and has a calming effect; yellow creates energy, blue cools and red signals passion. LED opens the door to new ways of creating mood and impressions for different occasions. A control system lets you adjust, dim and change the colour of the lighting. The directivity and optical efficiency of LED, in combina- tion with lenses and reflectors, make it an ideal technology for spotlights. Often better than a traditional solution, it is relatively simple to achieve the desired lit effect using less power. LEDs with a cold white light are even more effective and are the preferable solution where this type of lighting is suitable, for example in a refrigerated display case. Outdoor In general, LED technology is the optimal alternative for outdoor lighting. These luminaires are subject to the vagaries of weather, temperature, vibrations and human interference. Often the systems are designed so that special equipment is needed to conduct maintenance and replace broken components. The reduced maintenance characteristic of LED technology is both a practical and economic solution. Another advantage of LED lighting in outdoor environments is that cold temperatures actually have a positive effect on the diodes, enhancing light flow and life span. This, when compared with a light source with an aluminium housing , offers an extremely durable, reliable, maintenance-free luminaires that require a mini- mal amount of electricity in relation to the amount of light they generate. LED solutions are superior for simu- lating natural light through artificial windows and on walls. Cooler outdoor temperatures have a positive effect on LEDs, enhancing light flow and life spans.
  8. 8. 8 The way LEDs emit light when stimulated with electricity differs from traditional light sources, in which the light is a by-product of the filament being heated or of a gas discharge. Unlike traditional light sources, an LED contains no mercury, making it a better choice in terms of the envi- ronment and recycling. Altogether, LED technology provi- des many advantages in terms of function and design. Because LEDs do not emit ultraviolet (UV) or infrared (IR) radiation, the technology is extra well-suited for lighting in sensitive environments. Museums and exhibitions of art and artefacts, as well as grocery retailing with food displays, are just a few examples. In contrast to traditional light sources, LEDs achieve full brightness immediately and, in fact, the life span of the di- ode is increased by frequent switching on and off. Equally the light flow increases at lower ambient temperatures, so luminaires with LED technology are the ideal choice for refrigerator or freezer rooms and outdoors. LEDs do not contain any moving or fragile parts. There- fore, a properly designed LED luminaire is well-equipped to handle vibrations and other mechanical stress. . Advantage LED. Differences compared to traditional light sources
  9. 9. 9 Energy efficient, reliable and long-lasting. In many ways LED technology is superior to traditional light sources. But to really make the most of the technology, you need luminaires that were developed especially for LEDs. There are many types of retrofit LED light sources on the market which can be used to replace traditional sources, for instance cold halogen lamps (HRGI) of up to 50W and other types of halogen lamps. Some of these models also offer brightness adjustment. This type of light sources can be used in locations where light flow, light quality and ef- ficiency are lower, for example in a home environment. From a short-term capital outlay perspective it may appear more profitable to simply replace the light source within the existing luminaire to LED, however there are factors which need to be taken into consideration. No product standard In areas which place a high importance on light output and quality, retro-fitted LEDs are not always suitable. There are LED tubes on the market that are designed to replace T8 fluorescent tubes (26mm) and run on conventional lighting ballasts. As the scheme was originally designed for a traditional light source- switching to LED may conflict with the original lighting design. There are currently no product standards for this type of LED tube, nor are they covered by the standards for the LEDs. Some variants have been found to have structural flaws that make them dangerous, prompting the Swe- dish National Electric Safety Board to force suppliers to withdraw them from the market. An important considera- tion when retro-fitting LED light sources is that responsibi- lity for the entire luminaire passes over to the person who replaces it as the existing fixture has been tampered with. Retrofitting. Is it enough to simply replace the light source? When you install LED tubes in an existing system, you take over the re- sponsibility for the entire luminaire..
  10. 10. 10 As electricity prices rise, low power consumption becomes increasingly important. LED is superior to all other alterna- tives on the market in terms of energy efficiency and life span. But how much can we really ask? Comparing LED with traditional solutions can easily turn into a matter of apples and oranges. The properties me- asured in the laboratory of an LED manufacturer cannot be directly linked to how an LED module performs in a luminaire. To get a good idea of the lights capacity, the LED needs to be placed in its specific lighting context. Light output equals light flow The energy efficiency of luminaires with traditional light sources is described in terms of light output ratio (LOR). The LOR is measured by comparing the light flow (also known as luminous flux) from a freely glowing reference light source with the measured luminous flux from the LED. The economical alternative luminaire. But the energy efficiency of an LED luminaire cannot be defined by light output, because LED modules do not have a standardised nominal luminous flux as fluorescent tubes do. The reason for this is that the whole luminaire, including the LED and the electrical ballast, is counted as a reference, with the result that the light out- put is always 100%. Instead, the efficiency of an LED lumin- aire is defined as the ratio of the total measured luminous flux (lm) to the radiant flux including ballast (lm/W). Coloured light at no additional cost One of the advantages of LED is that the technology can produce coloured light without using a filter, which saves a lot of energy. For instance, with a traditional spotlight ad- ding a colour filter can reduce the light flow by up to 90%. With an LED, the colour of the light is determined by the material it is made of. An LED luminaire can have a very long life span assuming that it is well- designed and has high-quality components.
  11. 11. 11 100 % 90 % 80 % 70 % 60 % 50 % 40 % 30 % 20 % 10 % 0 % % 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 140 120 100 80 lm/W /1000 lm Suited for many types of luminaires While the rapidly improving luminance from white LEDs opens up exciting possibilities in luminaire design, its important to distinguish between the data for individual LEDs and those for a complete luminaire solution. The data provided by manufacturers of LEDs or LED modules nearly always refer to the maximum luminance of a cold LED. They take no consideration of losses due to higher tempe- ratures, the power consumption of the electrical ballast or losses in reflectors or lenses. The luminance of a poorly designed LED luminaire, or one running on a poor-quality ballast, may be less than half the nominal value of the LED. In public environments, such as offices and schools, LEDs have previously been used for more decorative purposes, such as accent lighting or colour-shifting ef- fects; replacing low-voltage halogen light sources in these contexts. Now LED technology has achieved sufficient quality, energy efficiency and life span to surpass traditional solu- tions for general lighting as well. New reflector and anti- glare technology harnesses the huge light flows offered by LED while still making it comfortable for people to be in the room. In corridors, offices, entry halls and conference facilities downlights and T5 solutions can be replaced with new LED technology such as Fagerhults downlight range Pleaid G3 and the recessed general lighting system Multilume Flat. At least 50,000 hours An LED luminaire can have a very long life span assuming that it is well-designed and has high-quality components. An LED very rarely breaks although, as with any electro- nic products, there is a normal failure rate. Rather than breaking, an LED generates reduced light flow over time. Life expectancy is defined as when the light from the lamp goes down to 70% of the initial value. The Life span is expressed as L70 , followed by the number of hours. The standard life span of most LED luminaires is L70 50,000 hours, but there are deviations both upwards and down- wards. The expected life span is affected by several factors: Choice of LED (manufacturer and type) How hard the chosen LED is run (that is, how high a cur- rent it runs on) Luminaire design (considering the temperature of the LED or LED module) Choice of ballast (driver) The environment where the product is installed Other materials used in the design Once the L70 life span is reached, the LED still continues to produce light for a long time but with a further reduction in light flow. Therefore, to maintain the required levels, the module or entire fitting should be replaced at this point. After a projected 1520 years of operating time it may well be worth changing the entire system as newer, more efficient technology will be available. Schematic sketch of losses. This illustration shows the process from the indivi- dual LED, through heat losses in the modules (where the diodes heat each other up), to light losses in lenses, reflectors and ballasts, to the light that actually radiates from the luminaire. Depending on the design, each loss can be of greater or lesser magnitude. With the development of new technology and increasing efficiency, the prices of LED components have been steadily dropping for some time, but this is expected to stabilise. This graph shows what has happened so far and the projected cost p/ lm of an LED module.
  12. 12. 12 How to calculate expected life span: After 50,000 hours, about 70% of the light flow remains (L70 50,000 h). Maintenance-free Outside of standard cleaning, LED luminaires are pretty much maintenance free throughout their lifecycle. As such, larger organisations can save considerable amounts by not having to keep stock of equipment and associated man-power in replacing the light sources. 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 10 000 20 000 30 000 40 000 50 000 60 000 70 0000
  13. 13. 13 This graph shows how LED efficiency is expected to advance by 2015. The average annual increase in efficiency is about 10%. 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 140 120 100 80 lm/W From an environmental stance the energy efficiency and long life span are the two key benefits of LED. At the end of its life an LED module is recycled in the same way as other electronics. Although unlike traditional light sources, such as fluorescent tubes, LED modules contain no mercury, which simplifies waste management and reduces the risk of emissions. Superior efficiency As with all lighting, the greatest impact on the environ- ment is related to the energy used during its use. The large amount of light produced, compared to the energy consumed, makes LED solutions very efficient, this is particular important when the electricity used to power then comes from sources that are not environmentally optimised, such as coal. There are a selection of products that produce more than 200 lumen per watt in laboratory environments, however, these LEDs are not yet ready for a commercial launch. The environmental effect of reduced power consumption is significant in parti- cular when the electricity comes from power sources that are not environmentally optimised. Less waste The life span of an LED module greatly exceeds that of a traditional light source. This leads to reduced consumption of raw materials, less throwing away and less strain on the recycling system. However, the environmental impact of an LED luminaire in terms of energy efficiency and life span is always dependent on how the luminaire is desig- ned and what context it is intended to be used in. Thus, it is important to do calculations on each individual project and not blindly trust laboratory tests. LED. The environmental alternative
  14. 14. 14 Y X 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 0.2 0.1 0.0 520 500 490 480 470 460380 540 560 580 600 620 700 5000 3000 2000 1515 4000 6000 8000 20000 10000 Light quality Many factors affect the light quality of LED. Colour tem- perature, colour rendition and colour quality all impact how the light works and how it is perceived. Although the technological properties of LEDs and traditional light sources are not directly comparable, the users demands for how the light from a good luminaire should behave, remains unchanged. Colour temperature The colour temperature of a light source is given in Kelvin (K). Originally, Kelvin was a measure of the colour of a heated (and therefore glowing) black body. For lamps with a filament, this measure is easy to apply, as the colour temperature in Kelvin is the same as the actual tempe- rature of the filament. For light sources with no filament such as fluorescent tubes, gas discharge lamps and LEDs we must calculate a correlated colour temperature (CCT) in Kelvin. The instruments and measures available today were developed for traditional light sources and not specifically for LED, so the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) has begun to develop new methods of measuring. Colour temperature may vary from one manufacturer to another even if they report the same me- asurement. In addition, the colour temperature of an LED can change over time, which means that the value after several thousand hours of use will not be the same as that for a new product. When LEDs are produced, their colour temperatures and luminous flux vary widely, making it preferable to choose from a limited assortment. Manufacturers sort their pro- ducts into bins according to their performance. The fewer bins your LEDs are selected from, the more stable the quality of the product. The closer the selection the more the supply decreases and the cost increases, therefore lu- minaire manufacturers tend to accept diodes from nearby bins as well. Variations in white light Usually white light is created by applying a phosphor- based coating to a blue diode, either directly on the diode or on a separate plate over it. This coating converts some of the blue light to white light of various colour tempe- ratures a process that is reminiscent of how a standard fluorescent tube works. The quality of the light is determi- ned both by the specification of the blue LED and by how carefully the phosphor is matched to the selected diode. White diodes come in a wide range of colour temperatu- res, from warm white to very cold (27008000K). Because a blue LED is the basis of the white light, efficiency is greater for colder colour temperatures. To obtain a warmer It is important not to focus too heavily on the replacement value when con- sidering both colour temperature and colour quality. Also look into how the quality changes during the products ex- pected life span. This illustration shows how to calculate a correlated colour temperature: The filled-in curve shows the colour temperature in actual Kelvin degrees. The chromaticity of the light source is measured on one of the isothermal lines and the correlated colour temperature is the point where the line crosses the curve. How to create white light from a blue diode, or in the case on the right, from a cluster of diodes. On one individual LED, the phosphor covers the diode; in a module, the phosphor is placed on a plate that covers all the diodes in the module.
  15. 15. 15 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 70 80 90 100 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 CRI(18) CRI(114) 380 420 460 500 540 560 620 660 700 740 780 Wavelength (nm) 380 420 460 500 540 560 620 660 700 740 780 Wavelength (nm) T5 4000 K 380 420 460 500 540 560 620 660 700 740 780 Wavelength (nm) LED 4000 K (Fortimo) Tungsten 380 420 460 500 540 560 620 660 700 740 780 Wavelength (nm) CDM colour temperature, the phosphor must convert a larger proportion of the original blue light. Colour rendition Colour rendition in LEDs is not exactly the same as in tra- ditional light sources, but it is still described as Ra/CRI. The Ra scale is from 1 to 100 and measures the capacity of the light source to render colours. Depending on your choice of LED, the degree of colour rendition (Ra) normally varies from 60 to 95. A high Ra often produces a somewhat lower luminance. Normally, colour rendition is measured using the CIE method on a scale of eight colours (see illustration). The Colour Rendering Index (CRI) is given as an average value (Ra), so it is possible for a light source to be good at rendering seven colours but not as good at the eighth. A complementary scale is called CRI 1-14, which contains six more colours. As the illustration shows, this LED cannot render the bright red colour, number nine, in an optimal way. In consequence, the average CRI 1-14 value is lower than the average for CRI 1-8. Regardless of the average value, we can see that the LED does not give an ideal ren- dering of the red scale. Colour rendition can vary among LEDs from different manufacturers, but is linked to the spectral distribution of the LED. Therefore, an analysis of the spectral distribution can give us more information about the LEDs ability to reproduce colours. It is also worth noting that colour rendi- tion can differ between a new LED and one that has been in use for several thousand hours.
  16. 16. 16 Chromaticity The chromaticity of an LED product that is, degree of de- viation of its colour temperature is defined in MacAdam ellipses in Standard Deviation of Colour Matching (SDCM) as per the CIE 1964 standard. The MacAdam system origi- nates from the United States and ranks colour quality on a scale of 0 to 10. Between 0 and 4 is it difficult to see differences in co- lour, but further up the scale it can have an obvious and negative disparities.The problems are greatest when lighting a white surface, or placing a LED strip very close to a white wall. The requirements for most other Indoor environments are usually around MacAdam 3-5 SDCM. By compari- son, a T5 fluorescent tube from the major manufacturers is about Ma- cAdam 4. For exterior applications, a rating of MacAdam 7 SDCM is perfectly OK. One of the key considerations is how the colour qua- lity of a product changes throughout its lifespan. Some LEDs can maintain a very high colour quality for the first thousand hours but then deteriorate rapidly. The design of the luminaire is another critical factor, where insufficient cooling, or the LED being run too hard, can both have a negative impact.
  17. 17. 17 520 500 490 480 470 460 380 540 560 580 600 620 700 Pleaid SLD G3 has a MacAdam value of 3, avoiding the irritating colour differences which can appear with poor quality LEDs. These disparities are more noticea- ble on white surfaces. Large variation in colour quality results in a larger ellipse and a higher MacA- dam value. The size of the ellipse is calculated using a formula. Methods of documentation Despite the lack of all inclusive standards, the European organisation for luminaire manufacturers, CELMA, has proposed a number of parameters and methods of measu- rements for the documentation of LED luminaires. While it can be viewed as a temporary stop-gap pending the establishments of international standards, these parame- ters will, in all likelihood, be included in future IEC and CEN standards. The main purpose of uniformed reporting to allow an accurate and fair comparison between different manu- facturers and solutions, while highlighting the pertinent information which should be collected from manufactu- rers outside of CELMA.
  18. 18. 18 The design of an LED luminaire intended for working environme- nts is a careful balancing act between comfort and economy. Visual comfort The great challenge with LEDs is to keep glare within reasonable levels. It is not unusual that diodes and LED modules have a luminance (light intensity) of over 300,000 cd/m. In contrast, a standard T5 fluorescent tube has a luminance of 17,000 cd/m. Luminaire developed for working environments are a careful balancing act between comfort and economy. From a financial stance, creating a naked LED module with a cooling unit and external driver would deliver the highest lumens to watts ratio. However, this solution would be completely impractical. The greater the efficiency the great the glare, a factor which should be considered in both the development and selection of luminaires. In commercial environments the light from an LED or LED module has to be controlled by reflectors, lenses, or some other form of diffusing material. Lenses are usually directly linked to different manufacturers and the type of LED. The choice of reflector material or lens used is crucial to maintaining the luminaires efficiency while keeping the luminance sufficiently low.
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  20. 20. 20 Electrical ballast and operating temperature run on a constant 350, 500, 700 or 1050mA of current and are serially connected to the ballast. The voltage in the circuit depends on the number of diodes: the forward voltage of each diode is added to the next in the series. A downlight with three LEDs intended to run on a constant- current ballast will have a secondary voltage of about 9V DC (3x3V). If several luminaires are serially connected to a single ballast, the voltage is multiplied by the number of luminaires. SELV technology limits the number of diodes that can be serially connected because too many will lead to exces- sive secondary voltage. In addition, it is unlikely that the ballast has the capacity for such a high voltage or power. In a constant-current system, the LEDs are serially connected to bal- lasts. In a constant-voltage system, the LEDs are parallel connected to ballasts. The ballast is the heart that drives an LED. Different lumin- aires uses different ballasts and if the ballast is unsuitable, or improperly connected, it can damage or even ruin the LED luminaires connected to it. LEDs and LED modules require special electrical ballasts, or drivers, which converts 230V of mains voltage to suitable values to operate the component. Most of these are also designed as Safety Extra Low Voltage (SELV) systems, which means that the LED and other components do not need touch protection. The disadvantage of SELV systems is somewhat lower efficiency due to losses in the protective separation. Lu- minaires without SELV are only designed to shelter the LED modules and wires from touch and therefore require a tool to access the components. Current or voltage LEDs can be powered in two ways: with constant current or constant voltage. Constant current means that the diodes
  21. 21. 21 SELV limitations in EN 60598-1 (luminaire standard): For IP 20 luminaires the limit is 60V DC, and for luminaires with a higher protection class than IP 20 the limit is 30V DC. This is assuming that the diodes are accessible to touch. If they are shielded, the permitted voltage is 120V DC, but the certification of the luminaire and the recommended ballast must be considered. Constant current is usually used for LED products with a large number of diodes, such as LED strip lights and pro- ducts that produce a glowing line. The LEDs are connected parallel to ballasts. The constant voltage is usually 8, 10, 12, 24 or 48V DC. Several LED products can be connected parallel to a single ballast, as long as the ballast has the ca- pacity. The voltage drop in the wires is estimated to be the same as in traditional extra-low-voltage installations Use the right ballast Regardless of the type of power source, it is important that the ballast is suited to the specific type of LED luminaire. The polarity is also important because this is direct current (DC). If the ballast is unsuitable or improperly connected, it can damage or even ruin the LED luminaires connected to it. It is important that the ballast is designed for and approved to operate LEDs. Although some LEDs can run on conventional transformers, such transformers can lack certain kinds of safety features, such as short-circuit pro- tection, which can lead to injuries.
  22. 22. 22 Operating temperature Traditional light sources always radiate heat. While an LED itself doesnt it is still a problem. Unlike traditional light sources, which are cooled by ambient air, the LED must be cooled by the material behind it. Heat has the greatest negative impact on an LEDs life span, luminance and ef- ficiency. This is why Fagerhult makes sure when developing LED luminaires that the temperature of the components remains within the manufacturers specifications and meets the requirements in our own policy. Fagerhults LED policy Fagerhult uses only LEDs, or LED modules, from recognised manufacturers and pay close attention towards ensuing they are powered for optimal lifespan and efficiency. To help safeguard against the negative issues related to excessive heat all components within the Fagerhult range remain within the manufacturers stated levels. An addi- tional safety margin is added when measuring the control temperature (tc) and when calculating the temperature of the LED (tj). This policy has been applied to other elec- tronics, such as high-frequency ballasts and emergency lighting, for many years and has helped ensure the stated expected life span is always achieved by a good margin. The design is optimised by using software that stimulates temperatures and a heat camera to test calculations on the luminaire prototypes. During inspections and testing, the luminaire is always installed in the way it is inten- ded to be used by the end customer. By including these processes at the early stage of the design, this additional margin can be included without increasing the cost of the luminaire.
  23. 23. 23 Control High-quality LED lighting can be regulated by a range of control systems. In addition to light intensity timers, day- light harvesting and proximity control, LED offers comple- tely new options for controlling the colour of the light. The regulation of LED light is managed using ballasts with pulse-width modulation (PWM). The connected load is run by a technology consisting of a square wave with varying frequency. The load is switched on and off with a high frequency, which gives the impression that the light level changes. PWM ballasts are available with various types of control interfaces, such as DALI, DSI, DMX 512 and switchDIM. Separate PWM units are also available, which can serve as connections between constant voltage and the load. Colour shifting RGB/DMX Colour shifting in red, green and blue is generally referred to as RGB control. About 65,000 colours can be obtained by mixing and combining these three colours at various strengths. Creating a specific colour requires some type of control unit or interface to a program that communicates via DALI or DMX 512. The control unit might be a lighting desk which is unusual in many applications a router or some kind of control panel. People often make an association between DMX, RGB and LED. A simple description of DMX is a control unit that controls all electrical loads. DMX 512 is a standard pro- tocol that was initially developed to control lighting and dimmers in theatrical environments via a lighting desk. It has a high rate of transfer, which requires high-quality installations, wiring and connections. However, with the development of new light sources and the desire for colour in various applications, DMX control has come into use in many other environments. DMX is advancing DMX is also available in a recently updated version, RDM, which allows you to address loads via the DMX wiring, as long as the loads and software are correctly selected. The most common way to address DMX is with a DIP switch setting on each unit. (RDM is currently employed in such products as Fagerhults Pleiad LED Wallwasher with Lexel.) DMX compared to DALI There are more differences than similarities between DMX and DALI. DALI was developed with a focus on energy- efficient fluorescent-tube lighting in public environments where people work and visit. It has been a very popular alternative considering its limitations, but its simplicity was the key. Multiple control units can control all or part of the electrical loads. In the not-too-distant future, the current DALI standard will be expanded with DALI Colour Control Command. Comparison of DALI/DMX Control protocol DALI DMX Speed Slow Fast Number of addresses 64 512 Multiple units at same address No Yes Automatic addressing Yes No Centralised control No Yes Decentralised control Yes No Cord length 300m 300m Cord requirement No Yes, Cat5 Terminating resistor No Yes 1) Converters for 110V are common. 2) RDM luminaires can be addressed via software.
  24. 24. 24 Greater efficiency, lower prices and better applications of the tech- nology will contribute to steadily growing demand for LED.
  25. 25. 25 LED a glimpse of the future Advances in the LED field are astounding. Efficiency has doubled in just a few years, while costs have dropped dramatically. But what happens next? This development is likely to continue, even if the rate may slow. It is not unreasonable to expect that LED systems that produce 100lm/W today may be up over 150lm/W in a year or two. As volumes increase, costs will drop, alt- hough how much is uncertain. While there is still a level of uncertainty about the speed of the growth, the increase in the demand for LED luminai- res is clear and predictions that LEDs will dominate lumin- aire sales in 10 years time are far from idle speculation. One phase in Fagerhults further development of this technology is to research into how people perceive LED lighting. Early indications point towards LED being percei- ved as brighter than traditional light sources at the same levels, which opens up intriguing possibilities for further energy savings. In addition to research Fagerhult are deve- loping even more solutions geared towards offering viable LED alternative for general and workspace lighting. There is a joint standardisation project being undertaken within the lighting industry called Zhaga, which is aiming to de- velop common product standards for physical dimensions and connections to electrical, photometric and thermal product standards. This process, in essence, is set to make it easier to replace LED modules and electronic ballast. The first standardised modules are expected to be available in 2011
  26. 26. 26 A 2 A1 C 1 B 2 B 1 C 2 975049 A1 A2 B1 B2 C1 C2 300300 296 266 296 266 600600 596 566 596 566 3001200 1196 1166 296 270 HB 600600 596 566 596 566 Ballast box 247 164 5814 HB Multilume Flat The Multilume Flat is amongst the first LED luminaire that is more efficient than a T5 luminaire; producing more than 80 lumens per watt, with the same light ergonomics. Its slim aluminium profile, with a low recessed depth, offers many advantages in the construction process. Multi- lume Flat was developed for daylight and proximity control and can be fitted with two different anti-glare devices - mi- croprismatic or opal. Luminaire, Delta LED-module, lm, W Length Width Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W kg Visible T-bars (VTB) 1000, 15 300 300 1086 70 2.4 22373 4000, 50 600 600 4107 81 6.5 22375 4000, 50 1200 300 3849 77 6.2 22374 Concealed T-bars (HB)/D-edge, symmetrical attachment of ceiling boards 4000, 50 600 600 4107 81 6.5 22377 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. Luminaire, Opal LED-module, lm, W Length Width Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W kg Visible T-bars (VTB) 1000, 15 300 300 1155 75 2.4 22370 4000, 50 600 600 4294 85 6.5 22372 4000, 50 1200 300 4098 81 6.2 22371 Concealed T-bars (HB)/D-edge, symmetrical attachment of ceiling boards 4000, 50 600 600 4294 85 6.5 22376 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. Suffix code -03 Connection cable with earthed plug, RKK 30.75mm, L=2.5m. -205 110V Add suffix code to the end of the luminaire part number to indicate required functi- on. Only one suffix can be added.
  27. 27. 27 A B 165 t Max 550 A B 232 139 232 100 Pleiad G3 Pleiad G3 is a series of LED downlights designed especially for general lighting. Thanks to an innovative reflector, it combines the efficiency and high light flows of LED tech- nology with exceptional glare reduction and light treat- ment. Available in a variety of designs and complemented with a large range of accessories, there is a solution for all types of spaces and applications. Luminaire, comfort LED-module, lm, W Colour temp., K Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W Reflector 1100, 12 3000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 809 54 Specular 77950 1100, 12 3000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 768 51 Matt 77951 1100, 11 4000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 773 56 Specular 77952 1100, 11 4000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 737 54 Matt 77953 2000, 24 3000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 1322 47 Specular 77955 2000, 24 3000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 1265 45 Matt 77956 2000, 22 4000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 1454 53 Specular 77957 2000, 22 4000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 1396 51 Matt 77958 2000, 30 27006500 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM Specular 77975 2000, 30 27006500 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM Matt 77976 Luminaire, compact LED-module, lm, W Colour temp., K Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W Reflector 1100, 12 3000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 804 54 Specular 77930 1100, 12 3000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 789 53 Matt 77931 1100, 11 4000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 772 59 Specular 77932 1100, 11 4000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 757 58 Matt 77933 2000, 24 3000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 1388 50 Specular 77935 2000, 24 3000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 1357 48 Matt 77936 2000, 22 4000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 1466 54 Specular 77937 2000, 22 4000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 1453 53 Matt 77938 Suffix code -03 Connection cable with earthed plug, RKK 30.75 mm, L=2.5 m. -111 Wieland GST18i3 (3-way). One outlet socket. -365 TouchDIM/DALI Add suffix code to the end of the luminaire part number to indicate required functi- on Only one suffix can be added. Luminaire, basic LED-module, lm, W Colour temp., K Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W Reflector 1100, 20 3000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 944 49 Specular 77880 1100, 20 3000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 935 49 Matt 77881 1100, 18 4000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 970 54 Specular 77882 1100, 18 4000 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 947 53 Matt 77883 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk.
  28. 28. 28 Pleiad Power LED Luminaire, Fast LED-module, lm, W Colour temp., K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality Distribution angle 24 1000, 18 3000 897 43 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 2 SDCM 77530 1000, 18 4000 885 43 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 2 SDCM 77531 Distribution angle 42 1000, 18 3000 875 43 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 2 SDCM 77532 1000, 18 4000 864 42 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 2 SDCM 77533 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. Accessories LED ballast 33 W, 350/700 mA 99006 LED ballast 30 W, 700 mA dimmable via DSI/DALI/ switchDIM 99004 Luminaire, Flex LED-module, lm, W Colour temp., K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W Rotate/Tilt Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality Distribution angle 24 1000, 18 3000 897 43 355/ 60 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 2 SDCM 77534 1000, 18 4000 885 43 355/ 60 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 2 SDCM 77535 Distribution angle 42 1000, 18 3000 875 43 355/ 60 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 2 SDCM 77536 1000, 18 4000 864 42 355/ 60 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 2 SDCM 77537 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. 113 98 147 100 t Max 30 146 146 130 137 92 177 138 t Max 30 Pleiad Power LED is a small, efficient downlight that brings power economy and energy efficiency into one complete package. The luminaire is designed for entrances, meeting halls and showrooms and other applications which require a varied generous, general light.
  29. 29. 29 Pleiad LED Wallwasher makes optimal use of LED technolo- gy. A new reflector design makes it possible to avoid a dark line where the wall and ceiling meet. An even, soft spread light fills the whole wall, creating new opportunities for striking and varied light planning. The series also includes complementary downlights that follow the same square design aesthetic. Pleiad LED Wallwasher 243 156 273 224 242 230 230 230 t=130 251 141 241 230 230 225 241 Suffix code -365 TouchDIM/DALI Add suffix code to the end of the luminaire part number to indicate required function. Luminaire, wallwasher LED-module, lm, W Colour temp, K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality Black White Fortimo 1100, 19 3000 805 40 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 77799 77790 1100, 18 4000 949 55 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 77800 77791 2000, 36 3000 1701 45 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 77804 77795 2000, 32 4000 1746 54 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 77805 77796 Lexel 1100, 40 RGB 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 77801 77792 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. Accessories Assembly plate 41957 Assembly plate adapted for 600mm 41953 Assembly plate adapted for 625mm 41954 Luminaire, downlight LED-module, lm, W Colour temp, K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality Black White 1100, 19 3000 926 47 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 77802 77793 1100 ,18 4000 1055 61 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 77803 77794 2000, 36 3000 1934 52 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 77806 77797 2000, 32 4000 1992 61 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 77807 77798 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk.
  30. 30. 30 Pleion is a series of downlights equipped with advanced lens technology, formulated directly for the LEDs. The len- ses allow a wide range of beam angles, with minimal glare, making it suitable for all types of environments where you want to create variation in the lighting or accentuate objects. The ability to angle the luminaire contributes to its inherent flexibility. Pleion A B C 3 LED 107 76 52 5 LED 118 79 57 7 LED 134 90 57 A B C D D 46 46 64 t Max 30 E 25 22 28 E 95 108 122 Luminaire LED-module, W No. LEDs Colour temp., K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality Distribution angle 8 7 3 3000 377 43 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77820 7 3 4000 404 46 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77821 11 5 3000 635 48 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77825 11 5 4000 686 52 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77826 Distribution angle 26 7 3 3000 341 39 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77822 7 3 4000 368 42 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77823 11 5 3000 564 42 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77827 11 5 4000 606 46 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77828 15 7 3000 800 44 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77830 15 7 4000 886 50 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77831 Distribution angle 46 15 7 3000 770 42 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77832 15 7 4000 853 48 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 77833 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. Accessories LED ballast 18W/700mA dimmable via 110V 98179 LED ballast 30W/700mA dimmable via DSI/DALI/ switchDIM 99004
  31. 31. 31 Easy LED The Easy LED is an energy-efficient, flexible alternative to traditional recessed downlights with a halogen light source. Its size, design and function make it ideal for repre- sentative environments, such as hotels and offices, where the lights are often on for long hours. The EasyLED comes in a fixed version and a version that can be tilted 30 and twisted 355, to accentuate walls and objects. Both come in white and alu-grey and are rated to IP 44, which means they can also be installed in bath- rooms. 80 30030 105 = 90 35 80 = 70 26 80 Luminaire LED-module, lm, W Colour temp., K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W kg Turn/Tilt Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality White Grey Distribution angle 24 500, 7 3000 493 57 0.3 0/0 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76840 76844 500, 7 4000 601 71 0.3 0/0 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76841 76845 500, 7 3000 493 57 0.4 355/30 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76890 76894 500, 7 4000 601 71 0.4 355/30 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76891 76895 Distribution angle 38 500, 7 3000 377 44 0.3 0/0 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76922 76924 500, 7 4000 449 53 0.3 0/0 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76923 76925 500, 7 3000 377 44 0.4 355/30 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76926 76928 500, 7 4000 449 53 0.4 355/30 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76927 76929 Distribution angle 54 500, 7 3000 452 53 0.3 0/0 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76842 76846 500, 7 4000 533 63 0.3 0/0 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76843 76847 500, 7 3000 452 53 0.4 355/30 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76892 76896 500, 7 4000 533 63 0.4 355/30 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 4 SDCM 76893 76897 For current information on output and luminous flux see www.fagerhult.co.uk. Accessories Assembly plate 41982 LED-driver 9W/350mA dimmable via 110V 98178 LED-driver 15W/350mA dimmable via DSI/DALI/switchDIM 99003
  32. 32. 32 Freedom Freedom is an innovative LED luminaire that makes it possible to create free forms suspended in the air, on the ceiling and on the wall. With the help of two modules, one straight and one curved, the luminaire can be built up to follow the shape of the room or a creative concept. Of- fering architects, interior designers and lighting designers full freedom of expression. Luminaire, pendant and ceiling LED-module, W, V Colour temp, K Luminous flux, lm Output, lm/W kg Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality 40, 24 Straight, direct/indirect, pendant 4000 1216 30 1.5 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 16901 32, 24 Straight, direct light, pendant, ceiling 4000 828 26 1.4 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 16902 40, 24 Curved, direct/indirect, pendant 4000 1216 30 1.6 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 16903 32, 24 Curved, direct light, pendant, ceiling 4000 828 26 1.5 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 16904 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. Accessories LED ballasts 300 W/24 V fitted in the installation box. Max. 6 luminaires. 98011 LED ballasts 120W/24V. Max. 3 luminaires. 98198 LED PWM dimmer 120 W/24 V D 110 V 99110 LED PWM dimmer 120 W/24 V D DALI 99111 2wire and wire bracket for pendant installation 94021 2end-caps 94022 Continuous coupler bracket, light trap, cable for continuous installation 94023 4 m power cable connection 2conductors 94024 4 m power cable connection 4conductors 94025 Please note; luminaires for dimming require a ballast and dimming module, both ordered separately- i.e. 98198+99110 or 98198+99111. 1200 1300 R=1200 430 136 60 Installation box 48 48 48 Luminaire, wall LED-module, W, V Colour temp, K Luminous flux, lm Output, lm/W kg Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality 32, 24 Straight luminaire 4000 800 25 1.4 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 16910 32, 24 Curved luminaire 4000 800 25 1.5 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 16911 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk.
  33. 33. 33 1730 1200 54 36 265 40 80 700 50 68 130 180 Gaudi With Gaudi new technology meets timeless elegance. A suspended luminaire inspired by classical architectural principles and developed based on LED technology. Gaudi has tailored optics for the latest generation of LEDs that distribute a balanced effective light with an appealing co- lour temperature. The luminaire is available in two models: Gaudi Linear and Gaudi Circular Luminaire, circular System, W Colour temp, K Luminous flux, lm Output, lm/W kg Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality White Black 18 4000 350 20 2.6 700 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 54611 54612 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. Accessories Inflld takkopp, white 94040 Inflld takkopp, black 94041 Mounting plate 41390 Luminaire, suora System, W Colour temp, K Luminous flux, lm Output, lm/W kg Length Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality White Black 20 4000 475 20 2.2 1730 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 3 SDCM 54607 54608 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk
  34. 34. 34 G5 G5 is a luminaire for task lighting on a desk or other wor- king areas. LED technology makes it an extremely energy- efficient alternative to traditional halogen solutions. This approach has contributed towards a enhanced ability to adjust the direction of the light, focusing on the desktop with minimal upward spill. The design of the fixture takes advantage of all the benefits of the technology, combining small dimensions with clean lines. Cost-effective everyday luxury! Luminaire System, W Colour temp, K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality 8 3000 247 29 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 62005 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. 78 80 390 450 Densus LED D AB C W B C D 27 678 181 106 460 27 678 181 106 460 56 1278 181 106 800 70 1578 181 106 1100 15 678 181 106 460 A Accessories Cable wire bracket/pair 91334 Conduit bracket/pair 91198 Adjustable ceiling bracket/pair 91374 Adjustable wall bracket/pair 91375 Wall bracket, 135 , L=200 mm/st 91313 Wall bracket, 90, L=150 mm/st 91508 Wall bracket, 90, L=250 mm/st 91509 Spare shade for 15 W/678 mm 90352 Spare shade for 27 W/678 mm 90355 Spare shade for 56 W/1278 mm 90356 Spare shade for 70 W/1578 mm 90357 Luminaire System, W Colour temp., K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W Length kg Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality 15 3000 1000 68 678 2.5 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 34480 27 3000 1900 70 678 3.0 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 34481 27 5700 2200 73 678 3.0 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 34471 56 5700 4500 80 1278 4.8 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 34473 70 5700 5300 75 1578 5.5 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 34475 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. LED technology requires good cooling for optimal per- formance, which makes it extra useful in cold or well- ventilated areas. LEDs also lights up quickly, even at low temperatures. Densus LED is a sturdy lighting solution for cool spaces, such as refrigeration and freezer rooms, lo- ading docks and other environments where the luminaire is switched on and off many times a day.
  35. 35. 35 Fasett Beetle Luminaire System, W Colour temp, K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W kg Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality 15 4000 438 30 1.3 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 7 SDCM 64844 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. Suffix code -368 DALI Add suffix code to the end of the luminaire part number to indicate required function. 98 150 37,5 200 70 Luminaire System, W Colour temp, K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W kg Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality 16 4000 435 27 1.7 85 L70 60.000h MacAdam 7 SDCM 64840 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. 395210 60110 95 Fasett is a wall mounted luminaire with a contemporary design, specifically developed for LED. By positioning the diodes close together on the module no dots appear on the diffuser, while still providing a well-directed, even, comfortable light. The components are encapsulated, which makes the Fasett an excellent choice for busy faci- lities. Beetle is a wall-mounted luminaire developed for LED technology. Its design concept features classic, rounded shapes, allowing a well-reflected and comfortable glare- free light. Encapsulated components make Beetle a robust, maintenance-free solution for environments where many people are active. The fixture is also fitted with adjustable ballasts for ease of control.
  36. 36. 36 Zoft LED A wall fixture with a classic design, Zoft LED embraces the long life and maintenance-free advantages of LED tech- nology. The luminaire has excellent glare reduction and an even distribution of light, ideal for applications such as stairwells. The frame is white and the dome is matte, opal glass or acrylic for extra durability. Zoft LED is additional- ly fitted with adjustable ballasts for extra ease of control. Accessories Wall bracket for corner mounting of 56922 & 56912 94884 Luminaire System, W Colour temp, K Luminous flux, lm Efficiency, lm/W kg Height Ra (CRI) Life Colour quality Glass Acrylic 11 4100 446 40 1.6 310 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 56917 11 4100 538 48 1.6 310 80 L70 50.000h MacAdam 5 SDCM 56918 For current information on output and luminous flux, see www.fagerhult.co.uk. 220 310 90 165 620 75
  37. 37. 111SE.1.01.01.1producedbyfagerhultsbelysningab Fagerhult develops, manufactures and markets professional lighting systems for public environments such as offices, schools, industries and hospitals. Our operations are run with a constant focus on design, function, flexibility and energy saving solutions. Fagerhult Lighting Ltd, Fagerhult United Arab Emirates and Project Lighting Ltd are part of the Fagerhult Group, one of Europes leading lighting groups with operations in more than 15 different countries. AB Fagerhult is listed on the NAS- DAQ OMX Nordic Exchange in Stockholm. HEAD OFFICE SWEDEN Fagerhults Belysning AB SE-566 80 Habo, Sweden Tel +46 36 10 85 00 Fax +46 36 10 86 99 www.fagerhult.com UNITED KINGDOM Fagerhult Lighting Ltd 50 Southwark Street London, SE1 1UN Tel +44 (0) 207 403 4123 Fax +44 (0) 207 378 0906 light@fagerhult.co.uk www.fagerhult.co.uk IRELAND Project Lighting Ltd Unit F1, Calmont Park Ballymount Dublin 12 Tel +353 1 426 0200 Fax +353 1 429 9606 info@projectlighting.com www.projectlighting.com United Arab Emirates Fagerhult Lighting P.O Box 126287 Dubai Tel +971 0 4 3297120 Fax +971 0 4 3297130 info@fagerhult.ae www.fagerhult.ae