Evaluation of Education Interventions

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<ul><li><p>EFFECTIVENESS OF A COMMUNITY-BASED EDUCATIONAL </p><p>INTERVENTION TO IMPROVE SCHOOL CHILDRENS KNOWLEDGE </p><p>OF RABIES AND DOG BITE PREVENTION </p><p> Aashima Auplish, Alison S. Clarke, Trent van Zanten Kate Abel, Charmaine Tham, </p><p>Thinlay N. Bhutia, Colin R. Wilks, Mark A. Stevenson, Simon M. Firestone </p></li><li><p>RATIONALE BEHIND COMMUNITY-BASED EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION </p><p> Major factors contributing to endemicity: Knowledge gaps in rabies awareness Lack of nationally coordinated control and </p><p>prevention strategies </p><p> Changing the public perception of rabies prevention and control is a fundamental aspect of ongoing control efforts </p></li><li><p>RATIONALE BEHIND COMMUNITY-BASED EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION </p><p> Target demographic: </p><p> Risk and burden falls on the most vulnerable sectors of society with 40% of human rabies deaths occurring in children </p></li><li><p>RATIONALE BEHIND COMMUNITY-BASED EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION </p><p> Aim: To evaluate the implementation of a community-</p><p>based educational intervention, with target demographic of local school children in urban and rural Sikkim </p></li><li><p>WHERE DOES EDUCATION FALL INTO DOG POPULATION MANAGEMENT? </p><p> Impact 4: Reduce risks to Public Health Dog bite prevention Impact on rabies risk </p><p> Impact 5: Improve Public Perception Attitudes towards dogs Human-dog interactions </p></li><li><p>MAJOR GAPS IN KNOWLEDGE AND CONTROL STRATEGIES </p><p> Most patients are victims of rabies due to: Lack of knowledge Disregard of post-exposure prophylaxis An inadequate availability of primary health care </p><p>services </p></li><li><p>EDUCATIONAL SESSIONS Section I: Interpretation of dog behaviour Section II: Knowledge of rabies and its transmission Section III: Post-exposure precautionary steps </p><p> Sample size (n): 226 students Of 8,700 students participating in the education </p><p>program Comparison of pre- and post-test scores to evaluate </p><p>the effectiveness of educational intervention </p></li><li><p>SECTION 1: INTERPRETATION OF DOG BEHAVIOUR </p><p> Impact 4: Reduce risks to Public Health Dog bites &amp; Impact on rabies </p><p> Impact 5: Improved Public Perception Attitudes towards dogs &amp; Human-dog interaction </p><p> Most important reservoir of rabies are dogs 17 million dog bites occur annually in India Children more likely to suffer bites to the face and head </p><p> Key knowledge gap: Appropriate behaviour around scared dogs </p></li><li><p>SECTION 1: INTERPRETATION OF DOG BEHAVIOUR </p><p>Results: Increased awareness of the risk of approaching </p><p>scared dogs (30.4%) Improved ability to identify and approach a </p><p>happy dog (22%) </p></li><li><p>SECTION 1: INTERPRETATION OF DOG BEHAVIOUR </p></li><li><p>SECTION 2: KNOWLEDGE OF RABIES AND </p><p>TRANSMISSION Impact 4: Reduce risks to Public Health </p><p> Direct impact on reducing rabies risk </p><p> Only 15% of patients reported learning about rabies at school* </p><p> Key knowledge gap: Understanding animals other than dogs are a </p><p>potential source of rabies *As demonstrated in a multi-country, multicenter study conducted in </p><p>the SEAR </p></li><li><p>SECTION 2: KNOWLEDGE OF RABIES AND </p><p>TRANSMISSION </p><p>Results: Increased ability of identifying rabies as a virus </p><p>(19%) </p><p> Increased recognition of only mammals transmitting rabies (16%) </p><p> Increased ability to identify that cows transmit rabies (47.2%) </p></li><li><p>SECTION 2: KNOWLEDGE OF RABIES AND </p><p>TRANSMISSION </p></li><li><p>SECTION 3: ABILITY TO CORRECTLY ORDER POST-</p><p>EXPOSURE PRECAUTION STEPS </p><p> Impact 4: Reduce Risks to Public Health </p><p> Reduce dog bites and Impact on rabies risk </p><p> Estimated only 20% of 19 million humans bitten (in SEAR) receive one or more doses of PEP vaccine due to lack of awareness </p><p> Key knowledge gap: Correctly understanding post-exposure prophylaxis </p></li><li><p>SECTION 3: ABILITY TO CORRECTLY ORDER POST-</p><p>EXPOSURE PRECAUTION STEPS Results Increased ability to correctly order post-</p><p>exposure precautionary steps (40%) Absolute rise of 87.5% </p></li><li><p>SECTION 3: ABILITY TO CORRECTLY ORDER POST-</p><p>EXPOSURE PRECAUTION STEPS </p></li><li><p>LIMITATIONS &amp; REVISIONS </p><p> Accessibility and time constraints Large classes of students Selection bias Reliance on students to self complete questions Poor English comprehension Unwillingness for students to answer questions </p><p>that they were unsure of the correct response </p></li><li><p>CONCLUSION </p><p> Gauged requirements for future programs Evidence for incorporation into school curriculum </p></li><li><p>INTERNING AT </p><p> October December 2014 within the Dept of Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases, under Dr Bernadette Abela Ridder </p><p> Organising the 4th International Meeting on the Control of Neglected Zoonotic Diseases </p><p> Creation of bite prevention and rabies oriented educational booklets with WHO, GARC for South Africa as part of the Kwa Zulu Natal Rabies Elimination Program </p></li><li><p>ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS </p><p> Vets Beyond Borders: Charmaine Tham Kate Abel Thinlay Bhutia Helen Byrnes </p><p> University of Melbourne Vet Faculty Simon Firestone Colin Wilks Mark Stevenson </p><p> External veterinarians Gabrielle Carter, Robert Holmes, Alan Sherlock </p>Effectiveness of a community-based educational intervention to improve school childrens knowledge of rabies and dog bite preventionRationale behind community-based educational interventionRationale behind community-based educational interventionRationale behind community-based educational interventionWhere does education fall into dog population management?Major gaps in knowledge and control strategiesEducational sessionsSection 1: interpretation of dog behaviourSection 1: interpretation of dog behaviourSlide Number 10Section 1: interpretation of dog behaviourSection 2: knowledge of rabies and transmissionSection 2: knowledge of rabies and transmissionSlide Number 14Slide Number 15Section 2: knowledge of rabies and transmissionSection 3: ability to correctly order post-exposure precaution stepsSection 3: ability to correctly order post-exposure precaution stepsSlide Number 19Section 3: ability to correctly order post-exposure precaution stepsLIMITATIONS &amp; REVISIONSCONCLUSIONInterning atACKNOWLEDGEMENTS</li></ul>