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  • @reyjunco #juncz

  • 1. Psychosocial Tensions 2. Assumptions 3. Informal Learning 4. Formal Learning 5. Strategies for SA pros

    Overview

  • Digital Inequalities

  • Time

    Progress

    Tech

    nolog

    y

    Psyc

    hoso

    cial A

    dapt

    ation

    Techno-Socio Tension

  • Adult Normative Youth Normative

    Viewpoint Adult experience Youth experience

    Approach Prescriptive Inquisitive

    Beliefs about social media Negative Balanced

    Source of information Self Other

  • Moral Panic Narratives

  • Progress Narratives

  • What do social media do to

    youth?

  • 1. Keep youth from interacting 2. Are bad for development 3. Detract from learning 4. Lead to bullying

  • They really

  • 1. Help youth connect 2. Help youth develop identity 3. Help students learn 4. Afford bystanders the ability

    to stand up to bullies

    1. Help youth connect 2. Help youth develop identity 3. Help students learn 4. Afford bystanders the ability

    to stand up to bullies

  • 1. Help youth connect 2. Help youth develop identity 3. Help students learn 4. Afford bystanders the ability

    to stand up to bullies

    1. Help youth connect 2. Help youth develop identity 3. Help students learn 4. Afford bystanders the ability

    to stand up to bullies

  • 1. Help youth connect 2. Help youth develop identity 3. Help students learn 4. Afford bystanders the ability

    to stand up to bullies

    1. Help youth connect 2. Help youth develop identity 3. Help students learn 4. Afford bystanders the ability

    to stand up to bullies

  • 1. Help youth connect 2. Help youth develop identity 3. Help students learn 4. Afford bystanders the ability

    to stand up to bullies

    1. Help youth connect 2. Help youth develop identity 3. Help students learn 4. Afford bystanders the ability

    to stand up to bullies

  • 31

    Significant Associations with Facebook Activities Found in the Literature FB Activity Positive Association Negative Association Time on FB Narcissism Competence Initiating Offline Interpersonal Relationships Anxiousness Life-Satisfaction Loneliness Social Avoidance Alcohol Use Marijuana Use Improved Self-Esteem Improved Life-Satisfaction Campus\Community Involvement Log-ins to FB Narcissism Competence Initiating Offline Interpersonal Relationships Anxiousness Loneliness Social Avoidance Alcohol Use Marijuana Use Improved Self-Esteem Improved Life-Satisfaction # FB Friends Problematic Internet Use Loneliness Social Connectedness Social Avoidance Emotional Closeness with Peers Emotional Closeness with Peers FB Status Updates Loneliness Loneliness Social Connectedness Self-Esteem Time Selecting Profile Pic Loneliness Self-Esteem Passive Social Monitoring Loneliness Self-Esteem Student Engagement Playing Games Student Engagement Posting Photos Student Engagement Smile Intensity in Profile Pic Life-Satisfaction Communicative Activities Student Engagement Student Engagement Time Spent Preparing for Class Loneliness Displaying Romantic Partner in Profile Pic Relationship Satisfaction Emotional Closeness

    From: Deatherage (2015). Facebook engagement on college students interpersonal and interpersonal functioning. Dissertation, Purdue University.

  • Disconnect Between Research & Practice

  • Sexually Explicit Cell Phone Messaging AssociatedWith Sexual Risk Among Adolescents

    WHATS KNOWN ON THIS SUBJECT: Sending and receivingsexually explicit picture and text messages via cell phone(ie, sexting) among adolescents is publicized as a societaland public health concern, yet it is unknown whether sexting isassociated with physical sexual activity or sexual risk behavior.

    WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS: This study is the rst to examine sextingamong a probability sample of adolescents and found that sextingis associated with sexual activity, sexual risk behavior, andknowing other person(s) who have sent a sext.

    abstractOBJECTIVES: Sexting (sending/receiving sexually explicit texts andimages via cell phone) may be associated with sexual healthconsequences among adolescents. However, to date, no publisheddata from a probability-based sample has examined associationsbetween sexting and sexual activity.

    METHODS: A probability sample of 1839 students was collected along-side the 2011 Youth Risk Behavior Survey in Los Angeles high schools.Logistic regressions were used to assess the correlates of sexting be-havior and associations between sexting and sexual risk-taking.

    RESULTS: Fifteen percent of adolescents with cell phone accessreported sexting, and 54% reported knowing someone who had senta sext. Adolescents whose peers sexted were more likely to sext them-selves (odds ratio [OR] = 16.87, 95% condence interval [CI]: 9.6229.59). Adolescents who themselves sexted were more likely to reportbeing sexually active (OR = 7.17, 95% CI: 5.0110.25). Nonheterosexualstudents were more likely to report sexting (OR = 2.74, 95% CI: 1.864.04), sexual activity (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.072.15), and unprotectedsex at last sexual encounter (OR = 1.84, 95% CI: 1.172.89).

    CONCLUSIONS: Sexting, rather than functioning as an alternative toreal world sexual risk behavior, appears to be part of a clusterof risky sexual behaviors among adolescents. We recommend thatclinicians discuss sexting as an adolescent-friendly way of engagingpatients in conversations about sexual activity, prevention of sexuallytransmitted infections, and unwanted pregnancy. We furtherrecommend that discussion about sexting and its associated riskbehavior be included in school-based sexual health curricula.Pediatrics 2012;130:667673

    AUTHORS: Eric Rice, PhD,a Harmony Rhoades, PhD,a HaileyWinetrobe, MPH,a Monica Sanchez, MA,b Jorge Montoya,PhD,c Aaron Plant, MPH,c and Timothy Kordic, MAd

    aSchool of Social Work, University of Southern California, LosAngeles, California; bDepartment of Psychology, Clark University,Worcester, Massachusetts; cSentient Research, Los Angeles,California; and dLos Angeles Unied School District, Los Angeles,California

    KEY WORDSsexual risk behavior, adolescents, HIV, sexting, technology

    ABBREVIATIONSCIcondence intervalLAUSDLos Angeles Unied School DistrictLGBTQlesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning/unsureORodds ratioSTIssexually transmitted infectionsYRBSYouth Risk Behavior Survey

    www.pediatrics.org/cgi/doi/10.1542/peds.2012-0021

    doi:10.1542/peds.2012-0021

    Accepted for publication May 21, 2012

    Address correspondence to Eric Rice, PhD, School of Social Work,University of Southern California, 1149 South Hill St, Suite 360,Los Angeles, CA 90015. E-mail: [email protected]

    PEDIATRICS (ISSN Numbers: Print, 0031-4005; Online, 1098-4275).

    Copyright 2012 by the American Academy of Pediatrics

    FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE: The authors have indicated they haveno nancial relationships relevant to this article to disclose.

    FUNDING: Data collection was supported by the Centers forDisease Control and Prevention (award 5U87DP001201-04).

    PEDIATRICS Volume 130, Number 4, October 2012 667

    ARTICLE

    by guest on August 30, 2013pediatrics.aappublications.orgDownloaded from

    DOI: 10.1542/peds.2012-0021; originally published online September 17, 2012;Pediatrics

    Aaron Plant and Timothy KordicEric Rice, Harmony Rhoades, Hailey Winetrobe, Monica Sanchez, Jorge Montoya,

    AdolescentsSexually Explicit Cell Phone Messaging Associated With Sexual Risk Among

    http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/early/2012/09/12/peds.2012-0021

    located on the World Wide Web at: The online version of this article, along with updated information and services, is

    of Pediatrics. All rights reserved. Print ISSN: 0031-4005. Online ISSN: 1098-4275.Boulevard, Elk Grove Village, Illinois, 60007. Copyright 2012 by the American Academy published, and trademarked by the American Academy of Pediatrics, 141 Northwest Pointpublication, it has been published continuously since 1948. PEDIATRICS is owned, PEDIATRICS is the official journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. A monthly

    by guest on August 30, 2013pediatrics.aappublications.orgDownloaded from

  • Dyson et al. (2015). Evaluating the use of Facebook to increase student engagement and understanding in lecture-based classes. Higher Education, 69(2), 303-313.

    Students who never viewed class-related Facebook postings reported lower engagement and understanding of in-lecture discussion and concepts shared on Facebook.

    Rodrguez-Hoyos et al. (2015). Research on SNS and education: The state of the art and its challenges. Australasian Journal of Educational Technology, 31(1), 100-111.

    Examined 62 articles about SNS in education and found most focus on higher education, use quantitative methods, and examine SNS as educational tools.

    Want et al. (2015, March). Coming of Age (Digitally): An Ecological View of Social Media Use among College Students. Proceedings of the 18th ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work & Social Computing.

    Used computer and phone logging (cool!). Categorized checking behaviors. Continual checkers more likely to use Facebook; more likely to say that social media was a distraction. Found a negative relationship between checking social media sites and mood. Platform choice varied by class rank with first year students more likely to use Facebook.

  • Freshmen Sophomores Juniors Seniors

    Time Spent on FB

    Multitasking with FB

    Checking up on Friends

    on FB

    -- - -+

    Relationship to GPA

  • What can student affairs

    professionals do?

  • Use social media in meaningful ways that are tied to

    evidence

  • Used Twitter during Career Services Industry Road Trip

    Learning objectives: communicate skills and learn networking

    techniques

    Taught students how to maintain professional online presence

    Collected basic assessment data

  • Learn from your colleagues

  • #sachat

  • Engage with your students

  • Facebook groups with RA staff, front desk clerk staff, and residents

    Resident group used as a virtual lounge

    Bringing online conversations offline

  • Monitor social media references to financial aid at mizzou

    Respond to students who tweet about inferred needs: I hate being broke

    Answering direct questions about financial aid

  • COLLECT

  • A substantial decrease in staff hours to conduct the roommate matching/assignment process.

    A progressive increase in users each year, leading to dramatic increases in mutually requested roommates.

    More diverse (in terms of racial and ethnic background) roommate matches than the formerly used random matching process.

    Increased retention of students who utilized RoomSync.

    Higher satisfaction among students who utilized RoomSync.

    A considerable decrease (67 percent) in documented roommate conflicts.

  • Im done

    creative commons Flick photos by: danielfoster, francisco_osorio, opacity, thompsonrivers, ucirvine, & umdnews