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Engaging Learners in the Online Classroom Helen Bond, Ph.D. July 9, 2020

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Engaging Students in the Online Classroom1. Use the Teaching, Learning and Assessment (TLA)
process to create active and effective learning in their
online classroom;
system to achieve a higher level of interactivity;
3. Utilize both synchronous and asynchronous
modalities, strategies and tools to further engage
learners.
WHY USE ACTIVE LEARNING? • Reinforces important material, concepts, and skills.
• Provides more frequent and immediate feedback to students.
• Enables students the opportunity to think about, talk about, and
process course material.
increases their motivation to learn.
• Allows students to practice important skills, such as collaboration,
through pair and group work.
• Builds self-esteem through conversations with other students.
• Creates a sense of community in the classroom through increased
student-student and instructor-student interaction.
THE TEACHING LEARNING ASSESSMENT (TLA) PROCESS
What should my students know or be able to do or appreciate at the end of my lesson?
Step 1 Teach
What will I do and what will my students do so that they will learn the material I want them to learn?
Step 2 Learn
How will I know that my students have learned what I wanted them to learn?
Step 3 Assess
Engagement
know.
D I S C U S S I O N B O A R D / F O R U M S
T H E W O R K H O R S E O F O N L I N E L E A R N I N G
WHAT IS AN ONLINE (THREADED) DISCUSSION?
• Generally takes place in the Discussion Forum area of Blackboard in
an asynchronous format. This is different from synchronous (live and in
real time) discussions that can take place via Collaborate or Zoom.
• Instructors might post a reading, an audio file, a video, or questions
that they ask students to respond to.
• Students can also be asked to respond to other students known as a
threaded discussion.
these same conversations across different campuses, countries,
settings, and contexts thereby scaling up their impact.
DISCUSSION BOARD STRATEGIES Discussion Board Instrument How to
Discussion Board
interpersonal interaction and can replicate the
discussions that take place in the traditional classroom.
*Welcome new participants and encourage a round of
introductions
Additional Options
Discussion Board
With Student
Leaders, Moderators
first post or message
moderator or that they
must post first before
they can read other
students' messages.
Enable a student leader or a group of student leaders to
moderate or facilitate a particular Discussion Forum.
Assign a chapter, concept, or a case for students to read,
examine or study.
Discussion Board With
Guest Leader, Facilitator,
Discussion Board Forum. Request that an external user be
added to your Blackboard course as a co-instructor or observer
via ETS at 6-2020, if the person is not connected to the
University.
Do you have a colleague in another country who has
expertise in the topic you are teaching? Ask them to
moderate or join in on an asynchronous discussion in the
Discussion Forum area, or a synchronous (Zoom,
Collaborate) guest lecture.
Students Forum Use this forum space to allow students to ask and answer
each others’ questions. Allowing students the chance to
share their insight, their perspectives, and “teach” each
other may result in a deeper grasp of the material. In any
case, this space should feel open and welcoming for
students to express concerns and confusion and engage
with others who may have the same lack of clarity or those
who have the insight needed to help.
DISCUSSION BOARD STRATEGIES
Discussion Board Instrument How to
Advanced Forum Create a discussion forum to allow students to extend on the
ideas and concepts at a higher level. This group should have
discussions around the content that makes meaningful
connections to society, the world, their lives, or the profession.
The professor may be involved in this forum to help share articles,
insight, and professional experience that is meaningful to these
deep discussions. Great way to apply extra credit!
Collaborative Forum Collaboration is a 21st century skill. Students like collaborative
work as they love to share ideas and get feedback. While this
space may range in level of structure, the professor’s presence
could be valuable to help students move forward with their
projects and to maximize the “teachable moments”. While not all
students will take part in this forum, for those that like the
opportunity to brainstorm and talk through ideas together, this
will be a valuable space.
DISCUSSION BOARD STRATEGIES
Case Studies Discussion
Case studies work great in the Discussion Area!
They can be especially effective if they are paired with a reading
assignment or video that introduces or explains a concept that
applies to the case.
The amount of emphasis placed on the use of the reading during
the case discussion depends on the complexity of the concept.
Students can work in groups on the case and present their case
via a synchronous (live) presentation via Collaborate or Zoom.
ESTABLISHING “NETIQUETTE”
•Be honest and respectful.
• “Listen” and ask questions.
• It’s okay to disagree, but do so with curiosity, not
hostility.
•No inappropriate language
STUDENT PRESENTATIONS
H E L E N B O N D, P H . D.
STUDENT PRESENTATIONS STUDENT
video of themselves talking; attendees can view and hear and
ask questions.
stable, high-speed internet connections for this to be most
effective.
In addition, for all to attend, time zones where attendees and
presenter are located must be conducive to attendance.
Recorded
Presentations
zones, nature of presentation, length of presentation)
students or the instructor can record their presentation and
post it online for viewing.
You can provide guidelines for students just as you would for
“in-class” presentations, including length, requirements for
accompanying visuals, etc.
STUDENT PRESENTATIONS STUDENT
observe and conduct a peer-review of the
presentation.
Group Student
presentations. Students can be assigned to breakout
rooms. Presentations can be live or pre-recorded.
Rubric for
GO TO COURSE TOOLS, TO FIND THE RUBRIC BUILDER
WAYS TO ADD OR ASSOCIATE A RUBRIC IN BLACKBOARD
1. On your course’s Control Panel,
expand the Course Tools section
and select Rubrics.
click Create Rubric.
name is the title text that identifies
the rubric.
easier to associate it to relevant
assignments.
section).
with an original Blackboard
edit an existing assignment. ...
the drop-down list in the
Grading section..
assignment and click Submit.
HOW TO CREATE A RUBRIC IN BLACKBOARD
1. New rubrics default to three rows and three columns (scroll down to learn how to reuse or exchange rubrics with colleagues):
2. On your course’s Control Panel, expand the Course Tools section and select Rubrics.
3. On the Rubrics page, click Create Rubric.
4. Type a Name for the rubric. The name is the title text that identifies the rubric.
5. Enter a Description to make it easier to associate it to relevant assignments.
6. Edit the rubric grid (see next section).
7. Click Submit.
Blackboard Learn courses, you are able to
export and import rubrics. You should
not edit the rubric outside of Blackboard
Learn.
• To import a rubric, click Import Rubric
on the action bar and browse for the file.
• Click Submit to upload the file.
• OR-
Export on the action bar.
• You can download and import the file
into a different course or share it with
other instructors for use in their
Blackboard Learn courses.
•Step 1: Define Your Goal. ...
•Step 2: Choose a Rubric Type (Analytic or Holisitic)
•Step 3: Determine Your Criteria. ...
•Step 4: Create Your Performance Levels. ...
•Step 5: Write Descriptors for Each Level of Your
Rubric.
•Step 6: Revise your rubric and field test it
U S I N G T H E C H A T F O R M O R E T H A N J U S T C H A T T I N G
USING THE CHAT FOR ACTIVE LEARNING THE CHAT Instrument How to
The Chat
Collaborate, Zoom,
Discussion Forum
1. At a natural break in your lecture, pause and ask students to come up
with one question based on the lecture content up to that point.
2. Tell students that they will try to challenge their classmates, so they
must develop a challenging question.
3. Have students type their question in the Chat area.
4. Each student must select and answer one question. The answers can
be uploaded into an assignment in the Content, or answered directly
in the Chat, or another forum.
5. The questions can also be collected to be used as possible exam
questions or to check students’ comprehension.
The Chat
the warmup.
1. Begin you lecture or discussion forum by presenting a warmup or
review question to answer or a statement/quote for reflection.
2. Give students a minute or two to think about or write their responses
on the whiteboard, or the chat area, or in a discussion forum.
3. Debrief by asking students to share their thoughts or answers with the
class in the Chat
4. Reflect on students’ answers to gauge student progress and relate
their responses to the next part of your class.
OTHER TOOLS AND STRATEGIES Journals, Blogs, Instrument How to
Journals
• Science
Journal
The Journals tool offers students the opportunity to reflect on
course content and communicate privately with you. Course
journals are great places for students -- either individually or in
groups -- to draw concept maps. They have to pull apart articles
and then re-assemble them on one page
Blogs A blog is a kind of social media tool that allows one to share
ideas with authentic audiences and to engage those audiences in
conversation. Most blogs look something like journals, with a
series of “posts” appearing on the blog in reverse chronological
order (newest posts at the top, older posts below). Blogs can
address any number of topics, from travel to food to parenting
to politics, and they can be written by single authors or by
groups of writers.
Blogs Examples of
course blogs at
The Cinematic Essay, Jonathan Rattner (Cinema & Media
Studies)
Picture It: Literature, Photography, and Memory
Vandy Performs, Christin Essin (Theatre)
Neely’s News for Children’s Literature Enthusiasts, Ann Neely
(Teaching & Learning)
Breaking, Derek Bruff (Mathematics)
Curriculum and Instruction | School of Education
Howard University Online, Chair
Phone: 540. 539. 9953 | Email: [email protected]