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Engaging Faculty and Students in Talking about Teaching and Learning (Informed by Assessment Data) Karl A. Smith Civil Engineering - University of Minnesota [email protected] http://www.ce.umn.edu/~smith Designing and Implementing High Performance Learning Teams American Accounting Association August 2005

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Engaging Faculty and Students in Talking about Teaching and Learning (Informed by Assessment Data). Karl A. Smith Civil Engineering - University of Minnesota [email protected] http://www.ce.umn.edu/~smith Designing and Implementing High Performance Learning Teams American Accounting Association - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

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  • Engaging Faculty and Students in Talking about Teaching and Learning(Informed by Assessment Data) Karl A. SmithCivil Engineering - University of [email protected]://www.ce.umn.edu/~smith

    Designing and Implementing High Performance Learning Teams

    American Accounting AssociationAugust 2005

  • Assessment DataKnowledge Probe Classroom Assessment (minute paper)Mid-Term Review Student Management TeamSGID & Peer Review

  • Knowledge ProbeExample from MOT 8221What would you like to know about the students in your courses?

  • Participant Information

    MOT 8221, Spring 2005

    Name __________

    Work Experience (describe briefly): (use back if necessary)

    Previous Coursework/Experience in Project Management, Knowledge Management, Engineering Systems, Industrial Engineering/Operations Research (IE/OR), Management Science, and Quality Management (Six Sigma/TQM):

    For the following areas, please rank your level of understanding according to the following scale:

    1 = Little or no coursework/experience in this area.

    2 = (Between 1 & 3).

    3 = Moderate coursework/experience in this area

    4 = (Between 3 & 5).

    5 = A great deal of coursework/experience in this area.

    Project Management12345

    Knowledge Management12345

    PMI-PMBOK

    12345

    Engineering Systems12345

    IE/OR

    12345

    Modeling/Simulation12345

    Mgmt Science

    12345

    Six Sigma/ TQM

    12345

    Computing Experience:

    For each of the following, rate your proficiency and list any computer software:

    1 = Never have used it.

    2 = Know a little about it.

    3 = Have used it some.

    4 = Am very comfortable using it.

    Rating

    Specific Packages

    Spreadsheet

    1234

    Project Management

    1234

    Statistical

    1234

    Modeling/simulation

    1234

    Data base

    1234

    Programming language

    1234

    Expectations from the course (use back if necessary):

  • MOT 8221 Spring 2005

    PMQ1PMIQ2KMQ3LeadershipQ4EngSysQ5

    IE/ORQ6Mod/SimQ7CASQ8MgmtSciQ96 SigmaQ10

    Chart7

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    MOT8221 S 2005 PIF

    12345Avg

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    PMQ1059533.322

    PMIQ21360121.822

    KMQ31144302.022

    LeaderQ41210633.422

    EngSysQ5656412.522

    IE/ORQ61362011.622

    Mod/SimQ7772332.522

    CASQ81631111.522

    MgmtSciQ91093001.722

    6 SigmaQ107101312.122

    1234Avg

    1234

    SpreadQ1027133.522

    PMQ215973.022

    StatQ3613211.922

    Mod/SimQ478342.222

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    ProgQ6363102.922

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  • MOT 8221 Spring 2005

    SpreadQ1PMQ2StatQ3Mod/SimQ4DBQ5ProgQ6

    Chart8

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    MOT8221 S 2005 PIF

    12345Avg

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    PMQ1059533.322

    PMIQ21360121.822

    KMQ31144302.022

    LeaderQ41210633.422

    EngSysQ5656412.522

    IE/ORQ61362011.622

    Mod/SimQ7772332.522

    CASQ81631111.522

    MgmtSciQ91093001.722

    6 SigmaQ107101312.122

    1234Avg

    1234

    SpreadQ1027133.522

    PMQ215973.022

    StatQ3613211.922

    Mod/SimQ478342.222

    DBQ506973.022

    ProgQ6363102.922

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  • Participant Information Sheet

    MOT 8221, Spring 2004

    Name __________

    Work Experience (describe briefly): (use back if necessary)

    Previous Coursework/Experience in Project Management, Knowledge Management, Engineering Systems, Industrial Engineering/Operations Research (IE/OR), Management Science, and Quality Management (Six Sigma/TQM):

    For the following areas, please rank your level of understanding according to the following scale:

    1 = Little or no coursework/experience in this area.

    2 = (Between 1 & 3).

    3 = Moderate coursework/experience in this area

    4 = (Between 3 & 5).

    5 = A great deal of coursework/experience in this area.

    Project Management12345

    Knowledge Management12345

    PMI-PMBOK

    12345

    Engineering Systems12345

    IE/OR

    12345

    Modeling/Simulation12345

    Mgmt Science

    12345

    Six Sigma/ TQM

    12345

    Computing Experience:

    For each of the following, rate your proficiency and list any computer software:

    1 = Never have used it.

    2 = Know a little about it.

    3 = Have used it some.

    4 = Am very comfortable using it.

    Rating

    Specific Packages

    Spreadsheet

    1234

    Project Management

    1234

    Statistical

    1234

    Modeling/simulation

    1234

    Data base

    1234

    Programming language

    1234

    Expectations from the course (use back if necessary):

  • PMQ1KMQ2PMIQ3EngSysQ4IE/ORQ5Mod/SimQ6MgmtSciQ76 SigmaQ8

    Chart2

    2510100

    961020

    204120

    127341

    204210

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    129510

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    1

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    Sheet1

    MOT8221 S 2004 PIF

    12345Avg

    12345

    PMQ125101003.0

    KMQ29610202.2

    PMIQ32041201.4

    EngSysQ41273412.1

    IE/ORQ52042101.4

    Mod/SimQ61390411.9

    MgmtSciQ71295101.8

    6 SigmaQ81363412.0

    1234Avg

    1234

    SpreadQ1024213.7

    PMIQ2271162.8

    StatQ3611732.3

    Mod/SimQ4913232.0

    DBQ557782.7

    ProgQ6451082.8

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  • SpreadsheetQ1PMQ2StatQ3Mod/SimQ4DBQ5ProgQ6

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    MOT8221 S 2004 PIF

    12345Avg

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    PMQ125101003.0

    KMQ29610202.2

    PMIQ32041201.4

    EngSysQ41273412.1

    IE/ORQ52042101.4

    Mod/SimQ61390411.9

    MgmtSciQ71295101.8

    6 SigmaQ81363412.0

    1234Avg

    1234

    SpreadQ1024213.7

    PMIQ2271162.8

    StatQ3611732.3

    Mod/SimQ4913232.0

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  • Knowledge ProbeWhat would you like to know about the students in your courses?

  • Assessment DataKnowledge Probe Classroom Assessment (minute paper)Mid-Term Review Student Management TeamPeer Review

  • Minute PaperWhat was the most useful or meaningful thing you learned during this session?What question(s) remain uppermost in your mind as we end this session?What was the muddiest point in this session?Give an example or applicationExplain in your own words . . .

    Angelo, T.A. & Cross, K.P. 1993. Classroom assessment techniques: A handbook for college teachers. San Francisco: Jossey Bass.

  • Session Summary(Minute Paper)

    Reflect on the session:

    1. Most interesting, valuable, useful thing you learned.2. Question/Topic/Issue you would like to have addressed.3. Comments, suggestions, etc

    Pace: Too slow 1 . . . . 5 Too fastRelevance: Little 1 . . . 5 LotsFormat: Ugh 1 . . . 5 Ah

  • Q4 Pace: Too slow 1 . . . . 5 Too fastQ5 Relevance: Little 1 . . . 5 LotsQ6 Format: Ugh 1 . . . 5 AhMOT 8221 - Spring 2004 - Session 1

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    MOT8221 S 2004 Session 1 Reflection

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  • Session 1 CommentsMost interesting fast paced tower build exercise (cited by 10 or more); Engineering approach exerciseTeam efforts, Love the team building; plus/delta goodInquiry exercise good at reinforcing the group dynamics; Practical application of constructive controversy; controversy exercise, also new teamsPM is more than softwareUseful information that can be brought back to me company to useNot addressed scope creep; recipe for PM; little more on external factors; internal vs. external PM; formal PM life cycleQuestions Is project management a science or an art? How most companies do PM?Suggestion A little less reading, pleaseFormat nice balance of theory, background and some practice; class very interactive and interesting; wild first class, ugh, firehose! Great first class

  • Q4 Pace: Too slow 1 . . . . 5 Too fastQ5 Relevance: Little 1 . . . 5 LotsMOT 8221 - Spring 2004 - Session 2

    Chart1

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    MOT8221 S 2004 Session 2 Reflection

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  • Q4 Pace: Too slow 1 . . . . 5 Too fastQ5 Relevance: Little 1 . . . 5 LotsQ6 Format: Ugh 1 . . . 5 AhMOT 8221 - Spring 2005 - Session 1

    Chart1

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    MOT8221 S 2005 Session 1 Reflection

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    RelevanceQ51051743.927

    FormatQ600311134.427

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  • Q4 Pace: Too slow 1 . . . . 5 Too fastQ5 Relevance: Little 1 . . . 5 LotsQ6 Format: Ugh 1 . . . 5 AhMn/DOT Essential Skills for Project Managers May 2, 2005

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  • Assessment DataKnowledge Probe Classroom Assessment (minute paper)Mid-Term Review Student Management TeamPeer Review

  • http://eval.umn.eduMid-Term Review

  • MOT 8221 Mid-Semester Review

    Sheet1

    MOT8221 S 2005 Mid Semester Review

    Workload

    Q12%

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    L14

    AS1872

    M312

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    25

    12345Avg

    UMFGVGE

    ExpectQ10011594.3

    SpeakQ50016184.7

    InterestQ600211124.4

    AvailabilityQ700111134.5

    FeedbackQ100069104.2

    EvalQ110041284.2

    Q1 Your understanding of what is expected of you in this course

    Q5 The instructor's ability to speak clearly and audibly

    Q6 The instructor's success in getting you interested or involved

    Q7 The instructor's availability to answer questions or provide help

    Q10 Helpfulness of feedback on assignments or class work

    Q11 Degree to which evaluation procedures (e.g., exams, quizzes) measure your knowledge and understanding

    Sheet1

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  • Assessment DataKnowledge Probe Classroom Assessment (minute paper)Mid-Term Review Student Management TeamPeer Review

  • Student Management TeamA student management team will be used in this course to operationalize Total Quality Management principles. The attributes of student management teams are described below, and the operation of the team is based on shared responsibility:Students, in conjunction with their instructor, are responsible for the success of any course. As student managers, your special responsibility is to monitor this course through your own experience, to receive comments from other students, to work as a team with your instructor on a regular basis, and to make recommendations to the instructor about how this course can be improved. (Nuhfer, 1990-1995).

  • Attributes of Student Management Teams3 - 4 students plus teaching team.Students have a managerial role and assume responsibility for the success of the class.Students meet weekly; professor attends every other week. Meetings generally last about one hour.Meet away from classroom and professor's office.Maintain log or journal of suggestions, actions and progress.May focus on the professor or on the content.Utilize group dynamics approach of TQM.

  • Chapter 8: Student Management Teams: The Heretics Path to Teaching Success by Edward B. Nuhfer

    Wm. Campbell & Karl Smith. New Paradigms for College Teaching. Interaction Books, 1997.

  • Students as Co-DesignersGraduate TAs participating as members of the teaching teamUndergraduate TAs (near peers) as members of the teaching team

  • Approaches to Cooperative Learning in CE 4101W & 4102WInformal Book EndsFormal Task Groups projects in class and outsideCooperative Base Groups (Cohort Groups)Student Management Team

  • Active Learning: Cooperation in the College Classroom

    Informal Cooperative Learning GroupsFormal Cooperative Learning GroupsCooperative Base Groups

  • Book Ends on a Class Session

  • Cooperative Learning Task GroupsPerkins, David. 2003. King Arthur's RoundTable: How collaborative conversations createsmart organizations. NY: Wiley.

  • WebCT Peer Review & FeedbackStudents work in Base GroupsWebCT provides private message areas for each groupOpportunity to use the Model-Practice Feedback LoopFeedback to whole group rather than individualsMore informationMore models and feedback to help students

  • WebCT Discussion Area

  • Feedback Posting Sample

  • Detailed Feedback to the Group

  • Model-Practice-Feedback LoopCooper and Robinson [18] surveyed the literature in higher education and found that ...the model-practice-feedback loop is among the most powerful instructional strategies available to teachers at all levels. teacher modelingstudent practice with multiple opportunitiesdescriptive feedback on the quality of their performance

  • Successes & ChallengesIncorporating formal cooperative groups with the peer review process offered the students: access to more examples of writing access to comments on both their own papers and those of their group members

    Students need more explicit connections between the writing for class and the writing they will be doing in the workplace.Summer 2004 we incorporated an interview assignment to help students make this connection

  • Assessment DataKnowledge Probe Classroom Assessment (minute paper)Mid-Term Review Student Management TeamSGID & Peer Review

  • The biggest and most long-lasting reforms of undergraduate education will come when individual faculty or small groups of instructors adopt the view of themselves as reformers within their immediate sphere of influence, the classes they teach every day.

    K. Patricia Cross

  • It could well be that faculty members of the twenty-first century college or university will find it necessary to set aside their roles as teachers and instead become designers of learning experiences, processes, and environments. James Duderstadt, 1999

    8:30-9:30?Take copies of Active Lrn, HTMI, New Paradigms, Barr & Tagg's From teaching to learing is the most often requested article from Change mangazine

    Bill Camplbell and I started working on New Paradigms in 1993.