effects of online college student’s internet self-efficacy on learning motivation and performance

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  • This article was downloaded by: [BYU Brigham Young University]On: 21 August 2014, At: 21:09Publisher: RoutledgeInforma Ltd Registered in England and Wales Registered Number: 1072954 Registeredoffice: Mortimer House, 37-41 Mortimer Street, London W1T 3JH, UK

    Innovations in Education and TeachingInternationalPublication details, including instructions for authors andsubscription information:http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/riie20

    Effects of online college studentsInternet self-efficacy on learningmotivation and performanceChiung-Sui Changa, Eric Zhi-Feng Liub, Hung-Yen Sungc, Chun-HungLinb, Nian-Shing Chend & Shan-Shan Chengea Department of Educational Technology, Tamkang University,Taipei, Taiwan.b Graduate Institute of Learning and Instruction and Center ofTeacher Education, National Central University, Jhongli, Taiwan.c Center for General Education and Core Curriculum, TamkangUniversity, Taipei, Taiwan.d Department of Information Management, National Sun Yat-senUniversity, Kaohsiung, Taiwan.e Department of Information Management, Ming Hsin University ofScience and Technology, Hsinchu, Taiwan.Published online: 15 Mar 2013.

    To cite this article: Chiung-Sui Chang, Eric Zhi-Feng Liu, Hung-Yen Sung, Chun-Hung Lin, Nian-Shing Chen & Shan-Shan Cheng (2014) Effects of online college students Internet self-efficacy onlearning motivation and performance, Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 51:4,366-377, DOI: 10.1080/14703297.2013.771429

    To link to this article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2013.771429

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    http://www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-and-conditionshttp://www.tandfonline.com/page/terms-and-conditions

  • Effects of online college students Internet self-efficacy on learningmotivation and performance

    Chiung-Sui Changa, Eric Zhi-Feng Liub, Hung-Yen Sungc, Chun-Hung Linb

    Nian-Shing Chend* and Shan-Shan Chenge

    aDepartment of Educational Technology, Tamkang University, Taipei, Taiwan; bGraduateInstitute of Learning and Instruction and Center of Teacher Education, National CentralUniversity, Jhongli, Taiwan; cCenter for General Education and Core Curriculum, TamkangUniversity, Taipei, Taiwan; dDepartment of Information Management, National Sun Yat-senUniversity, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; eDepartment of Information Management, Ming HsinUniversity of Science and Technology, Hsinchu, Taiwan

    This study investigates how Internet self-efficacy helps students to transformmotivation into learning action, and its influence on learning performance. Inthis study, the effects of Internet self-efficacy on motivation and the learningperformance of online college students were examined using social cognitivetheory. The subjects of this study were 87 college students participating in anonline course. We applied quantitative analysis to elucidate the relationshipbetween student-perceived Internet self-efficacy and learning performance. Theeffects of Internet self-efficacy on student motivation and learning performancewere evaluated through the analysis of variance. Students with high Internetself-efficacy outperformed those with low Internet self-efficacy on the finalexam and were more confident in their ability to complete an online course. Sig-nificant gender differences were noted, in which males had a higher degree ofInternet self-efficacy and confidence than females; whereas, females had higherscores of online discussion participation and the final exam than males. Regard-ing the learning motivation, the influence of Internet self-efficacy of males onthe dimensions of relevance and confidence in the attention, relevance,confidence, satisfaction motivation model were stronger than females. Therefore,educators are encouraged to identify the psychological characteristics of onlinelearners to provide suitable support for their learning.

    Keywords: ARCS model; college students; Internet self-efficacy; onlinelearning

    Introduction

    Most college students are proficient in the use of computers and skilled at navigat-ing the Internet. The new generation of students typically uses online learning as amethod of acquiring knowledge. Learning performance is influenced by factors suchas the perception of students regarding their ability to perform particular tasks orachieve certain goals, their motivation to explore, and their desire for knowledge(Bandura, 1997). Educators would benefit from understanding the internal psycho-logical status of online learners to better facilitate learning. Sankaran and Tung(2001) found that learning motivation influences learning and Keller (1987)

    *Corresponding author. Email: nschen@mis.nsysu.edu.tw

    Innovations in Education and Teaching International, 2014Vol. 51, No. 4, 366377, http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14703297.2013.771429

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  • proposed the attention, relevance, confidence, satisfaction (ARCS) model, focusingon enhancing the motivation of learners. The ARCS model includes four elements:attention, relevance, confidence and satisfaction. Liu, Lin, and Chang (2010) foundthat ARCS models are beneficial to the improvement of learner motivation. Insocial cognitive theory, Bandura (1986) proposed the idea of self-efficacy, indicatingthat ones self-efficacy influences his/her performance. Song and Keller (1999)investigated the relationship between self-efficacy and motivation, and found thatself-efficacy also influences the motivation of learners. The Internet has been widelyapplied as a learning tool, fully integrated within a wider learning context. Underthese circumstances, the concept of Internet self-efficacy was proposed and it hasbeen found that high Internet self-efficacy has a positive influence on ones expecta-tion concerning learning performance in online contexts (Compeau & Higgins,1995). This study investigates the influence of Internet self-efficacy on the motiva-tion of students with regard to the ARCS model, by investigating the learning per-formance of college students in an online asynchronous course. The aim of thisstudy was to determine how Internet self-efficacy helps students to transformmotivation into learning action and its effect on learning performance.

    Literature review

    Internet self-efficacy and motivation

    Bandura (1997) demonstrated that self-efficacy is typically demonstrated in learningdomains. Self-efficacy influences learning performance, the judgement of onesability to complete tasks successfully, and how one reacts within a learning environ-ment. Additionally, self-efficacy is a belief in ones ability to complete a task and/orlearning goal; that is, learner motivation is driven by self-efficacy through cogni-tion, affection and selection. A belief in ones ability to complete a task pushes alearner to assume the actions required to attain goals (Gist & Mitchell, 1992;Stajkovic & Luthans, 1998; Woolfolk, 2001). In other words, self-efficacy willinfluence the choice of whether engage in tasks, the effort expended in performingit and the persistence shown in accomplishing it (Bandura, 1997; Bouffard-Bouchard, 1990).

    Learning motivation is based on the beliefs in ones capabilities and the evalua-tions of the learning environment. The evaluation of ability and learning environ-ment helps students to select a learning task and learning environment that are bestsuited to their abilities (Wood & Bandura, 1989). Students seeking to learn onlinerequire skills in information technology and computer self-efficacy (Compeau &Higgins, 1995). Barbeite and Weiss (2004) demonstrated that computer self-efficacycan be used to predict student computer use and whether they will learn well incomputer-based courses. Potosky (2002) indicated that a high degree of self-efficacytransforms into increased motivation to learn. When students are interested in usingcomputers, their computer self-efficacy can be enhanced by training courses.

    Previous studies have investigated the motivation of students in traditional learn-ing and online learning contexts (Arti

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