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Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 1 Comments (links) at … http://www.people.vcu.edu/~rsleeth/OBTC2010_Randy_Sle eth_Photo_Comments.html Photography Tips and Techniques … will add more pics to the resentation!!!

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  • Slide 1
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 1 Comments (links) at http://www.people.vcu.edu/~rsleeth/OBTC2010_Randy_Sleeth _Photo_Comments.html Photography Tips and Techniques will add more pics to the resentation!!!
  • Slide 3
  • 2 Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] Brief Outline of Session Introduction 5 minutes Comments and Examples 15 minutes Hands-On Practice 40 minutes Discussion & Critique 30 minutes
  • Slide 4
  • 3 Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] Overview Photographs can integrate meanings in behavior and portray displays of human potential Digital pictures can demonstrate applications to learning Application of Principles will improve the results Participants may try applying (with available cameras) some photography principles
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  • 4 Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] If A picture is worth 1000 words then 1000 words is worth a picture.
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  • 5 Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] Now, for an extremely fast overview of guidelines: my point is not to teach the tips but to show that they exist and there are many of them Then, some examples
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 6 1. View images immediately 2. Erase unwanted images 3. Go home with wanted images 4. Suffer no delays waiting to analyze a shot 5. Experiment without wasting film. The best thing about digital is the instant feedback
  • Slide 8
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 7 1.Primary Rule of compositional theory 2.Split images into thirds both horizontally and vertically 3.Note resulting four axis points (next slide) 4.Consider the eight potential compositions 5.Place subject in or around an axis point 6.Find composition with best harmony. The rule of thirds
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 8 The rule of thirds 1 2 43 Four axis points
  • Slide 10
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 9 Think Boy Scout: Be Prepared (1) 1.Stay prepared: Take unexpected photos Always have a camera Notice unexpected photo opportunities Take advantage of limited opportunities Create angles and frames Remain poised for a shot 2.Use simple motions for expressions and movement 3.Catch comfortable subjects at what they do well.
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 10 Think Boy Scout: Be Prepared (2) 1.Subjects will come to you Stay ready for unexpected opportunities Think and act creatively Prepare angles and framing 2.Keep open to possibilities 3.Great portraits do not require great smilesor even faces.
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 11 1.Perspective is everything 2.Walk around subjects to change perspective and find best viewing angle 3.Seek happy surprises: just move around 4.Focus on hands 5.Ask people to close their eyes 6.Use props to gain comfort 7.Relax with humor. Perspective: Add interest with your viewpoint
  • Slide 13
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 12 1. Apply metaphorically Seek subjects giving birth to something Seek subjects acting parentally. A mother comes to life with her child
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 13 Attend to surroundings 1.Two pictures are better than one Create sense of place with an establishing shot Begin with head-to-toe picture Then go in for the close-up Never pass up a close-up 2.Attend to the scene perimeter 3.Seek symbols and details to reflect the focus of the scene or event 4.Look for something different (angles & frames).
  • Slide 15
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 14 1.Build upon existing familiarities 2.Seek calm and cooperation 3.Talk Gain full attention Announce intention to take pictures Start snapping 4.Avoid pressure; just take the pictures 5.Its not life or death. Get friendly
  • Slide 16
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 15 1.Make wanted images happen 2.Use groups to create photogenic comfort 3.Move people very close together To break down defenses To gain comfort To add richness to composition 4.Remember: group shots make great shots. Group people for cooperation & relaxation
  • Slide 17
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 16 1.Learn that your feelings exceed your thoughts 2.Organize intellectually; respond emotionally 3.See for yourself, not as others see 4.Emphasize content over form 5.Keep the message more important than the composition. Emphasize Emotion Over Vision
  • Slide 18
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 17 Say something with your photographs 1.Photographs become artists language 2.Photographs speak with dreams and metaphors 3.Photographs offer emotion, intellect, and imagination (seen through form and content) 4.Educated viewers, accept, understand, relate to, and sometimes purchase your images.
  • Slide 19
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 18 1.Photographic images deal reality: Assumed Constructed Well seen 2.Images have a point to the extent they communicate with viewers 3.Successful images always use photographers eyes to share emotion or intellect with viewers. Maintain visible rapport with viewers
  • Slide 20
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 19 1.We work on a relatively level playing field 2.We separate ourselves with unique vision 3.Quality images require Consistency Thought Understanding Open mind 4.Zen of photography: Open mind sees all Camera snaps at infinite. Present a unique vision, consistently
  • Slide 21
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 20 1.Force a different view for deeper understanding of subject and subtleties 2.Work in series to demonstrate interest and deliberation 3.Find the unusual in ordinary or familiar objects 4.Challenge viewers with abstracting 5.Move close in to make ordinary objects seem wonderfully unusual. Challenge the obvious
  • Slide 22
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 21 1.Complex images not always intellectual 2.Art often sees less as more 3.Simplicity communicates vision effectively 4.The eyes have it 5.Both foreground and background contribute 6.Simple backgrounds help 7.Cropping can cut out distractions. Keep it simple
  • Slide 23
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 22 1.Let photography influence growth and style 2.Let style emerge from ideas and interests 3.Show positive mood and passion in subjects 4.Explore to find connections and styles 5.Find unusual in the ordinary 6.Find ordinary in the unusual. Be yourself & have Fun with your own style
  • Slide 24
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 23 1.Follow your interests: This is what I like This is what I want to be doing 2.Form a thick skin: You will not know you are right You will know what you like. Gain confidence in your own taste
  • Slide 25
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 24 1.Let your camera do the math 2.Seek interesting details Move around laterally and vertically Look through viewfinder Find angles and perspectives that work Take plenty of pictures Watch for little things 3.Find angles that add drama 4.Use contrasts to emphasize subjects 5.Know that what draws your attention may never happen the same way again. Take lots of pictures
  • Slide 26
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 25 1.Note: Actions and reactions occur quickly Shoot quickly and often Electrons are cheap One great shot justifies 100 other tries 2.Prefocus: Avoid Hole in the Middle Get in tight to capture emotions Depict relations in tight close-ups Use power of extreme close shots Keep subjects equidistant from camera Focus on eyes 3.Move around to view all scene elements. Take LOTS of Pictures
  • Slide 27
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 26 1.We care about seductive frame-filling faces 2.Let viewers experience affection and attraction 3.Tell subjects to think about what they romance Speak to bring out expressions Show warmth and playfulness; get same back Know smallest expression changes make and break images 4.Shoot a lot Electrons are still cheap Perfect moments are still rare. Close is Intimate
  • Slide 28
  • 27 Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] Dial in the Diagonals to Increase Appeal 1.We all like pictures with diagonals and S curves (think of the Nike swoosh) 2.Forego straight head and shoulders shots 3.Look for triangles 4.Position subjects comfortably looking sideways arms around legs head toward camera.
  • Slide 29
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 28 1.Position subjects close: shoulder-to- shoulder 2.Fill frames with faces 3.Organize groups members into rows 4.Place important people in important places 5.Position camera chest-high to avoid unflattering perspective distortion Low camera emphasizes torsos and necks High camera enlarges heads over bodies. Pose & Compose
  • Slide 30
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 29 1.Get to most critical places for action 2.Know what will define setting (ends of races are rarely interesting) 3.Make your images different 4.Pre-focus to prepare for action 5.Search and employ the best vantage points. Know your setting
  • Slide 31
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 30 1.Avoid shooting into highly reflective surfaces (mirrors, windows, polished wood paneling) Avoid flash bounceback by positioning at a slight angle 2.Avoid eyeglasses glare (flash reflecting off surface of glasses) Ask for removal of eyeglasses Raise lights Ask glasses wearers to tilt downward slightly. Plan and set up
  • Slide 32
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 43 3. Sequences and stages Capture continuous processes with movies Capture stages with pictures Examples: US Navy knot tying Making an ice cream sundae" Filling a classroom Coalescing into groups Highlighted tips
  • Slide 45
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 44 Tie a Bowline Knot Animated Looks cool; sometines difficult to follow
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 45 Tie a Bowline Knot Stages Focus where you want 1.Pass the end through a loop on the standing part 2.Round the standing part 3.Back through the loop.
  • Slide 47
  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 46 Pictures in Sequence (watch here)
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 47
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 48
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 49
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 50
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 51 loop
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 52
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 53 Pictures in Sequence Forming Teams
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 54 Pictures in Sequence Forming Teams
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 55 Pictures in Sequence Forming Teams
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 56 Pictures in Sequence Preparing Class Exercise
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 57 Squares Exercise Reactions: Done and not involved
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 58 Actively involved Squares Exercise
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 59 Watching & Analyzing (Observers behaving differently) Squares Exercise
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 60 Squares completed Squares Exercise
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 61 Pictures in Sequence Who are those other guys?
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 62 Pictures in Sequence
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 63 Pictures in Sequence
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  • 64 Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] Highlighted tips 4.Reactions vs. actions Speakers have audiences Leaders have followers Example: Students displaying different levels of involvement
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 65 Actions, reactions, and Timing
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 66 Anticipated Reactions
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 67 Dr. Randys 20-Item Guide to People Pix
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth [email protected] 68 (end.)
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  • Dr. Randy Sleeth rsleet[email protected] 69 (end.)