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ARJIMAND TALIB

Would Budget 2010-11 address the Basics ?P17

IN FOCUS Dipankar Sengupta: The Dilemma of Rather How to Pay for the Predecessors Party!P15

ANMOL SHARMA

Evil Deeds of Kot Bhalwal JailP46

EpilogueJ & K S M O N T H LY M A G A Z I N E ISSN : 0974-5653

N E W S ,

C U R R E N T

A F F A I R S ,

S O C I A L

S C I E N C E S

Jammu, March 1 ,2010 / Vol 4 / Issue 3 | Price Rs. 30 | Postal Regd. No. JK-350/2009 | www.epilogue.in

BUDGETKEY FEATURES OF PAST 10-YEAR'S BUDGETSSubsidies Fiscal Surplus Budget Surplus Capital Receipts Plan Expenditure Revenue Deficit Revenue Expenditure Aggregate Receipts Revenue Receipts The Money Movement Balance from Current Revenues Central Plan Amortization Budget Deficit Plan Expenditure Primary Deficit Primary Surplus Non-Plan Expenditure Capital Expenditure Revenue Surplus Aggregate Disbursements Miscellaneous Capital Receipts

Public Agenda For JAMMU & KASHMIR

2010-11

THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT J&K BUDGETS

nsible jo seh year of 4t

39th f o issue e sens

I have found Epilogue interesting. May be you need to broaden your convas to look at what has been happening in PaK and the Northern Areas and the solutions on offer or desired. Also the surrounding scene - Tibet, Xinjiang, Afghanistan - the last being closely linked to developments in J&K. And, of course, Pakistan. BG VERGHESE

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P7

Baba Ghulam185131Badshah University Shah RAJOURI Attention Admission SeekersS.No1. a. b. a. b.

ProgrammeMBA - Management Studies MBA - Financial Management MCA - Computer Sciences M.Sc - Information Technology M.Sc Biotechnology & Bioresources

Admission ProcedureThrough MAT Exam of February and May 2, 2010 followed by Group Discussion and Personal Interview. Centres for MAT Test : Rajouri, Jammu and Srinagar Entrance Test : July 4, 2010 Eligibility : Graduation in any discipline with at least 50% marks (45% for SC/ST) Entrance Test : July 4, 2010 Eligibility : B.Sc. in Biology / Agriculture / Forestry / Pharmacology / Biotechnology with at least 60% marks (50% for SC/ST) Admission on the basis of merit in B.A./B.Sc.

2.

3.

4.

a. b.

M.Sc - Applied Mathematics M.A. - Arabic B.Tech Computer Sciences & Engineering Electronics & Communications Information Technology & Telecommunication Civil Engineering Diploma Courses Civil Engineering Electronics & Communications Electrical & Renewable Energy Engineering

5. a. b. c. d. 6. a. b. c.

Entrance Test :

June 13, 2010

Eligibility : 10+2 with atleast 50% marks (45% for SC/ST) and Physics and Mathematics as compulsory subjects.

Entrance Test :

June 13, 2010

Eligibility : 10th with atleast 50% marks (45% for SC/ST)

d.7. a. b.

Mechanical EngineeringBachelors in Computer Applications - BCA Bachelors in Business Administration - BBAEntrance Test : June 13, 2010

Eligibility : 10+2 with atleast 50% marks (45% for SC/ST) with any subject combination

Application forms alongwith Information Bulletin : Available on payment of Rs. 600/- by Demand Draft, drawn in favour of Registrar, BGSB University payable at BGSB University Campus Rajouri, from the following offices : 1. Office of Assistant Registrar (Admission), University Campus, Rajouri - 185131 (J&K), 09419171665; 2. Camp Office, Opposite Channi Himmat, Bye Pass Road, Jammu - 180015, 0191-2466892 / 2464402; 3. Regional Office, H.No. 201, Sector - B, Bagh-i-Hyder, Hyderpora Bye-Pass, Srinagar, 9419011449 and 4. Can also be downloaded from University website : www.bgsbuniversity.org MAT forms will be available from the above mentioned offices somewhere in the month of March. For More Details Contact : Dean Academic Affairs, 09419103563 and Assistant Registrar (Admission), 09419171665.

No. BGSBU/Acad/10/22

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Epiloguebecause there is more to knowwww.epilogue.in

CONTENTContributors to this Issue Prologue Letters Current Affairs Kashmir Policy Create Discussion, not ConfusionsRam Chander Sharma

Editor Zafar Iqbal Choudhary Publisher Yogesh Pandoh Consulting Editor D. Suba Chandran Associate Editors Irm Amin Baig Tsewang Rigzin General Manager Kartavya Pandoh Art Editor Keshav Sharma Research Officer Raman Sharma Phones & email Office : +91 191 2493136 Editorial: +91 94191 80762 Administration: +91 94191 82518 subscriptions : +91 90188 87136 [email protected] [email protected] Printed and Published by Yogesh Pandoh for Epilogue NewsCraft from Ibadat House, Madrasa Lane, Near Graveyard, Bathindi Top, Jammu, J&K - 180012 and Printed at : DEE DEE Reprographix, 3 Aikta Ashram, New Rehari Jammu (J&K) Disputes, if any, subject to jurisdiction of courts and competitive tribunals in Jammu only. RNI : JKENG/2007/26070 ISN : 00974-5653 Price : Rs 30www.epilogue.in

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Volume 4, Issue 3, March 2010

Books Women in Kashmir The Glorious Roles they PlayedNyla Ali Khan

30

I N FOCUSBudget 201015 17 18 19 20 20 21 21 22 23 24 24 25 26 26 27 28 29 29 The Dilemma of Rather How to Pay for the Predecessors Party!Dipankar Sengupta

Exclusive Series By George : The Cunningham ContributionRakesh Ankit

33

Would Budget 2010-11 address the basics?Arjimand Hussain Talib

Ladakh Affairs Media: Ladakhs Best Friend, AIR Leh needs urgent upgradeTsewang Rigzin

36

Give women their dueManisha Sobhrajani

Political and Religious Organisations Join Hands for UTTsewang Rigzin

37 37 38 38

Put Rural Ladakh on AgendaT. Namgail

Think of saving precious glaciersPadma Sethi

Prioritise Quality EducationTashi Angchuk

Focus on EducationThukjay Tashi

Gyalwang Drukpa Rinpochey visits Leh Son of Ladakhi Soil, Stobdon is Indian Envoy to Kyrgyzstan Education Students Launch Movement ask fourth idiot to come backRinchen Dolma

Make Separate Power BudgetSyed Basharat Bukhari

Senior Citizens : Think of this 9% of total populationVikram Gour

Governance Council reviews plan progressEpilogue Report

40 41 42

Make Agriculture Engineer of GrowthAshwani Sharma

Make Tax Collection TransparentArjimand Hussain Talib

Academy Urged to Preserve Ladakhi Culture, Heritage Profile Nawang Rigzin Jora : The Unconventional PoliticanT. Norfail

Bridge Rural-Urban DivideChoudhary Zulfikar Ali

Do the Regional Balancing ActBalwant Singh Mankotia

Give Air Connectivity to Unreachable AreasTsetan Namgyal

Gender Not a fledging anymore : Womens movement in LadakhTashi Morup

43

Do Need-Based MappingSajjad Kichloo

Revisit Your Previous Promises Before Making NewHakeem Mohammad Yaseen

Rs 500 Crore for Illuminating Ladakh 45 11998 Youths Jobless in Ladakh 45 Column Evil Deeds of Kot Bhalwal Jail 46Anmol Sharma

Put Brakes on Price EscalationPeerzada Mansoor

Brain Drawn Indifference pushing youths away from their homesVikram Gour

47

Invest Creative IdeasAbdul Majid Wani

No Fresh Taxes, PleaseM R Qureshi

Opinion Paying Price for Justice Assassination of Shahid AzmiM Shamsur Rabb Khan

49

Vol. 4, Issue 3

Epilogue, March 2010

INTERNATION

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CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE

Ali, Choudhary Zulfikar; (In Focus p24) is a Member of Legislative Assembly representing Darhal constituency in Rajouri district of Jammu province. He belongs to Peoples Democratic Party. Angchuk, Tashi; (In Focus p20) is a businessman bases in Kargil district Ankit, Rakesh; (Forgotten History p33) is a young historian from Bihar. As a Rhodes Scholar recently he studied various missing links in the making of Kashmir conflict. Based on his first hand study, he is contributing exclusive series to Epilogue Bukhari, Basharat; (In Focus p21) is Member of Legislative Assembly representing Sangrama constituency in Baramulla district of Kashmir province. He belongs to the Peoples Democratic Party. Dolma, Rinchen; (Ladakh Affairs p38) is a journalist and researcher based in Leh Gour, Vikram; (In Focus p22) is an Engineer and activist. He specializes in energy matters and works for welfare of senior citizens in Jammu and Kashmir. Khan, M Samur Rabb; (Opinion p49) is Editor with Indian Institute of Dalit Affairs Khan, Nyla Ali; (Books p30) is a Kashmir writer and scholar and author of (most recently) Islam, Women and Violence in Kashmir: Between India and Pakistan. She is a professor of English at a US University

Kichloo, Sajjad Ahmed; (In Focus p26) is Member of Legislative Assembly representing Kishtwar constituency in Kishtwar district of Jammu province. He belongs to National Conference. Kumar, Ashok; (In Focus p28) is Member of Legislative Assembly representing Ramban constituency in Ramban district of Jammu region. He belongs to Congress Mankotia, Balwant Singh; (In Focus p25) is Member of Legislative Assembly representing Udhampur constituency in Udhamour district of Jammu province. He belongs to J&K National Panthers Party. Mansoor, Peerzada; (In Focus p28) is Member of Legislative Assembly representing Shangus constituency in Anantnag district of Kashmir province. He belongs to Peoples Democratic Party. Morup, Tashi; (Ladakh Affairs p43) is a journalist and researcher based in Leh Namgyal, T; (In Focus p19) is a journalist based in Leh Namgyal, Tsetan; (In Focus p26) is Member of Legislative Assembly representing Nubra constituency in Leh district of Ladakh region. He is an Independent Legislator Qureshi, MR; (In Focus p29) is Member of Legislative Council representing Poonch district of Jammu region. He belongs to National Conference

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Epilogue, March 2010

CONTRIBUTORS TO THIS ISSUE

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Rigzin, Tsewang; (Ladakh Affairs p36) is an eminent journalist and researcher. He is Associate Editor of Epilogue based in Leh, Ladakh Sengupta, Dipankar; (In Focus p15) is a Professor of Economy at the University of Jammu Sethi, Padma; (In Focus p20) is a development activist and Director of an NGO Rural Development and You Sharma, Anmol; (Columns p46) is a lawyer based at Jammu. He has been regular writer with Epilogue since 2008 Sharma, Ashwani; (In Focus p23) is Member of Legislative Assembly representing Bishnah constituency in Jammu district of Jammu province. He is an Independent Legislator. Sharma, Baldev Raj; (In Focus p24) is Member of Legislative Assembly representing Reasi constituency in Reasi district of Jammu province. Belongs to Bhartiya Janta Party. Sharma, Ram Chander; (Current Affairs p8) is a veterinary doctor based in district Rajouri. He is also an activist working for the welfare of refugees.

Sobhrajani, Manisha; (In Focus p18) is a Delhi based independent researcher working at various aspects of Kashmir conflict. She divided her time between Delhi and Jammu and Kashmir Talib, Arjimand Hussain; (In Focus p17) is an international development consultant and a widely read columnist based in Kashmir. His book 'Omar Abdullah: The Burdens of Inheritance' is due for release in the coming months Tashi, Thukjay; (In Focus p21) is a development consultant working in Leh Wani, Abdul Majid; (In Focus p29) is Member of Legislative Assembly representing Doda constituency in Doda district of Jammu province. He belongs to Congress. Yaseen, Hakeem Mohammad; (In Focus p27) is Member of Legislative Assembly representing Khan Sahib constituency in Badgam district of Kashmir province. He belongs to Peoples Democratic Forum.

Readers' requests for getting in touch with the authors, for feedback, comments and further discussions on their subjects of interest, are welcome. Since all authors/contributors are not interested in taking mails directly, the readers are requested to send us interview requests at [email protected] for passing on to the authors

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Vol. 4, Issue 3

Epilogue, March 2010

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PROLOGUE

From the Editor

Agenda for 2010-11ZAFAR CHOUDHARY

t Epilogue, reporting state budget has always been a very serious business. Since 2007, it has been a unique process for us involving the makers of budget, the behind-the-curtains architects, and experts on economy and, of course, those seeking to know how state's budget is prepared. Each year we have brought out two exclusive issues on the subject one pre-budget, analyzing the previous year's performance and listing public expectations and one post-budget carrying comprehensive reports and analysis on the year's budget. We have often been asked by our readers that why we lay so much emphasis on budget reporting. The answer to this question is very simple. It is all about public money and the public deserve to know how their money comes and goes. Before presenting Budgets, the Finance Ministers often engage with a not-sowide section of society in, what is called as pre-budget consultations. These consultations are always almost limited to a pre-identified set of business chamber representatives and a handful of teachers of economics, commerce and management from the Universities of Kashmir and Jammu. They are the

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same people who have been meeting the Finance Ministers for years with almost same sets of suggestions. Finance Ministers are not to be entirely blamed for keeping their consultations limited to some known faces. In fact, the public at large, particularly the elected representatives show a very little or no interest in such exercise. This lack of interest stems from the lack of knowledge for the process as most of the people believe that budget is a pure arithmetic and it better left to the Finance Minister and his key staff. In this pre-budget issue we have made an attempt to reach out the legislators with due care to the parties they belong to and the districts they come from. First such exercise of this kind, it was aimed at gathering feedback for the Finance Minister on what the general public want his Budget 2010 to reflect. Most of the legislators, economists and other stakeholders we spoke to have strongly emphasized on capitalizing on the natural resources to create a robust economic base in Jammu and Kashmir. It is hoped that the Finance Minister takes note of these suggestions. Feedback : [email protected]

SEPTEMBER 2009

FEBRUARY 2008

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Vol. 4, Issue 3

Epilogue, March 2010

Letters

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Readers WriteWhy You Ignored Two MinistersDear Editor At first sight, the photographs of Ministers page after page (performance review of coalition government, Epilogue Feb 2010) appeared little out of place for a scholarly journal like Epilogue. However, the reading of articles allayed the fears. This kind of review was important, timely and, of course, well balanced exercise. The only aspect of this review which goes unexplained is that you blacked out two Ministers Taj Mohiuddin and Agha Roohullah. Even though I don't think it was FEBRUARY 2010 an oversight but bias is least expected from Epilogue. It is strongly suggested that working of the government is constantly monitored, reviewed and reported for enabling the public to make well informed opinions. AKNIT SHARMA Jammu

Movement is Driven by PeoplesDear Editor The movement for rights to self determination in Kashmir seems to have been slightly underplayed by the author Ahmed Ali Fayyaz in his essay 'Revisiting Srinagar Central 20 Years After Bloodshed'. The sentiment for rights in Kashmir is as strong today as it was 20 years back, the leaders of the movement wield far more influence today than they did two decades back, the fire is growing only brighter and stronger. He is right in pointing out that leaders are now a divided lot and drawn in different directions but I would like to assert that ongoing movement in Kashmir driven by the sentiments of the peoples and not the leaders. MIR IFTIKHAR Sumbal, Kashmir

Three-points Govt Must Consider for Panchayat PollsDear Editor, As you know, there are indications that the State Government is intending to hold the much - awaited Panchayat elections soon. I am sure that while making preparations, the concerned Ministry is also considering policy measures required to be taken before elections are held. I think that at least 3 aspects should not escape Government's attention. First, it must spell out a timeframe for constitution of PRIs at all 3 tiers - Halqa, Block and District, so that this time the entire structure of Local Self Government is put in place. Second, it must clearly spell out a mechanism for effective devolution of functions and funds to local bodies at each level so as to rebuild people's confidence that PRIs are going to be real (and not cosmetic). Third, it should declare reservation of 50% seats of Panches and Sarpanches for women so as to ensure their effective participation in grassroots democracy. In my view, the above measures, taken before elections, will send a strong signal to the people of J&K that the process of democratization of governance has finally begun here as well! G. M. SHEIKH Director Leh Development Organisation, Leh

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Epilogue, March 2010

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LettersReaders Write

Give Youths Choice, Not ChanceDear Editor Epilogue is one of the best Magazines and I request that Editors should focus more on youths. In our society the ethic of moral education in lacking behind, as a result of which many evils such as corruption, crime etc prevail very often. The logic behind all this is that the youth are in depression and this syndrome is increasing day by day. With the growing significance and having seen the prevailing status of youth, it has becoming more challenge task to bring out the sustainable future for our younger generation. Unfortunately, under the present circumstance there is no common platform for our youth to discuss their problems. I strongly believe that youth can play an effective role in bringing about sustainable and equitable development in the world through their actively participation in the developmental work and their positive active. Today's our youth are tomorrow social reformer that why they need to be encouraged in every positive field. They need right guidance and good environment, work environment, political environment, quality leadership, so that they can have a future by choice not by chance. SONAM DORJEY Sakti, Leh

Give Fair Deal to Geo, Socio, PsychologyDear editor, This is the response to 'spreading literacy' (Epilogue, Feb 2010) in which I got to know that the new government brought some good hopes for the future of the education sector, especially the recruitment of various teaching and non teaching staff in education department which also includes the creation of 200 posts of lecturers for the subjects viz, IT, Bio chemistry, Functional English, Environmental Science and Bio Tech. at Higher Secondary level. Impressively, the creation of 200 posts for above mentioned subjects are welcome for those with career holders of those subjects and for students as well. But on the other hand, there is no clear indication about future of those with subjects specially Geography, Sociology, Psychology etc, as a career that the concerned authorities of the Omer Government couldn't give the proper attention to these mentioned subjects in creation of post for these subjects at Higher Secondary level. If various states and central universities are offering master degree programmes in these social science subjects under UGC, then why the concerned authorities of in government fail to consider these subjects at 10+2 level. Moreover, the teaching of these subjects at said level will not only solve the unemployment issue to some extent, but also are more relevant for the indepth study of subjects that assume importance in our state. TSERING ANGCHUK Leh

I have found Epilogue interesting. May be you need to broaden your convas to look at what has been happening in PaK and the Northern Areas and a the solutions on offer or desired. Also the surrounding scene - Tibet, Xinjiang, Afghanistan - the last being closely linked to developments in J&K. And, of course, Pakistan BG VERGHESE

Wish, Epilogue Stands TallDear Editor, It was really very nice to scan the special issue of epilogue...luckily it was also first time for me to come across this magazine and visualizing the warm recommendation from my close mentor Mr Ramchandra Guha. Hope to see good future of this magazine albeit also wish for continuance of standing. ATUL THAKUR New Delhi

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Vol. 4, Issue 3

Epilogue, March 2010

CURRENT AFFAIRS

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OpinionKASHMIR POLICY

Create Discussions, not ConfusionsRAM CHANDER SHARMA

The proposal for safe return and amnesty to the youths who crossed over to the Pakistan administered Kashmir during years of turmoil as mooted by the Chief Minister Omar Abdullah and quickly endorsed by Union Home Minister P Chidambram has kicked off confusion among several sections in Jammu and Kashmir. Recently the report of Prime Minister's Working Group headed by Justice Sagheer Ahmed has already caused criticism in Jammu and Ladakh regions. These developments have taken place at a time when many steps being taken on Kashmir are seen influenced by external pressures may be America's dilemma in Afghanistan. Need of the hour is to evolve a broad consensus on Kashmir issue and not a confusion among the stakeholders.reaking the long frozen ice of Indo-Pak dialogue New Delhi recently jumped into Foreign Secretary level talks with Islamabad putting terrorism as topic of discussion. Pakistan, on the other hand, insisted on downplaying the issue of terrorism and stressed for resumption of composite dialogue including discussions on 'core' issue of Kashmir and Indus water sharing. The Pak Prime Minister went to the extent of declaring diplomatic win over India that its neighbor bowed before international pressure over the bilateral issues and resumption of dialogue. The bilateral relations between two nuclear South Asian neighbors are running at low after 26/11 terrorist attacks. The American engagement in Afghanistan and the failure of NATO forces with rising financial cost has led the Obama administration to review its South Asian and Central Asian policy to lead and finance the war against terror. US is in a hurry to wash its hands off the unending vicious cycle of violence and possible fall out against the US national interests and is on the track of reconcili-

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ation with a faction of moderate Taliban having the Pakistan backing handing over the administration and law and order to the beleaguered Karazai Government. Pakistan is playing as a mediator and guarantor to the new formula. India as a major player in the sub continent has considerable interests in Afghanistan. If the new set up turns a reality than Pakistan would definitely cut Indian diplomacy to its size and the Indians in a knee jerk reaction are on the fast mode to have bilateral dialogue with Pakistan and some populist measures in Jammu and Kashmir as well. Keeping these fears and the recent spurt in anti Indian emotional flare ups in Kashmir valley following killing of two young boys the Omar Abdullah government proposed the carpet amnesty to the Kashmiri youths in Pakistan administered Kashmir who denounce militancy and return to Jammu and Kashmir without arms. The Home Minister has supported the scheme openly despite a warning statement of Defense Minister saying that the terrorist infiltration has increased in the year 2009. The Union Health Minister and former Chief

Minister of Jammu and Ghulam Nabi Azad has expressed reservations over the scheme as similar to the right wing nationalist Bartya Janta Party. Pakistan's intelligence outfit the ISI is running scores of armed training camps in the PaK and Pakistan and pushing the Kashmiri youths across the LoC for subversion. The recent suicide attacks of Taliban inside POK areas against the Pak army are the direct fall out of Pakistan's army action against the Taliban and Al-Qaeda in Pak restive FATA and North West Frontier Province including that of the South Waziristan with full military force under the terms and conditions of Obama administration. The American drone attacks have killed the top leadership of Tehrik-eTaliban inside the Pak territory making the anti American sentiment more vocal and open inside the Pak political circles and the tribal Pushtun community terming the attacks as direct threat on the sovereignty of the country. Pakistan has fully exploited the situation in the troubled Jammu and Kashmir to its main agenda of internationalizing the Kashmir issue. On the

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Epilogue, March 2010

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CURRENT AFFAIRSReports

other hand the Indians are failing with every passing day in dealing with the situation. The alienation of people and the aversion against the Indian army and other security forces in J&K release of Justice Sagheer Ahmed report on the Center and State relationship at this juncture has proved disturbing. The Ladakh Union Territory Front, PoK Refugees, West Pak Refugees, KP organizations and other Jammu based political parties including the BJP have opposed the 5th working group report which was hurriedly handed over to the Chief Minister. Now, the new amnesty scheme for the Kashmir youth across the LoC is opposed tooth and nail by these groups. Government of India has been generous with the surrender policy of the militants in J&K. This has already backfired in the valley, as most of the surrendered ultras are linked with further killings and looting on the behest of J&K Police and the security forces. The relief and rehabilitation of PoK Refugees, WP Refugees, KP Migrants and other Displaced Persons has been put to cold storage by the State and GOI and the state government. On the other hand the fresh amnesty and surrender policy mooted by J&K Govt with full central govt backing is creating confusion. The quiet diplomacy is a failure right from the beginning with major separatist groups and even the moderate Hurriyat M is keeping away for the moment due to internal opposition within the group. The sensitive issue of resolving the Kashmir imbroglio needs all party discussion and consensus instead of promoting the vested political interest inside the state.

Don't links talks resumption with Kashmir: Holbrooke tells PakS President Barack Obama's Special Envoy to Pakistan and Afghanistan, Richard Holbrooke has said that while Washington supports renewed contacts between Pakistan and India and wants the process to continue, Pakistani leaders should not burden the nascent process with insistence on core issues, specifically Kashmir. Holbrooke said it was encouraging that India had agreed to engage with Pakistan and issues could be brought onto the agenda once the talks progressed. Holbrooke was in Pakistan in mid-February and had meetings with Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani among others there.

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HOME MINISTER: Incident of Terror up in J&Khile commending the role of security forces in combating terrorism in Jammu and Kashmir, Home Minister P Chidambaram admitted, on February 17 in Jammu, that there has been an increase in terrorism-related incidents in the state. Sixty five terrorist incidents have taken place in the state in the first 45 days of this year, Chidambaram said at a press conference after reviewing the security situation in Jammu and Kashmir at a meeting of the unified command, a strategic group comprising representatives of the army, paramilitary forces, police and intelligence agencies. "In these incidents, seven civilians, nine security personnel and 24 militants have been killed," he said, but felt that the "security forces were making gradual progress, and the situation was improving." He commended the role of security forces. "They are dealing with the situation with great caution and wisdom." The home minister made it clear that zero tolerance would be exhibited towards human rights violations. Evidence of that was the arrest of a Border Security Force trooper who was suspected to be behind the killing of Kashmiri teen Zahid Farooq. "The commandant has been suspended and investigations are on," Chidambaram said. At the unified command meeting, sources said, the home minister took stock of the situation on the borders and also in the hinterland. He urged security forces to neutralize militants but avoid collateral damage.

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Pak Pushing in Ultras: Armyrmy Chief Gen Deepak Kapoor said on February 19 that Pakistan was continuing to push in militants from across the border into Jammu and Kashmir but the armed forces deployed there were capable of tackling it. "Our neighbour is continuing infiltration of militants from across the border into Jammu and Kashmir. It (infiltration) will continue. Forces are deployed in the border and they will make all efforts to stop the infiltrators there. If some militants do come in, our forces will tackle them.

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Epilogue, March 2010

CURRENT AFFAIRSReports

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J&K IN NATIONAL PRESS

Earning GoodwillTimes of India, Feb 17

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ew Delhi's show of resolve in continuing with the IndiaPakistan talks despite the Pune blast has been heartening. Now, it must also stand firm on defusing internal tension without letting the latest terror attack cloud the issue. This is particularly so when it comes to Jammu and Kashmir chief minister Omar Abdullah's recent proposal backed by Union home minister P Chidambaram for the return of Kashmiris who had crossed over to Pakistan-occupied Kashmir (PoK). It is a potent statement of intent. And given that hard questions will be asked of Islamabad in the wake of the Pune blast, this is an opportunity for it to back up its rhetoric about a sustainable solution in the region with concrete action by cooperating with New Delhi on the issue. The devil lies in the details, of course. Concerns such as the ones raised by Union health minister Ghulam Nabi Azad about militants using this as an entry point are overstated. Similar concerns came up when the Muzaffarabad trade route was opened; they came to nothing. But this does not mean the process is risk-free. Rigorous controls and screening mechanisms must be put in place before any such initiative can be launched. There should be thorough procedures for

Establishing accountability for incidents such as the shooting of 17-year-old Zahid Farooq Shah is another. Credibility is the currency of any dialogue; moderate Hurriyat Conference leader Mirwaiz Umar Farooq's backing out of talks with the Centre because of the killing shows how such incidents degrade that credibility. It's essential to restore trust in the Valley where large sections of the people are alienated from the administration.

Amnesty Call GoodstepAsian Age, Feb 12 nion home minister P. Chidambaram's readiness to endorse J&K chief minister Omar Abdullah's suggestion for the return of Indians trapped in PoK is a positive development. Seen in any light, the chief minister's proposal to grant amnesty to former Kashmiri militants stuck in PoK over the years, and encourage their return and reintegration into society, is a useful one. Given the ups and downs the state has known for two decades, such an idea should have been formulated long ago. In the light of experience, it was easy to see that bringing the former flame-throwers back into the fold would have had a salutary effect on Kashmir society. Using their ingenuity, some young men, who had crossed over to PoK for arms training in the late Eighties and the early Nineties with one or another militant outfit in the backdrop of an insurgent movement, have been returning. Their narrative is uniformly one of disillusionment with the jihadi establishment run by Pakistan in the other Kashmir. The articulation of this on a wide scale were an amnesty scheme available was certain to have had a positive impact on the younger generation in the Valley, some of whom continue to be wooed by jihadist ideologues. What has prevented a wholesale trudge back of the prodigal is the absence of a suitable amnesty scheme and the consequent fear of long jail terms. Quite apart from young minds in the Valley being influenced by the negative experiences of their brethren who had gone across, accepting people back into society is a public good in its own right. It is such thinking that lay behind amnesty schemes in respect of dangerous Chambal dacoits initiated through the aegis of stalwarts like Jayaprakash Narayan in the past. The ending turned out to be good for all concerned, the government included. Taking people back into the system removes a source of festering bitterness. This has been seen to be the case in some states of the Northeast as well. In Kashmir also, there are several people who have committed serious crimes but have emerged as political leaders of the so-called

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CURRENT AFFAIRSReports

identification of returning militants, with corroboration from family members. Abdullah and Chidambaram must focus on reintegration efforts as well. Laying down arms can be temporary if the individual finds himself alienated socially and economically from a society that has changed drastically in the intervening years. It's crucial that concurrent to any such proposal, a concerted effort be made by the state and central administrations for the rehabilitation of the tens of thousands of Kashmiri Pandits still living in transit camps in Jammu. It has been two decades since they were driven from their homes in a blatant instance of ethnic cleansing. To facilitate the return of those who might have crossed the border to take up arms against the Indian state while ignoring the continuing plight of the Pandits would be a gross miscarriage of justice. These are all crucial pieces of the Kashmir conundrum. Establishing accountability for incidents such as the shooting of 17-year-old Zahid Farooq Shah is another. Credibility is the currency of any dialogue; moderate Hurriyat Conference leader Mirwaiz Umar Farooq's backing out of talks with the Centre because of the killing shows how such incidents degrade that credibility. It's essential to restore trust in the Valley where large sections of the people are alienated from the administration.

Nilekani takes J&K inch closer to UID projectutting all speculations to rest, the chairperson of Unique Identification Authority of India Chairperson Nandan Nilekani has brought Jammu and Kashmir on his project agenda. It was earlier widely believed that Jammu and Kashmir might go untouched in this ambitions national project. Nilekani recently visited Jammu and made a presentation before the Chief Minister Omar Abdullah and other government officials to be involved in implementation of the project. The state government has already constituted a high level committee headed by the Chief Minister to coordinate with the UIDAI. Making the presentation at the civil secretariat, Nilekani said that this unique number will be based on data to be provided by each person. His/her biometrics like finger prints, iris scan and facial features will be stored in the database and any person seeking any kind of service will have to prove his identity using these biometrics, Nilekani said. Abdullah appreciated the UIDAI for taking proactive steps in introducing UID number in Jammu and Kashmir. He assured the state government's full cooperation with the UIDAI in the implementation of the project. Abdullah said a committee will be constituted to work on this project, adding permanent resident certificates will also contain this unique identification number to make them more informative.

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separatist camp. If they can be rehabilitated without the state making a fuss, there is no reason why the rank-and-file insurgent, who made the wrong choice at a given historical moment, should be denied a similar opportunity. J&K Congress leader and Union health minister Ghulam Nabi Azad has raised some issues of procedure. He has noted that a general amnesty can be exploited by PoK jihadist networks to push in terrorists. Such concerns naturally need to be taken into account while formulating schemes for the return of Kashmir Valley people. Appropriate vetting procedures will be required to be put in place. However, it will be shortsighted not to see the wider picture. Clear numbers may not be available about Kashmiris stranded in PoK but keen to return. The scheme to be drawn up for their rehabilitation necessarily has to be pragmatic, elastic, and adequately funded, possibly with Central and state government resources. The main idea is to see such a proposal as a political act with wide social benefits. Successful prosecution of the plan cannot but have a beneficial effect on the wider Kashmir question, irrespective of the terms in which it is defined. In any conversation with Pakistan as well as the local separatist leadership, a successful rehabilitation programme of this nature cannot but have a strong impact.

Urban Local Bodies polls from Apr 15ollowing a decision of the state cabinet in its meeting held on February 15, the J&K government has announced elections to the urban locals bodies. The Election Department has been told to to draw a schedule and complete entire election process by first fortnight of May. The election to two Municipal Corporations in two capital cities of Jammu and Srinagar, six Municipal Councils and about 71 Municipal Committees are likely to be held in second fortnight of April.

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Advani warns UPA against diluting Indian authority in Kashmirenior BJP leader and Parliamentary Party Chairman L K Advani on February 19 warned of dire and unprecedented agitation if the UPA took any action that compromised national interests and failed to take measures to check prices of essential commodities. In his concluding remarks at the threeday National Executive and National Council conclave in Bhopal, Advani referring obviously about the Indo-Pak talks scheduled to be held on February 25, said the talks of granting autonomy by the committee headed by Justice Saghir Ahmad was nothing but a 'fraud', as no meeting had taken place. "I warn the Government that if it takes any step to dilute Indian authority in the Northern most State of the country, the Government will have to face unprecedented national repercussions," Advani said.

Mufti appeals BJP to support peace processalling for a consensus among various political parties for resolution of the Kashmir issue with Pakistan, PDP has appealed to the BJP-led NDA not to create hurdles but support the new efforts of the Central government. "There is a need for parties across the political spectrum of the country to evolve a consensus on resolving the Kashmir issue with Pakistan and also address its internal dimension," PDP patron and former Chief Minister, Mufti Mohmmad Sayeed said. "There is no substitute to resolving this festering sore that has dampened the immense economic potential of South Asian region for decades and bruised the body and soul of Jammu and Kashmir," Mufti said.

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Sadhus join ex-militants in selling Hindu temple properties in Kashmirharging the government of failing to protect the religious properties of pandits in the Kashmir valley, the Kashmiri Pandit Sangarsh Samiti (KPSS) has said temples were being leased out or sold by some non-state subjects and a former militant with the help of revenue department. President of KPSS Sanjay Kumar Tickoo alleged that time and again it has been observed that the state administration, particularly revenue department was working against the interests of pandit community. He said the department was working with the unscrupulous elements in vandalising the religious property of the Kashmiri Pandit community damaging the over all social fabric in general and the very existence of the community in the valley. Tickoo said KPSS takes strong note about the recent development regarding the Shri Ganesh Temple, Sonwar, Srinagar. The non-state subjects alongwith one ex-militant turned temple broker was trying to sell or lease the property of the temple. Even some persons (Non-State Subjects) in the shape of Sadhus are trying to change the title of the temple and its property by corrupting the concerned Revenue Officials, he alleged. This ex-militant turned broker in the temple land mafia is involved in many other sale and leases of other temples in the Valley. He alleged that even after repeated complaints against the said person no action was taken by the authorities for the reasons best known to them. Even with the help of former militant some other non-state subjects (Sadhus) are trying to mutate the temple property in their name with the help of the concerned officials of the Revenue Department. He questioned how state administration and judiciary allows sale and lease of the temple property when Article 370 was in force in the state. Tickoo alleged that despite ban by the government on the sale of such property, it was going on. This, he said, was a clear conspiracy against the Kashmiri Pandit Community. In 1819, when Sikh Rulers invaded the Kashmir Valley they tried to demolish the muslim worship places in the Valley, but the Kashmiri Pandits came forward and saved them from the invaders, he said adding now KPSS request the majority community of the Kashmir Valley to come forward and save our religious places from these anti Kashmiri Pandit and Anti Social elements and keep the spirit of Kashmiriyat alive in true sense.

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Epilogue, March 2010

Who Writes the Complex Stories of J&K Budget in Simplest Possible Form?

Epilogue, Of Course

---images ---FEB 2007. Jan 2008. Feb 2008. June 2009. Sept 2009.

Our Budget Reports and Analysis Are Written By Top of the Line Experts In A Manner That Even A Layman Enjoys Reading Them

FROM EPILOGUE ARCHIVES SINCE 2007

16 UNPUTDOWNABLE STORIESAvailable in Hard Copies, E-Files, CD-ROMEmployment to Empower GrowthVol 1, Issue 2, Feb 2007 By Prof NISAR ALI Economist

Some Basics About J&K EconomyVol 2, Issue 1, Jan 2008 By BALRAJ PURI Author, Thinker

Buoyancy in J&K Economy Financing Development and Budget 2008-09 in J&K is Financing PeaceVol 2, Issue 1, Jan 2008 By Prof NISAR ALI Economist Vol 2, Issue 1, Jan 2008Interview: TARIQ HAMEED QARRA

Finance Minister (2008)

J&K State in the Grip of Financial CrisesVol 2, Issue 1, Jan 2008 By ABDUL RAHIM RATHER Leader of Opposition (2008)

Budget 2007-08 The Unfinished AgendaVol 2, Issue 1, Jan 2008By ARJIMAND HUSSAIN TALIB

How Not to Promote Economic Growth: The Case of Jammu and KashmirVol 2, Issue 1, Jan 2008 By DIPANKAR SENGUPTA Economist

An Economy in Disadvantaged PositionVol 2, Issue 1, Jan 2008 By RAM SAHAI Business Leader (Since Died)

Economist, Development Consultant

A Lot Needs to be DoneVol 2, Issue 1, Jan 2008 By ANNIL SURI Business Leader, Management Consultant

J&K is a Rich State Run By a Poor GovernmentVol 2, Issue 2, Feb 2008 Interview: HASEEB DRABU Economist, Chairman, J&K Bank

Budget 2008-09: Political Courage Sans InnovationVol 2, Issue 2, Feb 2008 By DIPANKAR SENGUPTA Economist

Figures Fudged, Statistics FakedVol 2, Issue 2, Feb 2008 By ABDUL RAHIM RATHER Leader of Opposition (2008)

We Have Brought Turn Around in EconomyVol 2, Issue 2, Feb 2008 By TARIQ HAMEED KARRA Finance Minister (2008)

Enhancing Own Resources, Controlling Ensure Taxpayers' Money There are No Quick Fixes; Goes to Programmes We are Working on a Non-Productive That Work Workable Employment Policy Expenditure Are Our Top Vol 3, Issue 9, Sept 2009 Vol 3, Issue 9, Sept 2009 PrioritiesVol 3, Issue 6, June 2009Interview: ABDUL RAHIM RATHER

By BILAL HUSSAIN Financial Journalist

Interview: ABDUL RAHIM RATHER

Finance Minister (2009)

Finance Minister (2009)

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Budget 2010

The Dilemma of Rather How to Pay for the Predecessor's Party!DIPANKAR SENGUPTA Economisthere is no person in Jammu and Kashmir whose position is as unenviable as Mr Abdul Rahim Rather. His inheritance as the Finance Minister of the state was an economy rocked by agitations in both in Jammu and the Valley as the result of the Shree Amarnath Land Controversy and the precarious financial position of the government made much worse by the recommendations of the Sixth Pay

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By not renewing the 5-year moratorium on state government employment agreed upon by the NC led state government and the NDA Government in 2000, the Prime Minister Dr Manmohan Singh opened the floodgates for a surge in largely non-productive government employment. The Congress-PDP coalition did not disappoint. The state's salary bill doubled during the previous coalition's tenure spiking form 2005 onwards. Even with buoyant revenues salaries as a proportion of total expenditure rose to 30% towards the end of the Congress-PDP rule as compared to 24% when NC lost power in 2002. It has fallen to Mr Rather's lot to handle the consequences of the 6th Pay Commission which was announced just prior to the present coalition coming to power. This coalition will have to think of ways to pay for the previous coalition's party

Commission which no government would have the courage not to accept. The previous Congress-PDP coalition had handed Mr Rather a time bomb in the form of a state government with a huge salary bill, the result of the lifting of the freeze on government employment for Jammu and Kashmir in 2005. By not renewing the 5-year moratorium on state government employment agreed upon by the NC led state government and the NDA Government in 2000, the Prime Minister Dr Manmohan Singh opened the floodgates for a surge in largely nonproductive government employment. The Congress-PDP coalition did not disappoint. The state's salary bill doubled during the previous coalition's tenure spiking form 2005 onwards. Even with buoyant revenues salaries as a proportion of total expenditure rose to 30% towards the end of the Congress-PDP rule as compared to 24% when NC lost power in 2002. It has fallen to Mr Rather's lot to handle the consequences of the 6th Pay Commission which was announced just prior to the present coalition coming to power. This coalition will have to think of ways to pay for the previous coalition's party. As if this were not bad enough, inflation, particularly food inflation is assuming alarming proportions. Strictly speaking this is a matter that the central government's responsibility. However, in these matters, the closest

person to the masses who symbolise political authority are state level politicians. This unfair fact of life means that Mr Rather will have to think of ways and means to tackle this problem as well. Last but not the least, he will also have to deal with the consequences of the drought. Mr Rather's work therefore is cut out. He will have to deal with the fall out of three major timebombs none of which is his doing! As if that was not bad enough, the deficit on account of the power sector still remains abnormally high even after generous power grants for the central government under a MOU signed with the state government that was supposed to bring this sector to order. With the enhanced pay to be paid for the entire year (unlike in the previous year when it was paid for only part of the year), the salary bill will probably cross 8000 crores as opposed to 6500 crores the previous year. Thus Mr Rather has no room for financial manouevre. Nor can her abuse the previous government to his heart's content, as his coalition partner was part of it. Such, as they say is life! The NC government therefore has two choices. It can seek to play the politics of victimhood and blackmail and seek extra central government assistance and carry on with business as usual. Alternatively, it may choose to bite the bullet and carry out painful adjustments as it courageously did a decade ago when it froze hiring at the state level. The chances are it will do neither. Some financial room may accrue to the state for an action that is purely non-budgetary in nature. Once the long-delayed panchayat elections are held, grants-in-aid recommended by the 12th Finance Commission that could be spent only through Panchayati Raj Institutions may resume. These were withheld as the previous coalition

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had not held elections to these bodies long after their terms had expired. .The 13th Commission has been requested by the state government to release this amount once elections are held. Crucially this assistance, by its very nature is biased towards rural areas. Potentially therefore they may be dovetailed with a state-government sponsored scheme so that investment in the state's rural economy especially irrigation infrastructure receives a much needed fillip. Equally importantly, the State Government must find a way to dovetail existing schemes with NREGS for which Panchayats should be involved so that the farce of the entire allocation under this scheme lying practically unspent does not reoccur. Given the severity of the recent drought and the fact that for most crops the state's productivity is below (the already low) national average, the importance of this step cannot be doubted. For a state facing a financial crunch, this will be a significant step taken largely at the expense of the central government under the aegis of an arrangement open to all states. As for setting the state finances right and creating an environment for growth, the government is unlikely to take any courageous decisions. This

As for setting the state finances right and creating an environment for growth, the government is unlikely to take any courageous decisions. This state government is unlikely to freeze hiring as it did in 2000. The trauma of the subsequent loss of power in 2002 still lingers. In any case the space created by that action was utilised by its rivals in power (although in a most wasteful manner.)state government is unlikely to freeze hiring as it did in 2000. The trauma of the subsequent loss of power in 2002 still lingers. In any case the space created by that action was utilised by its rivals in power (although in a most wasteful manner.) What it can do is to take steps to plug the power deficit. The muchtouted political difficulty in executing this measure is simply overstated. It must be remembered that after initial resistance, the exercise of metering power went ahead smoothly in the Valley. Indeed, this very fact led to a fall in power consumption as consumers realised that power would no longer be a free commodity. The new government has now to begin charging for power consumed. This may be unpopular in the short run, but in the long run may deliver political dividends if the power outages and shortages become a thing of the past. But this too is essentially a nonbudgetary governance exercise. The budget will merely signal if the government wished to take this step. The budget to be presented to the state assembly cannot hope to overcome the state's problems in a single stroke. But its nature will tell whether it is business as usual or longterm political sagacity which will be at play.

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The NC government therefore has two choices. It can seek to play the politics of victimhood and blackmail and seek extra central government assistance and carry on with business as usual. Alternatively, it may choose to bite the bullet and carry out painful adjustments as it courageously did a decade ago when it froze hiring at the state level. The chances are it will do neither

deficit down to mere Budgetary Rs 124.84 crore, Next year's budgetary deficit provisionally estimated at Rs 618.73 crores. up by Rs 1701.81 crore. Receipts Expenditure down by Rs 205.80 crores. Total disbursements for next year decrease to Rs 9070.49 crores as against Rs 9178.59 crore provided in BE of current year. Tax collection targets exceeded by Rs 53.16 crore excluding electricity duty, which is lower by Rs 12 crore in comparison to budgetary targets. Tax revenue targets for next year fixed at Rs 794.91 crore and non-tax revenue targets at Rs 661.58 crore. Plan expenditure estimated at Rs 1750 crore and for the next year provisionally fixed at Rs 2000 crore. Related Expenditure Security over and above the normal expenditure on law and order up from Rs 253.12 crore to Rs 401.94 crore. Salary payable to migrant employees estimated at Rs 83.41 crore in 2000-2001. support to PSUs kept Budgetary in RE at Rs 75.41 crore. crore for modernisation Rs 13.50 of police force. duty on IMFL up from Rs Import 5 per LPL to Rs 10 per LPL. Export fee on IMFL abolished. Liquor industry taken out of negative list. rates increased upto 10 Toll tax per cent . Fresh fruits and vegetables exempted.

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Would Budget 2010-11 Address the Basics?ARJIMAND HUSSAIN TALIB International Development Consultant&K state today looks akin to those African states which survive by foreign aid. For years, poverty eradication and economic growth strategies in such countries have failed to deliver for many reasons. The most striking reasons being donor dictates, lack of political sovereignty, unjust international trade regimes, poor taxation systems, abysmal governance and acute corruption. Zambian economist, Dambisa Moyo's path-breaking book 'Dead Aid' has some unmistakable lessons especially why the 'aid model' has actually failed, and what havoc aid dependency was wrecking with most of the African countries. Given J&K's case of aggravating aid dependency and poor tax revenues, our case also needs to be looked from the same prism. As the government is finalising the state's budget for 2010-11, a focus on the macro picture is expected. That macro picture would help us analyse where the state is headed. Excessive focus on the micro aspects of the budget exercise would, at best, address the populism constituency. We require a political will to look at the policy part of it from a macro perspective. J&K state is at a highly critical juncture today. The level of dependency on the Government of India (GoI) aid in our case 'grants' is reaching a critically high level. In Budget 2009-2010, the GoI grants constituted 59 per cent of the state's total annual income. Salaries, pension liabilities, interest payments and the power bill alone constitute 53 per cent of our expenditure. Capital expenditure in 2009-10 was a mere 34 per cent. In 2002-03, the overdraft from the Jammu and Kashmir Bank (the state's official banker) was Rs 814 crore as against the maximum permissible limit set by the Reserve Bank of India of Rs 950 crore. Today, the government has a whopping overdraft of Rs 2,200 crore to deal with. Then there are other systemic problems, as acknowledged by the Finance Minister himself, related to delayed payment of salaries to government employees and the delayed clearance of bills in the government treasury. The state's debt to GSDP ratio also requires some imaginative thinking. J&K's overall fiscal liabilities are constantly increasing. Fiscal and primary deficits are also burgeoning. The growth rate of fiscal liabilities was 18.33 per cent during 2005-06 over the previous year. The ratio of fiscal liabilities to GSDP also increased from 60.37 per cent in 2000-01 to 73.78 per cent in 2005-06. That means that the fiscal liabilities had grown faster than the State's GSDP. The state's spiralling debt liabilities have become a sort of a vicious cycle of deficit, debt and debt service payments. There is a constituency that believes that since J&K's GSDP and the per capita incomes are relatively better, the state can ward off any public finance crisis. That is only partly As the government is finalising the right. We must bear in mind that in J&K's case a relatively state's budget for 2010-11, a focus on the better GSDP does not necessarily mean corresponding macro picture is expected. That macro buoyancy in the state's tax revenues. Our taxation system has too many loopholes. Imperatives of public order and peace picture would help us analyse where the through populism measures would continue to remain as state is headed. Excessive focus on the long as the larger political conflict remains unaddressed. micro aspects of the budget exercise The crisis of our power sector is acute and beyond the band would, at best, address the populism aids of any budget exercise. The revenue deficit in the sector constituency. We require a political will is again likely to make the state's budget go haywire. It is to look at the policy part of it from a again a political issue, which requires a political solution. macro perspective. And it remains to be seen whether Mr. Omar Abdullah can go beyond the usual band aids or not.

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and Electric electronic goods, Plaster of Paris and Earthmovers brought under the existing list of 12 items for purpose of entry tax. reduced Sales Tax by four per cent on motor spare parts, tyres and tubes and by three per cent on jewellery and ornaments. Small scale industrial units exempted from ST on service component of sales of their products. of selfBenefit assessment scheme extended to the dealers with taxable turnover upto Rs 25 lakh as against the present limit of Rs 10 lakh. Golden Handshake Scheme proposed for Public Sector Undertakings (PSUs). Daily wagers wages enhanced from Rs 45 per day to Rs 60 per day. Freedom fighters pension up by 50 per cent. Ration allowance of police jawans up from Rs 300 to Rs 450 per month.

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G L O S S A R Y

Give women their dueMANISHA SOBHRAJANI Researchern any society, womenconsciously or unconsciouslystrengthen social structures and fabrics. In Jammu & Kashmir, they do much more. Contrary to popular perception, women's issues are not 'soft' subject matter, but a plethora of complex themes with unimaginable parameters, and this is especially true of women in J&K. As I write this column, the State Assembly has just got down with 45-day long budget session, one of the highlights of which will be the controversial Jammu and Kashmir Permanent Residents (Disqualification) Bill which seeks to annul permanent resident rights of Kashmiri women who marry outside the state. Based on my interactions with several women from different walks of life in many regions of J&K over the years, I have two suggestions towards the state's budgetary planning. Economic independence is the one thing that is most crucial: creating work opportunities for women

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It is suggested that there are interventions towards personality development (of women), self-defence, confidencebuilding etc., keeping in mind the fact that the region has been witnessing a political turmoilespecially in the last 20 yearswhich has translated into extreme situations for women where many have not had the chance to go to school or utilise their potentials to the maximum.

on a priority basis is the need of the hour. In the 2009 budget speech made by the J&K Finance Minister Abdul Rahim Rather, the word 'women' is mentioned less than ten times in a 85-page long document. The references are as bleak as '...a special scheme has been devised for their economic empowerment. Under this scheme, 100 women entrepreneurs shall be selected from each district taking the total to 2,200 in the first phase.' The budget speech also mentions: 'Special provisions have been made in the budget for development of Gujjar and Bakerwals, Schedule Castes and Schedule Tribes, Women and Child Welfare.' I am not sure if mentioning women in the same breath as other categories mentioned above is the smartest thing to do. My second suggestion is towards creating educational awareness for women. And this does not simply mean knowledge from books and educational institutions. Rather, it is suggested that there are interventions towards personality development, self-defence, confidencebuilding etc., keeping in mind the fact that the region has been witnessing a political turmoilespecially in the last 20 yearswhich has translated into extreme situations for women where many have not had the chance to go to school or utilise their potentials to the maximum. My humble suggestions can be achieved by initiating a grassroots representation of women in civil society organizations which, based on their work in

REVENUE RECEIPTS are all those receipts, which do not incur repayment liability. These include, in addition to the State's own revenues (Tax and Non-Tax), share in central taxes, grants from the Central Government for the financing of State Plans as well as non-plan grants. These also include interest and dividend on investments made by the Government. REVENUE EXPENDITURE is that which covers the routine administrative expenditure of the State, such as wages and salaries, expenditure on maintenance and repairs and other overheads like payment of rent, taxes, user charges of services, insurance premia and interest. It also includes expenditure on goods for sale like in Stationery Depots, Govt. Presses, Agriculture Production Department, Health institutions and CAPD. BUDGET DEFICIT, the conventional deficit, is the difference between total expenditure and total receipts and has to be zero in the absence of monetization, State Governments have no access to the monetization route and as such Budget Deficit in their case ought to be zero.the field, make policy recommendations to the government. Based on their feedback of the ground realities, the government will easily be able to assess the situation and create suitable opportunities for women. And hopefully, the next budget speech will acknowledge women as individuals who ought to be given their due.

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Put Rural Ladakh on AgendaT. NAMGAIL Journalist from Zanskar in Kargiln today's age of information and technology, there are many remote villages in our state which still don't have motor road connectivity and telecommunication facility. Such things should be kept as top priority of the government. At the same time the government should also invest a lot in the field of information and technology. Our government must also keep provision to produce electricity from different kinds of renewable energy such as hydro, wind and solar energy. Ladakh is perhaps the only area in the country which has a very high potential for producing electricity from solar and geothermal energy and these should be tapped. As the unemployment is rising day by day everywhere, setting up of industries of different kinds needs to be encouraged by providing due incentives by the Government. Production of local and organic produces and local handi-

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Government should come up with a scheme to provide subsidies and incentives for Ladakh region to construct green house at a large scale so that every household in Ladakh can produce vegetable for their own consumption in the winter months

crafts must also be encouraged. Ladakhis have seen that construction of greenhouses for producing vegetables in winter in Ladakh has revolutionized life in Ladakh in the past more than one decade. Therefore the government should come up with a scheme to provide subsidies and incentives for Ladakh region to construct green house at a large scale so that every household in Ladakh can produce vegetable for their own consumption in the winter months. In the 2009 budget speech made by the J&K Finance Minister Abdul Rahim Rather, the word 'women' is mentioned less than ten times in a 85-page long document. The references are as bleak as '...a special scheme has been devised for their economic empowerment. Under this scheme, 100 women entrepreneurs shall be selected from each district taking the total to 2,200 in the first phase.' The budget speech also mentions: 'Special provisions have been made in the budget for development of Gujjar and Bakerwals, Schedule Castes and Schedule Tribes, Women and Child Welfare.' I am not sure if mentioning women in the same breath as other categories mentioned above is the smartest thing to do. My second suggestion is towards creating educational awareness for women. And this does not simply mean knowledge from books and educational institutions. Rather, it is suggested that there are interventions towards personality devel-

CAPITAL EXPENDITURE relate to the creation of assets. This corresponds to the State's own investment outlay on the acquisition of permanent assets like land, buildings, power projects, Irrigation and water supply schemes, establishment of Industrial Estates, all extensions and structural alteration of existing assets, construction of roads, railways, airports, plant / machinery, InterState Bus Terminals etc. etc. Disbursements, which are comprised of repayment of State public debt and the loans and advances made by the State to the various entities, are also taken as Capex.

opment, self-defence, confidencebuilding etc., keeping in mind the fact that the region has been witnessing a political turmoilespecially in the last 20 yearswhich has translated into extreme situations for women where many have not had the chance to go to school or utilise their potentials to the maximum. My humble suggestions can be achieved by initiating a grassroots representation of women in civil society organizations which, based on their work in the field, make policy recommendations to the government. Based on their feedback of the ground realities, the government will easily be able to assess the situation and create suitable opportunities for women.

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Think of saving precious glaciersPADMA SETHI Director, Rural Development and You (RDY), Leh.e the people of Ladakh are expecting a lot from budget 201011. I am sure the government will fulfill ours basic needs in the upcoming budget. Ladakh, with its peculiar geo-climatic conditions, is situated in the northeastern part of the Indian state of Jammu and Kashmir. It is a high-altitude cold desert, with settlements located as high as 16000 feet above sea level where the winter temperatures dips down as low as - 40 C. Most of Ladakh's population lives in rural villages where people still follow agrarian lifestyle. Scarce resources make everyday life further difficult in this environment with harsh climatic conditions. Still, Ladakh

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has been home to a centuries old indigenous culture that has not only survived this land, but has thrived in it. In view of above circumstances, I shall impress upon the government to come up with programs in the upcoming budget for Sustainable Development of Rural Ladakh and also for Renewable Energy Development in Ladakh besides allocation of funds for saving the precious Himalaya Glacier that have been lifeline for lakhs of people inhabiting in many Himalayan mountainous enclaves. The sudden advent of globalization and modernization has posed a threat to Ladakh's traditional lifestyle, like what

I call upon the Finance Minister to come up with programs in the upcoming budget for Sustainable Development of Rural Ladakh and also for Renewable Energy Development in Ladakh besides allocation of funds for saving the precious Himalaya Glacier that have been lifeline for lakhs of people inhabiting in many Himalayan mountainous enclaves.has happened in the past in other parts of the globe on account of industrialisation and globalisation. Therefore the need of the hour is that the government should take steps to bridge the gap between Ladakh's traditional lifestyle and the modern development by striking a fine balance between the two. At the end I am also expecting more and more fund allocation for the development of the far-flung areas of Ladakh like Dipling area, such villages are still lacking very basic amenities.

Prioritise Quality EducationTASHI ANGCHUK Businessman, Chiktan village of Kargil Districtfeel that the Finance Minister should give his top priority to the education sector because it is only education that ensures a peaceful, bright and a sustained future. Teaching community should not face any obstacle while they pursue their due rights, be it a case of getting promotion or any other privileges, because teaching is a highly honored profession. The Government should foresee a future

The government should come up different schemes and programs customized to different cultural identities of the State for their promotion and preservation

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wherein, unlike today, not a single dilapidated school building should exist. Secondly since the State is composed of three distinct regions, Jammu, Kashmir and Ladakh, with their own respective culture and history, the Government should also give its priority to promote and preserve the diversity of the cultural richness of the State. Preservation different historical monuments and distinct

cultural identities will help the Government to promote the State as a unique tourist destination. Hence the government should come up different schemes and programs customized to different cultural identities of the State for their promotion and preservation.

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Focus on EducationTHUKJAY TASHI Programme Officer, GYURJA, TATA-LAHDC Support programammu and Kashmir is economically backward state despite its high potential of economic development. Low literacy, quality education and lack of employment opportunities are enforcing the violence in the state. The full potential of human resource is still a dream to make a reality as a result the state is infected by the low quality and unskilled labour to be employed in a production units while compromising the productivity and efficiency of a production unit. Thus it is most urgent that state allocates its financial resource strategically in building the education infrastructures and in line with providing quality education to its citizens. The second impediment for the

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Centralized nature of entrepreneurship promotes survival of the fittest and leaves the gaps between haves and have nots among the citizens that is against the state's social tradition and human right therefore decentralized small unit entrepreneurship is the solution for it

state development is the poor and lack of entrepreneurship development which drags the state way behind others. Centralized nature of entrepreneurship promotes survival of the fittest and have and have not among the citizens that is against the state's social tradition and human right therefore decentralized small unit entrepreneurship is the solution for it. Economic decentralization can be promoted through tourism industry that the state has unlimited scope to tap by promoting more attractive home stays and travel companies. This is already the main source of livelihood to thousands of people and still the pressure on it is dramatically increasing. So reasonable financial resource allocation

would not only rejuvenate and synergies the state's crippled economy but a provision of constitutional right to life. In conclusion investment in better educational infrastructure in order to produce skillful and resourceful citizens to be more productive is the need of the hour. The Promotion of decentralized entrepreneurship by tapping the greater potential of tourism industries will not only provide livelihood to growing population but bring back the life in its economy. Therefore sufficient budget allocation will meet twine objective of the state peace and development.

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G L O S S A R Y

Make Separate Power BudgetSYED BASHARAT BUKHARI MLA, Sangramay strong suggestion to the Finance Minister would be to consider reverting back to the brief practice of presenting a separate budget for the power sector. While sitting in the capital cities we talk big about the power projects while situation in the rural areas still present a gloomy picture. A separate budget for power sector will not only

FISCAL DEFICIT is the difference between aggregate disbursements net of debt repayments and recovery of loans and revenue receipts and nondebt capital receipts.tional Budget brings to discussion the latest economic scenario and proposals for the next year, a separate budget for power sector will serve as an annual reality audit to improve the state of affairs. My other suggestion is to make employment policy a workable proposition and support it with budgetary provisions. While, of course, I strongly suggest against imposing any fresh taxes, the Finance Minister should also think of easing some areas to de-escalate prices of essentials.

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help in better fiscal management but also streamlining of the projects, supply of power and realization of revenue. We talk of going about mega power projects but there are many villages where people are yet see the first glow of an electric bulb and then there are villages and power supply lines are tied through the trees. Like every March, our conven-

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Vol. 4, Issue 3

Epilogue, March 2010

IN FOCUSBudget 2010

22

B U D G E T

G L O S S A R Y

Senior Citizens : Think of this 9% of total populationVIKRAM GOUR Engineer, Activistudget 2010-11 is the second budget of the present term of Abdul Rahim Rather, one of the ablest of the Finance Ministers of the State so far. He must have many things in mind for running the government in most economical manner to achieve optimum benefits for the citizens of the state. I would only like to add a few public beneficial items to suggest from both for increasing revenue as well as for meeting the aspirations of the people of the state. The Senior Citizens: The Senior Citizens (SC) constitute more than 9% of

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The Senior Citizens (SC) constitute more than 9% of the population of the state and the number is on the increase. The population is estimated to increase to more than 12% by 2015-16. Majority of the SC are in the rural areas and most of them are uncared for. Till date no FM has shown any interest in the welfare of CS in the state. We expect the FM in his budget will provide adequate funds to care for the SC in the shape of opening Day-care Homes, Old age- Homes, Pay and stay Homes, removal of VAT on Medicines for SC, reduction in charges on government/tourism guest houses/tourism huts, providing Emergency Services, both medical and otherwise to the CS etc and advise the government to enact laws that will protect the right of the hapless CS visa-vis their financially sound children

the population of the state and the number is on the increase. The population is estimated to increase to more than 12% by 2015-16. Majority of the SC are in the rural areas and most of them are uncared for. Till date no FM has shown any interest in the welfare of CS in the state. We expect the FM in his budget will provide adequate funds to care for the SC in the shape of opening Day-care Homes, Old age- Homes, Pay and stay Homes, removal of VAT on Medicines for SC, reduction in charges on government/tourism guest houses/tourism huts, providing Emergency Services, both medical and otherwise to the CS etc and advise the government to enact laws that will protect the right of the hapless CS vis-a-vis their financially sound children. Such laws already stand already enacted by the GOI. This act of the FM will certainly assure greater political support to the government from this large section of the population of SC. That Court Fee on registration of the property in court at present is 21% which is highest in the country. We do not understand whether this high rate has been fixed for optimising the revenue of the state out of property registration or encouraging people for under-valuing the property while getting it registered or not getting it registered at all. As per our information majority of the incumbents are keeping away from getting their property registered and those who getting it registered or enormously undervaluing their property for registration and final looser the state. We would

CAPITAL RECEIPTS include loans raised by the State from the market, borrowings from RBI and other institutions, loans from the Centre, receipts from special securities issued to NSSF and the State's recovery of its own loans and proceeds from disinvestment of Government's stake in Public Sector Undertakings, all form part of Capital Receipts. CENTRAL PLAN refers to the Central Government's budgetary support to the Plan and, the internal and extra budgetary resources raised by the Public Sector Undertakings. SUBSIDIES are financial aid provided by the Government to individuals or a group of individuals to become competitive. The grant of subsidies is also aimed at improving skills of those who benefit from the subsidies. AMORTIZATION refers to liquidate (a debt) by repayment in installments is called Amortization. PLAN EXPENDITURE consists of revenue spending and capital spending in the plan. Under the former is included salary and maintenance expenditure. Latter includes expenditure on creation of capital assets.

like to advise the FM to reduce the Court Fee to around 10% so that the purchasers are encouraged to get their property registered thus increase the revenue of the state.

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Vol. 4, Issue 3

Epilogue, March 2010

23

IN FOCUSBudget 2010

B U D G E T

G L O S S A R Y

Make Agriculture Engine of GrowthASHWANI SHARMA MLA, Bishnaheople of all the three regions of the State have voted for good governance and as such expect peace and progress. Budget is not merely a heap of stapled papers with seal of government. It must not only reflect the agenda of the government but should also pave the way for various developmental projects (both ongoing and new) in the state for the year ahead. As a public representative I would like to see allocation of more funds for my constituency which mainly comprises of rural population. Otherwise also in overall context to state, around 80% our population resides in rural area and earning their livelihood through mean of agricultural pursuits. The crisis of unemployment can be catered or minimized if the government comes with a comprehensive plan for agriculture sector. The attention of the government should be focused for incentives to the farmer's community. The fertilizer, loans and other requirements of the farmers may be given priority. Since we don't have any major industrial establishments in the state so the growth of the state is directly proportional to that of agriculture productivity. The irrigation facilities need to be strengthened. Power is one of the major issues concerning every member irrespective of political affiliation. We have so much potential for hydro-power generation in Jammu and Kashmir. The pending power generation and power grid projects should be taken into on war-footing speed. In my own constituency there are

PRIMARY DEFICIT is Fiscal Deficit net of 'Interest Payments and Debt Servicing' under Non-Plan. REVENUE DEFICIT is the difference between Revenue expenditure (Plan / Non-Plan) and Revenue Receipts (Tax / Non-Tax). BALANCE FROM CURRENT REVENUES (BCR) is the difference between Revenue Receipts and the sum total of all Plan grants and Non-Plan Revenue Expenditure. AGGREGATE DISBURSEMENTS include (i) Revenue Expenditure (ii) Capital Disbursements and (iii) Disbursements under Public Account. AGGREGATE RECEIPTS include (i) Revenue Receipts (ii) Capital Receipts and (iii) Receipts under Public Account. MISCELLANEOUS CAPITAL RECEIPTS (MCR) are treated as Non Debt Capital Receipts.

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two such projects costs Rs. 70 Cr. are pending. I feel the government will also take the problem of people into consideration and complete the projects well in time. In my constituency, the people of the border area are not given compensation by the government for the loss of crops and fields acquired by the army and other security forces for the purpose of border fencing. The land is acquired but neither rent nor any other compensation is being awarded to many poor villager of my constituency. The state government must take the issue with government of India. Let us be hopeful that this time the Finance Minister is sincere in delivering it to the people of the state, and Ladakh, Jammu and Kashmir get their equal share. Special attention is also required towards health and education sector especially in rural areas. Though in the government schools the situation has improved but yet we are not able to bring private players in rural education sector. The Government Medical College in Jammu is under staff and over-burdened with patients. To tackle this problem we must upgrade our rural health facilities. Primary Health center may be strengthening, Sub District and other district hospitals must be equipped with modern techniques and proper staff strength. The regional discrimination is there and no one can deny this fact, be it employment or other incentives each

government ignored Jammu region, whether it was question of releasing funds for the district development. Jammu is perhaps the largest district in the state in respect of population and area. We are having 11 constituencies but the amount released in the district development board is not sufficient to meet the requirements. There is need for allocation of more funds. I am hopeful that the Finance Minister will not burden the ordinary citizen of the state with more taxes as already the poor man finding it difficult to make both hands in this era of pricehike and inflation.

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Vol. 4, Issue 3

Epilogue, March 2010

IN FOCUSBudget 2010

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Make Tax Collection TransparentBALDEV RAJ SHARMA MLA, Reasiefore listing my demands for the upcoming budget, I would like to know from the Honourbale Finance Minister, Did his government deliver all the promises made in his previous budget? As an elected representative of the public I would like to see a public friendly budget without burden on common people in form of direct and indirect taxes. The tax collection system needs more transparency without humiliations to the tax payers. In the budget it is also expected that government make some announcements regarding a visible policy on Kashmiri Pandits. The government must make it clear that what do they want to do with them ? there should be no more experiments. The migrants from Jammu region may also be treated at par with that of Kashmir without any prejudice, discrimination and delay. Now they must be allowed to live a

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dignified life. It is shameful that the state government supported by union government is asking for amnesty and other incentives to the terrorist returning from PoK. It is unfortunate that the Chief Minister of a terror victim state is advocating amnesty to the terrorists. The government is keen to rehabilitate those who adopt the path of violence and killings but they have no sympathy with innocent educated youth of the state. Today, educated youth of the state feels being humiliated, carrying big degrees with them but denied of any job. Instead of initiating a rehabilitating policy for the state, the focus of the government should remain on exploring new job opportunities for the people. The hyped employment policy of the state is nothing but a joke with the educated young peo-

ple of this state. The discrimination issue is not being sorted out. When Omar government took over there were big sloganeering of dealing with the regional discrimination. I feel it sorry to say that during the present government the level of discrimination has widened instead of being bridged. The funds released for the district development are not sufficient. The districts of Jammu region and especially that of my constituency is being almost ignored. There is acute power shortage in the state and there are many remote villages that are yet to be electrified. The power scenario is also worst in towns and villages, there power remains off even for days and week together. For the past few years, there has been dry seasons without rain. The wells are dry and it's just drought like situation. No water for irrigation and also scarcity of drinking water. This issue needs to be address on priority. The government must come with a policy to deal with the alarming situation. The government seems concerned on Cross LoC trade but I feel it has not been able to give any benefit to small businessmen and common people may be it is good for a few businessmen. Don't orchestrate about the political issues but concentrate on developmental issues. and disincentives for accelerating infrastructure and services in the rural areas. I would also like to recommend that there should not be any new taxes in the Budget 2010. Instead of levying any fresh taxes, the Finance Minister should look at some areas where tax regime can be eased. Recently there has been central tax rebate to Jammu and Kashmir and its benefits should percolate down to the masses in general through measures in the upcoming Budget. We understand that inflation is national phenomenon but some cess on petrol diesel etc levied in last year's budget has further contributed to price escalation in Jammu and Kashmir. This local inflation is hitting the poor hard. Budget 2010 should come up with definite measures to ease the prices of essentials.

Bridge Rural-Urban DivideCHOUDHARY ZULFIKAR ALI MLA, Darhalhether it is Union Budget or State Budgets, when the presentation is round the corner it is just the urbancentric view point that comes under discussion. There has never been any process of consultation in the rural areas and therefore the fears of not factoring in majority feedback always remain. My

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first and foremost suggestion to the Finance Minister would be that his budget should lay emphasis on schemes that are aimed at bridging the rural urban divide. You look at education, healthcare, power supply and road network, the rural areas lag far behind. There should be a scheme of incentives

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Vol. 4, Issue 3

Epilogue, March 2010

25

IN FOCUSBudget 2010

APPEASE ALL BUDGET

Do the Regional Balancing ActBALWANT SINGH MANKOTIA MLA Udhampurudget defines goal of the government and it also reflects the action plan of the government for various sectors in the state. I feel no hesitation in saying that this government has failed in meeting with the aspirations of the people of the state, especially that of Jammu region. The role of the government is not only to rule but also to govern and administer the system, the Omar government is just confined to 'rule' but failed to govern and administer in a proper way. Today, the common citizen is loaded with the burden of unchecked price hike of essential commodities. He is not even able to have bread and butter for his family. It would be soothing to see Jenab Finance Minister making some announcements to take steps so that the graph of inflation is brought down. The government needs to take immediate steps to revive its Pubic Distribution System, which is a total a flop show. The ration card holder are being deprived of their due ration. The

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V O T E

O N

A C C O U N T

Finance Minister Abdul Rahim Rather had taken a Vote-onAccount of Rs 9503 crore on March 3 in a brief session of the Legislature for a period of five months for the financial year 2009-10 beginning April 1.

poor people are totally depend CAPD ration stores and when they are shown out of stock board they feel humiliation. So this needs special attention and there must be accountability of the officers concerned. The affected people are not even paid compensations under drought relief fund. The drought relief fund amount may be enhanced and should be made flexible so that victims and genuine people are not being harassed unnecessarily. To deal with the rising graph of unemployed youth the government should accommodate private investors in the state, a industrialization policy should be formed so t