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: DOCUMENT' RESUME ED 117 743 CS 202 496 TITLE b Teacher's Guide for Communication Skills, Grades 11 and 12, Secondary Schools. coo PUBDATE NOTE 454p. EDRS PRICE 1?-50:8-1 EC=$24.77 PItt-PostaAt DESCRIPTORS *Communication Skills; Compositiion (Literary) ; Curriculum Guides; *Iniglish Instruction; Films; *Language Arts;, Literature Appreciation; Reading; Science Fiction; Secondary Education This l'uide focuses on communication skills within 17, courses: American literature 1 and 24 English literature 1 and 2, world literature 1 and 2, advanced composition, advanced literature, aovanced literature and composition 11and 2, film study, science fiction, modern writers, comic spirit, Afro-Americin literature, career English, and college prep English. Each course outline contains a description, general goals, content, actitivities, and materials. Also included is an outline-for the overall goalsof communication skills curriculum in the subject area of listening, reading, writing, speaking, language, critical thinkingn literary interpretation and appreciation, and media. (JM) ABSTRACT ******************************,!*************************************** Documents acquired by ERIC include'many informal unpublished * materials not available from other sources. ERIC makes every effort * * to obtain the best copy available. Nevertheless, items of marginal * r* reproducibility *re often encountered and this affectS the quality * I * Of the microfiche and hardcopy reproductions ERIC makes available * * via the ERIC Document Reproduction Service (EARS) . EDRS is not ** * responsible for the quality of the original.document. Reproductions * * supplied by' !DRS are the bes,t that can be made from the original. * *********************************************************************** 4

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:DOCUMENT' RESUME

ED 117 743 CS 202 496

TITLE b Teacher's Guide for Communication Skills, Grades 11and 12, Secondary Schools.

cooPUBDATENOTE 454p.

EDRS PRICE 1?-50:8-1 EC=$24.77 PItt-PostaAtDESCRIPTORS *Communication Skills; Compositiion (Literary) ;

Curriculum Guides; *Iniglish Instruction; Films;*Language Arts;, Literature Appreciation; Reading;Science Fiction; Secondary Education

This l'uide focuses on communication skills within 17,courses: American literature 1 and 24 English literature 1 and 2,world literature 1 and 2, advanced composition, advanced literature,aovanced literature and composition 11and 2, film study, sciencefiction, modern writers, comic spirit, Afro-Americin literature,career English, and college prep English. Each course outlinecontains a description, general goals, content, actitivities, andmaterials. Also included is an outline-for the overall goalsofcommunication skills curriculum in the subject area of listening,reading, writing, speaking, language, critical thinkingn literaryinterpretation and appreciation, and media. (JM)

ABSTRACT

******************************,!***************************************Documents acquired by ERIC include'many informal unpublished

* materials not available from other sources. ERIC makes every effort ** to obtain the best copy available. Nevertheless, items of marginal *

r* reproducibility *re often encountered and this affectS the quality *

I * Of the microfiche and hardcopy reproductions ERIC makes available *

* via the ERIC Document Reproduction Service (EARS) . EDRS is not **

* responsible for the quality of the original.document. Reproductions ** supplied by' !DRS are the bes,t that can be made from the original. ************************************************************************

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1975

TEACHER'S GUIDE FOR COMMUNICATION SKILLS

SECONDARY SCHOOLS

Clyde C. Miller

Superintendent of Echools.

Prepared under the supervision of.the

DIVISION OF CURRIGULUM SERVICES

Anne E. Price, Director

-

S

Gerald H. Moeller

Assistant Superintendent

John D. Buckner, Second4

M. Eloise Fay, Secondary

Secondary Communication Skills Curriculum Committee

Theresa Baker

Michael J. Carroll

Joseph Clark

Maxine M. Houston

Judith Ann Hunter

Copyright, 1915.

St. Louis Public Schools

St. Louis, Missouri

All rights reserved.

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Ruby H.: Jones

Mildred Kovacevich

Jacqueline Leslie

Mari-Fran MantiaH

Jeannette

4t,

No part of this work may be reproduced or trimmei

form by any means, electronic or Mechanical,- incl

copying and recording, of by any information ptor

retrieval system without permission in writing fr

LOU' Board of Education, St. Louis, Missouri

UpUPe 1 r

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St. Louis Public High Achools

GOALS

COMMUNICATION SKILLS CURRICULUM

_LISTENING:

The-student listens courteously.

The student listens to increase his ability to concentrate, to interpret, and to evaluate.

The student listens to learn efficiently and to think contructively.

READING:

The student reada.for knowledge, for enjoyment, for vicarious experience.

The student reads to form personal values.

The student masters the basic reading skills essential to his comprehension of printed

materials.

WRITING:

The student writes clear, correct, effective English.

The student writes creatively.

SPEAKING:

The student speaks clearly, thoughtfully, effectively.

The student, communicates his experiences; he develops skills in oral communication.

The student learns standard English and uses it when appropriate.

LANGUAGE:

At

The student expands his vocabulary continually.

The student uses words precisely.

The student understands that words convey symbolic meanings and emotional

connotations.

The.student recognizes that communication is non-verbal as well as

verbal.

The student understands the relationship between speaking and writing.

CJ1

CRITICAL THINKING:

The student learns and uses both logical and creative thought

processes.

The student develops a positive self image and worthwhile

personal values.

The student functions as both a group member and an independent

entity.

The student respects the rights of others to theiropinions.

LITERARY, INTERPRETATION AND APPRECIATION:

3

The student interprets and comprehends both literal and

symbolic meanings.

The student discriminates between the meretricious and the true and

sincere in literature,

The student appreciates the meaning, significance, and

style of literary works.

The'student recognises various literary forms;

The student appreciates. the literary heritage and the relation of literature

to the,othe tar

MEDIA: The student understands the impact of media

on, the individual and society.

The student makes judgments about media by evaluating '6resentations.

The student differentiates

among statements of fact, fiction, and opinions.

The student develops audiovisual literacy.

'

The student uses visual media as.tools of communication.

ID:The student uses audiovisual media as

supplements to and not substitutes for the. printed 4014.

The studenekevaluates what he sees and hears with an understanding of human nature and i

0 fallibility.

The student distinguishes fact fro* opinion and is aware of subtle propaganda

techni4des

The student draws from and reinforces, learns from other disciplines.

The student develops an appreciation for the literary heritage through the best that:con eap4rary :

media offer as they make curriculum content relevant.

0

975

TABLE OF CONTENTS

American Literature 1

American Literature 2

English Literature 1

'English Literature 2

World Literature

1

5

13

31

64

79

World Literature 2

99

Advanced Composition

107

Advanced Literature

113

Advanced Composition and Literature 1

119.

Advanced Composition and Literature 2

135

-

Film Study

Science Fiction

Modern Writers

)Comic Spirit

Afro - American. Literature

Career English

College Prep English

3

141

169

217

235

247

263

277

COMPOSITION.

Advanced Composition

.

LITERATURE, SURVEY,COURSES

(Two -Seniesters)

American Literature 1

American Literature 2

English Literature 1

English Literature 2

World Literature 1

World Literature 2

LITERATU

TIC ODURSES.

(One

ster)

Science Fiction

Modern Writers

/

Comic Spirit

Afro-American Litetature

COURSES GROUPED BY TYPES

MEDIA

107

Film Study

5

13

ADVANCED COURSES

Advanced Composition and Litetat

Advanced Composition and Litekat

Advanced Composition

31

Advanced Literature

61

World Literature 1

79

World Literature 2

".99

169

217

235

247

.Afro-American Literature

e 1

re 2

PRACTICAL PREPARATORY COURSES, LANGUAG ORIENTED

Career Enclish

College Prep English

141

119

135

107

113 79

99.

247

263

277

AMERICAN LITERATURE 1

.

05031

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Study literary movements and major authors inAmerican literature from its beginnings to

the

present time.

Read works of authors from various socio-economic groups.

Note how their

contributions to American

literature reflect the changing aspects of American society as

well

as its enduring values.

This course is for any 11th or 12th graders,

college bound or career

oriented.

GENERAL GOALS

The student becomes acquaintedwith the influential writers of

each period.

The student develops an awareness

of major literary movements.

The student gains insight into

the development of the various genre

of literature on the American

The student recognizes that American

literature reflects the social and

economic trends of the era

which it was written.

scene.

during

The student becomes aware of

the diversity and multiplicity of

views expressed by various

ethnix and sgocio-

,

00

economic groups.

The student investigates

themes in American literature which

have been present from itsbegihni*s

times.

to modern-

The student becomes conscious

of the recurrence in American

literature of a quest for sustaining

apd enduring

values.

The student develops the ability to

read literature critically.

The student writes as an

outgrowth of.his study of American

literature.

5

AMERICAN LITERATURE I

05031

Materials

tle

AMERICAN LITERATURE-.... Ginn and Company

AMERICAN LITERATURE, TEACHER'S HANDBOOK AND KEY.

Ginn and Company.

I, TOO', SING AMERICA: BLACK VOICES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE.

Hayden Book Company.

ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST.

American Book Company.

ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST/KESSEY: TEACHER-STUDENT PACKAGE.

Aterican Book'Company.

NATIVE SON.

Harper and Row Publishers, Inc.

NATIVE SON NOTES.

Harper and Row Publishers, Inc.

A SEPARATE PEACE.

American Book Company.

A SEPARATE PEACE/KNOWLES:TEACHER-STUOENT-PACKAGE.

American Book Company.

EIGHT AMERICAN ETHNIC PLAYS,

Charles Scribner's Sons.

Use

Students

Teacher

Students, Teacher

Students

Teacher

Students

Teacher

'

Students

Te'acher

Students, Teacher

LISTEN TO LITERATURE: RECORD ALBUM TO ACCOMPANY AMERICAN' LITERATURE (2 records).

Department

Ginn and Company.

AMERICAN LITERATURE 1,

GOALS AND CONTENT

----1. -Me:Student investigatei-major themes which .

each succeeding group of American writers tasmodified according to his own experience.

A. He "sees that everyman acquires a "senseof place," a feeling of ilentificationwjth his home.

1. He learns that AmericEnlliteraturebegan withattemptd by settlers torecord what thpy, found in this newland,.how they managed to live, andwhat. their hopes were for the future.

2. He learns that writers of.the 19thcentury recorded the natural wandersthey saw throughout the,country.

3. He becomes acquainted with th'efamiliar theme of the'young manor woman's journey from a .smalltown to the big city2 rind he seesthe profound influences, 'both forgood and evil, that the city ex-

upon ..those who fell within itsbotkhdaries."

4. He see that theAmerican "sense ofplace", iso includes thecity.

107

1CTIVITIES AND

-4

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Thp Sens

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from,A DIOF THE SOp. 5

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from ROUG

AMERICAN LITERATURE: froth 'OF Tv

2

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from AVA"City of"Lenoir Av

11

f ' \05031

NTENT

tagatei major themes-whichroup of American writers has.g to his dim experience.

evry man acquires a "sensee ling of-identification

t

that American literatUre,h attempts by settlers toat 4hey-found in'this newthey:managed to Live, andhoRes_were for, the future.

that writers of the 1 th.ecorded the natural wo klersthroughout the country,N

s acquainted 'with 'the

theme of the young mans journey from a small`he big city,, and he seesund-influen0s, both forevil, that.the city ek-n those who fetl within itss. 4

r''

hat, the American "sense ofso includes the city.

107

`ACTIVITIES AND*MATERIALSn .

AMERICAN tITERATURE: "T e Sense of Place," p. 1

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from A DISCOURSE OF THEE' PLANTATIONOF THE SOUTHERN COLONY IN VIRGINIA,p. 52

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from ROUGHING IT, 11..15

AMERICAN LITERATURE: frdh OF TIME AND THE RIVER, p: .22.

0

AMERICAN' LITERATURE: from A WALKER IN THE CITY, p. 27"City of Harlem," p. 33"Lenox Avenue Mural,"p.

AMERICAN LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND/

B. The student recognizes that individualismwas, from the beginning, a central factand resource of American 'life.

I. He learns that one -of the first effectsof life in early America was the needfor self-reliance.

Z. He studies literature which havreflec--ted the importance of individual'thoughtand actiOn and the relationship of thestate.

C. The student understands that theAmerican dream cannot be definedprecisely4pecause it has taken avariety of forms', the oftTlity andnature of the vision depending entire-ly upon the convictions and imaginationof the dreamer.

128

j

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The Ind"Of Indi

% Countrie

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "LetterJanuary,Freedom,"The Hau"The Bri"Yardbir

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: from LE

AMERICAN UTERATURE: "The di

"The May"The Decp. 86"I Hear

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "I, Too,

FPL THE BLACK AMEid

AMERICAN LITERATURE1 "Inaugur"Message"Christ I ;

a

13

05031

CONTENT' ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

recognizeS that-individualismhe begi ning, acentralfacte of A rican life.'

ns that one of the first effectsin early America Was the need

f-reliance.

ies literature which has reflec-importance of individual thoughton and the relationship of the

understands that theeam'cannot be definedcause it has taken a

forms; the quality andhe vision depending entire-convictions and imaginationer.

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The Individual," p. 47"Of Individualism In DemocraticCountries," p. 50

"Letter to. the Town of Providence,January, 1655, On the limits ofFreedom," p. 53"The Haunted Mind," p. 56"The Bride Comes to Yellow Sky," p.68"Yardbird's Skull," p. 78.

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: from LETTERS TO A BLACK BOY, p. 277

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The American Dream," p. 80"The Mayflower Compact," p. 84"The Declaration of Independence,"p. 86"I Hear America Singing," p. 96

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "I, Too, Sing America," p. 103

FPL THE BLACK AMERICAN DREAM

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Inaugural Address," p. 101"Message to the Grass Roots," p. 165"Christmas Sermon on Peace," p. 115

AMERICAN LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT. ACTIVITIES AND

II. The student moves into an historical surveyof-American*literature, focusing on growth,continuity, and recurring themes.

0

A. He sees that there was little imagip-ative writing in the 17th and 18thcenturies.

1. He reads examples of the earlydiaries, journals, sermons, religiouspoems, and political treatises.

2. He studies the Puritan, ethicbecomes aware of the importance-ofPuritan attitudes to America'sliterary, intellectual; social, andpolitical heritage.

149

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from THEPLANTATIfrom ALINE,

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "On BeinAmerica,from LIFDOUGLASS"An Ante

AMERICAN LITERATURE; ."The Pur

AMERICAN LITERATURE: _ "SpeechMeditati"Six,""PrefaceTouching"Sinners.'

Angry Gofrom PE

41005031

ACTIVITIES AND'MATERIALS

into

turecurr

'herein

an historical survey, focusing on growth,ing themes.

was little imagin-the 17th and 18th

xamples of the earlyournals, sermons, religiouspolitical treatises.

the Puritan ethic andare of the importance oft.itudeg to America'sintellectual, social, and e

heritage.

149

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from THE HISTORY OF THE PLYMOUTHPLANTATION, p. 125from A HISTORY OF THE DIVIDINGLINE, p. 134

I, TOO, SING AMERICA:

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

"On Being Brought from Africa toAMerica," p. 13from LIFE AND TIMES OF FREDRICKDOUGLASS, p. 18"An Ante-Bellum Sermon," p'. 88

"The Puritans," p. 138

"Speech to the General Court,"_p. 143Meda6tion,"Huswifery," p. 150

p. 151"Preface to God's DeterminationsTouching His Elect," 153

"Sinner's in the Hands of anAngry God," p. 156from PERSONAL NARRATIVE, p. 158

AMERICAN LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

B. He sees thatslatcer colonial writerswere concerned with political mattersand investigated *themes which have

' continued to be present in Americanlife And thought.

1. He reads selections which reflecttheir idealism, their concern withideas and values, and their shrewdpracticality.

2." He sees their willingness to fightfor material gain as well as for aprinciple.

C. The student gains insight into the surgeof nationalistic feeling in the 1800'swhich formed the basis for the develop-ment of an authefitic American literature.

1. He itudies selections based on concern:`with the beauty of nature and refleCt-.ing the writer's faith in the transcen-dent meaning of that beauty.

3

1q,

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from"Hamatr

RECORD LISTEN TO LITERATURE-

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "On Fre

AMERI N LITERATURE: "The Wa"The Sa"On the

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Speechp. 184

RECORD LISTEN TO LITERATURE-SCONVENTION

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The BaRECORD LISTEN TO LITERATURE-T

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "A Nati

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Thanat"To the"The Tip. 278"The So"The Fi

1?

E1 05031

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

at later- colonial writersrued with political mattersigated themes which haveto be present in Americanhoughe.

ds selections which reflectidealism, their concern withand values, and their shrewdcality.1

s their willingness to fightterial gain as well as for aple.

t gains'insight into the surgelistic feeling in the 1800'sed the basis for the develop-authentic American literature.

dies selections based on,coneernhe beauty of nature-and reflect-e writer's faith in the transceaning of 'that beauty.

16

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from THE CRISIS, p. 188"Hamatreya," p.

RECORD LISTEN TO LITERATURE-HAMATREYA

I, T00, SING AMERICA: "On Freedom," p. 13

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The Way to Wealth," p. 170"The Sale of the Hessions," p. 177."On the Subject Of Salaries," p. 179

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Speech,to the Virginia Convention,"p. 184

RECORD LISTEN TO LITERATURE-SPEECH TO THE VIRGINIACONVENTION

AMERICAN LITERATURg: "the Battle of the Kegs," p. 193

RECORD LISTEN TO LITERATURE-THE BATTLE OF THE KEGS

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "A National Culture," p. 201

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Thanatopsis," p. 205"To the Fringed Gentian," p. 209"The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls,"p. 278"The Sountitrof the Sea," p. 279"The Fire of Driftwood," p, 280

AMERICAN LITERATURE 1

'GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

2. He reads folk tales and legendswritten in the local color traditions.

'3. He evaluates the American philopophyof responsible individualism.

4. He traces the early-development ofthe American short story.

5. He investigates the continuingconcern with the Puritan ethic andthe dark side of human nature.

6. He compares and contrasts literaturereflecting. points of view and con-cerns during die Civil War.

18

AMERICAN LITERATURE:(

11

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

SFS 770-713SFS 770-568F 171 152

"Rip Va"Self-Refrom WA

What Ifrom WA

"Tht Pit"A Descep. 296

THAT STRONG MR. POE.A.POEE.A.POE

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "The Ing

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Young G"Bartleb

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "GettysbRECORD LISTEN TO' LITERATURE

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: from UP"The At1p. 61"Of Mr.Others,

"Booker

19

05031.b

NTENT ACTIVITIES. AND MATERIALS

folk tales .and legendsn the local color tradittons.

tea the American philosophysible individualism.

the early development ofcan short story.

igates the continuingith the Puritan ethic andside of human nature.

es and contrasts literatureg points of view and con-ing the Civil War.

18li

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Rip Van Winkle," p. 211"Self-Reliance," p. 225from WALDEN,"Where I Lived andWhat I Lived For," p. 250from WALDEN, "Conclusion," p. 263

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The Pit and the Pendulum," p. 284"A Descent into the Maelstrom,"p. 296

SFS 770-713 THAT STRONG MR. POESFS 770-568 E.A.POE

i-171-152 E.A.POE

I,'TOO, SING. AMERICA:

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

"The Ingrate," p. 93

"Ybung Goodman Brown," p. 316"Bartleby the Schrivener," p. 327

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Gettysburg Address," p. 357RECORD LISTEN TO LITERATURE

I,'TOO, SING AMERICA: from UP FROM SLAVERY, p. 57"The Atlanta Exposition Address,"p. 61"Of Mr. Booker T. Washington andOthers,e" p. 65

"Booker T. and W.E.B.," p. 76

19

AMERICAN LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

IV.//The student reads and discusses or writes areport on at least one of the three no elssuggested for the course, showing therelevance of this literary form to the ther

'selections read in class.

1.

V. The student reads and discusses,or writesreport on at least one of the dramas sugg sted.He may also participate in reader's theateror dramatic interpretation of excerpts, fromthe play.

20

4

12

ACTIVITIES: In the teAcher'sAMERICAN LITERATURE suggestionsassignments, uses of illustrativocabulary work, and other follshould be correlated to the resing to the needs of the individ

LINE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NESTONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST/PACKAGE

NATIVE SON (Cliff's NOTES ON NAA SEPARATE PEACEA SEPARATE PEACE/KNOWLES TEACHE

EIGHT AMERICAN,ETHNIC PLAYS:

D

A

21

05031

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

and discusses or writes aone of the three novelscourse, showing theliterary, form to the otherclass.

and discusses or writes aofte of the dramas suggested.ipate in reader's theaterretation of excerpts from

20

ACTIVITIES: In the teacher's manual which accompanies/-------170E166WLITERATURE suggestions are given for writing

assignments, uses of illustrations, tests, quizzes,vocabulary work, and other follow-up activities. Theseshould be correlated to the reading assignments accord-ing to the needs of the individual teacher.

12

ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NESTONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST/KESSEY, TEACHER/STUDENTPACKAGE

NATIVE SON (Cliff's NOTES ON NATIVE SON)A SEPARATE PEACEA SEPARATE PEACE/KNOWLES TEACHER /STUDENT PACKAGE

EIGHT AMERICAN ETHNIC PLAYS: I REMEMBER MAMA, p. 83A RAISIN IN THE SUN, p. 221THE OXCART, p. 303

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

.05032

COURSE DESCRIPTION

American Literature 2 is designed for the college-bound and the career-oriented student.

It

course beginning with the literature written around the time of the Civil War and continuing

of the present day.

A number of major authors are studied, along with significaht literary

Particular emphasis is given to the new developments in the major genre.

The contributions

ethnic groups to the American literary and cultural scene are noted.

Attention is also paia

values and concerns in American literature which have appeared throughout its history.

is a ,survey

through works

trends.

of various

to those

".%

GENERAL GOALS

The student becomes acouainted with the influential writers of each period.

The student develops an awareness of major literary movements.

The student gains insight into the development of.the various genre

of literature on the American scene.

The student recognizes that American literature reflects the social and economic trends of the era during

which it was written.

41

The student becomes aware of the diversity and multiplicity of views expressed by writers from various ethnic

and socio- economic groups.

The student investigates themes in American literature which have been present from its beginning to modern

times.

The student becomes conscious of the recurrence in American literature of a quest for sustaining and enduring

values.

The studefit develops the ability to read literature-critically.

The student writes as an outgrowth of his study of American literature.

13

1\D

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

05032

Materials

Title

Use

AMERICAN LITERATURE.

Ginn and Company.

Students

AMERICAN LITERATURE, TEACHERS' HANDBOOK AND KEY.

Ginn and Company.

Teacher

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: BLACK VOICES IN AMERICAN LITERATURE.

Hayden Book Co., Inc.

Students

A NATION OF NATIONS: ETHNIC LITERATURE IN AMERICA.

The Free Press.

Students

EIGHT AMERICAN ETHNIC PLAYS.

Charles Scribner's Sons.

Students

TENDER IS THE NIGHT.

American Book Company.

Students

TENDER IS THE NIGHT/FITZGERALD, TEACHER-STUDENT PACKAGE.

American Book Company.

Teacher

ALL THE KING'S MEN.

Bantam Books, Inc.

Students

THE THIRD LIFE OF GRANGE COPELMM1.

Harcourt Brace Jovanovichi'Inc.

Students

LISTEN TO LITERATURE: RECORD ALBUM TO ACCOMPANY AMERICAN LITERATURE.

Ginn and Company.

Department

AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

I. The student reads prose works by majorauthors of the latter part of she -nine-

teenth century.

A. He reads colorful portrayals of theAmerican West and stories about someof its distinctive characters.

B. He shares the experiences of a masterstory teller.

I

C. He looks at Americans from the'perspe tive

of a cosmopolitan American author.

D.. He analyzes the realism of a well-k own

short story.

E. He reads a story which investigates the

deep schism in mankind produced by race.

2415

NOTE: In this course, many ofare repeated under several diffrepetition is designed to showserve to illustrate various goato suggest that works be reread

AMERICAN LITERATURE: PTenpeps0

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LIHANDBOOK A

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from OLDp. 400

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LI

SFS 769-543 WORLD OF MARK

AMERICAN. LITERATURE: "A Bundl

"The Ope

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LIHANDBOOK A

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Of the

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LI

25

05032

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

s prose works by majoratter part of the nine-

orful portrayals of thet and storied about somenctive characters.

e experiences of a master

Americans from the perspectivelitan American author.

the realism of a well7known

tory which investigates the

in mankind produced by race.

6

2415

NOTE: In this course, many of\the reading suggestionsare repeated under several different goals. This

repetition is designed to show th t one selection may

serve to illustrate various goals d is not intended

to suggest that works be reread.\

AMERICAN LITERATURE:, "Tennessee's Parfter," p. 390

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LITERATURE, TEACHERS'HANDBOOKAND KEY, Nos. 3 and 5, p. 271

AMERICAN LITERATURE: from OLD TIME ON THE MISSISSIPPI,p. 400

WRITING ACTIVITY: .AMERICANIITERATURE, No. 14, p. 424

SFS 769-543 WORLD OF MARK TWAIN

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "A Bundle of Letters," p. 427

thrhe'Open Boat," p. 454

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LITERATURE, TEACHERS'HANDBOOK AND KEY, No. 3, p. 303

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Of the Coming .of John," p. 476.'

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LITERATURE, No. 8, p. 486

25

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

II. The student studies the short story of thetwentieth century.

A. ,He understands each story's themeand its similarities to and differences

: from the short story of earlier eras.

1. He realizes that an investigationof man's relationship to nature isstill significant to American liter-ature.

2. He sees that the quest for theAmerican dream continues.

20

gt8 760-403 'LATE 19th iNDDEVELOPMENT Co

"'F 262-137 LITERATURE INSFS.760404 MODERN DEVELOSFS 760-405 INTERPRETATION

SHORT STORY

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Big'Twp. 573

ACTIVITY: Answer questions 1,Literature, p. 580

F 361-163 HEMINGWAY, PARTF 361-164 ,,HEMINGWAY, PART

SFS 769-45t ERNEST HEMINGWA,INTERPRETATION

SFS 769-45Z. ERNEST HEMINGWAHEARTED RIVER'

SFS 770-712 . HEMINGWAY-

AMERICAN LITERATURE:* 'The Bee

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Winier

27.

lE 2

CONTENT

05032

ACTIVITIA AND MATERIALS

tudies the short storpof thetury.

tands each story's themeimilarities to and differencesshort story of earlier eras.

alizes that an investigationn's relationship to nature issignificant to Amqrican liter-

es that the quest for thecan dxeam continues.

SFS 760-403

F 262-137SFS 760-404SFS 760-405

LATE 19th AND EARLY 20th CENTURYDEVELOPMENT (of the short story)

LITERATURE IN AMERICA-THE SHORT STORYMODERN DEVELOPMENTINTERPRETATIORANDEVALUATION OF THESHORT STORY

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Big Two-Hearted River: Part II,"p. 573

ACTIVITY: Answer questions 1, 3, and 5 in AMERICANLiterature, p. 580

F 361-163F 361-164

SFS 769-456

SFS 769-457

HEMINGWAY, PART 1HEMINGWAY, PART 2

ERNEST HEMINGWAY, THE MAN: A BIOGRAPHICALINTERPRETATION WITH CARLOS BAKER

ERNEST HEMINGWAY, THE WRITER "BIG TWO -

HEARTED RIVER" (two.parts)-

SFS 770-712 HEMINGWAY

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The Bear," p. 558

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Winter Dreams," 541

27

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALOAND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

It

3. He becomes aware of a morepsychological approach to theportrayal of character.

4. He examines the search for identityby the Black man.

SFS 770-711. GATSBY--THE AME

ACTIVITY: Much attention has. F. Scott Fitzgerald, particulaStudents familiar with the fitoto examine thematic relationeh

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LI

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Silent S

'ACTIVITY: Answer question $ fp. 531

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The Cat

MUTING ACTIVITY: Write a shoconflict and triumph in a humsthe use of Thurber's humorous

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The Chr

ACTIVITY: Answer questions 5LITERATURE, p. 595

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Flying

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LIp. 617

2 05032

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

es award of a moreogical approach to theal of character.

ines the search for identityBlack mat.

2817

SFS 7703711 GATSBY--THE'AMERICAN MYTH

ACTIVITY: Much attention has been given recently toF. Scott Fitzgerald, particularly to THE GREAT GATSBY.Students familiar with the story should be encouragedto examine thematic relationships with "Winter Dreams."

0

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LITERATURE, No. 11, p. 556

AMERIC PLITBRATURE: "Silent Snow, Secret Snow," p. 519

ACTIVITY: Ariswer question 8 from AMERICAN LITERATURE,p. 531

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The Catbird Seat," p. 533

WRITING ACTIVITY: Write a short, short story showing',conflict and triumph in a human relationship throughthe use of Thurber's humorous techniques.

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The Chrysanthemums," p. 588,

ACTIVI*: Answer questions 5 and 6 from AMERICANLITERATURE, p. 595

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Flying Home," p. 604

WRITING ACTIVITY; AMERICAN LITERATURE, Nos. 8 and 11,p. 617

28

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

6

5. He ,sees man's concern ,for, thefuture of .civil1zation.

6. He discovers the profound piear h.ftir moral values present inwriting.

7. He explores the subject of mansalienation from his fellow man intwentieth-century literature.

B. He becomes aware of the fundamental viewsof life represented by,each author, eitherthrough the story itse1-or throughsupplementary reading and/or teacherassistance.'

3018

I s TOO, SING AMERICA: "Who's

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

AMElICAN LITERATURE:

I, TOO, SING AMERICA:

d

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

I, TOO, SING AMERICA:

"The Port

"The Bea"Flying

°"Brother

"Silent S"The Catb"Big Two-p. 573"Thy Chry

e Portlying H

It

Summe

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "On the"Dear Dr

05032

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

n's concern for the

era the profound searchvalues present in modern

es the subject of man'sfrom his fellow man in

-'century literature.

f the fundamental viewsby each author, either

itself or throughing and/or teacher

3018

I, TOO, SING AMERICA,: "Who's Passing for Who?" p. 105

AMERICAN LITERATURE:. "The Pbrtable Phonograph," p. 597

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "The Bear," p. 558"Flying Home," p. 604

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "Brother Carlyle," p. 209

AMERICAN LITERATURE:- "Silent Snow, Secret Snow," p. 519"The Catbird Seat," p. 533"Big Tim-Hearted River: Part II,"p. 573"The Chrysanthemums," p. 588"The Portable Phonograph,!! p. 597"Flying Home," p. 604

TOO, SING AMERICA: "A Summer Tragedy," p. 139

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "On the Road," p.150"Dear Dr. Butts," p. 282

31

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND 'CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

C. He sees how the short story has changedin forri and style from earlier writingof this genre.

1. He becomes aware that plot is less,emphasizedthan in the earlier shortstory.

2. He sees that this has led to a greaterconcentration of character.

3. He notices that most writers usevocabulary and syntax that arebasically simple, akin to ordinaryspeech.

4. He learns that some marked inno-vations in style have occurred.

3219

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "A Fly i

"The Poc

NOTE: Gbals C 1 and C 2 can beand simultaneously through a coSnow, Secret Snow," p. 519, "Pip. 583, and "The ChrysanthemumsAMERICAN LITERATURE.

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "We're tHere," p

ACTIVITY: Compare twentieth cecontemporary writers to nineteeNathaniel Hawthorne, Herman Mel

ACTIVITY: Analyze and contrastErnest Hemingway and William Faimpact of each on subsequent Am

33

05032

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

he short story has changedtyle from earlier writing

aware that plot is lessthan in the earlien short

hat this has led to a greatertion of character.

s that Most writers useand syntax that aresimple, akin to ordinary

that some marked inno-n style have occurred.

3219

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "A Fly in the Buttermilk," p. 234

"The Pocketbook Game," p. 254

NOTE: Goals C 1 and C 2 be illustrated effectivelyand simultaneously through consideration of "SilentSnow, Secret Snow," p. 519, "Picture for Her Dresser,"p. 583, and "The Chrysanthemums," p. 588, all fromAMERICAN LITERATURE.

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: -,"We're the only Colored PeopleHere," p. 251

ACTIVITY: Compare twentieth century stories bycontemporary writers to nineteenth century works byNathaniel Hawthorne, Herman. Melville, and Bret Harte.

ACTIVITY: Analyze and contrast the writing styles ofErnest Hemingway and William Faulkner and consider theimpact of each on subsequent American writing.

33

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2AA

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

5. He realizes that the modern shortstory sometimes ends without adefinite resolution.

III. The student studies American poetry fromthe Civil War period to modern times.

A. He sees sharp changes in subject matterand style through the two most prominentpoets of the latter part of the nine-teenth century.

1. He realizes that Whitman's popular-ization of free verse and emphasison the commonplace revolutionizedAmerican poetry.

2. He becomes aware that Emily Dickinsonwas a precursor to the twentieth-centurypoet in the synthesized nature of herwork and in her unique perceptions.

34 20

4110

co rt)

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Big Twp. 573

"The Ch

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "The Al

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "One's"Therep. 367"Out ofRocking"A Nola

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LIT

F 372-115 WALT WHITMAN -P0

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "This ip. 381"The Mu

3

"I

p. 38"Succesp. 385"BecausDeath,"1

A

05032

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

zes that the modern shorttimes ends without a

resolution.

ies American poetry fromriod to modern times.

changes in subject matterrough the two most prominentlatter part of the nine-

ry.

zee that Whitman's popular-of free verse and emphasisommonplace revolutionizedpoetry.

a aware that Emily Dickinsonecursor to the twentieth-centurythe synthesized nature of herin her unique perceptions.

34 20

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Big Two-Hearted River: Part II."p. 573"The Chrysanthemums," P. 588

1, TOO, SING AMERICA: "The Almost White Boy," p. 256

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "One's Self I Sing," p. 366"There Was a Child Went Forth,"p. 367"Out of the Cradle EndlesslyRocking," p. 370"A Noiseless Patient Spider," p. 378

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LITERATURE, No. 7, p. 369

F 372-115 WALT WHITMAN -POET FOR A NEW AGE

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "This ia6my letter to the World,"p. 381"The Murmur of a Bee," p. 382"I taste a liquor never brewed,"p. 383"Sbccess is counted sweetest,"p. 385 .

"Because I could not stop forDeath," p. 387

35

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT

B. Re sees that many poets of the twentiethcentury have adopted further changes in,;subject matter, style, form, and language.

I. He bees aware that the modernpoet'b subject matter includes allaspects of life.

2. He learns that free verse has becomewidely used.

36CD

ACTIVITIES AND

WRITING ACTIVITY: Write a thof "Success is counted sweetest'

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Chicago"Grass,"

SFS 769-530 STREETS, PRAIRIECARL SANDBURG

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "SpringI, TOO, SING AMERICA: "Harlem,

from "Thp. 201

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Fiddler

SFS 772-433 SPOON RIVER ANT

AMERICAN LITERATURE: -"Pattern"Localit"Hurt Ha"Three B

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "Nikki-

R 566-102 ANTHOLOGY OF NEG

21 37

05032

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

many poets of the twentiethadopted further changes iner, style, form, and language.

ea aware that the modernobject matter includes allof life.

a that free verse has becomesect. 0

362

WRITING ACTIVITY: Write a theme extending the messageof "Success is counted sweetest" to a personal experience.

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Chicago," p. 6,31

"Grass," V. 636

SFS 769-530 STREETS, PRAIRIES AND VALLEYS: THE LIFE OFCARL SANDBURG

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Spring and All, 1," p. 652

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "Harlem," p: 200from "The Children of the Poor,"p. 201

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Fiddler Jones," p. 624

SFS 772-433 SPOON RIVER ANTHOLOGY

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Patterns," p. 628"Localities," p. 637'

"Hurt Hawks," p. 650"Three Brown Girls Singing," p. 656

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "Nikki-Roasa," p. 208

R 566-102 ANTHOLOGY OF NEGRO POETS

1 37

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT

3. He'sees that the language of poetryis frequently close to that of ordinaryspeech.

*4. He sees that some forms are dieting -tively new and innovative.

C. He becomes aware of how these changes inpoetry are reflective of modern andemerging trends in American life.

1. He realizes that previously taboo.subjects are now open to diacussionand exploration.

38

ACTIVITIES AND.

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Cliff"Grafts,

"Fire a"To Sat

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "lotto"We Rea

SFS 771-722R 566-103

BLACK POEMS, BANTHOLOGY OF200 YEARS

'AMERICAN LITERATURE: , "Status"meggie

maY," P"1 (a,""Two Ja

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "The Al

AMERICAN LITERATURE: 'Tette"The Si"Siegfr

ACTIVITY: Each student bringscurrent publication. The clan,

an interchange of poems withinGoals 1, 2, or both.

39

1E2

IND CONTENT

05032

es that the language of poetryrequently close to that of ordinaryh.

es that some forms are distinc-ly.new and innovative.

a aware of how these changes, ine reflective of modern andtrends in American life.

alizea that previously tabooeta are now open to discussion

exploration.

ACTIVITIES AND IMATERIAIS

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Cliff lingenhagen," p. 620"Grass,' p. 636"Fire a d Ice," p. 644"To Satc " p. 677

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "Motto," . i06"We Retl C 1,"'slk 206

SFS 771-722 BLACK POEMS, BLACK IMAGESR 566-103 ANTHOLOGY OF NEGRO POETS IN THE U.S.

200 YEARS

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Status Symbol,'~ p. 648"maggie and milly and molly andmay," p. 658"1 (a," p. 660"TWo Jazz Poems," p. 664,

I TOO, SING AMERICA: "The Alarm Clock," p. 249

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Patterns," p. 628"The Silent Slain," p. 654"Siegfried," p. 679

ACTIVITY: Each student brings to class a poem from a

current publication. The clews divides into groups andan interchange of poems within each groups illustrate

Goals 1, 2, or both.

39

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT

2. He sees how the greater freedom oflanguage, form, and style reflecta new openness in American life.

D. He realizes that some modern poets haveadhered 09 a basically traditional formin meter, rhythm, and rhyme scheme.

E. He investigates some dominant themes inmodern American poetry.

1. He views the alienation of man in themodern world.

4°O 23

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Chicago411,

"ThirteeBlackbird

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "The Neg"Impasse

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Richard"Pity MeDay," p."StoppiEVening,"Dead, Bo

"Year-En

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Richard"Desert"Siegfri

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "Yet Do"Inciden"Freedom"PrefaceNote," p"A Poem

41

0NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS,

!ow the greater f Imian ofform, and style reflect

nness in American 1ifd.

A4

hat Some'Modern'poets havebasically traditional forthhm, and rhyme scheme.

es some dominant themes inan poetry.

the alienation of man in therld.

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Chicago, ". p. 631,

"!", p. 659"Thirteen Ways of Looking at aBlackbird," p. 674

I; TOO, SING AMERICA:

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

"The Negro," p.216"Impasse," p. 216

"Richard Cory," p: 619"Pity Me Not Because the Light ofDay," p. 638"Stopping by Woods on a SnowyEvening," p. '645"Dead Boy," p. 667"Year -End," p. 686

AMERICAN LITERATURE: ' "Richard Cory," p. 619"Desert Places," p. 646"Siegfried," p. 679

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "Yet Do I Marvel," p. 109"Incident," p.'109"Freedom Rider! Washout,",p. 268"Preface to a Twenty Volume SuicideNote," p. 210"A Poem for Black Hearts," p. 280

1 4

AMERICAN LITERATURE 209.

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES -AND

2. Re looks at 'the modern poet's ,

investigation of social issues.

3. He reads various poetic explorationsof the subject of death.

4. He realizes that,optimism'and a'loveof life and beauty are present in, theworks of many American poets.

42

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Patte",Status"The Si"the Ca"Market"Middle

I, TOO, SING AMERICA; "If We1Americ

C, to Litt,

ACTIVITY: Consider the presenselection& through:a short oraa specific social issue of tod"one of the poems.

AMERICAN LITERATURE:'

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

"Dead B"C round

"The Ws"To- Sat

"A Song;,"The pe

''Birche

"maggiemay," p

.43

05032

.CONTENT ACTIVITIES -AND MATERIALS

a at the modern,poet'sgation of social issues.

s various poetic explorationssubject ordeath.

izes that optimism and a loveand beauty are present in thef many American poets.

42

.1

AMERICAN LITERATURE:e."Patterns," p. 628, "Status Symbol," p. 648

"The Silent Slain," p. 654"the Cambridge ladies," p. 663"Market," p. 89"Middle Passage," p. 694

4* T SING AMERICA: "If We Must Die," p. 694

'"America," p. 114CHICAGO DEFENDER Sends a Man

tai Little Rock," p. 242

ACTIVITY: Consider the present-day .relevancel'gf theseselections. through a short oral presentation relatinga specific social issue of today to that presented°in

one of the pOems.

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

"DeadBoy,".p. 667"31-9undhog," p. 669

"The Waking," p. 671"To Satch," p. 677

"A Song of Pralse," p. 626"The people will live on;" p. 633 '""Birches," p. 642"maggie and -milly and molly andmay," p. 658

43

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT

F. He understands that modern Americaipoetry continues to explore some othe themes which have been presentfrom the beginnings.

1. He realizes that there is a continuingfascination with nature.

2. He sees that the positio of theindividual in society co tinues to bean important subject.

A

IJ

ACTIVITIES A01

25

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Birch

R. 566-166 ROBERT FROST

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Hurt1"The G

"On th

'I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "The C

F 272-162 POETRY BY AMER

ACTIVITY: Compare and contranature of twentieth-century pLongfellow, and Dickinson.

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Mr. F"Statu"Siegf"Silen

ACTIVITY: Answer questions 1LITERATURE, p. 622, on "Mr. F

4

05032

ACTIVITIES AND MATBRIALS

that modern Americanes to explore some ofch have been presentnings.

s that there is a continuingn"with nature.

at the position of thein society continues to be

nt subject.

7

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Birches," p. 642

ROBERT FROSTR.,566-166

AMERICAN LITERATURE.: "HUrt Hawko,"p. 650"The' Groundhog," p. 669"On the Coast of Moine,"

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "The Creation,".4).111'P.

POETRY BY AMEiICANS: JAMES WELDON JOHNSONF 272-162

P 691

ACTIVITY: Compare and contrast the attitudei towardsnature of twentieth-century poets to those of Bryant,Longfellow, and Dickinson.

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Mr. Flood's Party," p. 621"Status Symbol," p. 648"Siegfried," p. 679"Silence," p. 683

ACTIVITY: Answer questions 1, 2, 3, 4, in AMERICANLITERATURE, p. 622, on "Mr. Flood's Party."

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALS. AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

3. He understands that the search forthe American dream continues. -.

IV. The student reads selections from modernAmerican drama.

A. He analyzes the character of theprotagonist in a one-act play written

. in traditional form.

B. He examines technical innovation in awell-kn6Wn American play and understandsthe timeless message of this drama.

46

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Anne Ru"The peo"The ..Exp

I, TOO, SING AMERICA: "Iv Too.

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LI( HANDBOOK AND KEY, p. 439,

Especially recommended sps onmodern w tang in general:SFS THE.CITY AND T

AMERICAN LITERATURE:. "Ile,"

AMERICAN IITERATURE: "Our T

WRITING ACTIVITY:

F 359-111F 359-112

AMERICAN LI

HUMANITIES: OURHUMANITIES: OUR

47'

05032 ,

CONTENT4

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

rstands that the search forrican dream continues.

4

da selections from modern

the character of thein a one-act play writtenal form.

technical innovation in aAmerican play and understandss message of this drama.

46

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Anne Rutledge," p. 625"The people will live on," p. 633'"The Explorer," p. 682

I, TOO, SING. AMERICA: "I, Too." p. 103

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LITERATURE, TEACHERS'HANDBOOK AND KEY, p. 439

--Especially recommended SFS on,the impact of the city onmodern writing in general:SFS. THE CITY AND THE MODERN WRITER

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Ile," p. 701

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Our Town," p. 714

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICAN LITERATURE: No. 5, p. 753

F 359-111F 359-112

HUMANITIES: OUR TOWN AND OUR UNIVERSEHUMANITIES: OUR TOWN AND OURSELVES

47

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

C. He reads other selected plays and under-stands their wider implications we wellas their ethnic origins.

V. The student studies the twentieth centuryessay.

A. He explores several issues which areof particular concern to modern man.

B. He looks at an analysis of whit "ThisNew Man," the American, is.

VI. The student learns about America'simnigrsnt backgrounds.

A. He reads a commentary by John F.Kennedy about the arrival of immigrants.

B. He looks at an analysis of some of thereasons for European emigration.

4827

EIGHT AMERICAN ETHNIC PLAY:

ACTIVITY: Act out sections frstudied. Even simple coitumineffectiveness of the effort.

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "Walden,"Wild anp. 762"The Cre

AMERICAN LITERATURE: "What ThNew Man?'

WRITING ACTIVITY: AMERICANp. 795

NOTE: All selections listed ufrom: A NATION OF NATIONS, E

"A Natio

"Peasant

49

O

05032

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

her selected plays and under-,t wider implications we ``wellhnic origins.-

ies the twentieth century

several issues which arear concern to modern man.

an analysis of what "Thishe American, is.

rns about America'srounds.

commentary by John F.t the arrival of immigrants.

an analysis of some of theEuropean emigration.

2 7

EIGHT AMERICAN ETHNIC PLAY: DINO. o. 135THE TENTH MAN, p. 163DAY OF ABSENCE, p. 275

ACTIVITY: Act mut sections from one or mord-of the playsstudied. Even simple costuming and scenery add to theeffectiveness of the effort.

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

AMERICAN LITERATURE:

WRITING ACTIVITY:p. 795

"Walden," p. 56"Wild and Park Lands: John Muir,"p. 762"The Creative Dilemma," p. 774

"What Then Is the.American,, ThisNew Man?" p. 779

AMERICAN LITERATURE, NOs. 10 or 13,

NOTE: All delections listed under Goal VI are takenfrom: A NATION OF NATIONS, ETHNIC LITERATURE IN-AMERICA.

"A Nation of Nations," p. 3

"Peasant Origins," p. 6

49

AMERICAN LITERATURE 243.

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

C. He exOlores the stereotyped ideas ofwhat an American is.

D. He reads selections by Indian writersand considers theit thoughts.

E. He devefOps an appreciation of thedifficulties, frustrations, and rewardsof integration of diverse peoples intoAmerican life.

SFS 768-458SFS 768-459

A NATION

"Is There An ASearch of a

p. 26

"What the India"The Soul of th"Now that the B

AMERICAN INDIANAMERICAN INDIAN,

OF NATIONS: ETHNIC LI

"Evenin' Air 81"Immigrants," p,"Puerto Rican P"Christ in Concfrom CHINATOWNfrom THE SUBWAY"The Fractional"Danny O'Neill"The Three SwGrocer," p. 201"Theme for Engl"Debate with th"Black Power,""The Return tofrom THE. AMERIC"Speech to the"Incident," p."The Alarm Clocfrom BEYOND THE"City of Hatlemo"Pericles on 31

05032

I LATENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

the stereotyped ideas ofican'is.

ections by Indian writerss their thoughts.

an appreciation of the, frustrations, and rewardson of diverse peoples into

50

.SFS 768-458SFS 768-459

A NATION OF

"Is There An'American Stock?" p. 16"In Search of a Majority: An Address,"p. 26

"What the Indian Means to America," p."The Soul of the Indian," p. 278"Now that the Buffalo's Gone," p. 329

AMERICAN INDIANS, Part 1AMERICAN INDIANS, Part 2

NATIONS: ETHNIC LITERATURE IN AMERICA

"Evenin' Air Blues," p. 40"Immigrants," p. 83"Puerto Rican Paradise," p. 116"Christ in Concrete," p. 122from CHINATOWN FAMILY, p. 152from THE SUBWAY TO THE SYNAGOGUE, p. 167"The Fractional Man," p. 181"Danny O'Neill Was Here," p. 190"The Three Swimmers and the EducatedGrocer," p. 201"Theme for English B," p. 213"Debate with the Rabbi," p. 277"Black Power," p. 306"The Return to the Source," p. 331from THE AMERICAN IRISH, p. 345"Speech to the Court," p. 361"Incident," p. 363"The Alarm tlock," p2479from BEYOND THE MELTING POT, p. 428"City of Harlem," p. 452"Pericles on 31st Street," p. 477

AMERICAN LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

VII. The student reads one novel from thetwentieth century and analyzes itfrom the standpoint of character,theme, style, and its relevancy toother American literature of this time.

29

ACTIVITIES: 1. Inthrview twoperson who came to America manrecent immigrant, and give anclass of their experiences acid

2. Interview a member of a migive an oral presentation to tindi dual'a thoughts about Ahis p rticular background.

F 372-107 IMNIGRANT: THE

TENDER IS THE NIGHT

TENDER IS THE NIGHT/FITZGERA

ALL THE KING'S MEN

F 272-128 POLITICS, POWE(Restricted availability; ordHead, Communication Skills)

THE THIRD LIFE OF GRANGE COPE

111.

050324

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

de one novel from thery and analyzed itoint of character,nd its relevancy toliterature of this time.

5229

ACTIVITIES: 1. Interview two individuals, one older

person who came to America many years ago and one

recent immigrant, and give an oral presentation to theclass of their experiences and impressions.

2. Interview a member of a minority ethnic group and

give an oral presentation to the class of this

individual's thoughts about America as it relates to

his particular background.

F 372-107 IMMIGRANT: THE LONG LONG JOURNEY

TENDER IS THE NIGHT

TENDER IS THE NIGHT/FITZGERALD, TEACHER-STUDENT PACKAGE

ALL THE KING'S MEN

F 272-128 POLITICS, POWER, AND THE PUBLIC GOOD(Restricted availability; ordelr,through The Department

Head, Communication Skills)

THE THIRD LIFE OF GRANGE COPELAND

53

`ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

05041

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Study the superhuman deeds of Anglo-Saxon superhero Beowulf.

Travel on a pilgrimage with Chaucer's

CanterbuTy pilgrims.

Participate in the age-old battle of the sexes through Shakespeare's TAMING OF

THE SHREW.

Read the carefree love poems of the Cavalier poets.

Discover the satire in Swift's

proposal to "roast, bake, or stew' small children to cut down on the population.

Moving to-the

present, view Black -White relations in South Africa in the Twentieth Century noveCRY, THE BELOVED

COUNTRY.

All this and more in English. Literature I, intended for any student in Grades 12 or 11,

but especially useful to the college-bound senior.

GOALS

The student becomes familiar with selected literary works by English writers.

He recognizes that the writings of an era reflect ideas, customs, events of that era.

'1

Nae developes his knowledge of literary forMs, styles and techniques.

He analyzes the relationships of literary form to content.

He learns a little about the history of the English language.

31

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

05041

Materials

Title

Use

ENGLAND IN LITERATURE:

TAMING OF THE SHREW EDITION.

Scott, Fortsman and Company.

Students

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK TO ACCOMPANY ENGLAND IN LITERATURE:

TAMING OF THE SHREW

Teacher

EDITION.

Scott, Foresman and Company.

CRY, THE BELOVED COUNTRY.

Charles Scribner's Sons.

CRY, THE BELOVED COUNTRY, MONARCH REVIEW NOTES.

Monarch Press.

Students

Teacher-

Students

eacher

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

UNIT ONE: THE ANGLO-SAXON AGE

I. The student recognizes the epic qualitiesof BEOWULF.

A. He defines epic and applies his definitionto BEOWULF.

B. He reads and reacts to literary criticismof BEOWULF. His reaction may be oral and/or written.

C. He reads a modernmay react to it.

ion of BEOWULF and

II. The student' views the reflection of Anglo-Saxon life in the poetry of the era.

33

NOTE: All selections and pageguide are references to OGLANDOF THE SHREW EDITION unless oth

"Background," p.'55

F 364-123 *STERY OF STONEF 364-124' MYSTERY OF STONE

BEOWULF, pp. 4-34"The Poetry"of BEOWULF," pp. 40"The Epic," p. 11 ,

"BEOWULF and Its Critics,"Rp.

ACTIVITY: #6 on page 39

BEOWULF, p. 42

ACTIVITIES:1. Attempt

form.

2. Create A superhero of yourhis superhuman powers and t,and its rationale, his asshis superhuman activities.

3. Also see "Writing Activitie

a retelling of the

"The Ruin," pp. 43-44"The Wife's Complaint," p. 45"The Wanderer," pp. 46-47"The Wanaerer,"*p. 48

05041

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

AXON AGE

izes the epic qualities

c and applies his definition

pacts to literary criticismis reaction may be oral and/

ern version of BEOWULF and

the reflection of Anglo-poetry of the era.

563

NOTE: All selections and page numbers given in thisguide are references to ENGLAND IN LITERATURE: TAMINGOF THE SHREW EDITION unlesstptherwise noted.

"Background,"' p. 55

F 364-123.F 364-124

MYSTERY OF STONEHENGE, PART IMYSTERY OF STONEHENGE, PART II

BEOWULF, pp. 4-34"The Poetry of BEOWULF," pp. 40-41"The Epic," p. 11

"BEOWULF andaIts Critics," pp. 36-38

ACTIVITY: #6 on page 39

BEOWULF, p. 42

4ACTIVITIES:1. Attempt a retelling of the original BEOWULF in verse

form.

2. Create a superhero of your own. Include his name,

his superhuman powers and their origin, his costumeand its rationale, his associates, and one or two of

his superhuman activities.3. Also see "Writing Activities 1-9," on p. 39

"The Ruin," pp. 43-44"The Wife's Complaint," p. 45"The Wanderer," pp. 46-47"The Wanderer," p. 48

5 7,

ENGLISH 'LITERATURE 1

GOALS WAND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

A: He defines lyric and applies hisdefinition to poems.

B. He attempts to solve Anglo-Saxonriddles.

III. The student compares Anglo-Saxon prosewith Anglo -Saxon poetry.

A. He defines'analogv and appies hisdefinition to the selec.tion.

B. He compares.a poetic version with,a prose version of a similar subject.

IV. The student pursues individual projects.

A. He may compare Old Irish poetry withAnglo-Saxon poetry.

B. He may study the craftsmanship of theearly Anglo-Saxons.

42.

C. He may trace the changing English lan-guage through the Anglo-Saxon age.

"Anglo-Saxon Lyrics," p. 44

"Anglo Saxon Riddles," p. 49

ACTIVITY: Write a riddle aboutaloud and have the class and tInclude, as did the Anglo-Saxocould both lead and mislead th

"The Conversion of King Edwin,

"Dark Age Glosses on the Vener

ACTIVITIES:1. CoMpare the above poem wit

"Persuasion," pp. 3432. See "Writing" on p. 54

"Old Irish Poetry," p. 56

"The Treasure of Sutton Hoo,

"The Changing English Language

05041

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

yric and applies hiso poems.

to solve Anglo-Saxon

aces_ Anglo-Saxon prosepoetry.

nalogv and appieso the selection.

a poetic version withion of a similar subject.

uts individual pro-j-eets.

re Old Irish poetry withpoetry.

the craftsmanship of theSaxofts.

the changing English lan-h the Anglo-Saxon age.

-"Anglo-Saxon Lyrics " p. 44

. "Anglo Saxon Riddles," p. 49,

ACTIVITY: Write a riddle about a moderiCobje Read'italoud and have the class and teacher try to ulas it.Include, as did the Anglo-Saxons, concrete clues whichcould both lead and mislead the class. (See #1, p. 49)

"The Conversion of King Edwin," pp. 51-53

"Dark Age GlOsses on the Venerable Bede," 54

ACTIVITIES:1. Compare the above poem with Woxdsworth's sonnet

"Persuasion," p. 343See_"Writini"- on p. 54

-"Old Irish Poetry," p. 56

"The Treasure of Sutton Hoo," pp. 57 -58

"The Changing English Language," pp. 59-61

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT' ACTIVITIES AND

UNIT TWO MEDIEVAL NGLAND

I. The student rec gnizes CANTERBURY ,

TALES as a vpi ,picture of Medievallife and times.

A. He explains; how Chaucer's back-ground enab ed him to portraytravelers o such varied backgrounds.

B. He defines L he freework story.

C. He identifies ysical details andcharacter tits of each pilgrim.

D. He recognizes the satire in Chaucer's

characterizations.

GO

35

"Background," pp. 121-122

"The Prologue," pp. 64-77

TS 644-107 MEDIEVAL WORLDF 150-119 MEDIEVAL WORLDF 150-118 MEANING OF FEUDF 256-111 MEDIEVAL MANORF 369-106 MEDIEVAL ENGLA

"Geofrey Chaucer," p. 127

" Chaucer's Popularity," p. 66

ACTIVITY: Write in an approkilanguage, a description of a cto read their descriptions to,to recognize themselves or thedescriptions. Please remind s

writing about,LiAting-1,feeling.keep, their satire mild, The tthe descriptions in draft formaloud.)

"Chaucer the Satirist," p. 76

ACTIVITIES1. Discuss--which pharacter(s,

with irony? Why did he usdwith others?

2. See discussion questions o

3. Students may choose from wt

61

U

05041.

'CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS ,

ENGLAND

ognizes CANTERBURYd picture of Medieval

how Chaucer's back-led him to portrayf such varied Yackgrounds.

the framework story.

es physical details andraits of each pilgrtnh

t e satire in Chaucer'sations.

60

35

"Background," pp. 121 -122

"The Prologue," pp. 64-77

FS 649-107 MEDIEVAL WORLDF 150-119 MEDIEVAL WORLDF 150-118 MEANING OF FEUDALISM

F 256-111 MEDIEVAL MANORF 369-106 MEDIEVAL ENGLAND: THE PEASANTS' REVOLT

"Geofrey Chaucer," p. 127

"Chaucer's Popularity," p. 66

ACTIVITY: Write in an approximation of Chaucer'slanguage, a description of a classmate. (Ask Students

to read their descriptions to the class. Students try

to recognize themselves or their classmates -from these

descriptions. Please remind students that they arewriting about living, feeling persons and urge them to

keep their satire mild. The teacher may want to review

the descriptions in draft farm prior to the reading

aloud.)

"Chaucer the Satirist," p..76

ACTIVITIES:1. Discuss--which character(s) did Chaucer not treat

with irony? Why did, he use irony with some and not3-with others?

2. See discussion questions on p. 77.

,3. Students may chooSe rom writing activities on p. 78.

ENGLISH LITERATW 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

II. The student selects for analysis one orboth of the pilgrims' tales he reads.

A. He recogniies the moral of "ThePardoner's Tale."

1. He defines avarice.

2. He applies the moral to the tale.

B./He will identify irony in "The Pardoner'sTale."

C. He describes the character of the Wifeof Bath, drawing his information fromher own words.

D. He identifies the theme of her tale.

"The Pardoner's Tale," pp. 78-8

F 358-103 CHAUCER'S ENGLANPRESENTATION OF

See "Discussion," question 4,

ACTIVITIES: Discussion questioWriting assignments may be chos

on p. 86

"The Wife of Bath's Prologue,"

SUGGESTED FILM:F 371-101 MIDDLE AGES: A W

LETTERS (include

ACTIVITY: Write a newspaper inBath, presenting her as a moderLiberation. Prepare' questionsher answers,

"The Wife Of Bath's Tale," pp.

ACTIVITIES:1. Discussion questions 1-5 on2. Prepare an oral dialogue bet

or more of her husbands, folin "Readers' Theater," secti

ONTENT

05041

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

cts for analysis one orrims' tales he reads.

s the moral of ''.Theale."

es avarice.

es the moral to the tale.

tify irony in "The Pardoner's

the character of the Wifewing his information froms.

s the theme of her tale.

62

"The Pardoner's Tale," 0%478-86

F 358-103 CHAUCER'S ENGLAND: WITH A SPECIALPRESENTATION OF THE PARDONER'S TALE

See "Discussion," question 4, on p. 86

ACTIVITIES: Discussion questions 1-6 on p. 86Writing assignments may be chosen from numbers 1-3

on p. 86

"The Wife of Bath's Prologue," pp. 87-93

SUGGESTED FILM:F 371-101 MIDDLE AGES: A WANDERER'S GUIDE TO LIFE &

LETTERS (includes "The Wife of Bath")

ACTIVITY: Write a newspaper interview with the Wife ofBath, presenting her as a modern advocate of Women'sLiberation. Prepare questions and, of course, recordher answers.

"The Wife of Bath's Tale," pp, 93-97

ACTIVITIES:1. Discussion questions 1-5 on p. 982. Prepare an oral dialogue between Dame Alice and one

or more of her husbands, following the suggestionsin "Readers' Theater," section on p. 98.

63

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MA

III. The student identifies major types ofmedieval poetry.

A. He recognizes major themes in medievallyrics.

1. He identifies poems of love and beauty.

2. He identifies poems that satirizewomen.

B. He recognizes the ballad stanza.

1. He reads aloud poems in the Scottishdialect.

2. He analyzes the characteristics ofthe ballad.

C4

37

3. Students may choose assignmesuggestions on p. 98.

4. Students may choose roles ancharacters from the "ProloguSuch a performance might be

5. Students interested in furth

report on "How Original Wasand/or on "Chaucer and His T

"Lyrics," pp. 99-105

ACTIVITIES:Compare "The Land of Cockayne""The Big Rock Candy Mountain"

See "Discussion'," questions 1-5

"The Ballad Stanza," p. 106"Popular Ballads," pp. 106-110

See "Reader's Theatre" on p. 111

See "Discussion," questions 1-7,

05041

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

fies major types of

major themes in medieval

ies poems of love and beauty.

ies poems that satirize

the ballad stanza.

loud poems in the Scottish

s the characteristics.of

U4

37

A

Students may choose assignment 1 or 2 from writingsuggestions on p. 98.

. Students may choose roles and play the parts ofcharacters from the "Prologue" or from the two tales.

Such a performance might be videotaped.

.Students interested in further research may read and

report on "How/Original Was Chaucer?" pp. 123-124,

and/or on "Chaucer and His Translators," p. 124

41;

"Lyiqc pp. 99-105

ACTIVITIES:Compare "The Land of Cockayne with a recording of"The Big Rock Candy Mountain"

See ."Discussion," questions 1-5 on,p. 105

"The Ballad Stanza," p. 106"Popular Ballads," pp. 106-110 °

See "Reader's Theatre" on p. 111 for hints on oral reading.

See "Discussion," questions 1-7, p. 111

(3'

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS.AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

IV. The student pursues individual projects.

A. He may write a modern ballad dedlingwith a current event.

B. He may research the ballad form.

C. He may trace the changes in theEnglish language through the Medieval

age.

V. The student recognizes the chivalricelements in medieval prose.

A. He analyzes the use of chivalry inMalory's "Slander and Strife."

B. He compares Malory"s prose with thatof T. H. White.

UNIT THREE: THE ELIZABETHAN AGE,

I. The student-compares several types of

Elizabethan poetry.

See "Writing" on p. 111

"The Popular Ballads," p. 125

"The Changing English Language

"Slander and Strife," pp. 112-

"from THE ONCE AND FUTURE KING"Sir Thomas Malory," p. 127

ACTIVITIES: Ciympare the heroi

times with that of knighthood.the form of a discussion or aspecific incidents from the woyour thesis.

Read: "Background," p. 227SFS 768-424 DAILY LIFE IN E

F 371-115 ELIZABETH: THE

FPL THE ENGLAND OF

05041

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ues individual projects.

a modern ballad dealinght event.

rch the ballad form.

the changes in theuage through the Medieval

gnizes the chivalriceval prose.

the use of chivalry inander and Strife."

Malory's prose with thatte.

ABETHAN AGE

ares several types ofry.

6'6

See "Writing" on p. 111

"The Popular Ballads," p. 125

"The Changing English Language," pp..126-127

"Slander and Strife," pp. 112-117

"from THE ONCE AND FUTURE KING,1 pp. 118-120"Sir Thomas\ Malory," p. 127

ACTIVITIES: Compare the heroic ideal of Anglo-Saxontimes with that of knighthood. This comparison may take

the form of a discussion or a paper. Be sure to citespecific incidents from the works you use to back up

your thesis.

Read:."Background," p. 227SFS 768-424 DAILY LIFE IN ELIZABETHAN ENGLAND

F 311 -115 ELIZABETH: THE QUEEN WHO SHAPED AN AGE.

FPL THE ENGLAND OF ELIZABETH

6 7

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT

A. He analyzes selected works of thecourtly poets.

B. He recognizes characteristics ofElizabethan pastoral poetry.

1. He defines pastoral.

2. He compares two pastoral poems.

3. He'reads a parody of "The PassionateShepherd to His Love" in "The Bait."

C. He analyzes Elizabethan conga of love.

1. He defines paradox and applies hisdefinition to "Love is a Sickness."

2. He defines lament and applies hisdefinition to "Dirge for Cymbeline."

D. The student recognizes the allegoricalnature of "The Faerie Queen."

1. He defines allegory and applies hisdefinition to the selection.

. 2. He recognizes the Spenserian stanza.

68

39

ACTIVITIES AND

"Elizabeth and the Courtly Poet

"The Passionate Shepherd to His."The Nymph's Reply to the Sheph

ACTIVITY: Write a modern-day yeproposal and/Or the reply. (Idwrite the proposals. Mix propoyoung women to write the repliemimeograph the best for class u

"The Bait," p. 237

"Songs and Lyrics," pp. 143-145

"The Faerie Queen," pp. 138 -1421

"Allegory," p. 142

"The Spenserian Stanza," p. 140

69

TENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

lettedWorks of the

characteristics ofatoral poetry.

pastoral.

two pastoral poems.

parody of "The Passionateo His Love" in "The Bait."

izabethan songs of love.

paradOx and applies his `

to "Love-is a Sickness."

s lament and applies histo "Dirge for Cymbeline."

ecognizes the allegoricale Faerie Quden'."

s allegory and applies hisn to the selection.

izes the Spenserian stanza.

68,

.39

05041

"Elizabeth and the Courtly Poets," pp. 130-131

"The Passlonate Shepherd to His Love," p. 143"The Nymph's Reply to the Shepherd," p. 143

ACTIVITY: Write a modern-day version of the shepherd'sProposal and/oil the reply. (Idea--have the young menwrite the propoSals. Mix proposals up and give to theyoung women to write the replies. Read aloud ormimeograph the bet for class use.)

"The Bait,".p. 237

"Songs aid Lyrics," Pp. 143-145

"The Faerie Queen," pp. 138-142

"Allegory," p. 142

"The Spenserian Stanza," p. 140

69

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

4 E. He recognizes the major forms of sonnets.

.1. He recognizes the Italian orPetrarchan sonnet form.

2. He defines iambic pentameter.

3, He identifies and marks the rhyme'schemes of various sonnet forM.

4. He identifies the Shake'pearean orEnglish sonnet form.

II. ,The student reads and reacts,to a "Shakespearean play.

A. The student does some research on theElizabethan theatre.

ACTIVITY:1. Attempt a verse in Spenser2. Write a brief allegory, us

of modern characters and i

"Sir Philip Sidney," pp. 134-1"Edmund Spenser," p. 137

"Shakespeare's Sonnets," pp.

ACTIVITY:Attempt a sonnet in either Ita

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, pp. 1

F 260-133 SHAKESPEARE'S TFPL UNDERSTANDING SFPL HEART OF ENG(Filmstrips are often availabl

ACTIVITY: Panel reports with vresearch on history of the theall lend themselves to furtherElizabethan theatre..

05041

[LATENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

the major forms of sonnets.

izes the Italian /orin sonnet form.

iambic pentameter.

fies and marks the rhymef various sonnet forms:

fies the Shakespearean oronnet form.

and reacts to,a

Y.

oes some research on theheatre.

ACTIVITY:1. Attempt a verse in Spenserian stanza.2. Write a brief allegory, using allegorical eiluivalents

of modern-characters and incidents.

"Sir Philip Sidney," pp. 134-136"Edmund Spenser," p. 137

"Shakespeare's Sonnets," pp. 146-149

T

ACTIVITY:Attempt a sonnet in either Italian or English form.

I4HE TAMING OF THE SHREW, pp. 150-213

F 260-133 SHAKESPEARE'S THEATRE

FPL UNDERSTANDING SHAKESPEARE: HIS STAGECRAFT. FPL HEART OF ENGLAND (SHAKESPEARE COUNTRY)

(Filmstrips are often available through school libraries.)

ACTIVITY: Panel reports with visual aids, scale drawings,research on history of the theatre (morality plays, etc.), I

. all lend themselves to furthering understanding of theElizabethan theatre.

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

B. The studdit does some reading on thelife of William Shakespeare. ,

C. The student reads aloud from THE TAMING OFTHE SHREW.

1. He reads each scene and prepares asynopsis of it.

2. He followsrthe two romantic plots asthey interweave.

a. Kate-Petruchio, an action plot.

b. Bianca-Lucenzio, an intrigue plot.

3. He classifies the play as a comedy ora tragedy.

a,. He defines comedy.

b. He defines tragedy.

c. He analyzes the play; following thedefinitions.

d. categorizes the play.

'7 .41

FPL & F355-148 WILLIAM SHAPESPFPL SHAKESPEARE: SOU(Filmstrips are often available

ACTIVITY: Reports, as fqell as,fsaving way to share and dispens

THE TAMING OF THE SHREW, pp. 15

F 373-117 MAN AND WOMAN

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK TO ACCOTAMING OF THE SHREW EDITIONthe student write a one-line syaction.

See "Discussion," question 2, p

it

05041

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

oes some reading on theam Shakespeare.'

eads aloud from THE TAMING OF

each scene and prepares aof it.

s the two ro6antic plots asrweave.

Petruchio, an action plot.

a-Lucenzio, an intrigue plot.

fies the play as a comedy or

fines comedy.

fines tragedy.

alyzes the play, following the

it ions.

tegorizes the play.

72 41

FPL & F355-148 WILLIAM SHAPESPEAREFPL .SHAKESPEARE: SOUL OF AN AGE(Filmstrips are often available through school libraries.)

ACTIVITY: Reports, as well as films, will prove a time-saving way to share and dispense information.

THE TAMING OF THE,SHREW,pp. 150-213

F,373-117 MAN-AND WOMAN

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK TO ACCOMPANY ENGLAND IN LITERATURE:TAMING OF THE SHREW EDITION - NOTE:-It is suggested thatthe student write a one -line synopsis of each scene's

action.

See "Discussion; question 2, p. 215

I 3

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

4. He discusses the action of the

041Y.

5. He discussed the theme of theplay.

a. He discusses it in terms ofthe setting.

b. He discusses it in terms oftoday's society.

D. The student pursues independent projectsfor an in-depth look at the play.

1. He does some reading on the use ofnames in Shakespeare's works.

2. He prepares a scene for class pre-sentation.

He does a research on the use of punsand proverbs in the play.

4. He does research on an idea he haspreviously submitted to the teacher

. for approval.

7 442

See "Discussion,"..gliestions l

ACTIVITY:1. Compare Kate with the Wife

0

question #8, p.02152. liqW would a. woman of today

to Kate's speech in Act 5,Write a dialogue between Gmight do research readingmagazine articles or her b

"What's in a Name?" p. 216

See 4 under "Readers' Theater,taping a performance for showiSee 8 under "Writing," p. 215

See "Writing," p. 215, "ReaderTEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK for id

05041

ORTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

sea the action of the

se the theme of the

scusses it in terms ofetting.

scusses it in terms of1 s socieg.

pursues independent projectspth look at the play.

some reading on the use ofShakespeare's works.

res a scene for class pre-n.

a research on the use of punserbs in the play.

research on an idea he hasly submitted to the teacheroval.

7442

See "Discussion," questions 1-11, p. 215

ACTIVITY:1. Compare Kate with the Wife of Bath. See "Discussion,"

question #8, p. 2152. How would a woman of today--even a feministrespond

to. Kate's speech in Act 5, Scene 2, lines 136-179?Write a dialogue between Germaine Greer, and Kate. (Youmight do research reading on Greer's opinions,inmagazine articles or her books.)

"What's in a Name?" p. 216

See 4 under "Readers' Theater," p. 215. Consider video-taping a performance for showing to other classes.See 8 under 'Writing," p. 215

See "Writing," p. 215, "Readers' Theater," p. 215, andTEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK for ideas.

ENGLISH LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

III. The student identifieb various types ofElizabethan prose.

A. He identifies characteristics of theessay.

1. He recognizes elements of the formalessay.

2. He lists characteristics of theinformal essay.

B. He reads a selected passage from anearly English novel.

C. He compares translations of THE BIBLE.

"The essay," p. 219Parents and Children," pp.

"Of Studies," p. 220

Wilte-an essay of nthe formal manner of,acon. S

Of Honesty.Of FriendshipOf AmbitionOf PrideOf Success

"from THE UNFORTUNATE TRAVELLE

"The Creation of the World,""Translations of the Bible,"

ACTIVITIES:1. Compare a passagd from "Gen

BIBLE with the same passageas THE NEW ENGLISH BIBLE.richness of language.

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

tifies various types ofe.

s characteristics of the

nizea elements of the formal

"The essay," p. 219"Of Parents and Children," pp. 218-219"Of Studies," p. 220

characteristics of theessay.

elected passage from anh novel.

translations of THE BIBLE.

ACTIVITY: Write an essay of no more than 500 words inthe formal manner of Bacon. Suggested topics:

V Of HonestyOf FriendshipOf AmbitionOf PrideOf Success

"from THE UNFORTUNATE TRAVELLER," pp. 221-111

"The Creation of the World," pp. 223 -225"Translations of the Bible," p. 226

7 (343

ACTIVITIES:1. Compare a passage from "Genesis" in THE KING JAMES

BIBLE with the same passage in a modern edition, suchas THE NEW ENGLISH BIBLE. Note the difference in therichness of language.

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

46Z

IV. The student may pursue independent study inthe field of language.

UNIT FOUR: THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY

I. The student recognizes the distinctivestyle of the metaphysical poets.

A. He will recognize the paradox as a majorelement of metaphysical poetry.

1. He defines paradox.

2. He identifies the paradox in thepoetry.

B. He recognizes the conceit as a major ele-

ment.

7

\I;

2. Bring a copy of James WeldoCreation" to class and compof "Genesis" in THE KING JAfilms of Johnson's poem are

F 272-162 POETRY BY AMERIC(includes "The C

3. Utilize this version of thePARADISE LOST later in the

"The Changing English Language,

"Background," pp. 269-270

"The Metaphysical Poets," pp.

05041

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ursue independent study inage.

EEN' CENTURY

nizv: the distinctivephysical poets.

nize the paradox as a majortaphysical poetry.

paradox.

fies the paradox in the

the conceit as a major ele-

7

2. Bring a copy of James Weldon Johnson's "The

Creation" to class and compare it to the versionof "Genesis" in THE KING JAMES BIBLE. Records and

films of Johnson's poem are available.

F 272-162 POETRY BY AMERICANS: JAMES WELDON JOHNSON

(includes "The Creation")

3. Utilize this version of the creation when reading

PARADISE LOST later in the semester.

"The Changing English Language," pp. 229-230

"Background,"pp. 269-270

"The Metaphysical Poets," pp. 236-244

79

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

1. He defines conceit.

2. He identifies conceit in the poetry.

C. He identifies the metaphorical content"Meditation 17."

1. He identifies the two major metaphors.

2. He discusses the meaning and effective-ness of the two major metaphors.

II. The student identifies the style and content

of Cavalier Poetry.

A. He recognizes the classic form of Cava-

lier poetry.

B. He recognizes the subject matter glorifiedin Cavalier poetry.

1. He identifies themes of carefree love.

2. He identifies themes of carefree life.

III. The student recognizes the epic qualities of

PARADISE LOST.

45

"Medita.t1c'n 17," p. 241.

F 172-117 & FPL NO MAN IS AN I

SL 871-800 NO MAN IS AN

SL 871-801 NO MAN IS AN I

"Songs and Lyrics," pp. 245-247

"The Constant Lover," p. 245"What Care I?" p. 246"To the Virgins to Make Much

PARADISE LOST pp. 249-255

NTENT

[s conceit.

fies conceit in the poetry.

the metaphorical content7."

01?

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS.

flea the two major metaphors.

ses the meaning and effective-he two major metaphors.

ifies the style and content

Ythe classic form of Cava-

the subject matter glorifiedoetry.

fies themes of carefree love.

fies themes of carefree life.

nizes the epic qualities of

A

45

"Meditation 17," p. 241

F 172-117 (c.FPL NO MAN IS AN ISLAND

SL 871-800 NO MAN IS AN ISLAND

SL 871-801 NO MAN IS AN ISLAND

"Songs and Lyrics," pp. 245-247

"The Constant Lover," p. 245"What Care I?" p. 246"To the Vixgins to Make Muofi of Time," p. 247

PARADISE LOST pp. 249-255

bI

ENGLISHJSZERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

A. He identifies the narrative form.

B. He identifies the setting as theUniverse.

C. He identifies the lines in which Miltonstates the theme as the fall of man.

p. He identifies the poem's structure as,beginning in medias res.

E. He compares Milton's version with amodern version of the fall of man.

IV. The student recognizes the ode form.

A. He defines the ode.

B. He applies his definition to a 17thCentury Ode.

C. He defines onomatopoeia.

D. He discovers onomatopoetic words'inthe selection.

82

NOTE:' An explanation of MiJtbnclarify the setting for theist

"Note," p. 249

"The Fortunate Fall," p. 255

ACTIVITY:1. Do a drAmatic reading of t

p. 255.2. Compare Milton's version o

the story told in THE KING

"The Ode," p. 257

"A Song for St. Cecelia's Day,.

"Discussion," question 3, p. 25

05041

ENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS,

the narrative form.

the setting as the

he lines in which Miltone as the fall of man.

the poem's structure asdias res

ton's version with aof the of man.

zes the ode- form.

ode..

definition to a 17th.

topoeia.

omatopoetic words in

82

NOTE: An explanation of Milton's cosmography wouldclarify the setting for the student.

"NOte," p. 249

"The Fortunate Fall," p. 255

ACTIVITY:1. Do a dramatic reading of the temptation scene; see

p. 255.

2. Compare Milton's version of the fall of man withthe story told in THE KING JAMES BIBLE, pp. 223-225.

"The Ode," p. 257

"A Song for St, Cecelia's Day," pp. 256-257

?:

"Discussion," question 3, p. 257

88

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

V. The student views 17th-Century London throughits prose.

A. He studies.the character of a diary'sauthor through his own words.

1. He discusses the political eventsnoted.

2. He discusses Pepys' relationship withhis wife.

B. He attempts accurate recording of dailyevents in a diary.

VI. The student pursues individual projects.

A. He may study metaphysical poets andtheir critics.

B. He may trace the changing Englishlanguage through the 17th Century.

UNIT FIVE: THE EIGHTEENTH CENTURY

I. The student perceives the Age of Reason as itis reflected in the writings of the 18thCentury.

84

47

THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS, pp.

ACTIVITY: Keep a diary for aPepys'. Honestly describe youand people..

"Metaphysical Wit," p. 271

"The Changing English Language

Read: "Background," pp. 331-33

05041

ENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

17th-Century London through

character of a diary'shis own words.

es the political events

es Pepys' relationship with

curate recording of dailyary.

individual projects.

etaphysical poets and

he changing Englishgh the 17th Century.

NTH CENTURY .

ves the Age of Reason as ite writings, of the 18th

84

47

THE DIARY OF SAMUEL PEPYS, pp. 258-268

ACTIVITY: Keep a diary for a week, modeling it afterPepys'. Honestly describe your feelings toward eventsand people.

"Metaphysical Wit," p. 271

"The Changing English Language," p. 272

Read: "Background," pp. 331-332

ENGLISH LITERATURg 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

A. He examines satire as a dominanttype of writing.

1. He defines satire.

2. He applies his definition to theselections.

3. He explains the use of "Modest" inSwift's title.

4. He reads satire published in earlyperiodicals.

B. He examines the effect of verisimilitudein Defoe's writing.

1. He defines verisimilitude.

2. He applies his definition to theselection.

3. He attempts writing in the style ofverisimilitude.

C. He identifies "The Rape of the Lock" asa mock epic.

811

"A Modest Proposal," pp. 278-28

ACTIVITY:. Read sections of "AHave another student pantomineselections read.

"Joseph Addison," pp. 287 -29Q

ACTIVITY: Write a pdriodical efollies in today's society- -eveworks could be collected and miTATLER or they might be printed

"from JOURNAL OF THE PLAGUE YEA

See "Writing," on p. 286

"Alexander Pope," pp. 291-298

87

Ft05041

ENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

tire as a dominantg.

satire.

his definition to the

s the use "Modest" intle.

at ire published in early

e effect of verisimilitudeting.

verisimilitude.

his definition to the

s writing in the style oftude.

"The Rape of the Lock" as

8

"A Modest Proposal," pp. 278 -282

ACTIVITY: Read sections of "A Modest Proposal" aloud.Have another student pantomine his reactions to theselections read.'

"Joseph Addison," pp. 287-290

ACTIVITY: Write a periodical essay satirizing one of thefollies in today's society--even in your school. (Students'

works could be collected and mimeographed into a modernTATLER or they might be printed in the school's newspaper.)

"from JOURNAL OF THE PLAGUE YEAR," pp. 283-286

.See "Writing," on p. 286

"Alexander Pope," pp. 291-298

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

1. He notes the devices of the mock epic.

2. He discusses how Pope adapted epicdevices to the mock epic:

a. Invocation of the muse,b. Statement of themec. Statement of the epic questiond. Elevated languagee. Intervention of supernatural beingsf. A hero who seems "larger than life."g. Boastful speeches by great warriorsh. Descriptions of armori. Detailed history of heroes.' weaponsj. Great battlesk. Personal combats

D. He discusses satire in the selection.

1. He defines irony.

2. He defines sarcasm.

3. He defines burlesque.

4. He defines parody..

5. He cites examples of the above in theselection.

8849

See "Writing," 3, p. 296

"Satire," p. 293

89

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

es the devices of the mock epic.

cusses how Pope adapted epics to the mock epic:

ocation of the musetement of themetement of the epic questionaced language

ervention of supernatural beingsero who seems "larger than life."atful speeches by great warriorscriptions of armorailed history of heroes' weaponsat battlessonslcombats

es satire in the selection.

ines irony.

ines sarcasm.

ines burlesque.

ines parody.

es examples of the above .in the

ion.

8849

See "Writing," 3, p. 296

t"Satire," p. 293

89

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

E. He identifies the heroic couplet.

1. He discusses the maxims from twoviewpoints.

a. He discusses the maxims as adviceto writers or critics.

b. He discusses the maxims as generaladvice for living.

2. He identifies the epigram.

a. He defines epigram.

b. He explains the humor or clever-ness in the selection.

F. He compares two allied prose authors ofthe Age of Reason.

I. He describes Johnson's personalitythrough his dictionary definitions.

2. He compares Johnson's view of Londonas presented in "London" with Swift'sview as presented in "A Modest Proposal."

130

"Quotable Pope," p. 296

ACTIVITY: Write a composition

"Epigram," p. 297

ACTIVITY: Attempt an epigramfamous people as She subject

"Samuel Johnson," pp. 298-303"James Boswell," pp. 304-308

ACTIVITY: Prepare personalizecurrent words in Johnson's man

"from 'London'," p. 303"A Modest Proposal," pp. 278-2

91

NTENT

the heroic couplet.

05041

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

:ses the maxims from twos.

scusses the maxims as adviceiters or critics.

scusses the maxims as generale for living.

fies the epigram.

fines epigram.

plains tie humor or clever-in the selection.

wo allied prose authors ofas on.

bes Jghnson's personalityis dict1nary definitions.

es Johnson's view of Londonted ik"London" with Swift'sresented.....tn "A Modest Proposal."

:j 0

"Quotable Pope," p. 296

ACTIVITY: Write a composition based on a Pope maxim.

"Epigram," p. 297'

ACTIVITY: Attempt an epigram using current events orfamous people as the subject matter.

"Samuel Johnson," pp. 298-303"James Boswell," pp. 304-308

ACTIVITY: Prepare personalized definitions ofsomecurrent words in Johnson's manner.

"from 'London'," p. 303"A Modest Proposal," pp. 278-282

a

1o

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

3. He discusses the objectivity ofBoswell's biography of Johnson.

II. The student perceives the differences between18th Century thought and Pre-Romantic thought.

A. He compares the classical elegy with Gray's"Elegy..."

1. He defines elegy.

2. He compares the personal lament withGray's general lament.

3. He identifies the tone of the poem.

B. He compares the classical ode withGray's ode.

1. He defines ode.

2. He compares Gray's adaptation of theode with Pope's adaptation of Or epic.

C. The student recognizes Robert Burns as apoet et the people.

1. He reads aloud Burns' dialect poems.

51

See "Discussion," question 1,

"Elegy Written in a Country Chu

ACTIVITY: Write a brief parodSee "Writing," p. 316, for idea

ACTIVITY: Discuss how Gray'set the mood of his poem.

u

"Ode on the Death of a Favoriteof Gold Fishes," p. 316

Robert Burns," pp. 317-320

F ;62-114 SCOTLAND: BACKG

9t)

A 05041

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

usses the objectivity of's biography of Johnson.

ceives the differences betweenought and Pre-Romantic thought.

the classical elegy with Gray's

nes elegy.

area the personal lament withgeneral lament.

tifies the tone of the poem.

the classical ode with

nes ode.

area Gray's adaptation of theh Pope's adaptation of the epic.

recognizes Robert Burns as apeople.

a aloud Burns' dialect poems.

5 1

See "Discussion," question 1, p. 313

"Elegy Written in a Country' Churchyard," pp. 314-315

ACTIVITY: Write a brief parody of Gray's "Elegy..."See "Writing," p. 316, for ideas.'

ACTIVITY: Discuss how Gray's use of onomatopoeia helps

set the mood of his poem.

"Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat, Drowned in a Tubof Gold Fishes," p. 316

Robert Burns," pp. 317-320

F 162-114 SCOTLAND: BACKGROUND OF LITERATURE

(' r)J

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

2. He identifies major themes in Burns'poems.

a. He finds examples of love poems.

b. He finds examples of poems cele-brating the common man.

D. He compares Blake's "Songs of Innocence"with his "Songs of Experience."

1. He compares matched poems.

a% "Introduction"

b. "The Lamb"

c. "The Tyger"

2. He accounts for placement of certainspecific poems in "Songs of Innocence"or "Songs of Experience."

3. He compares "Songs of Innocence" with"Songs of Experience," focusing onone specific area.

a. Tone

b. Major symbols

c. Verse forms and rhythm

4. He reads modern tributes to Blake.

994 52

ACTIVITIES:1. Discuss how Burns' life a

his poetry. See Burns' b2. Act out a scene from one

"To a Louse" or pantominereads the poem.

"William Blake," pp. 321-328

FPL A GRAIN OF SA

See "Discussion," questions

See "Discussion," question 9,

"Memo," p. 330"Lullaby for William Blake,"

95

4'

05041

TENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS4

li.es major themes in-Burn

s examples of love poems.

examples of poems cele-e common man.

ake's "Songs of Innoience"s of Experience."

s matched poems.

suction"

b"

yger"

s for placement of certainoems in "Songs of Innocence"of Experience."

"Songs of Innocence" withExperience," focusing onis area.

symbols

forms and rhythm

dern tributes to Blake.

',3 4 52

ACTIVITIES:1. Discuss how Burns' life as a poor farmer enriched

his poetry. See Burns' biography, p. 338

2. Act out a scene from one of Burns' poems such as"To a Louse" or pantomine the scene as someonereads the poem.

"William Blake," pp. 321-328

A GRAIN OF SANbo (about'Blake's'Poem)

See "Discussion," questions 1 & 2, 00 329, for ideas.

See "Discussion," question 9, on p. 329

"Remo, . 330"Lulls for William Blake," p. 330

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1 N.

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

III. The student pursues individual projects.

A. He may further study biography,

B. He may analyze Blake's meanings'ofinnocence and experience.

C. He may trace the changing English languagethrough the 18th Century.

UNIT SIX: THE NOVEL (This unit may be taught at'anytime during Semester I)

I. The student analyzes a novel. .

A. He identifies the two major themes inBook I.

1. He contrasts the new society with thetribal$ society.

o

2. He contrasts the effects of love andhate within society.

B. He traces the problems stated in Book II.

1. He compares the first two pages ofBook II with the first pages of Book I.

2. He identifies "the problem."

9 G 53

"Boswell as Biographer, pp.

"What Did Blake Mean by Innocepp. 335-336

I

"The Changing English Language

CRY THE BELOVED COUNTRY

R'566-143 LOST IN .THE STA

P. 35 and various other pages

p. 40 and other pages in Book

DISCUSSION: Why did Pato*begsimilarly? What effect was heful? At what point does the s

p. 134

9 7

05041

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

sues individual projects.

her study iography.

lyze,Blake's meanings of

"Boswell as Biographer," pp. 332-335

"What Did Blake Mean by Innocence and Experience?"

nd experience.

e the changing English languagee 18th Century.

L (This unit may be taught at anyr I)

lyzes a novel.

ies the two major themes in

trasts the new society with thesociety.

trasts the effects of love andithin society.

the i, blems stated in Book II.

pares the first two pages ofI with the first pages of Book I.

ntifies "the problem."

96 5-3

pp. 335-336

The Changing English Language," pp. 336-337

1

CRY THE BELOVED COUNTRY,

R 566-143 LOST IN THE STARS

P. 35 and various other pages in Bo9k I

p. 40 and other pages in Book I

DISCUSSION: Why did Paton begin the two books sosimilarly? What effect was he seeking? Was he success-

ful? At what point does the similarity end?

p. 134

97

ENGLISH LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

C. He examines the resolution of theconflict in Book

1. He traces the relationship ofJarvis and Kumalo.

-2, He justifies- the ending in -termsof the book's theme and, purpose.

D. He identifie6 symbols used in thebook.

E. He defines the term omniscient author.

F. He identifies the author's point ofview as omniscient.

II. The student reacts to the novel.

A. He writes his reactions to the novel.

.

See the "Glossary" for defini

WRITIG SUGGESTIONS: Alan Pastates, "It is my own beliefcan resist the power of fearHe obviously tries to prove tcharacters. Write an essay c

0 characters which prove his st

Authors often use specific naLook up the story of* Absalom"II Samuel: xviii." Readinga reason for Paton's use of texplaining the' similarities o

9

[ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

the resolution of theBook III.

Is the relationship ond Kumalo.

les the anding in termsook's theme and purpose.

is symbols used in the

he term omniscient author.

s the author's,poipt ofscien

s tb the novel.

s reactions to the novel.

Yr

r.

See the "Glossary" for definitions of symbols..

WRITING SUGGESTIONS: Alan Paton, in his introduction,states, "It is my own belief, that the only power thatcan resist the power of fear is the power of love."

He obviously tries to prove this statement through hischaracters. Write an essay citing actions of hischaracters which prove\his'staiement.

Authors often use specific names for specific purposes.Look 4 the story of Absalamin the OLD TESTAMENT,"II Samuel: xviii." Reading this source, can you find,a reason for Paton's use of the name? Write an essayexplaining the similarities of names.

99

Out

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT

1

ACTIVITIES A

B. He discusses his reactions to the_novel.

10055

Do some research reading onAfrica. (Periodical article

GUIDE...) Write a comparis0the present or report orallyeurrPnt rnnclitiona_.

Class diScussions may centerthe novel, the structure ofuse, of words, the symbolismof the protagonist--his strogeneration gap as- present inquestions brought up,by thebd a discussion--opener.

FS 670-131 OSSOUTH AFRICA:

TEACHER'S REFERENCE:

"CRY THE BELOVED COUNTRY andMan's Inhumanity to Man,"pp. 609-616.

101

05041

1CONTENT

At-

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

his reactions to the

.100

Do some research reading on current conditions in SouthAfrica. (Periodical articles may be found in READER'S

GUIDE...) Write,a comparison of conditions in 1946 andthe present or report orally to the.class, telling ofCurrent conditions

Class discussions may center around the universality ofthe nove4, the structure of the novel, Paton's poeticuse of words, the symbolism of the novel, characterizationof the protagonist--his strong and weak points, the,generation gap as present'in the novel, and otb0questions brought up by the class,. The film tklow mightbe a discussion - - opener.

55

FS 670-131 SOUTH AFRICA: PRICE OF INEQUALITY

TEACHER'S REFERENCE:'-'

"CRY THE BELOVED COUNTRY and STRANGE FRUIT: SxploringMan's Inhumanity to Man," ENGLISH JOURNAL, December, 1962,

pp. 6094,-616.

101

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

05041

Materials Available from Audiovisual Services

Films

F 358-103

F 371-115

F 162 -198

CHAUCER'S ENGLAND

ELIZABETH: THE QUEENS WHO SHAPED AN AGE

ENGLAND: BACKGROUND OF LITERATURE

4F 360-126

INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION IN ENGLAND

F 259-120

F 259-121

MAGNA CARTA, PART II

F 373-117

AND WOMAN (TAMING OF THE SHREW)

F 372-105

A MATTER OF CONSCIENCE (SIR THOMAS MORE)

F 150-118

MEANING OF FEUDALISM

./

F 369-106

'MEDIEVAL ENGLAND,: THE PEASANTS' REVOLT

F 256-111

MEDIEVAL MANOR

F 150-119

MEDIEVAL WORLD

F 371-101

MIDDLE AGES: A WANDERER'S GUTDE TO LIFE AND LETTERS

F 364-123

MYSTERY OF STONEHENGE, PART

F 364-124

MYSTERY OF STONEHENGE:PART II

F 173 -117

MAGNA CARTA, PART I

F 362-104

NORMAN IS AN ISLAND

NOVEL: EARLYVICTORiAN ENGLAND AND CHARLES DICKENS

1'

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

05041

Materials Available from Audiovisual Services

Films

F S627111

F 372-100

F 371-104

F 162-114

F 260-133

F 355-108

NOVEL: WHAT IT IS, WHAT IT'S ABOUT, WHAT IT DOS

PURITAN REVOLUTION

ROMANTICISM: REVOLT OF THE SPIRIT

SCOTLAND: BACKGROUND OF LITERATURE

SHAKESPEARE'S THEATRE

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

A?.

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

05041

Materials Available from Audiovisual Setvices.

Sound Filmstrips

SFS 768-424

DAILY LIFE IN ELIZABETHAN ENGLAND

Filmstrips

FS 660-157

FS 363-102

FS 659-113

FS 649-107

FS 670-131

I--

Slides

SL 871-800

SL 871-801

Record'

R 566-143

ART OF ENGLAND

CHARTRES CATHEDRAL

GOTHIC ARCHITECTURE

MIDDLE AGES

SOUTH AFRICA: PRICE OF INEQUALITY

NO MAN IS AN ISLAND, PART I

NO MAN IS AN ISLAND, PART II

LOST INTHE STARS

aN

W,

4s.

ENGLISH LITERATURE 1

05041

Films Available from the St. Louis Public Library

HE BRITISH ISLES

CHANGING WORLD OF CHARLES DICKENS

ENGLAND: BACKGROUND OF LITERATURE

A GRAIN OF SAND (WILLIAM BLAKE)

HALL OF KINGS: WESTMINSTER ABBEY, PART II

HEART IS THE HIGHLAND

HEART OF ENGLAND (SHAKESPEARE'S COUNTRY)

LONDON LANDMARKS

LONDON'S COUNTRY

-

NO MAN IS AN ISLAND

RIME OF 'THE ANCIENT MARINER

SHAKESPEARE: SOUL OF AN AGE

THE TRAGEDY OF JOHN MILTONI

UNDERSTANDING SHAKESPEARE:' HIS STAGECRAFT

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

59

1

V,

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

05042

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Same as course 05042, continued.

Read important works by important writers of the eighteent

twentieth centuries.

Delve into works by modern English writers.

Devote special in-depth s

OTHELLO and to Maugham's OF HUMAN BONDAGE.

GOALS

'The student becomes familiar with selected literary works by

English writers.

He recognizes that the writings of an era reflect, ideas, customs, events

of that era.

He develops his knowledge of literary forms, styles, and techniques.

He analyzes the relationships of literary form to content.

He learns a little about the history of the English language.

MM

.

a

,illineteenth, and

udy to Shakespeare's 3

'4

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

0504-2

Materials

Title

ENGLAND IN LITERATURE: TAMIAG OF THE SHREW EDITION.

Sbott, ForesmIn .and Company.

TEACHER'S RESOURCE-BOOK TO ACCOMPANY ENGLAND IN LITERATURE: TAMING OF TIT SHREW

EDITION.

Scott, Foresman and Company.

OF HUMAN BONDAGE.

Wits_hington Square Press.

OTHELLO (E-Z LEARNER STUDY TEXT).. Coshed, ,Inc.

.7`

(

Use

Students

- Teacher

Students, Teacher

Students,. Teacher

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

-GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

TO THE TEACI1ER: English Literature 2 begins with"The Eighteenth Century" and thus overlaps thelast sects, of English ,iterature 1. The teachermay wish to evi .thiq_Atpit_briefly_or may wishto begin secon -s esterlOurst work with "The.Romantics," Unit Two.

It

UNIT ONE: THE EIGHTEENTH 6ENTUOt

A. The student objectively.i..ists the new-foundpriorities of the AugudiOn writers. viewsthe impact of science and reason on thihperiod and recognizes this era as clearlydeparting from the excesses and fancifulflights of the Elizabethan Age.

A. The student reads from the works ofJonathan Swift.

1. He gives examples of the nature andfunction of irony and explains itsrelationship to satire.

Or

2., He) distinguishes between situationala d verbal irony,

10863

NOTE': With respect to artistsclassification difficult, thown judgment. It is Cumbers11 Ltriter _in___accardance wit_ h.

convinced that the artist door category to which he is "a

ACTIVIT41: Prepare oral repofall of the Tories, the growtmiddle class," or the ramifi

Period.

"A Modest Proposal," pp. 278-

ACTIVITY: Prepare an oral reas a "children's book" and asstatue of England in Swift's

ACTIVITY: Discuss the eye inLaurel and Hardy as a springbdepth.

Pee "Writing," p. 282

109

If

0$042

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

lish Literature 2 begins withtury" and thus:ovetlaps thelish L teratureJ. The teacherthis u it briefly ormay'tlishester-course work With'ITheo.

EENTH CENTURYo

jectively lists the new-foundthe Augustan writers. He views'science and reason on thisognizes this'era'aa clearlythe excesses and fancifulElizabethan Age.,

t reads from `the works of

wift.

es examples of the nature, andon of irony and explains itsonship to satire.-

tinpishes between situationalrbal.irony.

108 63

NOTE; With respect to artists whose work makesclassification difficult, the teacher should use his

own judgment. It is cumbersome at best to try to handle

a writer in accordance with textual. guidelines when one isconvinced that the attist does not belong in the section

or category to which he is 'assigned."

ACTIVITY: Prepare oral reports sketching the rise andfall of the Tories, the growth of the elusively-termed"middle class," or the ramifications of the Restoration

Period.

"A Modest Proposal," pp. 278-280

:ACTIVITy: Prepare an oral report on GULLIVER'S TRAVELS

as a "childttli,11 book" and as a, satire on the political

status of England in Swift's day.

ACTIVITY: Discuss the eye in satire and its uses. Use

Laurel and Hardy as a springboard to studies in greater

depth.

See "Writ,ing," p. 282

109

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AN

B. The student reads an excerpt from DanielDefoe's JOURNAL OF THE PLAGUE YEAR andnotes how careful handling Of detailenforces verisimilitude.

C. The student reads from the works ofJosdph Addison.

D. The student reads selections from thewritings of Alexander Pope.

1. He defines mock epic.

2. He explains the popularity, of themock epic during the Augus3an Age.

E. The student reads selections from thewritings of Samuel Johnson.

F. The student reads selections from theworks'of James Boswell.

1 1 0

ACTIVITY: Students can addsatire by becoming familiara top-flight satiric periodic

from JOURNAL OF THE PLAGUE

"Ned Softly the Poet," p. 28

ACTIVITY: Prepare written oemergence of Addison and SteeSPECTATOR.

See "Writing," p. 290

"The Rape of the'Lock,"

ACTIVITY: A class discussioquotations from Pope Might p

from THE DICTIONARY,_22., 298

from THE LIFE OF SAMUEL JOHNS.

See "Writing," p. 302

1 1 1

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

05042

reads an excerpt from DanielAL OF THE PLAGUE YEAR andreful handling of detailisimilitude.

reads from the works ofon.

reads selections from theAlexander Pope.

es mock epic.

Ins the popularity of thec during the Augustan Age.

reads selections from theSamuel Johnson.

reads selections from thees Boswell.

1 1 0

ACTIVITY: Students can add to their understanding ofsatire by becoming familiar with THE NATIONAL LAMPOON,a top-flight satiric periodical.

"from JOURNAL OF THE PLAGUE YEAR," pp. 283-286

"Ned Softly the Poet," p. 287

ACTIVITY: Prepare written or oral reports on the -

emergence of Addison and Steele's THE TATLEI and THESPECTATOR.

See "Writing," p. 290

"The Rape of the Lock," pp. 291-296

ACTIVITY: K class discussion centering around memorablequotations from Pope might prove interesting.

from THE DICTIONARY, pp. 298-299

from THE LIFE OF SAMUEL JOHNSON, LL.D., pp. 304-308

See "Writing," p. 302

1 1 1

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

II. The student readi from Burns and Blake, notingtheir Romantic themes and their great differences.

A: The student readi from the works of RobertBurns.

B. The student studies selected works ofWilliam Blake.

11265

ACTIVITY: An out-of-class reinvolve a comparison between.JOHNSON, LL.D. and Lytton Stbiography.

"From THE LIFE OF SAMUEL JOof the Sexes (April 1778),"is almost certain to generat

See "Writing," p.'313

"A Red, Red Rose," p. 317"To a Mouse," p. 317"To a Louse," p. 318

See "Writing," especially su

from SONGS OF INNOCENCE"The Lamb," p. 321"The Chimney Sweeper," p. 32"Holy Thursday," p. 323

from SONGS OF EXPERIENCE"The Tyger," p. 324"The Chimney Sweeper," 325"London," p. 326"The Clod and the Pebble,""Proverbs of Hell," p.' 328

ACTIVITIES: Select one of teither support or deny the p

113

05042

CONTENT

ads from Buins and Blake, notingthemes and their great differences.

t reads from the works Of Robert

nt studies selected works oflake.

11265

'ACTIVIT/ES AND MATERIALS'0

ACTIVITY: An research project couldinvolve a comparison between Boswell's LIFE OF SAMUELJOHNSON, LL.D. and Lytton Strachey's later efforts at

biography.

"From THE 'LIFE OF SAMUEL JOHNSON, LL.D., On Equalityof the Sexes (April 1778)," pp. 307-308. (This excerpt

is almost certain to generate good discussion.)4

See "Writing," p. 313

"A Red, Red Rose," p. 317"To a Mouse," p. 317"To a Louse," p. 318

See "Writing," especially suggestions 2 .and 4, p. 320

from SONGS OF INNOCENCE"The Lamb," p. 321"The Chimney Sweeper," p. 322"Holy Thursday," p. 323

fiom SONGS OF EXPERIENCE"The Tyger," p. 324"The Chimney Sweeper," 325"London," p. 326"The Clod and the Pebble," p. 326"Proverbs of Hell," p. 328

ACTIVITIES: Select one of the "Proverbs of Hell" andeither support or deny the positi6 it presents.

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

UNIT TWO: THE ROMANTICS

I. Although literary Romanticism is an elusiveterm to define, the student sees the move-ment not only as a reaction against Neo-classicism but also as a positive force thatemphasized independence and the soul.

A. The student studies selected writings ofWilliam Wordsworth.

1. He analyzes Wordsworth's views of manand of nature.

114

Prepare an oral report on Blaabout religion as these are r

"Of Literary Interest: Blake-artist?" p. 321

Students with interest in artof some of Blake's etchings-aanalysis, and/or critique of

ACTIVITY: Prepare oral reporLocke, the French Revolution,Romantic Era.

'The World Is Too Much With Us"London 1802," p. 342"The Prelude," p. 350"Composed Upon Westminster Bri

p. 342"Lines Composed a Few Miles A'pp. 348-349

ACTIVITY: Students interestedshowing their classmates how Riin art and music.

See "Writing," p. 343 `

1 /(5

ONTENT

6

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

05042

ICS

y Romanticism is an elusivethe student sees the move-alreaction against Neo- -lso as a positive force thatendence and the soul.

studies selected writings ofsworth.

zes Wordsworth's views of manature.

Prepare an oral report on Blake's attitudes and feelingsabout religion as these are revealed in his writings.

"Of Literary Interest: Blake--the first multimediaartist?" p. 321

Students with interest in art might search out reproductionsof some of Blake's etchings and prepare a presentation,analysis, and/or critique of some of them for the class.

ACTIVITY: Prepare oral reports on the influence of Rousseau,Locke, the French Revolution, and Napoleon upon theRomantic Era.

"The World Is Too Much With!Us," p. 342"London 1802," p. 342"The Prelude," p. 350"Composed' Upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 18020"

p. 342"Lines Compaqed a Few Miles Above Tintetn Abbey,"

pp. 348-349

ACTIVITY: Students interested in the arts might enjoyshowing their classmates how Romanticism was reflectedin art and music. xi

See "Writing," p. 343

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

w.

I

B. The student studies selections from theworks of Samuel Tlaylor Coleridge.

II. The student reads works of Byron, Shelley andKeats as example of Romantic poetry.

6A. The student reads selected works of

George Gordon, Lord Byron.

1. He learns about the tradition of thepicaresque hero.

2. He identifies and defines the stanzapattern called ottava rima.

116 67

ACTIVITY: In connection witWordsworth, students might sas a literary theme. Questione capable of 'sinning'? orinnocence?" could be consideworks on the theme, such asHUCKLEBERRY FINN, yield muchFor the very sophisticated rHenry James would form the b"loss of innocence."

"Kubla Khan," p. 352

ACTIVITY: The class discuss"Kubla Khan."

NOTE: A good recording of TMARINER should be played soits auditory impact and sens

"So We'll Go No More A-Rovin"Whe Walks In Beauty," p. 35from "Don Juan, Canto I," p.

NOTE: Folk singer Joan Baeiincluding Lord Byron's "So W

ACTIVITY: A student might rthe life of Byron. BYRON, bmany biographies of the poet

117

05042

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

studies selections from themuel Taylor Coleridge.

ds works of Byron, Shelley ande of Romantic poetry.

reads selected works ofon, Lord Byron.

s about the tradition of theque hero.

tifies and defines the stanzacalled ottava rima.

/ 67

ACTIVITY: In connection with their reading ofWordsworth, students might study the "loss of innocence"as a literary theme. Questions such as "At what age ipone capable of 'sinning'? or "How does one first loseinnocence?" could be considered. More contemporaryworks on the theme, such as CATCHER IN THE RYE orHUCKLEBERRY FINN, yield much material for discussion.,For the very sophisticated reader, some of the works ofHenry James would form the basis of a good paper on the"loss of innocence."

"Kubla Khan," p. 352

ACTIVITY: The class discusses the completeness of"Kubla Khan."

NOTE: A good recording of THE RIME OF THE ANCIENTMARINER should be played so that students can experienceits auditory impact and sense its tone and atmosphere

"So We'll Go No More A-Roving," p. 355"Whe Walks In Beauty," p. 355from "Don Juan, Canto I," p. 357

NOTE: Folk singer Joan Baez has recorded many ballads,inclOding Lord Syron's "So Go, No Mcire A-Roving."

ACTIVITY: A student might report in outline form onthe life of Byron. BYRON, by Andre Maurois, is one of

many biographies of the poet.

117

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

B. The student reads selected words by PercyBysshe Shelley.

1. He analyzes themes in po s which re-inforce the Romantics' di dain forauthoritarian rule.

2. He notes the imagery of Sh lley'spoems.

C. The student reads selected works ofJohn Keats.

1. He demonstrates understanding ofimagery and of how it operates inpoetry.

11'868 411

"England in 1819," p. 363"Ozymandias," p. 363IPSong to the Men of England,

NOTE: Mary Wollstonecraft ShStudents would find the storinteresting. Some studentsreading the novel and in analatmosphere, and tone.

"On First Looking nto Chap"Ode on a Grecian Urn," p. 37

ACTIVITY: Open, frank discusreading literature could be g"...Hamer."

"To Autumn," p. 369

ACTIVITY: The student mightwhich engages several of the

NOTE: In any study of imageown poetry, the student shoull

excellent example, for few pc)in their work than has John K1

05042

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

reads selected words by Percyley.

lyzes themes in poems wh 'ich re-the Romantics' disdain for

tarian rale.

s the imagery of Shelley's

reads selected works of

nstrates understanding ofand of how it operates in

11668 10

"England in 1819," p. 363"Ozymandias," p. 363"Song to the Men of England," p. 363

NOTE: Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley wrote FRANKENSTEIN.Students would find the story behind its inceptioninteresting. Some students might be interested Inreading the novel and in analyzing it for theme,atmosphere, and tone.

"On First Looking into Chapman's Homer," p. 368"Ode on a Grecian Urn,!' p. 370

ACTIVITY: Open, frank discussion on the Validity ofreading literature could be generated from Keat's'...Hamer."

"To Autumn," p. 369

ACTIVITY: The student might be asked to write a poemwhich engages several of the reader's senses.

NOTE: In any study of imagery or attempt at writing hisown poetry, the student should find Keat's imagery anexcellent example, foil few poets have used richer imageryin their work than has John Keats.

119

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

2. He analyzes theme and form in "La BelleDame Sans Merci."

3. He writes a paper of comparison andconof

RO

rest, discussing Keat's "The Evet. Agnes" and Shakespeare's0 AND JULIET. (Optional)

III. The students reads works by Romantic eraessayists.

A. The student lists several differencesbetween the formal and the informal orfamiliar essay.

B. The student reads an essay by Charles Lamb.

UNIT THREE: THE VICTORIAN AGE

I. The student recognizes the qualities ofspiritual turmoil and chaos as manifest inmuch Victorian prose apd poetry.

A. The student reads selected works ofAlfred Lord Tennyson.

12069

./p. 371

ACTIVITY: A creative male cbrief, perhaps humorous, apemythology and literature.

See "Writing," p. 378"The Eve of St. Agnes,"

NOTE: If the student has nev'he might do so as a special pthis objbctive.

ACTIVITY: 'Write a sequel toeither poetry or prose.

ACTIVITY: Write either a fo(Length of the essay is left

"Dream Children," p. 379

NOTE: Assignments suggestedBOOK are excellent.

"Ulysses," p. 388"Break, Break, Break," p. 389"Crossing the Bar," p. 389from "In Memoriam," p. 389

121

05042

ONTENT-

zes theme and form in "La Belles Merci."

s s paper of comparison and, discussing Keat's "The Evegnes" and Shakespeare's

JULIET. (Optional)

s WbKks by Romantic era

lists several differencesformal and the informal oray.

reads an essay by Charles Lamb.

ORIAN AGE

gnizes the qualities ofland chaos as manifest inrose and poetry.

reads selected works ofTennyson.

12069

p. 371

ACTIVITIES SAND MATERIALS

ACTIVITY: A creative male chauvinist could deliver albrief, perhaps humorous, speech on the siren inmythology and literature.

See "Writing," p. 378"The Eve of St. Agnes," pp. 373-378

NOTE: If the student has never read ROMEO AND JULIET,he might do so as a special project in connection withthis objectivt.

ACTIVITY: Write a sequel to "The Eve of St. Agnes,either poetry or prose.

git

ACTIVITY: Write either a formal or an informal essay.'(Length of the essay is left to the teacher's judgment.)

"Dream Children," p. 379

NbTE: Assignments suggested in the TEACHER'S RESOURCEBOOK are excellent.

"Ulysses," p. 388"Break, Break, Break," p. 389"Crossing the Bar," p. 389from "In Memoriam," p. 389

121

-ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT

B. He reads several works of Robert Browningand learns to identify and analyze adramatic monologue.

C. The student reads several poems by MatthewArnold.

\ 4

II. The student reads selectio s from otherVictorian poets:

A. He reads a poem y9 Oscar Wilde.

B. He reads poetry by Thomas Hardy.

C. He reads poetry by Gerard Manley Hopkins.

1. He recognizes the profoundly religiousnature of the work of Hopkins.

2. He recognizes and defines s runrhythm.

ACTIVITIES A

"Porphyria's Lover," p. 393"My Last Duchess," p. 394

ACTIVITY: Taking for his suhistory, the student compose

"Dover Beach," p. 397"Self-Dependence," p.

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK... e

"Symphony in Yellow," p. 401

NOTE: Students may enjoy WiAmong the wittiest in any pe

"The Darkling Thrush," p. 40.."Editaph on a Pessimist," p."Nature's Questioning," p. 44

"Pied Beauty," p. 407"God's Grandeur," p. 407"Thou Art Indeed Just, Lord,

70

4110D

123

CONTENT

05042

IVITIES AND MATERIALS

everal works of Robert Browningto identify and analyze anologue.

t reads several poems by Matthew

ads selections from others:

poem by Oscar Wilde.

oetry'hy Thomas. Hardy.

oetry by Gerard Manley Hopkins.

ogniZes the profoundly religiousof the workof Hopkins.

ognizes and defines sprung

122 70

"Porphyria's Lover," p. 393"My Last Duchess," p. 394

ACTIVITY: Taking for his subject a prominent person inhistory, the student composes a dramatic monologue.

"Dover Beach," p. 397"Self - Dependence," p. 397

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK...See "Writing," p. 117

"Symphony in Yellow," p. 401

NOTE: Students may enjoy Wilde's writings, for they areamong the wittiest in any period of English literature.

"The Darkling Thrush," p. 405"Editaph on a Pessimist," p. 405"Nature's Questioning," p. 404

"Pied Beauty," p. 407"God' Grandeur," p. 407"Thou A Indeed Just, Lord," p. 407

'2:3*

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS"AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

D. The student demonstrates his ability toread poetry which utilizes not onlytwisted syntax and elipsis,but alsostartling imagery and unusual wordchoices.

E. The student Yearns that not all Victorianvoices were pessimistic but that somefound a positive, joy in living.

F. The student reads from the works ofA. E. Housman.

III. The student reads samples of great Victorianprose.

A. The student reads from the works ofCharles Dickens.

B. He reads "a major work by Lewis Carroll.

124.71

0

See TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK,p. 125 and "Writing Suggestion

"To an Athlete Dying Young,"

ACTIVITY: Students should betestimonies or speeches by orSome possibilities include: Loat Yankee Stadium; any of theAgannis, Ernie Davis, Roberto

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK, "Assi

HORATIO SPARKINS, p. 413

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK, "Assiand "Concluding Discussion," pprovoking questions.

ALICE IN WONDERLAND, pp. 440-4

12

05042

ENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

monstrites his ability toich utilizes not onlyand elipsis but alsoery and unusual word

erns that not all Victorianssimistic but that someve joy in living.

ads from the works of

samples of great Victorian

ads from the works ofs.

or work by Lewis Carroll.

See TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK, "Extending Interests,"p. 125 and "Writing Suggestions," p. 125

rY

"To an .Athlete Dying Young," p. 409

*ACTIVITY: Students should be encouraged to bring to classtestimonies or speeches by or about athletes who died, young,"

Some possJilities include: Lou Gehrig's farewell speechat Yankee Stadium; any of the many tributes to HarryAgannis, Ernie Davis, Roberto Clementi, or' Brian Picolo.

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK, "Assignment Suggestions," p. 126

HORATIO SPARKINS, p. 413

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK, "Assignment Suggestions," p. 127,and "Concluding Discussion," p. 127, offer some thought-provoking questions.

ALICE IN WONDERLAND, pp. 440-483

Om.

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

I. He analyzes the elements of fantasy.

2. He enjoys Carroll's uses ofwords.

UNIT FOUR: THE TWENTIETH CENTURY

I. The student reads modern short storireviews their uses of the major elemliterature and of the conventions ofshort story.

nonsense

s and

nts ofthe

A. The student reads a short story y

Joseph Conrad and analyzes his use ofpoint-of-view.

'53

B. He reads two short stories by D. H.Lawrence, paying special attention totibeir themes.

G. He reads two short stories by KatherineMansfield,, noting their structure,setting, and characterization.

"Jabberwocky," p. 485

ALICE IN WONDwhite, 16 mm.This film wasProductions,Gary Cooper,

NOTE: The teacher may wishcomplete analyses of each stto outstanding qualities of

YOUTH, pp. 493-507

ACTIVITY: A good general dimany writers' uses of the semotif.

"Tickets, Please," pp. 508-5

I

"Two Blue Birds," pp. 514-52

ACTIVITY: Conduct a general"Is Lawrence a sexist writerliterature, place undue emphof man?"

"A Cup,of Tea," Pp. 522 -526"Millie," pp. 527-529-'

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK...,

126 1271

05042

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

yzes the elements of fantasy.

ys Carroll's uses of nonsense

o

IETH CENTURY

s modern short stories andes of the major elements of

the conventions of the

reads a short story byand analyzes his use of-

Short stories by D. H.ying special attention to

short stories by Katherineoting their structure,

d characterization.

123

"Jabberwocky," p. 485

ALICE IN WONDERLAND (79 min., black-and-white, 16 mm., Wholesome Film Center, Inc.)This film was produced by ParamountProductions, Ltd. and features W. C. Fields,Gary Cooper, and Gary Grant.

NOTE: The teacher may wish students either to engage incomplete analyses of each story or to attend particularlyto outstanding qualities of any given story.

YOUTH, pp. 493-507

ACTIVITY: A good general discussion could center aroundmany writers' uses of the sea as a functional literarymotif.

"Tickets, Please," pp. 508-514"Two Blue Birds," pp. 514-521

ACTIVITY: Conduct a general discussion on the questions"Is Lawrence a sexist writer?" and "Does he, in hisliterature, place undue emphasize on the sexual ?mensionof man?"

"A Cup of Tea," pp. 522-526"Millie," pp. 527-529

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK..., "Writing Suggestions," p. 154

127

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

D. He reads two short stories by JamesJoyce, analyzing their structure,\setting, tone, and uses of language.

E. He reads a short story by Saki (H. H.Munro), noting humor.

F. He\reads a short story by ElizabethBowen, analyzing her characterizations.

G. He reads a short story by Angus Wilson,probing the -story for its levels of

meaning.

H. He reads a short story by Dylan Thomas,analyzing its tone, setting, character-izations.

I. He reads a short story by Frank O'Connor,

noting O'Connor's use of point-of-view,tone, humor, and characterization.

12&73

"Eveline," p. 530"Araby," p. 533

See "Writing," p. 522"I

NOTE: The works of Virginiaexception, far too sophisticaTwo selections are included iincluded in the basic reading

"Tobermory," p. 544

"A Queer Heart," pp. 554-556

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK.. ."Wr

and "Extending Interests,"

"A Little Companion," p. 559-

"A Visit to Grandpa's," pp.

"My Oedipus Cot4ie " pp. 569

129

05042

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

short stories by Jamesing their structure,, and uses of language.

ort story by Saki (H. H.g humor,

ort story by Elizabething her characterizations.

ort story by Angus Wilson,tory for its levels of

ort story by Dylan Thomas,tone, setting, character-

ort story by Frank O'Connor,or's use of point-of-view,and characterization.

12873

"Eveline," p. 530"Araby," p. 533

See "Writing," p. 522

NOTE: The works of Virginia Woblf are, almost withoutexception, far too sophisticated for high school seniors.Two selections are included in the text but are notincluded in the basic readings for the course.

"Tobermory," p. 544

"A Queer Heart," pp. 554-556

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK. . ."Writing," p. 558and "Extending Interests," p. 161

"A Little Companion," p. 559-564

"A Visit to Grandpa's," pp. 565-568

"My Oedipus Complex," pp. 569-574

129

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT

J. He reads a short story by Alan Sillitoe,analyzing uses of point-of-view, mean-ing, setting, characterization.

K. He reads a short story by GrahamGreene, focusing on meaning, character-ization, structure.

L. He reads a story by E. M. Forster,analyzing meaning.

II. The student studies twentieth-century poetryand notes the uses poets make of the elementsof prosody and the special qualities ofpoetic language.

A. The student reads selected poems byWilliam Butler Yeats, noting Yeat'skeen interest in the themes ofagingand of nature.

.4

130

ACTIVITIES A

"On Saturday Afternoon," pp.See "Writing," p. 580, sugge

"The Destructors," pp. 581-5

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK...Sep. 166, for thought-provo

"The Machine Stops," pp. 600

"The Lake Isle of Innisfree,"The Song of Wandering Aengu"The Old Men Admiring Themse"The Scholars," p. 619"Sailing to Byzantium," p. 6

ACTIVITY: Students might remany recent studies on the athe works of Simon de Beauvo

THE GREENING OF AMERICA couldiscussion. Among possibleeven as a formal debate exerHenry David Thoreau's viewsTwentieth Century.

131

05042

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

short story by Alan Sillitoe,ses of point-of-view, mean-g, characterization.

short story by Grahamusing on meaning, character-ructure.

story by E. M. Forster,eaning.

dies twentieth-century poetryses poets make of the elementsthe special qualities of

reads selected poems byler,Yeats, noting Yesesst in the themes of agingre.

.130

"On Saturday Afternoon," pp. 577-580See "Writing," p. 580, suggestion 1

"The Destructors," pp. 581-587

TEACHER'S' RESOURCE BOOK...See "Concluding Discussion,"p. 166, for thought-provoking questions.

"The Machine Stops," pp. 600-615

"The Lake Isle of Innisfree," p. 618"The Song of Wandering Aengus," p. 619"The Old Men Admiring Themselves in the Water," p. 619"The Scholars," p. 619"Sailing to Byzantium," p. 623

ACTIVITY: Students might read and report on any of themany recent studies on the aged and aging, for example,the works of Simon de Beauvoir and William Reich.

THE GREENING OF AMERICA could be a useful springboard todiscussion. Among possible discussion topics, perhapseven as a formal debate exercise, the relevancy ofHenry David Thoreau's views to the world of theTwentieth Century.

131

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

B. The student reads poems by T. S. Eliot,analyzing his uses of allusiOn, meaningsimagery, symbolism,. language.

.

The student reads selections from poetsof World War I.

1. He reads several poems by SiegfriedSassOon.

2. He reads a poem by Wilfred Owen.

3. He reds poems by Rupert Brooke.

D. He studies works of poets called the"Enduring Romantics."

I. He reads a poem by Walter de la Mare.

2. He'reads poems by Robert Graves.

13275

"Portrait of a Lady," 'pp. 62See "Of Critical Interest,"

"Sweeney among the NightengaSee "OfCritical Interest,"

"The Hollow Men," pp, 630-63See "Of Criti&d. Interest,"

"Journey of the Magi," pp.-See "Discussion," p. 633

6

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK... Se

"Suicide in the Trenches,""Dreams," p. 634

"The Next War," p. 634

"The Soldier," p. 635"The Hill," p. 635.-

"The Listeners.," p. 636

'"The Legs," p. 636"The Visitation," p. 637"Turn of the Moon," p. 637

133

05042-

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

reads poems by T. S. Eliot,is uses of allusion, meaning;bolism, language.

reads selections from poetsr I.

s. several poems by Siegfried

s a poem by Wilfred Owen.

s poems by Rupert Brooke.

works of poets called the=antics."

s a poem by Walter de la Mare.

s poems by Robert Graes.

13275

"Portrait of a Lady," pp. 625-627See "Of Critical Interest," p. 627

"Sweeney among the Nightengales,"-p. 628See "Of Critical Interest," pp. 628-629

"The Hollow_ Men," pp. 630-631See "Of Critical Interest," p. 631

"Journey of the Magi," pp. 632-633 ---

See "Discussion," p. 633

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK:..See "Extending Interests," p. 177

"Suicide in the Trenches;'-,R. 634 .

"Dreams,': V. 634

"The Next War," p. 634

"The Soldier," p. 635"The. Hill,h p. 635

"The Listeners," p. 636

"The Legs," p. 636"The Visitation," p. 637"Turn of the Moon," p. 637

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

III. The student st dies examples of poetryfrom the twen ieth century, "The Ageof Anxiety," noting especially themeaning, tone, symbolism of the poets.

A. He reads several works from W. H.Auden.

B. He reads a poem by Stephen Spender.

C. He reads several selections from thepoetry of Dylan Thomas.

D. He reads a poem by C. Day Lewis.

IV. The student studies examples of poetryfrom the twentieth century which represent"The Search for Values."

A. He reads a poem by Philip Larkin.

B. He reads poems by Ted Hughes.

C. He reads poems by Alastair Reid.

"The Unknown Citizen," pp."Musee des Beaux Arts," p.'"In Memory of W: B. Yeats,"

"The Landscape Near an Aerod

"Fern Hill," pp. 652-653"Do Not Go Gentle," p. 654

"The Unpxploded Bomb," p. 65

"Whatever Happened?" p. 663

"Hawk Roosting," p. 664"The Jaguar," p. 664"Second Glance at a Jaguar,"

"The 0-Filler," pp. 666'-667. "Curiosity," p. 667

05042

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

dies examples of poetryeth century, "The Agetang especially thesymbolism of the poets.

veral works from W. H.

poem by Stephen Spender.

veral selections from theylan Thomas.

poem by C. Day Lewis.'

dies examples of poetryeth Century which representValues."

poem by Philip Larkin.

ems by Ted Hughes.

ems by Alastair Reid.

131 76

"The Unknown Citizen," pp. 640-641"Musee des Beaux Arts," p. 642"In Memory of W. B. Yeats," pp. 644-645

"The Landscape'Near n Aerodrome," p. 647

"Fern Hill," pp. 652-653"Do Not Go G.entle," p. 654

,"The Unexploded Bomb," p. 657',

"Whatever Happened ?" p. 663

"Hawk Roosting," p., 664-"The Jagua," p. 664"Second Glance at a Jaguar," p. 665

"The 0-Filler," pp. 666 -667"Curiosity," p. 667.

35

ENGLISH LITERATURE 2

AGOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

UNIT FIVE: DRAMA - NOVEL

I. The student studies dramatic works fromvarious eras and of various types.

A. He studies, im-depth, Shakespeare'stragedy OTHELLO.

B.- He reads George Bernard Shaw'sANDROCLES AND THE.

C. He reads Harold Pinter's THE BLACK

AND WHITE.-

II. The student reads a twentieth- centurynovel by Somerset Maugham, OF HUMANBONDAGE, noting its uses of conven-tions of the novel and its compellingtheme.

136

AC 860 OTHELLO (Audio-CasAC 28444 OTHELLO AND JULIUS

OTHELLO (E-2 LEARNER STUDY TE

ENGLAND IN LITERATURE...

pp. 674' -698

See "Discussion," p. 699

pp. 706 -70

"Discussion," p. 707

OF HUMAN BONDAGE

NOTE: The teacher may introdthe novel at any point in theful to break into the survey

-several natural stopping pointcentrated study of these spec

77 .

a

137

05042

'CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

,NOVEL

ies dramatic worka fromc various type

in depth, Shakespeare'sLLO.

orge Bernard Shaw's_ND THE,.

rold Pinter's THE BLACK

a a twentieth-centuryt Maugham, OF HUMANits uses of conven-el and its compelling

13677

AC 860 OTHELLO (Audio-Cassette-see Librarian.)AC 28444 OTHELLO AND JULIUS CAESAR

OTHELLO (E-Z LEARNER STUDY TEXT)

ENGLAND IN LITERATURE...

pp. 674-698

See "Discussion," p. 699

pp. 706-707

See "Discussion," p. 707

OF HUMAN BONDAGE

NOTE: The teacher may introduce study of the drama andthe novel at any point in the course. It might be help-ful to break into the survey of English literature atseveral natural. stopping points and to take up a con-centrated study of these special literary farms.

137

WORLD LITERATURE I

05051

COURSE DESCRIPTION

World Literature is for you who

are in Grades 12 and 11, particularly the college- capable, interested in

knowing of the literary heritage of major non-English-speaking

cultures.

The course will focus on the

literature of Eastern and Mid-Eastern cultures,

centering on the Chinese,Japanese, Hindustani, Hebraic,

and Babylonian, and of Russia.

You will study writings of major authors,

some renowned works or excerpts

from them which reflect their concerns in literature

over a span from ancient to modern times.

GOALS

The student becomes familiar with the literature

of the East and Mid East and of Russia.

He recognizes the universality of themes in the literature

he studies.

I.

He notes the artistic merits and qualities of the

non-western literature he reads.

CO

e

79

WORLD LITERATURE I

05051

Materials

Title

LITERATURE OF THE EASTERN WORLD.

Scott, Foresman and Company.

RUSSIAN AND EASTERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE.

Scott, Foresman and Company.

Use

Students

Students

MAN IN LITERATURE.

COMPARATIVE, WORLD STUDIES IN TRANSLATION.

Scott, ForesMan -and Company.

Students

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK to accompany MAN IN LITERATURE,

COMPARATIVE WORLD STUDIES IN

TRANSLATION.

Scott, FL-iesman and Company,

Teacher

THE CAPTAIN'S DAUGHTER.

E. P. Dutton and Company, Inc.

Students

THE DEATH OF IVAN ILYCH AND OTHER STORIES.

New American Library.

Students

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES`

UNIT I: THE LITERATURE OF THE EASTERN WORLD

I. The student studies Chinese poetry. Hereads selections written from five hundredyears before Christ through the eleventhcentury.

A. He realizes how ancient are the rootsof Chinese poetry.

B. He examines explorations of thesimple, personal themes of romantic,familial, and platonic love,:

C. He reads different viewpointsexpressed by and about women.

g'

Note: Unless otherwise indiarea of Eastern literature aLITERATURE OF THE EASTERN WO

Repetition of selections'ismay serve' to illustrate varisuggest repeated readings.

"Woman," p. 17"To His Wife," p. 20"Regret," p. 21

"To His Wife," p. 20"Plucking the Rushes," p. 22"A Bitter Love," p. 23"A Song of Chiang-ken," pp. 2"Parting at a Wine7Shop in N"Golden Bells," "Remembering"Remembering My Brothers on"To My Retired Friend Wie,"

"Woman," p. 17"Woman," p.-18"South of the Great Sea," p."A Bitter Life,".p. 23"A Sigh from a Staircase of J

.140 81 141

ONTIENT

05051

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

OF THE EASTERN WORLD

ies Chinese poetry. He

written from five hundredist through the eleventh

how ancient are the rootsoetry,

eltp1orations of the0nel:themes of romantic,d platonic love.

ferent viewpointsand about women.

140

Note: Unless otherwise indicated, selections in thearea of Eastern literature are taken from the text,

LITERATURE OF THE EASTERN WORLD.

Repetition of selections is intended t44show that theymay serve to illustrate various goals-4fid does not

suggest repeated readings.

"Woman," p. 17"To His Wife," p. 20"Regret," p. 21

"To His Wife," p. 20"Plucking the Rushes," p. 22"A Bitter Love," p. 23"A Song of Ch'ang-kan," pp. 24-25"Parting at a Wine-Shop in Nan-king," p. 25"Golden Bells," "Remembering Golden Bells," p. 33"Remembering My Brothers on a Moonlight Night,".p. 26

"To My Retired Friend Wie," p. 28

"Woman," p. 17"Woman," p. 18"South of the Great Sea," p. 19"A Bitter Life," p. 23"A Sigh from a Staircase of Jade," p. 23

a

81 141

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT4.

ACTIVITIES A

D. He sees not only the appearance ofthe subject of war but also question-ings about its necessity.

E. He realizes that satire was employedby the Chinese poet.

F. He sees a theme familiar to the readerof modern poetry--the yearning for amore simple and problem-free existence- -explored by a poet of the eighth-ninthcenturies.

G. He looks at an intensive examination byone poet into man's values;

711e studies

in this poet's search for these valuesthe role of nature and of solitude.

II. The student reads selected modern shortstories by Chinese writers.

A. He analyzes the use of symbols.

.142

"To His Wife," p. 20"Regret," p. 21

-"Nightin the Watch-Tower,"

-"A Song of War-Chariots," p."Hearing That ly Friend Wasp. 37

ACTIVITY: Consider the relevpoetry read in conjunction wi

(concerns and issues in today'

"The Philosophers," p. 36"The Red Cockatoo," p. 36"On the Birth of His Son," p

"Ch-ch'en Village," pp. 34-35

"Twenty-Four poems by Han-Sha

"The Last Train," p. 65"The Sorrows of the Lake of E

143

05051

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

nly the appearance off war but also question-s necessity.

hat satire was employede poet.

me familiar to the readertry--the yearning for and problem-free existence- -poet of the eighth-ninth

n intensive examination byman's values; he studiess search for these valuesature and of solitude.

selected modern shorte writers.

he use of symbols.

142

"To His Wife," p. 20"Regret," p. 21"Night in the Watch-Tower," p. 29"A Song of War-Chariots," p. 31"Hearing That His Friend Was Coming Back from the War,"

p. 37

ACTIVITY: Consider the relevancy of the themes in thepoetry read in conjunction with Goal I, B, C, and D, toconcerns and issues in today's world.

"The Philosophers," p. 36"The Red Cockatoo," p. 36"On the Birth of His Son," p. 38

"Ch-ch'en Village," pp. 34-35

"Twenty-Four poems by Han-Shan," pp. 42-49

"the Last Train," p. 65"The Sorrows of the Lake of Egrets," p. 103

143

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

B. He becomes aware of the importanceof ceremony, ritual, and long-standing customs in Chinese life.

C. He sees a questioning of standardbeliefs, superstitions and socialpractices.

D, He realizes the strong esu sis

assigned to an indivfduposition in society.

E. He learns about economic hardshipsand man's various reactions to them.

F. He looks at a qophisticated treatmentof man's relationship to his fellowman.

III. The student reads an older Chinese folktale. He understands its oral roots andsees other striking differences betweenit and the modern short story.

IV. The student studies an excerpt from theBabylonian epic of Gilgamesh.

A. He learns the basic characteristicsof an epic.

141 83

"Spring Silkworms," p. 90"The Widow," p. 77

"Stories illustrating_Goal Bserve to implement this goal.

"The Last Train," p. 65"The Widow," p. 77

"The Sorrows of the Lake of E"Spring Silkworms," p. 90

"The Last Train," p. 65

"The Lady Who Was a Beggar,"

THE ADVENTURES OF GILCAMESH,

ACTIVITIES: Compare the heroancient heroes the students

145

05051

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

of t

tal,in

pning of standardLtinna and social

he importanceand long-

Chinese life.

Itro

divty

coit

hiis

r

ng emphasisiduars

nomic hardshipseactions to them.

sticated treatmenthip to his fellow

lder Chinese folkits oral roots andfferences betweent story.

excerpt from thegamesh.

c characterietics

141 83

"Spring Silkworms," p. 90"The Widow," p. 771

"Stories illustrating Goal B immediately above alsoServe to implement this goal.

'The Last Train," p. 65°The Widow," p. 77

°The Sorrows of the Lake of Egrets," p. 103'Spring Silkworms," p. 90

"The Last Train," p. 65

"The Lady Who Was a Beggar," p. 50

TUE ADVENTURES OF GILGAMESH, p. 111

ACTIVITIES: Compare the hero of this epic to otherancient heroes the students may be familiar with.

145

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT

B. He becomes aware of the significanceof the hero to his people.

C. He traces the changes in the characterof the hero.

V. The student reads excerpts from the KingJames version of the BIBLE.

A. He analyzes the character of a greatBiblicalkhero by looking at hisstrengths and his weaknesses.

B. He derives some understanding of theancient HeWrew's feelings and thoughtsabout God.

C. He reads a famous piece of adviceabout how man should conduct his lifeand considers its present-day validity.

VI. The student reads works by modern Hebrewwriters.

A. He achieves insight into the Auschwitzexperience.

B. He shares with a poet the feelingsaroused by a total loss of communi-cation powers.

C. He sees various explorations of thesubject of death and decline.

146

Consider what constitutes a1970's.

"The Story of Samson," from

"Psalms," pp. 132-135

"Ecclesiastes 3," p. 136

from THE CLOCK OVERHEAD, p.

"Nothingness," p. 138

"Preliminary Challenge," p."Summer is Dying," p. 144"Birds Have Thoughts," p. 14"On My Return," p. 145

147

05051

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

are of the atgnificanceo his people.

changes in the character

excerpts from the Kingthe BIBLE.

he character of a greatby looking at hishis weaknesses.

e understanding of the's feelings and thoughts

:mous piece of adviceshould conduct his life

s its present-day va;idity.

works by modern Hebrew

insight into the Auschwitz

th a poet the feelingstotal loss of cammuni-

s.

ous explorations of theeath and decline.

14

Consider what constitutes a hero in the world of the1970's.

"The Story of Samson," from "Judges 13-16," p. 125

"Psalms," pp. 132-135

"Ecclesiastes 3," p. 136

from }THE CLOCK OVERHEAD, pi- 147

"Nothingness," p. 138

"Preliminary Challenge," p. 139"Summer is Dying," p. 144"Birds Have Thoughts," p. 143"On My Return," p. 145

147

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

D. He compares the sentiments of .a modernpoem to the Beatitudes of Christ.

E. He sees the skill of a poet who takesan ancient Jewish ceremony and notonly emulates its form through hispoem but also uses it to express hisawn particular themes.

F. He analyzes one poet's exploration ofthe nature of poetry.

G. He examines the conflicts arising amongdifferent generations in a modern Israelifamily over the question of Jewishtradition.

H. He explores the consequence of deceptionon a sensitive human being.

VII. The student reads some selections fromHindustani literature. He realizes thatthis literature encompasses many languages,only several of which are represented inthe text.

A. He sees the rigid caste system and theservant/master relationship portrayed.

B. He investigates the various effects ofeconomic deprivation on people.

85

"Blessing," p. 141

"The Dance of the Torches,"

"Ars Po," p. 146

"The Name," p. 158

ACTIVITY: Discuss how the threlate to American life also.

"The Blind Girl," p. 174

"The Gold Watch," p. 181"My Lord, the Baby," p. 218

"The Bamboo Trick," p. 207"The Gold Watch," p. 181

149

05051

UNTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

he sentiments of a moderneatitudes of-Christ.

kill of a poet who takesish ceremony and notits form through hisuses it to express hisr themes.

one poet's exploration off poetry.

the conflicts arising amongerations in a modern Israelithe question of Jewish

the consequence of deceptione human being.

s some selections fromature. He realizes thatencompasses many languages,hich are represented in

rigid caste system and theer relationship portrayed.

tea the various effects ofrivation on people.

1488

"Blessing," p. 141

"The Dance of the Torches," p. 171

"Ars Po, p. 146

"The Name, p. 158

ACTIVITY: Discuss how the themes of this story mayrelate to American life also.

"The Blind Girl," p. 174

"The Gold Watch," p. 181"My Lord, the Baby," p. 218

"The Bamboo Trick,°''p. 207"The Gold Watch," p. 181

149

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

C. He looks at a glorification oflove and at the Hindu conceptionof a woman portrayed in two well-known works.

D. He sees intensive analyses of humanbeings' motivations, of their under-standing and tailing to understandother men.

k*

E. He becomes-gOrre of how politicalissues can enter literature.

VIII. The student studies works from the worldof Islam. The two languages representedare Arabic and Persian.

A. He understands the importance ofthe Koran to Moslem life.

B. He reads excerpts from the KORANand compares the themes to thoseof the Judaeo-Christian religions.

C. He considers the question of con-forming to the madness of societyin a'one-act drama.

150

"Savitri's Love" from the MAan excerpt from "Black Marig

All of the short stories inincluding the "Confidence Mementioned, will illustrate t

"The Gold Watch," p. 181

"The Overthrowing," "The Cleathe KORAN, pp. 236-238

"The River Madness," p. 24

ACTIVITY: Act out this dramaand should be easy to do in c

151

05051

CONTENTACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

t a glorification oft the Hindu conceptionkportrayed in two well-s.

tensive humanttivations, of their under-d failing to understand,

;%:,

--

aware of how political

renter literature.

tdies works from the worldtwo languages represented.Persian.

Inds the importance ofo Moslem life. '

cerpts from the KORANs the themes to thoseeo-Christian religions.

s the question of con-the madness of societyt drama.

"Savitri's Love" from the MAHABHARATA, p. 189an excerpt from "Black Mariga0s," p. 194'

All of the short stories in the Hindustani section,including the "Confidence Men," not-previouslymentioned, will illustrate this goal.

"The Gold Watch," p. 181

"The Overthrowing," "The Cleaving," "The Unity," fromthe KORAN, pp. 236-238

"The River of,Madness," p. 245

ACTIVITY: Act out this drama. It has few charactersand should be easy to do in class.

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

D. He studies the deep mysticism seen ina number of Islamid poets from manycenturies past through modern, times..

I. He sees this mysticism displayitself in a yearning for union withGod.

2. He finds in the mysticism of thethirteenth century poet R:umi aneffort to understand the natureof evil.

3. He discovers in the mysticism ofthe fourteenth century poet Hafiza strong 'strain of optimism.

E. He becomes aware of a disenchantmentwith the limits of human life and a.certain fatalism expressed by otherIslamic poets.

F. He sees poetic commentary on the sub-ject of people direc yy and indirectlyinvolved in war.

IX. The student studies Japanese poetry

A. fie understands the structure of thetanks and the antiquity of the form.

15287

"Odes 1 and 5" from THE DIVAN"The Progress of Man," p./468"Remembered Music," p. 265"Song of Man," p. 255

"The Evil in Ourselves," p. 2"The Soul of Goodness in Thin

"Ode V," p. 242

Stanzas from THE MEDITATIONS,from THE RUBAIYAT OF OMAR K

"J Brother," p. 263"To My Wife," p. 269

153

05051

e deep mysticism seen inslamic poets from many

st through modern times.

this mysticism displaya yearning for union with

in the mysticism of thetH century poet Rumi ano understand the nature

ers in the mysticism ofeenth century poet Hafizstrain of optimism.

are of a disenchantmentits of human life and alimn expressed by others.

is chimentary on the sub-le directly and indirectlywar.

ies Japanese poetry-

ds the structure of thee antiquity of the form.

15287

"Odes 1 and 5" from THE DIVAN, pp. 241, 242"The ProgreSs of Man," p. 268"Remembered Music," p. 265"Song of Man," p. 255

"The Evil in Ourselves," p. 266"The Soul of Goodness in Things Evil," p. 267

"Ode V," p. 242

Stanzas from THE MEDITATIONS, pp. 239-240from THE RUBAIYAT OF OMAR KHAYYAM, p. 257

"0 Brother," p. 263"To My Wife," p. 269

1 }3

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

B. He notices the personal and lyricalnature of the tankas he 'reads.

C. He realizes the relative rarity ofthe long poem (nags uta) in Japaneseliterature.

D. He notices the wistful tone of thetwo examples of nags uta given.

E. He understands the form of thehaiku.

F. He sees the evocative and lyricalnature of the form through thehaiku he reads.

X. The student compares the old and themodern No play according to setting,characterization, and development oftheme.

XI. The student studies the modern Japaneseshort story:

A. He looks at an investigation of therole of the artist in society

B. He analyzes the use of symbols..

Examples of tankas by a numb

"CIV," p. 275"CV," p. 277

Selections of haiku poetry,

"The Damask Drum," p. 284"The Damask Drum," p. 290

ACTIVITY: Act out parts ofdrum should help the studentof the plays.

"Hell Screen," p. 307

"Hell Screen," p. 307"The Charcoal Bus," p. 347"Seibei's Gourds," p. 363

Ar T-. ti t)

05051

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

es the personal and lyricalf the tankas he reads.

zes the relative rarity ofpoem (nags uta) in-Japanesere.

es the wistful tone of theles of nags uta given. .,

stands the form of the

the evocative and.lyricalf the form through thereads.

ompares the old and they according to setting,ion, and development.of

tudies the modern Japanese

at an investigation of thehe artist in society

es the use of symbols.

Examples of tankas by a number of poets, pp. 271-274

"CIV," p. 275"CV," p. 277

Selections of haiku poetry, pp. 280-282

"The Damask Drum," p. 284"The Damask Drum," p. 290

ACTIVITY: Act out parts of:these dramas. The use of adrum should help the students understanding and enjoymentof the plays.

"Hell Screen," p. 307

"Hell Screen," p. 307"The Charcoal Bus," p. 347"Seibei's Gourds," p. 363

.1. 0 t)r r-"?

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

He becomes aware'of the authors'sensitive and analytical approachesto human behavior and motivation.

D. He sees a writer's skillful manipulationof point of view.

E. He lociG at war from the viewpoint of adying soldier.

XII.'The student contrasts the themes and formsof earlier "tales" with those of the modernshort story.

XIII.The student considers in a brief drama theissue of madness vs. sanity and theirrelative compensations.

XIV. The9student reads selections from thehardbound MAN IN LITERATURE text whichrelate culturally or thematically tothe literature of the Eastern world.

XV. The student engages in wripng activitiesrelating to the literature being read.

89

"Seibei's Gourds," p. 363"The Thief," p. 367"One Soldier," p. 376

"The Thief," p. 367

"One Soldier," p. 376

"The Bamboo Cutter and the"Hoichi the Earless," p. 340

"The Madman on the Roof," p.

ACTIVITY: Compare this workof madness vsk sanity', e.g.,NEST, SILENT SNOW, SECRET Sh._

ACTIVITY: In conjunction wistudied in this course, it mthe students to have a speakor other individual representhe class.

WRITING ACTIVITIES: As a crhe composes hiskown haiku or

157

((

0/1TENT

05051

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

are of the authors'd analytical approachesavior and motivation.

iter's skillful manipulationview.

war from the viewpoint of ar.

raats the themes and formswith those of the modern

ides in a brief drama thevs. sanity and their

at ions.

s belect1ons from theLITERATURE text whichy or thematically tof the Eastern world.

gee in w4ting activitiesliterafare beingl-ead.

t7nt

89

"Seibei's Gourds," p. 363"The Thief," p. 367"One Soldier," p. 376

"The Thief," p. 367

"One Soldier," p. 376

"The Bamboo Cutter and the Moon Child," p. 328"Hoichi the Earlees," p. 340

"The Madman on the Roof," p. 354

ACTIVITY: 'Compare this work to other literary analyses

of madness vs. sanity, e.g., ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S

NEST, SILENT SNOW, SECRET SNOW.

ACTIVITY: In conjunction with any of the cultures

studied in this course, it might be enlightening to

the students to have a speaker--a university student

or other individual representing that culture--visit

the class.

WRITING ACTIVITIES: As a creative writing experience,he composes his own haiku or a brief drama.

157

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALD AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

He compares and contrasts aHebrew, Hindustani, or JapaAmerican short story in aretheme, and mood.

He investigates one of thein depth; he analyzes its fand explains how they contr

He compares and contrasts voutlook on life in one of tof the American.

He writes a documented resecertain facets of one of thLiterature.

He reviews a literary selecof the authors studied in t

He writes essay examinationhas read.

i)9

05051

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

158

He compares and contrasts a short story from Chinese,Hebrew, Hindustani, or Japanese literature to anAmerican short story in areas such as subject matter,theme, and mood.

He investigates one of the longer or more complex poemsin depth; he analyzes its form and figurative languageand explains how they contribute to its meaning.

He compares and contrasts various aspects of man'soutlook on life in one of the Eastern cultures to thatof the American.

He writes a documented research paper investigatingcertain facets of one of the cultures covered in EasternLiterature.

He reviews a literary selection not in the text by oneof the authors studied in the course.

He writes essay examinations based on the literature hehas read.

WORLD LITERATURE I

COALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

UNIT 2: RUSSIAN AND EASTERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE

I. The student realizes the deep attachmentto their country characteristic of manyRussian writers.

A. He sees it expressed in poetry of thenineteenth and twentieth-centuries.

B. He analyzes it through the personalityand explicit statements made by thechief character in a nineteenth centurywork.

C. He views it in a stofy stemming fromWorld War II.

D. He sees this strong attachment tohomeland present in a contemporarySoviet writer.

II. The student considers some of the politicaland social issues which arose in Russia inthe nineteenth century and continued intothe twentieth.

1 091

Note: Unless otherwise indiarea of Russian literature aRUSSIAN AND EASTERN EUROPEAN

Repetition of selections ismay serve to illustrate vatisuggest repeated readings.

"My Country," p. 148"The Hawk," p. 58

"A Desperate Character," p.

"The Fate of a Man," p. 167

"Matryona's Home," p. 199

ACTIVITY: Read the excerptsmemoirs which also stronglyland.

161

05051

bENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

STERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE

s the deep attachmentaracteristic of many

ressed in poetry of thetwentieth-centuries.

through the personalityatemegts made by thein a nineteenth century

a story stemming from

rong attachment tot in a comtemporary

rs some of the politicalhick arose in Russia inury and continued into

91

Note: Unless otherwise indicated, selections in thearea of'Russian literature are taken from the text,RUSSIAN AND EASTERN EUROPEAN LITERATURE.

Repetition of selections is intended to show that theymay serve to illustrate various goals and does not'suggest repeated readings.

"My Country," p. 148"The Hawk," p. 58

"A Desperate Character," p. 246

"The Fate of a Man," p. 167

"Matryona's Home," p. 199

ACTIVITY: Read the excerpts from Stalin's daughter'smemoirs which also strongly reflect the love of home-land.

16.1

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

A. He sees the emergence of the "little man"as hero.

B. He becomes aware of an increasing dis-enchantment with the bureaucratic systemand with social injustice.

C. He investigates the nature and role ofthe old nobility.

III. The student analyies the nature of man andhis motivations as presented by several ofRussia's best-known authors.

A. He considers the means by which courageand pride manifest themselves.

B. He looks at the reactions to imprison-ment of a tomantic hero.

C. He explores the qualities of greed and

materialism.

D. He investigates the many-facetedpersonality of a character and theforces which shaped that personality. 4;

1 62

"The Overcoat," p. 115

"The Overcoat," p. 115"An Incident," p. 33"A Desperate Character," p. 24

"A Desperate Character," p. 2

"The Shot," p. 153

MAN IN LITERATURE, "A Prisone

"A Christmas Tree and a Weddi"Matryona's Home," p. 199

ACTIVITY: Compare the mannerqualities in these stories toJudgments of Shemyaka," p. 42

"A Desperate Character," p. 2

1 GR

05051

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

emergence of the "little man"

ware of an increasing dis-with the bureaucratic systemial injustice.

:tea the nature and role ofility.

lyzes the nature of man andas presented by several of

nown 'authors.

s the means by which courage:nifest themselves.

the reactions to imprison-omantic hero.

the qualities of greed and

ates the many-facetedof a character and the

h shaped that personality.

"The Overcoat," p. 115

"The Overcoat," p. 115"An Incident," p. 33"A'Desperate Character," p. 246

"A Desperate Character," p. 246

"The Shot," p. 153

MAN IN LITERATURE, "A Prisoner in the Caucacus," p. 178

"A Christmas Tree and a Wedding," p. 107"Matryona's Home," p. 199

ACTIVITY: Compare the manner of treatment of thesequalities in these stories to an earlier tale, "The

Judgments of Shemyaka," p. 42

"A Desperate Character," p. 246

r

1 HR

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

.IV. The student realizes the contributions ofthe Jewish writer to the literature ofRussia.

A. He analyzes snobbery through a humorousrecounting of a boyhood incident.

B. He explores a Jewish narrator's despairand faith; he witnesses a surprise ending.

V. The student views hmkthe experiences of warhave influenced Russian literature.

A. He analyzes the works of two poets con-cerning different wars.

B. He considers the bitterness toward theenemy in a story springing from WorldWar II.

VI. The student readri a classic Ikus?ian drama.

A. He examines the structure of the play.

193

"In the Basement," p. 50

"reifye Wins a Fortune," p. 16

ACTIVITY: Do research onthetoday and give an oral presen

hI m Goya," p. 14"I Am Goya," p. 115

ACTIVITY: Compare the differto illustrate the task corkfroaddition, look at the same poCyrillic to familiarize etudethe Russian alphabet.

"The Fate of.a Man," p. 167

THE SEA GULL, p. 60

G 5

05051

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

lizes the contributions ofer to the literature of

snobbery through a humorousof a boyhood incident:

a Jewish"narrator's despairhe witnesses a surprise ending.

ws how the experiences of warRussian literature.'

the works of two poets Con-ferent wars.

s the bitterness toward thestory springing from World

ds a classic Russian drama:

the structure of the play.

93

"In the Basement," p. 50

"Tevye Wins a Fortune," p. 16

ACTIVITY: Do research on.the state of the Jews in Russiatoday and give an oral presentation to the class.

"I'm Goya," p. 14"I Am Goya," p. 115

ACTIVITY: Compare the differences in the two translationsto illustrate the task confronting the translator. In

addition, look at the same poem printed on page 12 in theCyrillic to familiarize students with the appearance ofthe Russian alphabet.

"The Fate of a Man," p. 167

THE SEA GULL, p. 60

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

He becomes aware of the significanceof Chekhov's contributions to thedevelopment of drama extending beyondRussian literature.

C. He sees in the play an investigation ofthe nature of art.

D. He understands the use of the symbol.

E. He considers the consequences of one-sided loves and the complications ofhuman life.

VII. The student examines some of the manyparadoxes present in Russian life andliterature.

A. He sees a yearning for the ideal vs.the disillusionments of reality.

B. He looks at ascetic tendencies vs.the extravagances of riotoqa.Aliving.

C. He realizes that a deep sense ofspirituality has been present alongwith superstition and the purely out-ward practices of religion.

G

c

ACTIVITY: Act out parts of Tits emphasis on romantic loveto students.)

'The Young Man Who Flew Past,'

ACTIVITY: Discuss whether thin his final act.

"A Desperate Character," p.

"Where Love Is, God Is," p."Matryona's Home," p. 199

05051

NTENT

are of the significancecontributions to the

of drama extending beyondrature.

e play an investigation off art.

s the use of the symbol.

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

the consequences of one- ACTIVITY: Act out parts of THE SEA GULL. (This play, withand the complications of its emphasis on romantic love, should particularly appeal

to students.)

Ines some of the manyt in Russian life and

rning for the ideal vs. "The Young Man Who Flew Past," p.46ionments of reality.

ACTIVITY: Discuss whether the young man was justified-in his final act.

scetic tendencies vs. "IA Desperate Character," p. 246nces of riotous living.

that a deep sense"ofhas been present along

ition and the purely out-es of religion.

I. ( 3

"Where Love Is, God Is," p. 235"Matryona's Home," p. 199

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

VIII. The student becomes aware of the economichardships and of the social customs andmores retained from the past in a Russianvillage during the 1950's.

IX. The student studies poems by, several modernRussian writers.

A. He looks at one poet's view of the artof poetry and analyzes the imagery ofthe poem.

B. He sees a glorification of the peopleof Moscow in a poem written intraditional verse form.

C. He studies the use of the symbol and-figures of speecli in poetry writtenin free verse.

D. He notices the conversational qualityof some poems.

E. He reads a monologue on the absence ofroles in life.

F. He sees the author assume various rolesin a poem about Jewish persecution.

16895

"Matryona's Home," p. 199

"Poetry," p. 149

"On Early Trains," p. 150

"First Frost," p. 268"Foggy Street," p. 269"Parabolic Baljad," p. 271

"Lies," p. 273"Talk," p. 274"Encounter," p. 275

"Monologue of a Broadway Actr

"Babi Yar," p. 278

ACTIVITY: A committee does rRussia today and presents itspanel discussion.

169

05051

11/41TENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

omes aware of the economicOrthe social customs andfrom the. past in a Russianthe 1950's,

dies pomps by several modern

one poet's view of the artnd analyzes the imagery of

lorification of the peoplen a poem written inverse form.

the use of the symbol andspeech in poetry writtense.

the conversational qualitys.

monologue on the absence offe.

author assume various rolesbout Jewish persecution.

16895

"Matryona's Home;" p. 199

"Poetry," p. 149

"On Early Trains," p. 150.

"First Frost," p. 268"Foggy Street," p. 269"Parabolic Ballad," p. 271

"Lies," p. 273"Talk," p. 274"Encounter," p. 275

"Monologue of a Broadway Actress," p. 276

"Babi Yar," p. 278

ACTIVITY: A committee does research on censorship inRussia today and presents its findings to the class inpanel discussion.

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT'42

ACTIVITIES AN

X. The student studies a navel from Russianliterature. He considers its theme,structure, and relationship to the otherRussian literature which be has studied.

XI. The student reads and examines whatever,stories from the nations of Eastern Europethe teacher chooses.

XII. The student reads works selected by theteacher or suggested by the class fromthe MAN IN LITERATURE text which relateculturally or thematically to the materialbeing studies.

XIII. The student engages in writing activitiesrelating to the literature being read.

170

**-1 THE CAPTAIN'S DAUGHTERTHE DEATH OF IVAN ILYCH

WRITING ACTIVITIES: He revi.either from the nineteenth o

It would be particularly helstudent to read and review asignificance to Russian andclear in the texts. Other sincrease their knowledge ofand review one of Tolstoi's

He compares and contrasts. ashort story written in approthe standpoint of subject ma

He writes a research paper (in which he compares the socdescribed in the selectionsconditions in Russia today.

05051

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

udies a novel from Russiane considers its theme,relationship to the other

ture which he has studied.

ads and examines whateverhe nations of Eastern Europeooses.

ads .Works selected by the

gested by the class fromERATURE text which relatethematically to the material

gages in writing activitiese literature being read.

170

THE CAPTAIN'S DAUGHTERTHE DEATH OF IVAN ILYCH

WRITING ACTIVITIES: He reviews another Russian novel,either from the nineteenth op.twentieth centuries,

It would be particularly helpful for the more ambitiousstudent to read and review a novel by Dostoevski, whosesignificance to Russian and world literature is not madeclear in the texts. Other students who are anxious toincrease their knowledge of a gigantic figure might read

.and review one of Tolstoi's longer novels.

He compares and contrasts a Russian and an Americanshort story written in approximately the same era from

the standpoint of subject matter, theme, and style.

He writes a research paper (not necessarily lengthy)

in which he compares the social and economic conditions

described in the selections he has read to theseconditions in Russia today.

_171

WORLD LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENTACTIVITIES AND

3

172

I

97

He chooses a poem from the topoem and considers its similato an American poem, particulviewpoint.

He writes essay examinationsread.

.1 7 3

`CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

05051

17297

He chooses a poem from the texts or another Russianpoem and considers its similarities and differences

to an American poem, particularly from a thematic

viewpoint.

He writes essay examinations on the literature he has

read.

173

WORLD LITERATURE 2-

05052

ODURSE DESCRIPTION

In World-Literature 2 focus on the

literature of Black African writers representing

various nation - states

.7

and o

Aitings of Europeans representing

selected countries.

Study intensively twentieth-centurywriters

whose

erests are many and diverse but whose objectives

are often surprisingly similar.

Using poetry,

the essay, folk tales, the drama, short stories,

and the novel, Black African writers display their

rich

cultural heritage, fierier love for their homelands,

and their promise for the future.

Reading in these

same literary forms, survey European literature,

selected principally from the seventeenth, eighteenth,

and nineteenth centuries.

Become familiar with writers of France, Germany,

and Scandanavia.

For students

in Grades 12 and 11.

GOALS

The student reads literary works by African,

French, German, and Scandanavianwriters.

He recognizes the universality of

the themes in the literature he has read.

He notes the artistic merits and qualities

of the literature he has read.

99

WORLD LITERATURE 2

05052

Materials

Title

Use

BLACK AFRICAN VOICES.

Scott, Foresman and Company.

Students

fl

TEUTONIC LITERATURE.

Scott, Foresman and Company.

TRANSLATIONS FROM THE FRENCH.

Scott, Foresman and Company.

Students

Students

MAN IN LITERATURE.

COMPARATIVE WORLD STUDIES IN TRANSLATION.

Scott, Foresman and Company.

Students

TEACHER'S RESOURCE BOOK to accompany MAN IN LITERATURE.

COMPARATIVE WORLD STUDIES IN

Teacher

Students

THE STRANGER.

Random House, Inc.

Students

WORLD STUDIES IN TRANSLATION.

Scott, Foresman and Company.

TELL FREEDOM.

Alfred Knopf, Inc.

SIDHARTHA.

Published jointly by New Directions Publishing Corporation and Bantam Books,

Inc.

Students

ci

WORLD LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

UNIT I: BLACK AFRICAN LITERATURE

I.

II.

The student will read non-fiction accounts ofthe Black African who has become, in part,Westernized. The student will recognize theconflicting forces which such exposure bfingsabout.

Cultural differences not only between Whiteand Black Africans, but between American andAfrican Blacks will be viewed at close-hand

range.

III. The student will read several proverbs whichreflect the wisdom and perspective' of Africanpeople.

IV.

V.

The student will recognize the persistentstruggle of Black African countries to gain

freedom and autonomy.

The belief in.superstitution, and

tribal customs remains a way of life for

most Africans. The student will readseveral poems and short stories whichsupport this fact.

101.

Note: Unless otherwise indicaarea of African literature areBLACK AFRICAN VOICES.

"The Blacks," p. 20

"The Blacks," p. 20

"Proverbs," p. 52

"Defiance Against Force," p.

"Ritual Murder," p. 146"The Law of the Grazing Fields

177

05052

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

LITERATURE

1 read non-fiction accounts ofan who has become, in part,he student will recognize theces which such exposure brings

ences not only between Whiteans, but between American andwill be viewed at close-hand

1 read several proverbs whichdom and perspective of African

1 recognize the persistentck African countries to gainonomy.

uperstitution, ritual, andremains a way of life forThe student will readnd short stories which

ct.

I 7 fi

Note: Unless otherwise indicated, selections in thearea of African literature are taken from the text,

BLACK AFRICAN VOICES.

"The Blacks," p. 20

"The Blacks," p. 20

"Proverbs," p. 52

"Defiance Against Force," p. 111

"Ritual-Murder," p. 146"The Law of the Grazing Fields," p. 155

to I 7 '7

W3RLD'LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT

VI. The stude t will read a first-hand accountof living onditions--abject poverty being

the order o the day for the Black minersof South Africa.

VII. The student will read an allegory-fable andbe able to explain political parallels present.

. VIII. The student will learn the African conceptof family or clan.

IX. The student, through his readings, willlearn not only what apartheid is, but alsothe ramifications of such a policy.

X. The student will read an African picaresquetale.

XI. The student of Black African literaturewill recognize the literary movement ofthe 1930's called Negritude. This move-ment will be seen as an outgrowth ofincreasing Black awareness regarding.

African culture. The mixed receptionof Negritude received by Blacks in noway takes away from its influence..

178

a

ACTIVITIES AND'

"Aboard An African Train," p.

"The Gentlemen of the Jungle,"The Wages of Good," p. 100

"The Feud," p. 112from THE AFRICAN CHILD, p. 19

"The Dignity of Begging," p.

The selection listed under Gothis goal.

Yrfrica," p. 107"Your Presence," p. 110"Listen Comrades," p. 108

179

05052

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

1 read a first-hand accountitions--abject poverty beinghe day for the Black-minersa.

11 read an allegory-fable andlain political parallels present.

11 learn the African conceptlan.

hrough his readings, willwhat apartheid is, but alsoons of such a policy.

11 ,read an African picaresque

Black African literaturethe literary movement ofled Negritude. This move-eeh as an outgrOwth ofck awareness, regardinge. The mixed receptionkeived b Blacks in no

from it nfluence.

178

"Aboard An African Train," p. 176

"The Gentlemen of the Jungle," p. L90"The Wages of Good," p. 100

"The Feud,". p. 112from THE AFRICAN CHILD, p. 194

-"The Dignity of Begging," p. 254

The selection listed under Goal IX will also illustratethis goal.

"Africa," p. 107"Your Presence," p. 110"Listen 'Comrades *," p. 108

1 I

WORLD LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

UNIT 2: TEUTONIC LITERATURE IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION

I. The student will acquire a basic knowledgeof the evolution of modern German.

A. The student will learn of the relation-ship of both Proto-Germanic and'Indo-Germanic to modern. German.

B. The student will learn-the significanceof the Germanic Sound Shift.

C. The student will be able to define theterm dialect and learn how it operates.

II. The student will familiarize himself withthe Dadaist movement, and learn why theirrational, the destructive, and thenihilistic were stressed at certain pointsin Teutonic poetry and prose.

III The student will read several poems andstories dealing with the many dimensionsof war. He will recognize th,e existenceof pacifist literature.

IV. The student will read several Gothicstories and recognize the popularityof this genre in Teutonic literature.

180103

"German and Related Language

"Baobab," p. 21

"General, That Tank," p. 53

"The Tunnel," p: 71

181

05052

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

TERATURE IN ENGLISH TRANSLATION

1 acquire a basic knowledgen of modern German.

will learn of the relation-h Proto-Germanic and Indo-modern German.

will learn the significancenic Sound Shift.

will be able to define thet and learn how it operates.

1 familiarize himself withement, and learn why thedestructive, and thestressed at certain points

try and prose.

1 read several poems andwith the many dimensions1 recognize the existenceerature.

1 read several Gothicognize the popularityn Teutonic literature.

180103

"German and'Related Languages," pp. 10 -17

"Baobab," p. 212

"General, That Tank," p. 53

"The Tunnel," p. 71

181

WORLD LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

V. The even- present conflict between theartist's priorities and those of theMass audience will be made apparent tothe student. He will be able to recog-nize parody and understand how itfunctions.

VI. The student will read from selectionsthat depict a depression-torn Germany.He will see the extent of suffering,both physical and mental, that such acondition promotes.

VII. The student-will explore several represen-tations of family life. He will recognizethat a sense of duty often motivates peopleto settle for dreary lives and that earlyindependence and freedom to make one'sown decisions are desirable in most cultures.

VIII. The student will study the earliestpsychological or socially directed "problemplay," and become aware of the growingsophistication that w4s brought about bythe introduction of natural dialogue.

182

"Tristan," p. 174"The Master Builder," p. 300

"The Invisible Collection,

"Life Sentence," p. 286

THE MASTER BUILDER, p. 300

183

'CONTENT

nt conflict between theities and those of theilljoe made apparent to

He will be able to recog-d understand haw it

11 read from selectionsdepregsion-torn Germany.e extent of suffering,and mental, that such a.otes.

11 explore several represen-ily life. He will recognizeif duty often motivates peopledreary lives and that earlynd freedom to make one'sare desirable in most cultures.

11 study the earliestor socially directed "problemome aware of the growingthat was brought about by

on of natural dialogue.

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

"Tristan," p. 174"The Master Builder," p. 300

"The Invisible Collection," p. 265

"Life Sentence," p. 286

THE MASTER BUILDER, p. 300

r

WORLD LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

UNIT 3: TRANSLATIONS FROM THE FRENCH

I. The student of French literature willrecognize that translations have, nearlyalways, inherent inadequacies which can-

not be avoided.' He will understand thattranslation is an art, not a science.

II. The student should be able to define whatis meant by adaptation. He will also beable to point out the essential demandsthdt are made of the adapter.

III. The student will study a twentieth-century concept of tragic drama.

IV. The student will read excerpts fromresistance literature, both poetry andand prose, which express differentphilosophical attitudes toward life.

V. The student will recognize that literarychauvinism can and does exist in any

country.

VI. The student will read of the strugglesand discrimination experienced by aFrenchwoman during her early education.

184105

"Speaking of Translation,"

The same selection as in.Goa

ANTIGONE, p. 17

"The Waltz of the Twenty-Yea"Ballad of One Who Sang at tfrom ANTI-MEMOIRS, p. 255

from MEMOIRS OF A DUTIFUL DA

The same selection as in Goa

For the highly motivated; SiSECOND SEX is a monumental aand literary merit. Its lenstudy but excerpts will prov

r

05052

;INTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

FROM THE FRENCH

rench literature willranslations have, nearlyinadequacies which can-

tle will understand thatn art, not a science.

ld be able to define whattation. He will also b--""t the essential,demandgthe adapter.

study a twentieth-of tragic drama.

read excerpts fromature, both poetry andexpress differenttitudes toward life.

recognize that literarynd does exist in any

read of the struggleson experienced by ang her early education.

184105

"Speaking of Translation," p. 9

The same selection as in Goal I

ANTIGONE, p. 17

"The'aI

Maltz of the Twenty-Year Olds," p. 71ad of One Who Sang at the Stake," p. 73ANTI-MEMOIRS, p. 255

from MEMOIRS OF A DUTIFUL DAUGHTER, p. 104

The same selection as in Goal V.

For the highly motivated, Simone de Beauvoir's THE

SECOND SEX is a monumental achievement of scholarship

and literary merit. Its length precludes comprehensive

study but excerpts will prove valuable.

WORLD LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AN

VII. The student will read at 1past one exampleof existential literature. He will arriveat some workable definition of the term..

VIII. The student will read an essay whichdelineates a Frenchman's point of viewregarding big city life.

IX. The student will read several maxims andbe able to distinguish them from aphorismsand epigrams.

X. The student will be able to recognize thelegitimate uses of irony. He'will readone short story that illustrates a truththrough irony.

XI. The student will read at least one sciencefiction short story and discuss its tone.He will learn how tone influences the inter-pretation of a work.

mi. The student will read a play that exploresthe institution of marriage from many pointsof view, all designed to amuse as well as

enlighten.

XIII. The student will be able to distinguish be-

tween English or German ballads and

French ballads.

"Between Yes and No," p. 131

"The Rains of New York," p.

from "The Maxims," p. 256

"The Prisoners," p. 288

"The Earth Dwellers," p. 304

"The Forced Marriage, p. 32

"Three Ballads," p. 355

05052

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

1 read at least one exampleliterature. He will arrivee definition of the term.

1 read an essay whichenchman's point of viewity life

1 read several maxims andinguish them from aphorisms

1 be able to recognize theof irony. He will readthat illustrates a truth

1 read at least one sciencetory and discuss its tone.ow tone inflkiences the inter-work.

1 read a play that exploresof marriage from many points

signed to amuse as well as

1 be Ole to distinguish,be-German ball'ads and

8 fl

\X

"Between Yes and No," p. 131

"The Rains of New York," p. 138

from "The Maxims;" p. 2560

"The Prisoners," p. 288

"The Earth Dwellers," p. 304

"The Forced Marriage " p. 324

"Three Ballads," p. 355

187

ADVANCED COMPOSITION

05060

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Seniors, this course offers you opportunities to acquire

advanced writing skills and to practice them

intensively.

In so doing, prepare for college writing experiences.

Practical applications centering

on the development of single paragraphs and on

the development of complete essays will enable you to

understand the nature of effective 4Titing and to write effectively.

For college-capable students,

Grade 12.

'

GOALS

The student develops his writing skills with regard to the paragraph.

The student develops his writing skills with regard to

the essay.

The student develops skills he needsfor research.

A

107

ADVANCED COMPOSITION

05069

Materials

Title

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE.

Houghton Mifflin Company.

Use

Students

TEACHING WITH A PURPOSE (Instructor's Guide and Resource Book for WRITING WITH A PURPOSE,

Teacher

5th Edition).

Houghton Mifflin Company.

4

Students, Teacher

Students, Teacher

BETTER PARAGRAPHS, Third Edition.

Chandler Publishing Company.

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING.

New American Library.

ADVANCED COMPOSITION

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

I. The student writes effective sentences.

A. The student learns to write an effectivetopic sentence which contains a general,dominant idea and a significant, control-ling idea relevant to it.

$. The student learns to write an effectiveclincher sentence.

C. The student writes a variety of kinds ofeffective sentences.

D. The student develops a sense of appropri-ate sentence structure.

II. The student writes effective paragraphs.

The u ent develops paragraphs by meansof acts only, details only, examples only,inc dents only, reasons only. He learns

h to use a combination of, these methodswh re needed.

B. The student writes paragraphs of exposition,description, narration, and persuasion.

C. The student develops paragraphs which haveunity and coherence.

D. The student develops paragraphs using the

active voice.

1 5 0109

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Ch.

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Ch

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Ch.

WRITING,WITH A PURPOSE, pp.

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, '

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Ch.THE LIVELY AgT OF WRITING,

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING,

¶3

05060

NTENT ACLIVIE,LES AND MATERIALS-

s effectiiie sentences.

earns to write an effectivee which c ?ntains a general,and a significant, confrol-

evant to it.

earns to write an effectiveence.

rites a variety of kinds oftences.

evelops a sense of appropri-structure.

s effective paragraphs.

evelops paragraphs by meansdetails only, examples only,

y, reasons only. He learnscombination of these methods

rites paragraphs of exposition,narration, and persuasion.

evelops paragraphs which have

erence.

evelops paragraphs using'the

150

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Ch. 5

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Ch. 5

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Ch. 6

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, pp. 354-366

I

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Ch. 13 (for persuasion).------

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Ch. 5THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Ch. 6

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Ch. a

ADVANCED COMPOSITION

COALS ANDcONTENT

i

ACTIVITIES AN

III. The student learns the structure andpurposes of the essay and applies hisknowledge to the esA.ays he writes.

A. The student learns the functions ofthe parts of an essay:

1. the introduction2. the thesis statement3. the body4. the conclusion

B. The student learns that, even thougha combination of the forms of discoursemay be employed in the development ofan essay, an essay has but one central

4 purpose--to explain, to describe, tonarrate, or to persuade.

C. The student writes essays that haveorganization, unity, coherence,originality, logical transitions (bothwithin arguments being developed andfrom one argument to another) and apersonal, individual style.

D. The studen learns that elements ofstructure n licable to a singleparagraph are pplicable as well toparagraphs of a ssay.

192110

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Chs.

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Ch

ft

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Chs.

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Ch

193

05060

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

rns the structure andessay and applies his

e essays, he writes.

learns the functions of

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Chs. 1, 4 and 5

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Chs. 1-4

f an essay:

roductiOnsis statement

yclusion

learns that, even thoughon of the forms of discourstoyed in the development ofn essay has but one centralexplain, to describes toto persuade.

writes essays that haven, unity, coherence,, logical transitions (bothments being developed andallvment to another) and a

n idual style.

learns that elements ofpplicable to a singlere applicable as well toof, an essay..

192110

WRITING,WITH A PURPOSE, Chs. 1, 3-5, and 8

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Chs. 5, 7, 9, and 11-13

1 i3

ADVANCED LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

IV. The student learns the procedures necessaryfor research.

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Chti.

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Ch.

A. The student learns about primary andancL sec nndary s_ources AuakmArtt_ Jba

research.

B. The student learns that primary andsecondary sources are intended to backup, to support, to provide evidenceonly for his own judgmgnts; he learnsthat the topic argument of each para-graph that supports the thesis statementmust be original, even though it may havebeen deduced from primary or secondarysources.

1B4111

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Cho,

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Ch.

THE LIVELY. ART OF WRITING, Ch.

195

05060

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

rns the procedures necessary

learns about primary andy_ sources relevant to

learns that401

primary andources are intended to backrt, to provide evidence

s own judgments; he learnspic argument of each pare-supports the thepis statementinal, even though it may havefrom primary or secondary

194

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Chs. 11 and 12

'THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Ch. 14

WRITING WITH A PURPOSE, Chs. 11-12

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Ch. 14, pp. 165-176

111

THE LIVELY ART OF WRITING, Ch. 14, pp. 166-167

195

ADVANCED COMPOSITION

05060

NOTE:

Students do not always realize that the best reason for writing is to express

wotthw Ile ideas--either

to state their own original thoughts or to

explore, explicate, or criticize the idea

oothers.

Learning to write well means learning to express those ideas

through language withou

dging the

thought.

In the course, students should attend carefully to grammar and

language structure as ways

to achieve clarity of thought and 'to logic-and clarity

of thought as the primary pr

urSors of the

uses of grammar and language structure.

Methods of teaching composition differ greatly.

One possible way the teacher may begin the course is

to assign to all students a basic composition

exercise.

After correcting the papers, the teacher might

select from the students' papers common errors and

make these the basis of a lesson, using the board,

an overhead projector, or a dittoed

worksheet as ways to involve the class.

(When wiork ng with students'

errors in writing, it is usually wise to

select some examples from the work of each stu d't and to avoid

selecting a great many errors from the writing of an individual.)

This approach attack

irectly the

problems students have in their own writing.

It will serve as a gauge of students' abilities, guiding

the teacher to areas that need more intensive study and providing

students with immediate feedback on

their errors.

FILMS:

No wealth of films is available on the topic of Advanced Composition.

Some few fil

from Audiovisual Services or from the St. Louis Public Library.

Below are listed

prove useful incertain areas of study

for Advanced Composition:

,

F 161-102

COMPREHENSIVE SKILLS (on paragraphs)

FPL

HOW TO USE THE READER'S GUIDE TO PERIODICAL LITERATURE

s may be obtained

o films which may

ADVANCED LITERATURE

05080

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This advanced course offers you who are serious students

of literature opportunities to examine critically

the topics, themes, and elements with which good

literature concerns itself.

Learn to recOgnize, evaluate,

and appreciate the qualities of good literature

through a close study of poetry, drama, the short story,

and 'the novel.

For college-capable students in Grades 11 or 12.

GOALS

The student studies some of the major aspects of

literature in order to learn how a writer do4s w at he does.

The student learns to evaluate literature in order todetermile-how well a

writer does what

The student studies one or more'approaches to

literary criticism in ordIr to accustom himself

multiple approaches to the content of-literature available to

critics.

The student studies ,types of literature in terms -

of the aspects of literature, the evaluation

and the 'content of literature.

d ?es.

to the

of literature,

ADVANCED LITERATURE

05080

Materials

Title

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, 4th Edition,

Scott, Foresman and Company.

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA: A COMPREHENSIVE ANTHOLOGY.

00

The Macmillan Company.

114

Use

Students, Teacher

Students, Teacher

4 .

ADVANCED LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

e student studies some of the major aspectsof literature in order to learn how a writerdoes what he does.

studant diatinguisbeabetweerr fi icc t ai

B. The student studies action.

C. The student studies character.

D. The student studies setting.

E. The student studies language.

opinion.

F. The student studies tone, point of view,and atmosphere.

G. The student studies meanings in literature.

II. The student learns to evaluate literature inorder to determine how well a writer doeswhat he does.

A. The student studies artistry in details.

B. The student studies internal consistency.

199115

ETTER -REIOSING II: -LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

,BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

a

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

200

05080

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

1.es some of the major aspectsorder to learn how a writer

istinguishes between fact and

studies action.

studies character.

studies setting.

studies language.

studies tone, point of view,re.

studies meanings in literature.

s to evaluate literature inne how well a writer does

studies artistry in details.

studies internal consistency.

199115

BETTER READING-1-1-:---LITERATURE, pp. 2-30

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 30-45

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 45-57

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 57-Z,2

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 73-87

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 87-109

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 109-135

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 140-145

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 145-171

20()

ADVANCED LITERATURE .

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

III. *The student'stqdies one or more approaches toliterary criticism in order to accustom him-self to the multiple approaches to the con-tent of literature available to critics.

A. The student studies escape in literature.

B. The student studies biography in literature.

C. The student studies psychology in liter-ature.

D. The student studiet myth in literature.

E. The student studies society in literature.

F. The student studies morality in literature.

G. 41rhe student studies-philosophy in liter-ature.

IV. The student studies types of literature interms of the aspects of literature, theevaluation of literature, and the contentof literature.

A. The student studies prose fiction.

201

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE

BETTER READING II:sLLITERATURE

BLACK INTERS OF AMERICA, PARSlavery and Racism: 1800-1860

05080

CONTENTaa .

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

dies one or more approaches toi'sm in order to accustom him-tiple approaches to the con-ure availabre to critics.

studies escape in literature.

studies biography in 'literature.

studies psychology in liter-

studies myth in literature.

studies society in literature.

studies morality in literature.

studies philosophy, in liter-

ies types of literature inects of literature, theterature, and the content

studies prose fiction.

201

BETTER READING II: TITERATURE, pp. 177-182

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 182-191

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 1917205

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE,.pp. ,o5-210

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 210,-219

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 219-228 .

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 22$-234

BETTER READING II: LITERATURE, pp. 338-505

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PART II, "The Struggle AgainstSlavery and Racism: 1800-1860."

202

ADVANCED LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

,ettirr.

B. The student studies the drama.

C. The student studies poetry.

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PARthe Civil War: 1861-1865."

DLACK.WRITERS OF AMERICA, PARReaction: 1865-1915."

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PARRadicalism: 1915-1945."

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, 'PARSince 1945."

BETTER READING II, LITERATURE

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PARRadicalism: 1915-1945."

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PARSince 1945."

BETTER READING II, LITERATURE

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PAR

203 201117

05080

k

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

studies the drama.

studies poetry.

203117

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PART III "The Black Man in

the Civil War: 1861-1865."

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PART IV "Reconstruction and

Reaction: 1865-1915."

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PART V "Renaissance and

Radicalism: 1915-1945."

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PART.V1 "The Present Generation:

Since 1945."

BETTER READING II, LITERATURE, pp. 505-704

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PART V, "Renaissance and

Radicalism: 1915-1945."

BLACK WRITERS OF AMERICA, PART VI, "The Present Generation:

Since 1945."

BETTER READING II, LITERATURE, Rp. 704-819

BLACK WRITERS OFAMERICA, PART I - PART VI.

a.

201

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE1

05101

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This advanced course offers you who are setious students of composition. and literature

opportunities to examine

critically qualities of good literature and to recognize, evaluate,

and come to appreciate their intrinsic

worth.

Study of composition skills combined with study of the qualities of poetry and the short story

will

provide you with the tools youneed to write literary criticism:

Open to college - capable students in

Grades 11 or 12,

GOALS

I

The student develops his writing skills with regard to the paragraph and the essay.

He studies and criticizes prose fiction (short story) and poetry.

\

119

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

05101

Materials

Title

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, 4th Edition.

Scott, Foresman and Company. '5,

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE, 3rd Edition.

Prentice-Hall, Inc.

e

Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich, Inc:

COMPLETE COURSE, Revised Edition.

Harcourt, Brace

SOUND AND SENSE: AN INTRODUCTION TO POETRY, 4th Edition.

WARRINER'S ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION,

Jovanovich,-Inc.

-WARRINER'S ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION,

Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich, Inc.

COMPLETE COURSE, Revised Edition, TEACHING TESTS.

Use

StudentS, Teacher

Students, Teacher

Students, Teacher

Students

Teacher

ADVANCED COMPOSITION ACID LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT,'V.414"

ACTIVITIES AND

I. The student develops his writing skills.

A. He learns to develop paragraphs in variouswaysjby exa 'pies, comparisnn and contrast,definition, ombination, etc.), striving to

achieve unit and coherence. He uses the

forms of dis ourse.

1. He write2. He write3. He write

persuasi4. He write

paragraphs of description.paragraphs of exposition.paragraph& of argument and

n.

paragraphs of narration.

B. He writes th mes several,paragraphs in length,striving to

( C. The studentto write) anstructure,

chieve unitrand coherence.

earns to write (or reviews howessay 1n4terms-of its basic

1. He examies the introduction and practiceswriting interesting introductions.

2. He learn the purpose of the thesis state-ment and writes clear thesis statements.

e 3. He recog izes the body of an essay and'I earns t construct and organize thebody of is own essays.

207

A

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERAT-WARRINER'S ENGLISH GRAMMAR ACOURSE, pp. 312,pp. 346, 348-9,

313,

353,

316,361-2,

333

121

NOTE: This text offers manyrelated to literature. The aof these themes to develop hi

20g

AND LITERATURE 1

S05101

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND' MATERIALS

lops his writing skills.

develop Paragraphs in variousples, comparison and contrast,

,combination', etc.), striving "to

y and coherence. He uses thecourse.

s paragraphs of description.,,s paragraphs of exposition.s paragraphs of argument andon.-s paragraphs of narration.

emes several paragraphs in length,achieve unity and coherence.

learns to write"(or reviews howessay in terms of its basic

nes the introduction and practicesinteresting introductions.

s the purpose of the thesis state-writes clear thesis statements.

nizes the body of an essay ando construct and organize thehis, own essays.

207121

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE.WARRINER'S ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION, COMPLETECOURSE, pp. 312, 313, 316, 3301, 331, 334, 341, 345,

pp. 346, 348-9, 353, 361-2, 368-371

NOTE: This text offers many ideas for theme subjectsrelated to literature. The student can utilize someof these themes to develop his writing skills.

2.08

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE I

GOALS AND CONTENT AC IVITIES A

4. He understands the purposes of theconclusion of an essay and learns towrite effective conclusions.

. The student learns to'use the basic formsof discourse (description, exposition,argumentation,' narration) as these areappropriate in his essays.

E. The student reads several related literaryworks and writes a critical analysis essay.(This objective is to be assigned to thosestudents who, in the teacher's opinion; willbenefit from it.)

F. The student accustoms himself to a per-sonal stjrle nf writing with which he canwrite comfortably.

The student produces pieces.of writingthat express his creativity.

II. The student examines excellent examples ofvarious types of literature (especiallypoetry and prose fictiop) and understandsthe basic elements of critical thought- -opinion and reason. He learns to thinkcritically in terms of the major literaryelements..

209

ACTIVITY: The student may wexplaining, for example, ideand incorporating narration,argument in the development

ACTIVITY:. The-student may waffalys,pi, using three or morfor comparison of common quacharacters, setting, or stylgroupings in appendex.)

SOUND AND SENSE

NOTE: The student should utthe beginning of the course IIIliterary elements relative ndto other literary genre.

210

AND LITERATURE 1 ,

ONTENT

.

05101

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

rstands the purposes of theion of an essay and learns tofective conclushions.

learns to use the basic forms(description, exposition,

n, narration) as these arein his essays.

reads several'related literaryites a/critical analysis essay.ive is to be assigned to those, in the teacher's opinion, willit.)

accustoms. himself to a per-of writing with which he cantably.,

produces pieces of writinghis creativity.

ines excellent examples ofliterature (especiallyfiction) and understands

is of criticallthought--on. He learns to thinkrms of the major literary

209

ACTIVITY: The student may-write an expository essayexplaining, for example, ideals Aeld dear by Americansand incorporating narration, description, and/orargument in the development of his thesis statement.

ACTIVITY: The student may write'an essay of criticalanalysis, using three or more literary works as a basisfor comparison of common qualities Such as theme,characters, setting, or style. (See examples of suchgroupings in appendex.)

SOUND AND SENSE

'NOTE: The student.should utilize SOUND AND SENSE fromthe beginning of the course because it illustratesliterary elements relative not only to poetry but alsoto other literary genre.

210'

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

.A. He reviews action.

B. He examines character.

C. He studies setting.

D. He analyzes uses of language.

1. He recognizes imagery and reads itwell.

2. He understands the relationshipof figurative language and mean-ing.

E. He recognizes tone.

F. He analyzes the uses and effectsof point-of-view.

211

123

BETTER READING TWO: "LITERATUexamples from the text.

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATU

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATU

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATU

F 372-111 THE SECRET SHA

"BETTER READING TWO: LITERATU

BETTER READING TWO:.LITERAT

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATU

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATUBETTER READING TWO: LITERATUSOUND AND SENSE, pp. 152-156

F 372-114 THE VIOLIN

WRITING THEMESBETTER READING

F

F 369-111

ABOUT LITERATUTWO: LITERATUR

SILENT SNOW, SMY OLD MAN

2 1 2

AND LITERATURE 1 05101

ONTENT ACTIVITIES' AND MATERIALS

action.

character.

tz;

setting.

uses of language.

riizes imagery and reads it

rstands the relationshiprative language-and mean-

es tone.

the uses and effects-view.

211

123

BETTER READING TWO:. LITERATURE. The teacher selects

examples from the text.

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, p.,30ff.

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, p. 45ff.

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE, Chapter 3

F 372-111 THE SECRET SHARER (dual personality)

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, p". 57ff.

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, p..73ff.

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE, Chapter 11

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE, Chapter 12BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, p. 88ff.SOUND AND SENSE, pp. 152-156

F 372-114 THE VIOLIN

WRITING THEMESBETTER READING

FF 369-111'

ABOUT LITERATURE, Chapter 4TWO: LITERATURE, p. 23ff.

SILENT SNOW, SECRET SNOWMY OLD MAN

2

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

G. He recognizes the uses and effectsof atmosphere.

H. He knows that meaning is a majoraspect of literature.

I. He learns to analyze structure and-to see the importance of form.

III. The student reads and analyzes select&Ishort stories.

A. He analyzes each author's uses of theaspects of literatdte studies.

B. He writes short critical papers on anyone or combination of these aspectswhich interest him in a short story .

of his choice.

IV. The student examines excellent examples ofvarious types of poetry anal learns to thinkcritically in terms of the elements of poetry.

2 1 3

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATU

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATU

NOTE: If the teacher sees fcontent, pp. 177-234, may be

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERAT

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATU

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATU

NOTE: The teacher may se/ecand individual' study.

BETTER READING" O": LITERAT

SOUND AND SENSE

NOTE: SOUND AND SENSE is thjas they study poetry. The 9class or individual study fry

2 1 4

N AND LITERATURE 1 05101

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

zes the uses and effectsere.

hat meaning is a majorliterature.

to analyze strurrure ande importance of form.

ads and analyzes selected

s each author's uses of theliterature studies.

short critical papers on anybination of these aspectsrest him in a short storyIce.

amines excellent examples ofof poetry and learns to thinkterms of the eleilents of poetry.

2 1 3.

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, p. 95ff.

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, p. 109ff.

NOTE: If the teacher sees fit, the section on evaluatingcontent, pp. 177-234, may be used.

0

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE, Chapter 10

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE; pp. 137 -176

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, pp. 338-504

NOTE: The teacher may select sho-rt stories for class'and individual study.

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, pp. 712-818

SOUND AND SENSE

NOTE: SOUND AND SENSE is th% primary guide for studentsas they study poetry. The teacher will select poems forclass or individual study. rom basic texts.

. ,

2 1 4

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE-1'

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

He recognizes .denotatIon and connotation.

B. :He recognizes imagery, analyzes its uses,and enjoys its effects.

C. He becomes familiar With figurativelanguage:

1. Metaphor2. Personification3. Meionymy.

4. Symbol5. Allegory :

D. He analyzes uses of allusion.

E. He enjoys the uses of musical devices

in poetry.

F. He studies the effects of rhythm andmeter in pOetry.

125

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 3

SOUND AID SENSE, Chapter 4WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATU

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapters 5

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 5

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 6.

F 373-100 THE CROCODILE

NOTE: Chapter 7 treats paredstatement, and irony. If timIishes

'

the teacher might int*these uses of figurative lang

SOUND Atip SENSE, Chapter 8

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 11

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 12

ACTIVITIES: Students shouldexplanations of mechanics, cand emotional intensity in poREADING TWO: LITERATURE, Op.819. The teacher will select,appropriate to individuals an

2

AND LITERATURE 1

ONTENT

05101

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

es denotation and connotation.

es imagery, analyzes its uses,its effects.

familiar with figurative

/)

fication

uses of allusion.

he uses of musical devices

the effects of rhythm andetry.

2 1 5125

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 3

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 4WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE, Chapter II

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapters 5 and 6

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 5

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 6

F 373-100 THE CROCODILE (Satire, Allegory)

NOTE: Chapter 7 treats paradox, overstatement, under-statement, and irony. If time permits and the classwishes, the teacher might introduce from one to all of

these uses of figurative language.

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 8

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 11

SOUND AND SENSE, Chapter 12

ACTIVITIES: Students should pay particular attention toexplanations of mechanics, compactness, figurativeness,and emotional intensity in poetry as explained in BETTERREADING TWO: LITERATURE, pp. 705ff., especially pp. 712-

819. The teacher will select readings in poetry that areappropriate to individuall-and tothe,class.

2 G

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

.

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

R 576-102F 358-103

V. Writing About Literature:

A. The student concentrates on verbalizingand writing his own critiques ofliterature.

B. The student learns to select an appropriatetopic and to establish a relevant andsignificant thesis for an essay of literarycriticism.

C. The studefit learns to.pattern a sentenceoutline for his essay of literarycriticism that shows how he intends toadvance the thesis.

D. He `develops his essay.

217

F'263-132

F 372-115

F 371-104

CANTERBURY TALCHAUCER'S ENG

POETRY FOR ME

WALT WHITMAN -'

ROMANTICISM: T

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATU

SOUND AND SENSE, Standards focritiques, Ch. 15, 16

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATUselecting a topic. .

Class and panel discussion whis ideas.

218

.AND LITERATURE .1 05101

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

terature:

,concentrates on verbalizinghis own critiques of

learns to select an appropriate'establish a'eSievant and

,thes1.8 for an essay of literary

learns to pattern a sentencehis essay of literaryiat shows how he intends to

thesis.

his essay.

217

,R 576-102 CANTERBURY TALES

F 358 -103 CHAUCER'S ENGLAND4

F 263-152 POETRY FOR ME0

F 372-115 WALT WHITMAN-POET FOR A NEW AGE

F 371-104 ROMANTICISM: THE REVOLT OF THE SPIRIT

WRITING THEMES ABOUT tITERATURE,'"Introduction".

SOUND AND SENSE, Standards for judgment in preparingcritiques, Ch. 15, 16

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE, "Introduction"- -selecting a topic.

Class and panel discussion will help the student clarify

his ideas.

21g

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

05101

EXAMPLE'S OF LITERARY WORKS GROUPED FOR COMPARISON

(For Critical Anaiysis Essay)

Note to

Teachers:

This list is intended only to illustrate possible groupings of literary works for the

required essay in critical analysis.

Although the topics and titles offered here are

for the use of those who wish suggestions, students should be encouraged to make up

their own combinations - not necessarily from titles in this list.

Author

Title

Ibsen, Hendrik

Bronte, Charlotte

Mitchell, Margaret

Thackeray, William M.

Gaines, Ernest J.

A DOLL'S HOUSE

JANE EYRE

GONE WITH THE WIND

VANITY FAIR

THE AUTOBIOGRAPHY OF MISS JANE PITMAN

Basis for Comparison

The independent woman

Bronte, Emily

WUTHERING HEIGHTS

Robinson, E. A.

TRISTRAM (or any other version of the Tristram and Isolt

Tragic Love

C.0

story)

Shakespeare; William

ROMEO AND JULIET

Hemingwa5i, Ernest

FAREWELL TO ARMS

Bentley, E. C..

Buchan, John-

Christie, Agatha_

Collins, Wilkie.

Poe, Edgar Allan-

TRENT'S LAST CASE

, ADVENTURES OF RICHARDHANNAYi THE THIRTY-NINE STEPS

MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS

THE MOONSTONE

MURDERS IN THE RUE MORGUE

De La Roche, Mazo

JALNA

Galsworthy, John

THE-FORSYTE SAGA

O'Neill, Eugene

AH, WILDERNESS!,

Hansberry, Lorraine

RAISIN IN THE SUN

` 127

.1-

Detectives' methods

Family Life

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

05101

Bronte, Charlotte

Bronte,'Emily

White, E. B.

Stone, Irving

Bach411er, Irving

Bishop, James

Drinkwater, John

Sandburg, Carl

Fraser, Antonia

Anderson, Maxwell

Stephens, Eva

'Strachey, Lytton

'

..Tenkins, Elizabeth,

Hemingway, Ernest

Melville, Herman

Nordhoff, Charles B.

Conrad, Joseph

Chaucer, Geoffrey

Traven, B.

London, Jack

Lee, Harper

Clark, Walter

Dickens, Charles

Miller, Arthur

.Hugo,Nictor

Kipling, Rudyard

Maugham, Somerset

Shakespeare, William

Steele, Wilbur

JANE EYRE

WUTHERING HEIGHTS

WILD DECEMBER

LOVE IS ETERNAL:

A MAN FOR THE AGES

THE DAY LINCOLN WAS SHOT

ABRAHAM LINCOLN

THE WAR YEARS

MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS

MARY OF SCOTLAND

VICTORIA AND ALBERT

QUEEN VICTORIA

ELIZABETH THE GREAT

THE OLD MAN AND THE SEA

MOBY DICK

PEARL LAGOON

THE LAGOON

THE PARDONER'S TALE

THE TREASURE OF SIERRA MADRE

TOO MUCH GOLD

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

THE OX-BOW INCIDENT

BARNABY RUDGE

THE CRUCIBLE

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME

THE LIGHT THAT FAILED

OF HUMAN BONDAGE

RICHARD `III

FOOTFALLS

128

The Brontes

Lincoln

The life of queens

Man and the sea

Lust for gold

Mob violence

Physical handicap

and personality

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

05101

Shakespeare, William

Dostoievsky, Fedor

Troyat, Henri

Wilder, Thornton

Poe, Edgar Allan

Boulle, Pierre

Arnold, Matthew

Hawthorne, Nathaniel

Twain, Mark

Shaw, George Bernard

Werfel, Franz

Buck, Pearl

Dickens,-Charles

Steinbeck, John

jU

Andreyev, Leonid

Dreiser, Theodore

I'

Galsworthy, John

Lewis, Sinclair

Ellison, Ralph

Buck, Pearl

Cather, Willa

Carroll, Gladys H.

Rolvaag, 0. E.

Stuart, Jesse

Edmonds,' Walter

Garland, Hamlin

Roberts, Kenneth

Rolvaag, O. E.

MACBETH

CRIME AND PUNISHMENT

THE MOUNTAIN

THE BRIDGE OF SAN LUIS REY

THE TELLTALE HEART

FACE OF A HERO

SOHRAB AND RUSTUM

THE AMBITIOUS GUEST

Crime and conscience

Irony

.PERSONAL RECOLLECTIONS OF JOAN OF ARC

-SAINT JOAN

THE SONG OF BERNADETTE

THE GOOD EARTH

OLIVER TWIST

THE GRAPES OF WRATH

SEVEN WHO WERE HANGED

AN AMERICAN TRAGEDY

JUSTICE

KINGSBLOOD ROYAL

INVISIBLE MAN

THE GOOD EARTH

MY ANTONIA

AS THE EARTH TURNS

GIANTS IN THE EARTH

THE THREAD THAT RUNS SO TRUE

DRUMS ALONG THE MOHAWK

SON OF THE MIDDLE BORDER

NORTHWEST PASSAGE.

GIANTS IN THE EARTH

129

Miracles and visions

Poverty

Conflict between the

i'dividual and society

Hardship

of farm life

Hardships of American

pioneers

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

05101

'

Clark, Walter

James, Henry

O'Neill, Eugene

Bellamy, Edward

Butler, Samuel

More, Sir Thomas

Huxley, Aldous

Orwell, George

Bradbury, Ray

Bristow, Gwen

Jennings, John

Parkman, Francis

Twain, Mark

Warren, Robert P.

Wellman, Paul

Barrie, James M.

Bromfield, Louis

Tarkington, Booth

O'Connor, Edwin

Boyd, James

Crane, Stephen

Mitchell, Margaret

Cantor, MacKinley

Catton, Bruce

London, Jack

Nordhoff and Hall

Wauk, Herman

THE TRACK OF THE CAT.

THE TURN OF THE SCREW

THE EMPEROR JONES

LOOKING BACKWARD

EREWHON

UTOPIA

BRAVE NEW WORLD

1984

.FARENNEIT .451

JUBILEE TRAIL

RIVER OF THE WEST

OREGON TRAIL

THE GILDED AGE

ALL THE KING'S MEN

WALLS OF JERICHO

WHAT EVERY WOMAN KNOWS

Hit GREEN BAY TREE

Hit GENTLEMAN FROM INDIANA

1HE

LAST HURRAH

MARCHING ON

THE RED BADGE OF COURAGE

GONE WITH THE WIND

LONG REMEMBER

A STILLNESS AT APPOMATTOX

THE SEA WOLF

THE RISE OF SILAS LAPHAM

THE CAINE MUTINY

Fear

Utopias

Negative Utopias

Settling of the West

Politics

The Civil War

Mutiny on the sea

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

05101

Howells, William Dean

Lewis, Sinclair

Marquand, John P.

Camus, Albert

Cronin, A. J.

Heiser, Victor

Lewis, Sinclair

Braithwaite, Edward

Eggleston, Edward

Hilton, James

Kelly, Myra

Rattigan, Terrence

Cozzens, James G.

Cozzens, James G.

Cozzens, James G.

Barrie, James M.

Cronin, Archibald J.

McKee, Ruth

Bowles, Cynthia

Gunther, John

Hersey, John

Forster, E. M.

Besier, Theodore

Cornell, Katherine

Woolf, Virginia

Fitzgerald, F. Scatt

Thackeray, William

Warren, Robert Penn

THE RISE OF SILAS LAPHAM

BABBITT

THE LATE GEORGE APLEY

THE PLAGUE

CITADEL

AN AMERICAN DOCTOR'S ODYSSEY

ARROWSMITH

TO SIR, WITH LOVE

HOOSIER SCHOOLMASTER

GOODBYE, MR: CHIPS

CHRISTMAS PRESENT FOR A LADY

THE BROWNING VERSION

LAST ADAM (Doctor)

THE JUST AND THE UNJUST (lawyer)

GUARD OF HONOR (Military)

THE LITTLE MINISTER

THE KEYS OF THE KINGDOM

THE LORD'S ANOINTED

AT HOME IN INDIA

INSIDE RUSSIA

A SINGLE PEBBLE

PASSAGE TO INDIA

THE BARRETTS OF WIMPOLE STREET

I WANTED TO BE AN ACTREES

FLUSH

THE GREAT GATSBY

VANITY

ALL THE KING'S MEN

131.

American business Man

The,medical profession

The teacher

Com

rison of Profession

The missionary

West meets East

Elizabeth Barrett

Browning

,

Human ,vanity

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

05101

Steinbeck, John

Golding, William

Porter:Katherine Ann

Crane, Stephen

James, Henry

Conrad, Joseph

Knowles, Patrick

Hemingway, Ernest

Joyce, James

Melville, Herman

Wolfe, Thomas

Sheridan, Richard

Sheridan, Richard

Wilde, Oscar

Ross, Leonard

Muller, Herbert

Miller, Arthur

Boulle, Pierre

Frank, Anne

Hersey, John

Ibsen, Hendrik

Hansberry, Lorraine

Griffin, John

Patton, Alan

Trevino, Elizabeth

Lee, Harper

GRAPES OF WRATH

LARD OF THE FLIES

SHIP OF FOOLS

RED BADGE OF COURAGE

PORTRAIT OF A LADY

HEART OF DARKNESS

A SEPARATE PEACE

THE OLD MAN,AND THE SEA

\I

PORTRAIT OF THE ARTIST AS

AYOUNG MAN

BILLY BUDD

LOOK HOMEWARD, ANGEL

THE RIVALS

SCHOOL FOR SCANDAL

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING ERNEST

EDUCATION OF HYMAN KAPLAN

ADLAI STEVENSON: A STUDY IN VALUES

DEATH OF A SALESMAN

BRIDGE OVER THE RIVER KWAI

DIARY OF A YOUNG GIRL

HIROSHIMA

AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE

YOUNG, GIFTED AND BLACK

BCK LIKE ME

CRY, THE BELOVED COUNTRY

I, JUAN DE PAREJA

TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD

132

Man's inhumanity to

...man

Self-knowledge

Conflict of wills

Humor

Values

Courage

-Individual worth

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 1

05101

Turgenev, Ivan

Williams, Tennessee

Conrad, Joseph

Fitzgerald, F. Scott

Frank, Pat

Shute, Nevil

Knebel and Baily

Bradbury, Ray

Asimov, Isaac

Heinlein, Robert A.

Solzhenitsyn,' Alexander

Remarque, Erich M.

Hemingway, Ernest

Crichton, Michael

Tolkien, J. R.

Tolkien, J. R.

Carroll, Lewis

White, E. B.

Mailer, Norman

Heller, Joseph

Monsarrat, Nicholas

Hersey, John

FATHERS AND SONS

THE GLASS MENAGERIE

LORD JIM

THE GREAT GATSBY

ALAS, BABYLON

ON THE BEACH

SEVEN DAYS IN MAY

THE MARTIAN CHRONICLE

THE FOUNDATION TRILOGY

STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND

AUGUST 1914

ALL QUIET ON IHt WESTERN FRONT

NICK ADAMS STORIES

THE ANDROMEDA STRAIN

THE HOBBIT

THE LORD OF THE RINGS (trilogy)

ALICE'S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND AND THROUGH THE

LOOKING GLASS

THE ONCE AND FUTURE KING

THE NAKED AND THE DEAD

CATCH 22

THE CRUEL SEA

HIROSHIMA

133

Personality problems

Atomic war

Possible futures

World War 1

Fantasy

World War 2

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 2

05102

COURSE DESCRIPTION

/-

Same as course 05101, continued.

In advanced Composition and Literature

2 read in and write about the drama

and the novel.

For the college-capable student inGrades 11or 12.

GOALS

The student continues to develop his writing

skills with regard to the paragraph and the essay.

He studies prose fiction (novel) and

drama.

He prepares a research paper.

135

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 2

05102

Materials

Title

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, 4th Edition.

Scott. Foresman and Company.

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE, 3rd Edition.

Prentice -Hall, Inc.

KING LEAR.

New American Library.

WARRINER'S ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION, COMPLETE COURSE, Revised Edition.

Harcourt, Brace

Jovanovich, Inc.

WARRINER'S ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION, COMPLETE COURSE, Revised Edition.

TEACHING TESTS.

Harcourt, Brace Jovanovich, Inc.

Use

Students, Teacher

Students, Teacher

Students, Teacher

Students

Teacher

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

I. The student continues to write various kindsof paragraphs, themes several paragraphsin length and longer papers and criticalessays. He uses the forms of discourseappropriately. He develops a personal stylewith which he can write comfortably.

II. The student examines excellent examples ofvarious types of literature (especially thedrama and the novel) and understands thebasic elements of critical thought -- opinionand reason. He learns to think criticallyin terms of major literary elements.

2P8137

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATof expository Writing skillscompleted Advanced Compositiprofit from a review of the"Goals and Content," I.

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATULITERATURE, SOUND AND SENSE

NOTE: These textbooks Willmajor aspects of literaturenot taken the first semester

actioncharactersettinglanguagetone

See Advanced Composition and"Goals and Content," II

SOUND AND SENSE will provide/elements of poetic languagein:

denotation and connotatimageryfigurative languageallusionmusical devicesrhythm and meter

See Advanced Composition and"Goals and Content," IV

22

ND LITERATURE 2 05102

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

inues to write vartoud kindsernes several paragraphsger papers and criticalthe forms of discoursee develops.a 'personal stylewrite comfortably.

nes excellent examples ofliterature (especially theel) and understands thef critical thought--opinionlearns to think criticallyr literary elements.

2P8137

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE will provide a reviewof expository writing skills. Students who have notcompleted Advanced Composition and Literature I mayprofit from a review of the skills listed under"Goals and Content," I.

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE; WRITING THEMES ABOUTLITERATURE, SOUND AND SENSE

NOTE: These textbooks will provide information onmajor aspects of literature for the student who hasnot taken the first semester of the course:

actioncharactersettinglanguagetone

point-of-viewatmospheremeaningstructure

See Advanced Composition and Literature 1,"Goals and Content," II

SOUND AND SENSE will provide information about majorelements of poetic language for students who need review

in:

denotation and connotationimageryfigurativeallusionmusical devicesrhythm and meter

See Advanced Composition and Literature I,"Goals and Content," IV

229

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND.CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

A. The st ent reads and analyzes a novel--Conra s HEART OF DARKNESS.

1. He analyzes Conrad's writing forexamples of the major aspects ofliterature studied, noting especially -

setting character, meaning, and

structure.'

2. He writes a critical paper examiningConrad's use of any one or combin-ation of aspects of literature in hit-short novel.

B. He studies OEDIPUS THE KING. (Optional)

1. He learns about the conventions of theGreek theatre.

2. He analyzes the character of Oedipusand the meaning of the play.

230 138

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATU

pp. 237-299

'F 372-111 THE SECRET

F 362-111 NOVEL: WHAT IIT DOES

F 362-104 NOVEL: EARLYDICKENS

NOTE: If the teacher thinksextensive background in andhe may choose to have studen(BETTER READING TWO: EITERA

F 359-121

F 19-122

F 359-123

F 359-124

OEDIPUS REX:

OEDIPUS REX:

OEDIPUS REX:

OEDIPUS REX:

231

AND LITERATURE 2 05102

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

reads and analyzes.a novel--EART OF DARKNESS.

yzes Conrad's writing fors of the major aspects ofure studied, noting especiallycharacter, meaning, and

re.

es a critical paper examinings use of any one or combin-f aspects of literature in hisovel.

OEDIPUS THE KING. (Optional)

ns about the conventions of theheatre.

yzes the character of Oedipusmeaning of the play.

230 138

BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE1 HEART OF DARKNESS,pp. 237-299

F 372-111 THE SECRET SHARER

F 362-111

F 362-104

NOVEL: WHAT IT IS; WHAT IT'S ABOUT; WHATIT DOES

NOVEL:. EARLY VICTORIAN ENGLAND AND CHARLESDICKENS

NOTE: If the teacher thinks that the class requires anextensive background in.and a deep study of the dramahe may choose to have students study OEDIPUS THE KING(BETTER READING TWO: LITERATURE, pp. 511-553).

F 359-121

F 359-122

F 359-123

F 359-124

OEDIPUS REX: THE AGE OF SOPHOCLES

OEDIPUS REX: THE CHARACTER OF OEDIPUS

OEDIPUS REX: MAN AND GOD

OEDIPUS REX: THE RECOVERY OF OEDIPUS

231.

4

- ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND 1XTEMTURE 2

a GOALS AND CONTENTco

I

ACTIVITIES AND

C. He reads and analyzes Shaksspaare's KINGLEAR.

1. He analyzes Shakespeare's writing forexamples of the major aspects of liter-ature studied, noting especiallylanguage, character, structure, meaning.

2. He writes a critical paper examiningany one or combination of the aspectsof literature which interest him in._KING LEAR.

III. The student speaks and writes about liter-ature, concentrating on personal ritiques.(This section should be studied 1arallel to

section II)

A. He selects an appropriate topic andestablishes a relevant and significantthesis for an essay of literary criticism.

B.'He prepares a sentence outline for his'essay of literary criticism that showshow he intends to advance his thesis.

C. He develops his essay.

Oa. 2 3a

KING LEAR

F 355-108

F 260-133

F 370-126

NWILLIAM SHAKES

SHAKESPEARE'S

A4:ER KERR ON

0

NOTE: 'If the teacher wishesthe drama, she may select plaLITERATURE, pp. 511-703, forreading.

ACTIVITIES: Class and panelstudent clarify his ideas.

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATUSOUND AND SENSE, Chapters 15-preparing critiques.)

"Thesis," pp.

"Outline," p

2

AND LITERATURE 2

ONTENT

(

'ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

analyzes Shakespeare's KING;

es Shakespeare's writing forof the major-aspects of liter-died, noting especiallycharacter, structure, meaning.

a critical paper' examiningr combination of the aspectsture which interest him in

ks and writes about liter-ting on personal critiques.ould"be studied parallel to

4

appropriate topic andrelevant and significantessay of literary criticism.

sentence outline for hisrary criticism that showss to advance his thesis.

s essay.

232139

KING LEAR

F 355-108

F 260-133

F 370-126

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE

SHAKESPEARE'S THEATRE

WALTER KERR ON THEATRE

NOTE: If the teacher wishes students to read furtherinthe drama, she may select plays from BETTER READING TWO:LITERATURE, pp-. 511-703, for class or for individualreading.

ACTIVITIES: Class and'panel discussion will help thestudent clarify his ideas.

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATURE, "Introduction,", pp. 1-24.SOUND AND SENSE, Chapters 15-16 (Standards for'judgment,inpreparing critiques.)

V1 4

."Thesisi" pp..5-9

"Outline,".pp.'8-9

2

ADVANCED COMPOSITION AND LITERATURE 2

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

IV'.. The student learns the techniques ofpreparing a research paper. He writesa research paper.

A. He selects a subject and limits it.

B. He prepares a working bibliographyon cards.

C. He reads and takes notes on cards.

D. H. .prepares a final outline.

E. He*writes a arst draft.

F. He prepares the final draft.

G. He footnotes correctly.

H. He prepares t bibliography.

'231

WRITING THEMES ,ABOUT LITERATAppendix B, "A Notepp. 269-274

Appendix C, "A PerspThemes," pp. 275-290

WARRINER'S ENGLISH GRAMMAR ACOURSE, Reyiqed Edition,pp. 426-456

NOTE: The research paper mig,student's examination of Onedramatists who has capturedreading for the course. Theshould be literary.

235

1AN] LITERATURE'2 05102

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

rns the techniques ofarch paper. He writes

r.

a subject and limits it.

a working bibliography

takes notes on cards.

a final outline.

first draft.

the final draft.

s correctly.

a bibliography.

234

WRITING THEMES ABOUT LITERATUREAppendix B, "A Note on Documentation,"pp. 269-274

'1

Appendix C, "A Perspective on ResearchThemes," pp. 275-290

WARRINER'S ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION, COMPLETECOURSE, Revised. Edition, "The Research Paper,"pp. 426-456

NOTE: The research paper might well be based on thestudent's examination of one of the novelists ori:lamstists who has captured his admiration during hisreading for the course. The subject of the papershould be literary.

235

FILM STUDY

05370

4

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Lights!

Camera!

Action!

Study the history of American

filmy and techniques of their production.

Read

about, view, then analyze'films, using the

techniques you've learned.

Maybe you'll even try your hand

,

at filmmaking.

For you if you are above Grade 10, especially

if you enjoyed Media Survey.

NOTE

Suggested films for each unit should be supplemented

with filmi ftom the "Gdneral List" at the end bf

the

course.

The "General List" is briefly annotated to aid

teachers in their selection of films appropriate

to the unit.

The AUDIO-VISUAL CATALOG and the PUBLIC LIBRARY JOINT FILMCATALOG will provide additional

titles and information on films.

141

Materials

Titles

Use

MOVIES IN AMERICA.

Pflaum/Standard.

Students, Teache

FILM: REAL TO REEL.

St. Mary's College Press.

Students, Teadhar

TOMS, COONS, MULATTOES, MAMMIES & BUCKS.

Bantam Books, Inc.

Students

MOVIEMAKING ILLUSTRATED:

THE COMIC FILMBOOK.

Hayden Book-Co.

Students

MOVIES:

CONVERSAT;ONS WITH PETER BOGDANOVICH.

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.

Students,

FILM IN THE CLASSROOM.

Pflaum/Standard.

Teacher

TEACHING IN THE DARK:

Pflaum/Standard.

Teacher

Teacher

Teacher

Teacher

Teacher

Teacher

Teacher

Teacher

Teacher

Teacher

MOVIES ON TV, 7th EDITION.

Bantam Books,

BEHIND THE CAMERA.

Pflaum/Standard,

MAKING IT MOVE.

Pflaum/Standard.

Inc.

MAKING IT MOVE:

INSTRUCTOR'S MANUAL.

Pflaum/Standard.

FILMMAKING FOR CHILDREN.

flaum/Standard

CREATIVE FILMMAKING.

Collier Books

A CREATIVE LOOK AT FILM ARTS.

Educational Impact, Inc.

THE LIVELIEST ART.

New American Library.

MOTION PICTURE PRODUCTION HANDBOOK.

Pflaum/Standard.

"' o

ar.

FILZCHTIMY

GOALS AND CONTENT

UNIT ONE: BASIC FILM LANGUAGE/EARLY FILM HISTORY

;I. The student -learns characteristics and

techniques of ,the single shot

A. The student learns and identifiesexamples on screen of the basic terms

of film.

1. He studies the shot

a.

b.

c.

d.

e.

f.

g.

h.

i.

J.k.

1.

m.

establishing shotlong shotextreme long shotmedium shotclose upextreme erasepantilt shottrackingdollyinghand-held shotpoint of view (subjective) shotboom shot

2. He studies the-types of lenses

normal lenstelephoto lenswide angle lensfish-eye lenszoom lens

238

ACTIVITIES AND MATE

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 1MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 3-20

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 1

ACTIVITY? Several films ofdifferent eras may be shown

unit. The student should noangles, and unusual types ofbe discussed later. Emphasithe film "story" and toward

,SUGGESTED FILMS ON FILM LANG(These basic Mims may be insemester.)

FPLFPLF 270-156,F 269-186F 270-157F 270-184F 269-185

143

ART OF THELET'S MAKE A 11

OUR ART CLASSGROWING OF AHEY, LOOK ATTHE CINEMATOGBASIC FILM TE

2 R 9

05370

ONTENT ACT

-

VITIES AND MATERIALS

LANGUAGE/EARLY FILM STORY

s characteristics andsingle shot

earns and identifiescreen of the basic terms\

s the shot

lishing shotshote long shot.shot

upe close

shoting

ing' %

-held shott of view (subjective) shotshot

es the types of lenses

l lensphoto lensangle lenseye lenslens

238 143

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 1MOVIES IN AM4ICA., pp. 3-20

REAL TO REEL, Ch.:1

ACTIVITY: Several films of different types and fromdifferent eras may be shown during this introductory

unit. The student should note uses of various shots,angles, and unusual types of lenses. These items will

be discussed later. Emphasis here should be away from

the film "story" and toward the technique.

SUGGESTED FILMS ON FILM LANGUAGE:(These basic films may be interspersed throughout the

semester.)

FPLFPLF 270-156F 269-186F 270-157F 270-184F 269-185

ART OF THE MOTION PICTURELET'S MAKE A FILMOUR ART CLASS MAKES A FILMGROWING OF A YOUNG FILMMAKERHEY, LOOK AT ME!THE CINEMATOGRAPHERBASIC FILM TERMS

2R

FILM STUDY

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATE

3. He studies the Camera angle

a. normal angleb. high angle. .c. low angled. Dutch angle (tilted)

B. The Student analyzes the shot limitationsof early filmdakers and their solutionsthose problems.

1. He discovers the problem of a fixedcamera with no movement possible.

2. He discovers the men who began thetechniques of cutting, intercutting,and cross editing.

3. He realizes the problem of earlylighting.

4. He discovers why old films alwayshave a speeded-up look: the,handcranked camera.

240

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 3-20

ACTIVITIES: Watch a short ftwould this film have looked Whave been made at all? Wouldchanged?

Watch a silent film. How manthe filmmaker use different Ceffects?

Watch a modern story film witfollow the story? Is the actemotion?

Write a scenario which couldsound. Act it out on film orto a group and have your clanversions of what they WM.

241

es the camera angle

I angleangle

single

h angle (tilted)

05370

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

analyzes the shot limitationskers and their solutions1111 .

II :

ers the problem of a fixedith no movement possible.

ers the men who began thees of cutting, intercutting,s editing.

zee the problem of early

era why old films alwayspeeded-up look: theed camera.

240

MOVIES. IN AMERICA, pp. 3-20

ACTIVITIES: Watch a short film; count the cuts. Howwould this film have looked with no Cute? Could ithave been made at all? Would the meaning/effect bechanged?

Watch a silent film. How many cuts were used? Didthe filmmaker use different camera angles? Specialeffects?

Watch a modern story film without sound. Can you stillfollow the story? Is the acting sufficient to conveyemotion?

Write a scenario which could convey its message utssound. Act it out on film or on videotape. Preent .t

to a group and have your classmates write down theirversions Of what they saw.

241

FILM STUDY

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATE

II. Directing and Editing

A. The student differentiates betweenthe role of the director and that ofthe ,editor.

1. He defines the editor's role inmaking a film.

2. He defines the director's role inmakinka film.

3. He describes how the two rolessometimes may overlap.

242145

SUGGESTED

FPLFPLFPLFPLFPLFPL

SUGGESTED

ST

FILMS ON FILM HISTO

HISTORY OF THEHOW THE MOVIESHOLLYWOOD:HOLLYWOOD:MARCH OF THETHE MOVIES LEA

SLIDE-TAPE ON FILM

A REFLEETION 0

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 2, Ch. 8MOVIES IN AMERICA, I*. 22-36,

REAL TO REEL, pp. 31-32

SUGGESTED FILMS ON DIRECTING/

F 371-118F 272-158F 272-112F 272-148

FILM: THE ARTCONSTRUCTINGFILM ABOUT FIUNDERSTANDING

243

05370

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ting

I

ifferentiates betweenhe director and that of

8 .the editor's rol in

film.

the director's role infilm.

bes how the two rolesmay overlap.

242145

SUGGESTED FILMS ON FILM HISTORY:

FPLFPLFPLFPLFPLFPL

HISTORY OF THE CINEMA3)W THE MOVIES BEGANHOLLYWOOD: THE DREAM FACTORYHOLLYWOOD: THE GOLDEN YEARS ,

MARCH OF THE MOVIESTHE MOVIES LEARN TO TALK

SUGGESTED SLIDE-TAPE ON FILM HISTORY:

ST A REFLECTION OF AMERICAN VALUES, PT. 1 AND 2

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 2, Ch. 8MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 22-36, Ch. 3

REAL TO REEL, pp. 31-32

SUGGESTED FILMS ON DIRECTING/EDITING:

F 371 -118

F 272-158F 272-112F 272-148

FILM:. THE ART OF THE IMPOSSIBLECONSTRUCTING REALITY: A FILM ON FILMFILM ABOUT FILMMAKING (also FPL)UNDERSTANDING MOVIES

243

FILM STUDY1,1

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MAT

B. The student reads about the differencesin, directors'-styles and techniques.'

1. He differentiates between how thedirector communicates and whatthe director dommunicates.

2. He Compares directorial styles infilms on similar topics.

C. The student investigates the roles ofearly directors and explains how theyinfluenced both the directing and theediting of film today.

. He lists the additions to the artof the film of David Mark Griffith,early Airector. Points to emphasizeare:

a. Griffith's discovery of the shotas the basic unit of film.

b. Griffith's use of special lighting.

c. Griffith's use of two-reelersand longer films.

d. Griffith's technical excellencein BIRTH OF A NATION comparedwith the weakness of his storyline and the strong prejudiceshe showed.,

244

REAL TO ,REEL, Ch. 8

6

ACTIVITY: Read and discussPETER BOPANOVICH. A panelterms and activities are prebook.

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 22-35

SUGGESTED FILM ON D. W. GRI

FPL THE GREAT DI

o 245

:CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

05370

reads about the differences,styles and techniques.

erentiates between how thecommunicates and what

actor communicates.

area directorial styles inn similar topics.

investigates the roles oftors and explains how theyboth the directing and thefibns.today.

s the additions to the artlilm of David Mark Griffith,irector. Points to emphasize

ffith's discovery of the shot'the" basic unit of film.

ffith's use of special light-

ffith's use of two-reelerslonger films. .

fifth's technical excellenceBIRTH OF A NATION comparedh the weakness of his storye and the strong prejudicesshowed.

24446

REAL TO REEL,.,Ch. 8

ACTIVITY: Read and discuss MOVIES: CONVERSATIONS WITH

PETER BOGDANOVICH. A panel discussion may be presented;terms and activities are presented at the end of the

book.

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 22..35.

SUGGESTED FILM ON D. W. GRIFFITH:

FPL THE GREAT DIRECTOR

245

SFILM STUDY

GOALS AND CONTENTS ',ACTIVITIES AND MAT

2. The student studies the rolea'of prom-,lima post-World War I directors, andlists what each was noted for.

Thomas A. Ince--the Western

b. Cecil B. DeMille--the extravaganza

c. Fred W. Murnau--the stylistic film

kezt Lubitschmovie of manners

e. Erich Von Stroheim--films of realism

f. Victor Seastrom--man vs. environ-ment films

3. He overviews the changing post-WorldWar I film.

UNIT TWO: COMEDY OLD AND NEW/SOUND

I. Comedy Old and New

A. The student begins his deflation of comedyby study of the silent comediapa.

24G. 147

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 56-75

ACTIVITIES: Taave time anmight present dizcussions onstyle to that of a director

a

While viewing films of the 2and listen for credits mentifor their styles;

MOVIES IN AMERICA pp. 76-84

MOVIES47IN AMERICA, pp. 39-4pp. 154-

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 4MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 86-10

247

At-

05370

CONTENTS ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

dent studies the roles of prom-ost-World Mar I directors, andhat each-was noted for.

mas A. Ince--the Western'

it B. DeMille--the extravaganza

"d W. Murnau -the stylistic film

est Lubismch--movie of manners

ch Von Stroheim--films of realism

for Seastrom-man vs. environ-t films

iews the changing post=Wr4ilm.

AND NEW/SOUND

begins his definition of comedythe silent

24$4

147

MOVIES IN- AMERICA, pp. 56-75

ACTIVITIES: To save time and reading, panels of studentsmight present discussions on each director, comparing hisstyle to that of adirector cif today.

'(

While viewing films of the 201s, students, should watchand listen for credits mentioning directors and watchfor their"styles."

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 76-84

MOVIES IN AMERICA; pp. 39-47, 146-152, Ch. 4pp. 154-157

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 4MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 86-'106

247

.1

O

FILM STUDY

GOALS AND CONTENTS ACTIVITIES AND MATE

1. He perceives how characters use theabsurd, the impossible, and thefantastic, as well as the ordinary,in comedy.

2. He categorizes early comedy,by useof gags, the chase, tricks, props,and characterizations.

1

. The student views the career of aprominent early comedian, CharlieChaplin.

1. He .discovers Chaplin's use Oftechnique, camera placement, lighting,and pacing to create screen comedy.

2. He analyzes the themes in Chaplin'sfilms and the reasons they appealedto audiences.

3. He notes Chaplin's use of pantbMinein silent Mks.

C. The student diff tiates betweencharacteristics of silent comedies andthe comedy of the "talkies," including'musical comedy.

248

SUGGESTED FILMS FOR OLD COMED

FPL- THE CLOWN PRINFPL GOLDEN AGE OFFPL FUN FACTOFPL THIRTY YRS 0

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 39-47

moms IN AMERICA, pp. 146-1154 -1

249

05370

NTENTS ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

'fives how characters use thethe impossible, and the, as well as the ordinary,

rizes early comedy by usethe chase, tricks, props,cterilzations.

sews the career Of arly comedian, Charlie

ers Chaplin's Use of, camera placement, lighting,to create screen comedy.g

es the themes in Chaplin'sthe reasons they appealed

ces.

Chaplin's use of pantomimefilms.

ifferentiates betweenics of silent comedies andf the "talkies," including

y.

24.3

SUGGESTED FILMS FOR OLD COMEDY:

FPLFPLFPLFPL

THE CLOWN PRINCESGOLDEN AGE OF COMEDYEUN FACTORYTHIRTY YEARS OF FUN

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 39-47

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 146-152154-157

.

249

FILM STUDY

GOALS AND CONTENT

1. He analyzes the comedy of W. C. Fields.

2. He compares Fields' anti-society stanceto the Marx brothers' oblivious-to-society stance. ,

II. Sound

A. The student analyzes the uses of sound infilm.

1. He differentiates between dialogueand sound effects for achiiving apurpose.

2. He recognizes the problems of inte-grating film and sound.

3. He compares narration which doesnothing but describe the visualsto narration which offers a counter-point to the visuals.

4. The student lists the uses ofnarration.

5. He studies the uses of music in films,considering how music must fit a filmin rhythm, tempo, and style.

6. The student recognizes the use ofnoise in a sound track and suggestsspecific sounds for films.

ACTIVITIES AND MAT

SUGGESTED FILMS ON W. C. FIE

Many films are available inthese comedians' names. (Fi

Costello, Our Gang, Laurel aby included.)

SUGGESTED FILMS ON MODERN CO

FPL SONG OF THE PFP; CAPTAIN MON (FPL VICIOUS CYCLE

FPL SERGEANT SWELFPL BLAZE GLORY (

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 4

SUGGESTED FILM USING MUSIC;

17 372-114 THE VIOLIN

250 149 251

05370

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

the comedy of W. C. Fields.

s Fields' anti-society stancerx brothers' oblivious-to-tance.

lyzes the uses of sound in

entiates between diilogueeffects for achieving a

izes the problems of inte-ilm and" sound.

es narration which doesut describe the visualsion which offers a counter-the visuals.

nt lists the uses of

s the uses of music in films,ng-how music must fit a film

tempo, and style,

nt recognizes the use of

a sound rack and suggestssounds for films.

250 149

SUGGESTED FILMS ON W. C. FIELDS AND THE MARX BROTHERS:

Many films are available in the Public Library unde*

these. comedians' names. (Films featuring Abbott and\Costello, Our Gang, Laurel and Hardy, etc., may also,

by included.)

SUGGESTED FILMS ON MODERN COMEDY:

FPLFPLFPLFPLFPL

SONG OF THE PRAIRIECAPTAIN MON (also inVICIOUS CYCLES (alsoSERGEANT SWELL (alsoBLAZE GLORY (also in

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 4

SUGGESTED FILM USING MUSIC;

F 372-114 THE VIOLIN

251

animation unit)in animation unit)

in animation unit)Westerns unit)

FILM STUDY

GOALS AND CONTENT

B. The student recognizes the four majortypes of sound used today in fin:

1. He identifies synctwonoue sound.

a. sound that occurs simultan-eously with tie image

b. the least imaginative but verynecessary use of'solind

2. He identifies asynchronous, or "wild"sound.

a. sound that occurs when the imageand the sound track do not occursimultaneously

b. broad uses

3. He identifies silence as a moodsetter in several examples.

4. He identifies the use of music as amood setter in various examples.

2 52,4,

4 ACTIVITIES AND MAT

TEACHER REFERENCE: THE CEL

2 t

05370

ONTENT

recognizes the four majorand used today in film:

tifies synchronous sound.

nd that colours simultan-sly with the image

least imaginative but veryessary use of sound

tifies asynchronous, or "wild"

nd that occurs when the imagethe sound track do not occurltaneously

d uses

tifies silence as a mood.in several examples.

tifies the use of music as atier in various examples.

252

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

TEACHER REFERENCE: THE CELLULOID LITERATURE, Ch. 4

253

FILM STUDY

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MAT

UNIT THREE: THEMES IN FILM/THE GENRE FILM

The student identifies the various film genreand lists their characteristics.

I. The Western

'A, The student identifies the characteristicsof the Western and the symbols used in thisfilm genre.

B. The student identifies realistic themes inWesterns.

1. He recognizes the unifying functionof the railroad and the telegraph astheme.

2. He cites examples of the farmer/cattleindustry feud /theme.

3. He sees the conquest of Nature as amajor theme.

4. He gives examples of the thematic useof the lawlessness of a new land.

5. He recognizes the theme of self-reliance.

6. He acknowledges the theme of the brutaltreatment of minorities.

21-ti1

v 151

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 9MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 80-81

164-1182 -i

a

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 80-81

ACTIVITY: Westerns are bestHave students watch for andCompare with satirical films

F 367-121, FPL THE AMERICANNOON, FRIENDFRONT (gangs

F 348-100

FPLFPL

DRIVEN WESTW

.BLAZE GLORYSONG OF THE

r- rt )

ONTENT

FILM/THE GENRE FILM

s the various film genrecteristics.

dentifies the characteristicsn and the symbols used in this

dentifies realistic themes in

izes the unifying functionilroad and the telegraph as

examples of the farmer/cattlefeud theme.

he conquest of Nature as ae.

examples of the thematic uselessness of a new land.

izes the theme of self-

ledges the theme of the brutalof minorities.

25,1

05370

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 9MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 80-81, 169-173, 128-141,

164-165, 136-141, 166-168,182-184

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 80-81

ACTIVITY: Westerns are best found on late night TV.Have students watch for and identify stereotypes, etc.Compare with satirical films in list below:

F 367-121, FPL THE AMERICAN FILM ((includes SHANE, HIGHNOON, FRIENDLY PERSUASION, ON THE WATER-FRONT (gangster), and NORTH BY NORTHWEST)

F 348-s100

FPLFPL

DRIVEN WESTWARD ("Brigham Young" clip)

BLAZE GLORY (satire)SONG OF THE PRAIRIE (satire)

2r)riCab

I

FT LM STWY

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MAT

C. The student identifies mythologicalthemes in Westerns.

1. He gives examples of the glorificationof the gunman.

2. ,He gives examples of the dual.

3. He cites uses of the theme of thesuperiority of the white cowboy overall minority groups:

a. the Mexican stereotype

b. the savage Indian

c. the forgotten Negro cowboy

D. The student identifies and give examplesof major themes in the Western genre.

1. He gives examples from films inwhich the wide open spaces providefreedom.

2 x, 2 5'7

05370

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

identifies mythologicalterns.

examples of the glorificationnman.

examples of the dual.

uses of the theme of theies, of the white cowboy overcity groups:

exican stereotype

savage Indian

forgotten Negro cowboy

identifies and give exampleses in the Western genre.

examples from films ine wide open spaces provide

2 G 2r'7

FILM STUDY

GOALS AND CONiENT ACTIVITIES A

2. He cites uses of the theme of thecomradeship of men with men:

a. development of a sense ofdemocracy

b. the portrayal of women

3. He recognizes violence as a cult:

a. violence as the quickest means to"justice

b. violence, in good films, not as anend in itself but-Las a means bywhich the hero defends his identity

4. He analyzes the het. of the Western:

a. one who asserts personal values

0 b. a man of virtue

c. one prepared for suffering

d. a man of invulnerable morality

e. one who attains self-knowledge at

end

153

s.

258 .259

05370

CONTENTACTIVITIES. AND MATERIALS

a uses of the theme of theship of men with men:, .

elopment of a sense ofcracy

portrayal of women

gnizei violence as'a cult:

olence as the quickest means to

etice

olence; in good films, not as and in itself but as a means byich the hero defends his identity

lyzes the hero of the Western:

e who asserts personal values

man of virtue

prepared for suffering, -

man of invulnerable morality

e who attains self-knowledge at

d

28

4

153

259

<

FILM STUDY

GOALS, AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES

5. He identifies uses of defianceof the la47:

a. 'law as a protector of the4ealthy

b. law in Indian treaties

6. He notes differences in theexecution of the law.

a. by law enforcement agencies

b. by self-appointed defenders

E. The student investigates the styleofa major director of westerns.

II. The Gangster Film

A. The student identifies the symbols orthe gangster film and their Characteristics.

ti

H. The student recognizes the gangsterstory as an outgrowth of the depressionof the 1930's.

1. He recognizes the flawed hero, notthe gangster-villian.

2. He notes the idea of the failure ofsociety.

154260

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp, 169-11

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp..128-1

, ACTIVITY: Again, TV is thethe gangster genre. Watchinltypes may be an out-of-clime,

SUGGESTED FILMS FOR GANGSTER

F 272-136 WHETHER TO TElWATER FRONT)

201

05370

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ntifies uses of defiance

w as a protector of thealthy

w in Indian treaties

es differences in theidn of the law.

law enforcement agencies

self- appointed defenders

t investigates the style ofrector of westerns.

ilm

t identifies the symbols ofer film and their characteristics.

t recognizes the gangstern outgrowth of the depression0 s.

ognizes the flawed hero, notngster-villian.

tes the idea of the failure of

ty

260 154

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 169-173

AN

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 128-129

ACTIVITY: Again, TV is the best source of examples ofthe gangster genre. Watching for and analyzing stereo-types may be an out-of-class activity for students.

SUGGESTED FILMS FOR GANGSTER GENRE:

F 272-136 *WHETHER TO TELL THE TRUTH (from ON THEWATER FRONT)

201

tar

FILM STUDY'

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

3. He cites uses of wanton violence asan answer. .

C. The student recognizes the mythology of'the genre.

1. He notes the popularity of the gangster"success" story.

2. He examines the rise and fall of the"gangster-hero."

a. rises through violence

b. falls by violence

D. The student investigates the style of amajor director of gangster films.

III. The War Film

A. The student recognizes symbols in the

war film and notes their character-istics.

B. The student identifies major themes in

war films.

L. He gives examplesvs* the bad guys"

2. He recognizes theright" theme.

of thetheme.

"might

"good

makes

222

guys.

155

2

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 164-1

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 182 -1:

SUGGESTED FILMS IN WAR GENRE:

F 362-140F 272-129

F 272-127

F 166-117,FPL.

OCCURRENCE ATPRIDE AND PRIRIVER KWAI)MY COUNTRY RISUMMERTREE)TOYS (a great

2G3

05370

CONTENT; ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

es uses of wanton violence aswet.:

recognizes the mythology of

s the popurarity of the gangster' story.

ines the rise and fall of theer-hero."

es through violence

s by violence

investigates the style of afor of gangster films.-

recognizes symbols in the

d notes their character-

identifies major themes in

s examplesbad guys"

gnizes thetheme.

of "the "good guystheme.

"might mikes

262 155

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 164-165

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 182-184

SUGGESTED FILMS IN WAR GENRE:e

OCCURRENCE AT OWL CREEK BRIDGE (a'classic)PRIDE AND PRINCIPLE (from BRIDGE ON THERIVER KWAI)MY COUNTRY RIGHT OR WRONG (fromSUMMERTREE)TOYS (a great anti-war film)

F 362-140F 272-129

F 272-127

F 166-111,FPL

263

FILM STUDYa

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

3. He notes comradship of soldiers asa theme.

4. He sees courage vs. cowardice as awar filmf theme.

0.A,

IV. The Social Justice Film

A. The student recognizes the socialjustice film as an outgrowth ofthe depression of the 1930's.

. The student investigates the careerof a majpr director of socialjustice films.

V. The Black Film

A. The student views the stereotypedroles of Blacks in white films.

1. He,gives examples of the "tam"servant.

2. He cites uses of the "coon" clown.

'3. He notes characters who fit the"tragic mulatto" stereotype.

4. He identifies the "mammy" role invarious films.

5. He gives examples of the "brutalBlack buck" character.

2G4 156

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 136-1

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 166 -1

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 98-99

TOMS, COONS, MULATTOES,Students may use this supplways.' Panel.discussions onto present a-wealth of matertheme - a panel-on "Toms,"chronology.

ACTIVITY: Ask students to dBlack actor or director andon his major influence on fi

265

05370

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ea comradship of soldiers ase.

s courage vs. cowardice as alm theme.

ice Film

recognizes the socialm as an outgrowth ofion'Of the 1930's.

investigates the careerdirector of socialms.

views the stereotypedacks in white films.

s examples of the "tom"

s uses of the "coon" clown.

a characters who fit themulatto" stereotype,

tifies the "mammy" role infilms.

s examples of the 'brutaluck" character.

2U4

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 136-141

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 166-168

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 98-99

TOMS, COONS, MULATTOES, MANHOLES, AND BUCKS...Students may use this supplemental book in a variety ofways. Panel discussions on various chapters may be givento present a wealth of material to the class, either bytheme - a panel on "Toms," a panel on "Coons," etc.-or bychronology.

ACTIVITY: Ask students to do research on an earlyBlack actor or director and to present a brief reporton his major influence on film.

156 2 t )

411

FILM STUDY

COALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES

B. The' student investigates the all-Blackfilm from the 20's to today.

1. He sees that early Black filmswere "blacklash" to film racismsuch as THE BIRTH OF A NATION.

2. He studies Black musicals of the30's and 40's.

3. He reviews films of 1960-1970 andrecognizes trends in Black films:

a. the Black hero

b. violence in Black films

c. realism vs. sensationalism

26(3

I

157

TOMS, COONS...pp. 164-192 depp. 275-346 de

ACTIVITY: Student, discussio

and- 3 opposite with referencrealistic to Black ,life areimage is presented of the BAre the characters realisticsources to consult are speci

JET and other Black-oriented

SUGGESTED FILMS ON BLACK GEN

F 368-108

FPL

F 272-131

NOW IS THE Tfilm clips)THE GREAT DIA NATION)SPACES BETWELOVE - study

'CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

investigates the all-Blackhe 29's to today.

that earlyBlacOilmslacklash" to filM(racismTHE BIRTH OF AiliTION.

ies Black musicals of thed 40'4. ,

ewe films of 1960-1970 andzes trends in Black films:

Black hero

lence in Black films

lism vs: sensationalism

26C 157

TOMS, COONS...pp. 164-192 deal with musicalspp. 275-346 deal with current films

ACTIVITY: Student discussions may deal with topics 1,2,

and 3 opposite with reference to specific films. How

realistic to Black life are current Black films? What

image is presented of the Black man in these films?

Are the characters realistic or stereotyped? Good

sources to consult are special issues of EBONY, ESSENCE,

JET and other Black-oriented publications.

SUGGESTED FILMS ON BLACK GENRE:

F'368-108 NOW IS THE TIME (includes some earlyfilm clips)

FPL THE GREAT DIRECTOR (deals with BIRTH OF

'A NATION)F 272-131 SPACES BETWEEN PEOPLE (from TO SIR WITH

LOVE - study the Poitier mystique)

- 4-

°FILM STUDY

COALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

UNIT FIVE: THE DOCUMENTARY FILM

I. The student differentiates the docu-mentary film from the fiction film.

A. He, learns how Documentary filmmakerdRECORD events.

B. He knows that fiction filmmakersCREATE events.

II. The student concentrates on the careerof a noted documentary filmmaker andhis major work.

III. The student briefly views examples ofcinema yerite.

A. The student analyzes thespecific colors.'

B The student analyzWs thein effect created by useand black-and-white film.

effects of

difference

of color

0

0

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 10, pp. 180 -MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 159-161REAL TO REEL, Ch. 10

SUGGESTED DOCUMENTARY FILMS:

F 355-105 NIGHT AND FOGF 367-109 MONUMENT TO THE

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 159-161REAL TO REEL, pp. 180-183

SUGGESTED FILMS ON ROBERT FLA

F 322-100 NANOOK OF THE NF 322-101 NANOOK OF THE N

MOVIES IN AMERICA, PP. 186-18

SUGGESTED FILM IN USE OF COLOR

FPL THE STRINGBEAN

158 269

05370

iONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

NTARY FILM

erentiates the docu-the fiction film.

Documentary filmmakers

t fiction filmmakers8.

entrates on the careerntary filmmaker and

fly views examples of

analyzes the effects ofors.

analyzes the differenceeated by use of color-white film.

2138

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 10, pp. 180-183MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 159-161, 186-187REAL TO REEL, Ch. 10

SUGGESTED DOCUMENTARY FILMS:

F 355-105F 367-109

NIGHT AND FOGMONUMENT TO THE DREAM

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 159-161REAL TO REEL, pp. 180-183

SUGGESTED FILMS ON ROBERT FLAHERTY'S WORK:

F 322-100 4j NANOOK OF THE NORTH; PT. IF 322-101 NANOOK OF THE NORTH, PT. II

MOVIES IN AMERICA, PP. 186-187

SUGGESTED FILM IN USE OF COLOR/BLACK-AND-WHITE:

FPL THE STRINGBEAN

158 2G9

FILM STUDY

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES

IV. The student recognizes ANIMATION as amethod of presenting an idea visually.

A. The student differentiates betweenstop-action animatilop of realanimation and drawn animation.

1. The student recognizes*pixilla-tion and learns the method ofdoing it.

. The student recognizes photo-montage or kinestasis and under-stands the method of'doing it.

B. The student investigates the careerof a major animatof of. American film.

C. The student briefly views the historyof the movie cartoon as a shortsubject.

(0159

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 11TEACHER REFERENCES: MAKING

CREATIBEHIND

SUGGESTED FILMS ON PIXILLATI

FPLFPtFPLFPL

CAPTAIN MONVICIOUS CYCLEBLAZE GLORYSERGEANT SWEL

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 177-

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 48-49

SUGGESTED FILMS ON KINESTASI

FPLFPLFPL

AMERICAN TIMEFRANK FILM (eWORLD OF 68

?71

. ,05370 .

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

cognizes- ANIMATION as anting an idea visually..

differentiates betweenanimation of real

ind,drawn animation.

dent recognizes pixilla-d learns the method oft.

dent recognizes photo-or Iiinestasis and under-

.the method of doing it.

`investigates the careeranimator of American film.

briefly views the historye cartoon as a short

270159

REAL TO REEL, Ch. 11TEACHER REFERENCES: MAKING IT MOVE

CREATIVE FILMMAKING, pp. 126-129BEHIND THE CAMERA, Ch. 8

SUGGESTED FILMS ON PIXILLATION:

.FPL

FPLFPLFPL

CAPTAIN MONVICIOUS CYCLESBLAZE GLORYSERGEANT SWELL

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 177 -180

MOVIES IN AMERICA, pp. 48-49

SUGGESTED FILMS ON KINESTASIS:

FPLFPLFPL

AMERICAN TIME CAPSULEFRANK FILM (excellent)WORLD OF 68

271

FILM STUDY

105370

MATERIALS AVAILABLE FROM AUDIOVISUAL SERVICES: *

F 268-130

F 170-129

F 166-121

F 170-122

F 268-147

F 366-114

F 268-117

F 270 -121

A 378-118

F 272-137

F 272-138

F 272-134

F 272-125

F 272-126

F 272-127

F 272-130

F 373-119

F 272-128

F 272-132

F 272-131

F 272-133

F 272-134

F 272-135

F 373-111

F 373-115

F 373-117

14;TEACH ME (from UP THE DOWN STAIRCASE)

STAINED GLASS (color, rhythm)

STUDY. IN WET (rhythm, composition)

RIVER, WHERE DO YOU COME FROM (lighting, tracking,

juxtaposiion)1

A FABLE (a Marceau pantomine)

NO REASON TO STAY (camera angle, sound)

JOSHUA

OMEGA (color, still photography, lens use)

GRIME AND THE CRIMINAL

from IN COLD BLOOD)

DEHUMANIZING CITY (from THE TIGER MAKES OUT)

FINE ART OF AGGRESSION (fran THE RECKONING)

I WHO AM, WHO AM I?aiom THE SWIMMER)

LONELINESS .& LOVING (from FIVE EASY PIECES)

LOVE TO KILL (from BLESS THE BEASTS & CHILDREN)

MY COUNTRY RIGHT OR WRONG (from.SUMMERTREE)

RIGHT TO LIVE (from ABANDON SHIP)

POWER AND CORRUPTION (from Polanski's MACBETH)

POLITICS, POWER, & THE PUBLIC GOOD (from ALL THE KING'S MEN)

SENSE OF PURPOSE (from DRIVE, HE SAID)

SPACES BETWEEN PEOPLE (from TO SIR, WITH LOVE)

TROUBLE WITH THE LAW (from PURSUIT OF HAPPI

)

VIOLENCE: JUST FOR FUN (from BARABBAS)

WHEN PARENTS GROW OLD (from I NEVER SANG FOR MY FATHER)

AUTHORITY AND REBELLION (from THE CAINE MUTINY)

HEROES AND COWARDS (from LORD JIM)

MAN AND WOMAN (from TAMING OF THE SHREW)

*These films are not, as.a rule, listed elsewhere in the course.

Select those you wish to use, use the

brief notes, and employ them to fit the unit as you are teaching it.

Discuss films, using general

discussion questions listed in the guide and in

the texts.

160

FILM STUDY

05370

MATERIALS AVAILABLE FROM-THE PUBLIC LIBRARY (FPL): *

BARGES

THE EMERGING WOMAN (uses old pictures, newsreels)

ADVENTURES OF*(prizewinning animation)

AMERICAN TIME CAPSULE

(Braverman's photomontage),

BEGONE DULL CARE (Norman ?fele en animation)

CAROUSEL

CATCH THE JOY (aerial Shots

slaw motion)

CLAUDE (animation)

THE CRUSADES (an early DtMille film)

FRACTURED FLICKERS (comedy)

LITTLE MAN, BIG CITY (animation)

MILLIE THE MDONSHINER'S DAUGHTER (silent film)

MOSAIC (McLaren)

NEIGHBORS (McLaren again)

ORANGE AND BLUE (animation, coloi)

PAS DE DEUX (McLaren)

PATTERNS (non-narrated)

PEN POINT PERCUSSION & LOOPS (now McLaren does it)

POP COP

THE SIXTIES (a Braverman photomontage)

SPHERES ( McLaren meets Bach)

THE .STRIM BEAN (uses both color and b/w)

TAKE OFF (skiing in slow motion)

THE SOLITUDE THROUGH-WHICH WE GO IS I

THE TOP

TOYS (top-norch animation, anti-war message)

URBANISSIMID (animation)

VERY NICE, VERY NICE (collage).

t.40RID OF '68 (Braverman 4 minute photomontage)

Many other films on film, film history, comedy, and general interest films are

available through thePudic

Library.

Call well in advance to reserve films, -which you will have to pick up and deliver.

* These films are not, as a rule, listed elsewhere in the course.

Select those you wish to use, use the

brief notes, and employ them to fit the unit as you are teaching it.

Discuss films, using general

discussio4i questions listed in the guide and in the texts.

4161

FILM STUDY

05370

FREE AND CHEAP SOURCES OF FILM EXPERIENCES

PUBLIC LIBRARY FILM CATALOG

SOUTHWESTERN BELL FILM CATALOG

NA

4.)

FILM CATALOG UNIVERSITY OF MISSOURI,

COLUMBIA

SUPER 8 OR 8

FILMS

SUPER 8 & 8 ram. FILMS

Lists films available from city & county libraries for 15c insurance

fee.

Catalog.

$1.00.

Supplements are free at Film Service

Lists FREE films on various subjects for school use.

der films or

catalog from SoUthwestern Bell Film Library or call SW Bell Business

Office, 561-9800.

7727 Clayton Road

St. Louis, Missouri 63117

A catalog of inexpensive (THE GREAT TRAIN,ROBERY for $3.00) rental

films may be ordered from: University of Missouri, Columbia

Film Library

505 East Stewart Road

Columbia, Missouri

65201

If super 8 or 8 mm. projector is available, check out super 8 & 8

films'at branch libraries.

Many old serials and comedies are

available FREE.

May be purchased inexpensively from several companies.

Order catalogs

from:

Blackhawk Films

Davenport, Iowa 52808

Thunderbird Films

P 0 Box 4081

Los Angeles, Calif. 90054

162

Niles Film Products

1019 Michigan St..

South Bend, Indiana 46618

Sil'ents for Rent

1f36 Second Street

Fanwood, New Jersey 07023

(send s.s.= envelope)

FILM STUDY

0537

4

UMSL FILM SERIES

UNIVERSITY CITY

mim

eLIBRARY

AT MUSEUM FILM SERIES

PUBLIC LIBRARY-WEEKLY FILM SERIES

PUBLIC ,LIBRARY WEEKLY FILMS AT BRANCHES

1;4

, LOCAL COLLEGESI?

WEEKEND POST-DISPATCH CALENDAR

4

ST. LOUIS TODAY'S CALENDAR OF

EVENTS

0

FREE, films open to the public.

Get a schedule at infoimition

in Student Center.

Runs FREE film series, usually on Friday nights.

Schedule available

at Libra g.

Call the Art Museum for a Schedule.

Films are shown twice, often on

Friday night.

FREE.

1.2.

;

Held at CoMpton Branch; call'Film Services for schedullrbrcheUk

branch.

FREE.

Recent films are shown FREE in afternoon and evenings;

check at'

10branch,-

at

Inexpensive film series are run during school year .at

local coil ges--

check newspapers or get schedules at Student Center information

esks.

Usualry cost is between

$.50'and $1.00.

Check for FREE films open to the public.

163

FILM STUDY

053

FILM AWARENESS ACTIVITIES & PROJECTS

At random, cut sections from atonic strips and label them longshot, medium shot, closeup, extreme close up,

extreme long shot.

Practice framing by, cutting out comic panels and trimming them to make better compdsitions or to change the

meaning by reframing.

The same thing may be done with magazine advertisement pictures.

Make a framer- -cut's 2" x 2" square in stiff papert least 81/2" x 11".

Cut a 3" x 3" square in another; a

4" x 4" square in another, etc. .Fasten them together, smallest hole to largest hole.

Select magazine pictur

with interest.

Lay the framer over the picture..

Lift the pages, noting how the composition'of the picture

changes as the size enlarges. How can this be used to create completely opposite impressions?

Have students

find a picture which radically changes as more and more of it is ekposed--usuallY a picture with an important

detail in one corner.

o

Study a sequence of comic book panels.. Edit out the unnecessary shots and make suggestions for ones that youj

think would be better.,,

Try rearranging the order of panels in a comic book or strip.

Keep the sequence sensible but alter its impac

Cr)

(i.e. make a gag funnier).

Now, take a'sequence from a comic and alter its meaning; turn it into a comedy oil

satire by inserting cutawsYs from otbercomics.

Sate a film shot by making a series of flip cards, using 3 x 5 cards.

See page 133 of MOVIEMAKING

ILL TRATED.

Plan

movie scene for an action paragraph from a book.

Make a-storyboard for the. action in the scene." Ind

the angle of the proposed shot and type of proposed shot.

Be prepared to explain why you would choose a cert

shot for a.certain effect.

'Light a subject, a person, or an object from various.angles--front, side, back, below, reflected light--to se

what effects are created by the differences.

Write your impressions of'the moods that each change creates.

164

ate

141

0

FILM STUDY

605,370

'Using a.short.film

a)

Set a short filmto milsic, using music that complements or

with the film

action.b)

Record and play to accompany, a film some appropriate background sound.

Change the meaning of-comic scenes by "Whiting out" any dialogue and providing your own narrative,

Invite a local filmmaker to your class for a talk.

Invite a film critic to class.

Prepare Tburself beforehand by reading his recent columns.

Speakers' Bureaus at local colleges often provide free speakers in many areas--contact them for expert advice.

e

165

FILM STUDY

0537

FILMMAKING ACTIVITIES & PROJECT IDEAS

.(Many of the ideas below adapt well to videotape equipment.

See Pages 165-167 in BEHIND THE CAMERA for tips

Ron adapting film to videotape.)

STILL CAMERA ACTIVITY

BASIC FILM TERMS

REACTION SHOTS

ATMOSPHERE SHOTS

SUPERHERO SHOTS

TV COMMERCIALS

WESTERNS

m,1.

Have each student take a sequence of 6 pictures which tell a story.

Number the

pictures and mount them on stiff paper.

Have students exchange pictures and

tell the story they see.

This is a method of storyboarding, which should be doe

before students set hands on movie cameras.

Now is the time to discuss shots,

framing, and angles.

Illustrate as many basic film terms as you can in 1 minute of film.

(Have students

work 3 to a roll of film; each student gets one minute of film.)

This provides

hands-on experience and gives the student a chance to use his friends on film,

an

early desire.

Supply people with pictures which will evoke emotions.

the pictures--joy, anger, fear, perplexity, etc.

Then

pratfall, a death, a fight, etc.

Mix up the reactions

events.- Try different juxtapositions for effect.

4ilm their reactions to

film several events--a'

And edit them into the

Try to create an atmosphere of fear as someone enters a dark house.

Don't use

obvious 'Scare tactics'like ghosts, clanking chains, or blood.

Create fear by

camera angle, rapid shots, etc.

Pick a superhero comic story.

Try to duplicate it on film with matching cuts and;

camera angles.

Make a spoof of a television commercial.

Try to stay as close as possible to the

camera techniques and film cuts of the original.

Make an 8 mm. spoof of a popular western show.

FILM STUDY

0537!

VIEWPOINT

STILL FILM

IDEAS

Film something from the subjective view point and then from another angle.

View

and discuss the differences in effect.

Make a short film with no camera motion--panning, tilting, etc.

Use a variety

of camera angles and cuts to avoid a boring presentation.

Using a mixture of "wild" sound and silence, try to show on film the reactions

of a deaf girl at her first party.

Ask local TV stations for old film from comtercials or the news.

Edit the film

and provide a sound track to illustrate various camera angles and special effectis.

AV owns a silent KSD news clip, DEMOLITION OF PRUITT-IGOE, F 172-111, four minutes

long.

You might tape record appropriate sound effects and play them as you watch

the film".

Experiment with the surprise value of sound in a film.

Make some "screen tests" in your school to determine who is able to project emotions

to the movie screen.

Do a kinestasis of pictures of old movie stars.

After watching the film TOYS, do a pixillation of toys and props of your own

choosing to tell your own story.

After viewing a Norman McLaren film, draw your own film and set it to music!

Bleach

old 16 mm film (available from local TV stations or Audiovisual Services at times)

with regular chlorine laundry bleaCh.

Leave strips intact for interesting effects,

they will usually fade out to light blue.

Make your own film by painting on it,

drawing on it with india ink or permanent magic markets, even punching holes wih a

paper punch toward the center of the film-,. You will have to repeat an image on at

least 8 frames to make it appear on the screen for a brief time, so patience itt

important.

Instrumental music, acid rock, VICTORY AT SEA--all make great background

music, depending on the type of film.

OR animate a film by drawing with india 'ink

in simple shapes--dots and lines--move the dot around the frame rapidly or slovilly to

fit the music.

OR scratch designs on black film leader and project them.

For further film ideas, consult BEHIND THE CAMERA, pp. 173-175, and your

students'

imaginations.-

167

FILM STUDY

0537

EQUIPMENT SUGGESTED FOR FILMMAKING .(if and when possible):

1 per school

1 per school

1 per school

6 per school

Super 8mm. movie cavera with single frame capability, zoom lens

Super 8mm. film projector

Super 8mm. editor - viewer - splicer

Splicer for Super 8mm film (small plastic splicers)

168

SCIENCE FICTION

05400

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Pick a world, any world!

Students of all levels, investigate science fiction in its many forms.

If you are

interested in speculations about the universe, medical, scientific, technological changes in man and in his

uses of his untapped mind, space travel, passible human ecrieties,

and the like, this course will involve

you in readings into possible futures.

y.

INTRODUCTION

*This course has been planned to make available to students a wide range of books, cassette tapes, slides,

films, film strips, and references to fiction and non-fictidtla sources which are obtainable from

library

and audiovisual services.

Students at all levels will find sotething of interest to read, view,'or do.

The course itself is designed in two parts - an overview and `an intensive study section.

The overview

introduces students to prominent science fiction themes and authors.

The second section involves the student

in a selected author or interest area.

This outline suggests projects that will provide direction for

student action.

03G

OA

LS

The student will become familiar with the mind-stretching creativity of science fiction writers who project

into the future in imaginative ways.

The student will learn through extensive reading to recognize characteristics that make science

fiction a distinct literary genre.

The student will do intensive study in one or several specific areas of science fiction or in

works by one specific author.

Through projects, the student will involve himself in research in his topic or author area; the

student will utilize non-fiction in his research.

The student may attempt creative science fiction writing or expression in other media.

NOTE

Films'listed without numbers may become available during the 1975-1976 school year.

Do not order until

numbers are supplied.

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

Materials

Title

FIFTY SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TALES.

Collier Books.

THE PAST THROUGH TOMORROW.

Berkley Publishing Corp.

THE ILLUSTRATED MAN.

Bantam Books, Inc.

A CANTICLE FOR LEIBOWITZ.

Bantam Books, Inc.

Use

Students, Teacher

Students, Teacher

Students, Teacher

Students

HAVE SPACE SUIT - WILL TRAVEL.

Ace Books.

Students

DUNE.

Ace Books.

Students

CROSSROADS OF TIME.

Ace Books.

Students

FROM THE EARTH TO THE MOON.

Airmont,

Students

Students

Students

Students

PROFILES OF THE FUTURE: AN INQUIRY INTO THE LIMITS OF THE POSSIBLE.

Bantam Books, Inc.

Students

FUTURE SHOCK.

Bantam Books, Inc.

Students

,WAR OF THE WORLDS. 'Airkont.

SPACE MERCHANTS.

Ballantine Press.

MARTIAN CHRONICLES.

Bantam Books, Inc.

STARSHIP TROOPERS.

Berkley Publishing Corp.

STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND.

Berley Publishing Corp.

CAT'S CRADLE.

'Dell Publishing Co., Inc.

I, ROBOT.

Fawcett World Library.

170

Students

Students

Students

Students

SCIENCE FICTION

Title

NAKED SUN.

Fawcett World Library.

DEEP RANGE.

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.

BRAVE NEW WORLD.

Harper and Row Publishers, Inc.

GREYBEARD.

New American Library.

DEMOLISHED MAN.

New American Library.

PLANET OF THE APES.

American Book Co.

1984.

American Book Co.

GREAT TIME MACHINE HOAX.

Universal Publishing and Distributing Corp.

I

QUEST CROSSTIME.

ACe Books.

CA

DJOURNEY TO THE CENTER OF THE EARTH.

Airmont.

INVISIBLE MAN.

Airmont.

TIME MACHINE.

Airmont.

EARTHLIGHT.

Ballantine Press.

SOMETHING WICKED THIS WAY COMES.

Bantam Books, Inc.

ON THE BEACH.

Bantam Books, Inc.

ALAS, BABYLON.

Bantam Books, Inc.

ORPHANS OF THE SKY.

Berkley Publishing Corp.

171

Use

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

Title

FARMER IN THE SKY.

Dell Publishing Co., Inc.

SIRENS OF TITAN.

Dell Publishing C41, Inc.

END OF ETERNITY.

Fawcett World Library.

REPORT ON PLANET 3 & OTHER SPECULATIONS.

New American Library.

2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY.

New American Library

DOOR INTO SUMMER.

New. American Library

VINTAGE BRADBURY.

Random House, Inc.

SCIENCE FICTION:

THE CLASSROOM IN ORBIT.

Educational Impact, Inc.

GROKKING THE FUTURE.

Pflaum/Standard.

TEACHING TOMORROW:

A HAND BOOK OF SCIENCE-FICTION FOR TEACHERS.

Pflaum/Standard.

172

Use

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Teacher

Teacher

Teacher

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

PART I:

GENERAL OVERVIEW

The student will learn through extensive

reading to recognize characteristics that make

-science fiction a distinct

literary genre.

The student will listen critically to

taped interviews with science fiction authors.

The student will view media presentations in

the science fiction field.

The student will listen to taped dramatizations

of science fiction novels and short stories.

TEACHER'S NOTE:

The short stories from 50 GREAT SCIENCE FICTION

TALES have been categorized below into

interest

areas.

Many of the stories may be placed into

other categories by the teacher or the student as

they are of

interest in several fields.

The teacher may choose to introduce study

of.the short stories in Robert Heinlein's

THE PAST THROUGH TOMORROW and Ray

Bradbury's ILLUSTRATED MAN as units, by themselves,' orhe may choose to

categorize and investigate the short stories in

these two collections as the class

roads the stories from 50

GREAT SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TALES.

vi

An excellent introduction to the

history of science fiction is to be found

in'SCIENCE FICTION:

JULES VERNE TO

RAY BRADBURY, a three part slide-sound

presentation from The Center for the Humanities.

Audio cassette inter*

views with prominent science fiction

authors may be obtained upon request from the

school librarian.

Introductory classes might include some

of the following cassette tapes:

AC 32911

AN INTERVIEW WITH POUL ANDERSON

AC 30121

AN INTERVIEW WITH RAY

BRADBURY (FANTASY AND REALITY)

AC 12060

SCIENCE AND FICTION

AC 508

SCIENCE FICTION IN OUR TIME

AC 30428

SCIENCE FICTION:

ITS FUTURE

AC 33459

URSULA LEGUIN:

WOMAN OF SCIENCE FICTION

STRANGER THAN SCIENCE FICTION, a

film available from the St. Louis Public

Library, would also serve well in

the introductory section.

173

4 SCIENCE FICTION

05484

GOALS AND CONTENT

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

I.

MEDICAL/SCIENTIFIC/TECHNOLOGICAL CHANGES IN MAN

A.

The student learns to identify and analyze problems'

originating from man's inability to cope with

technological change.

B.

He analyzes and recognizes possible technological

advances in possible future societies.

C. He participates in class activities, utilizing

material from his readings and-from magazine

sources.

a

DM

50 SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TALES

:"Bainey," p. 253

1111en Are Different," p. 29

"Hilda," p. 118

"The Perfect Women," p. 238

"Spectator Sport," p. 155

"Obviously Suicide," p. 282

"The Weapon," p. 36

"A Bad Day for Sales," p. 139.

"The Cricket Ball," p. 161

"Available Data on the Worp Reaction- ,"

p. 174

"The Haunted Space Suits" p. 61

ACTIVITIES:

Desip a robot, keeping in mindiits

intended duties.

Would you have it do the dishes

for you?

Provide it with rubber hands.

Name it

and describe its daily routine.

These activities

could be described in list form, composition. form,

or illustrated composition form, depending on the

student's ability.

Write an ad' for a robot', new or used.

What features

would you stress?

Check new or used tar advertising

for ideas.

0

SCIENCE FICTION

GOALS AND CONTENTACTIVITIES AND MATE

0

\-1

175

A-CYBORG is part man, part.imachine.

mechanical parts 4false teeth, pac

now available to man. Do research

Discussion topics - -When does-one s

and become machine? Which parta,whove mechanical on the human body?

What if...a machine were Invented

with absolute accuracy the date of

you want to know when you would di

What if...scientistadeveloped'a wwould make man invisible? (For co

Of timg, pir forever.) Who would t

this? :14.ould you?

What,ifi,r.your body could be froze

be thawed hundreds of years from n

to be fiozen if you were in good h

ill with a now incurable disease/

to be awakened?

SFS 770-703 CaNITERCAND THE

)LATENT

O

287175

-

,45480.

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

A CUM, is part man, part machine. List all the

mechanical parts (false teeth, pacemakers, etc.)now availitble to man. Do'researchAl necessary.Discutsion topics -, -When does one stop-being human,

and become ,machine? Which pays would, you choose tohave mechanical on the human body?

.

What if...a machine were invented which could predict

with absolue accuracy the date of your death? Would

you want to know when. you would die? Why? Why not?

What if...acfentists developed a wonder drug whichwould make map invisible? (For controlled periods

of time, or forever.) Who would take advantage of

this? Would you?

What if...your body could be frozen now and you could

be thawed hundreds of years from now? Would you elect

to be frozen if you were in good health? If you were

ill with a now incurable disease? When would you wish

to be awakened?

SFS 770-703 COMPUTERS AND TgE WORLD OF THE FUTURE

288

4

SCIENCE FICTION

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MAT

F 'DIMENSIONS 'OF

THE MAN MARIE

F DIMENSIONS OFAN ENERGY EXC

II. WAR

A.

B.

D.

C.

The student views future was and theirconsequences.

He reads about alien invasion of Earth.

He reads about earthmen invading other regions.

He participates in clais activities and dis-cussions.

289

F 269-169 THE FLIGHT OFF 273-126 SCIENCE SCRE

.MARS -THE SEAR

From Library Services Center

AC 1436AC 1479,

MARIONETTES,TUNNEL UNDER

50 SHOli SCIENCE FICTION TA

°Ls "Random Sampl"The MAthemat"We Don't Wan

"The Hunters,J

ACTIVITIES: Imagine: Menstop rivers with the power owhat ways might such power bsbless would it create?

290

.05480

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

F

F

DIMENSIONS'OF CHANGE I, ECOLOGY:

THE MAN MADE PLANET

F 269-169F 273 -l26

DIMENSIONSAN-ENERGY

F CHANGE 4, FOOD:GE SYSTEM

THE FLIGHT OF APO 8 11SCIENCE SCREEN REPORT: EARTH SCIENCE-MARS-THE SEARCH FOR LIFE BEGINS

_From Library Services Center

AC 1436 MARIONETTES, INC.AC 1479 TUNNEL UNDER THE WORLD'

ews future warp and their ,50 SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TALES

alien invasion of Earth. "Random Sample," p. 40"The Mathematicians," p. 79"We Don't Want Any Trouble," p. 219

earthmen invading other regions. "The Hunters," p. 242

in class activities and dis-

Nqk

2 89

ACTIVITIES: Imagine:- Men can move mountains orstop rivers with the power of their minds. In

what ways might such,power be used? What pro-

blems would it create?

2 ,),, 0 .

SCIENCE FICTION

/ GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MAT

III. TRANSPORTATION AND COMMUNICATION

A. The student reads stories which deal withtravel--both in space and in time--andwith communication, including ESP.

B. The student identifies future methods andtypes of transportation.

291

Imagine: You are a scientishave come up withte--way

What if...the atomic bomb anwere eliminated? Would -Vat's

FPL

AC 1405-AC 1402AC 1476AC 1593

V

177

WAR OF THE P

THE C CHUTETHE DEFENDERSTHE LAST MAR_CONQUEROR'S I

50 SHORT SCIENCE FICTION,TA

"Project Hush"The Mist," p"Two Weeks in"The Business"The Third Lei"The Good Pr"Columbus Was"Emergency La

292

ONTENT

AND COMMUNICATION

ds stories which deal withspace and in'time--and

ion, including ESP.

ntifies future methods andort,tion.

291.

0

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

*--

,Imagine: You are a scientist, of the future and you

Vrth the-way -t-A:7--eud-wa-r

What if...the atomic bomb and other nuclear weapons

were eliminated? Would this situation change society?

FPL

AC 1405AC 1402

AC 1476AC 1593

WAR OF THE PLANETS

THE C CHUTETHE DEFENDERSTHE LAST MARTIANCONQUEROR'S ISLE

50 SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TALES

177

"Project Hush," p. 265"The Mist," p. 49 .

"Two Weeks in August," p. 203 /

"The Business, As Usual," p. 199"The Third Level," p. 83"The Good Provider," p. 103"Columbus Was a Dope," p."Emergency Landing," p. 277

292

SCIENCE FICTION

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MAT

-futtire-inuthadv---ut-

communication.

D. The student utilizes his reading-acquiredinformation in his writing and other class-related activities.

29'3

-

"Who's Cribbi

ACTIVITIES: Write a radio acommercial trip to the moon,or before the class. What sy'ou take? What selling pointMay also be done as.a magazii

You are one of the first mooletter home, to a friend or fwhat your environment is likday -is like.

Imagine that people of the fothers' minds'. What problemdate with a person who could,whose rind you could read?dialogue form about such a ssomeone in the class to read

Imagine that it is possibleand space. Where in time wo

178 291

ND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

05480

'met hods--trf

utilizes his reading-acquiredin his writing and other class"-

ivities.

293

"Tiger-by-ther-Terti. i85-"Illho's.Cribbing?" p. 147

ACTIVITIES: Write a radio ad for the firstcommercial trip to the moon and present it on tapeor before the class. What sales approach wouldyou take? What selling points would you stress?May also be done as a magazine ad with illustrations.

You are one of the first moon colonists. Write aletter home to a friend or family member tellingwhat your environment is like and what your typicalday is like.

Imagine that people of the future can "read" eachothers' minds, Whit problems might you have on adate with a person *ho could read your mind orwhose mind you could read? You might write indialogue form about such a situation and pair withsomeone in the class to read your work aloud.

Imagine that it is possible to travel through timeand space. Where in time would you go?

178

SCIENCE FICTION

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MAT

295

Where in place would you go?past or the future? You migdescriptive broChUi.e for thethese time-space tripe.

Using what you know about Sttransit system for the citytrate your plan with maps an

Write a story about your preinto space to visit the plan

F 367-101 AUTOS, AUTOS EVEF DIMENSIONS OF C

FROM THERE TO HEF DIMENSIONS OF CHIC

ONE WORLD MINDF 271-106 MAN AND MACHINE:

SMOKEF 3674115 TRIP FROM CHICAGF 266-103 AN AMERICAN RENDFPL SURVIVAL IN OUTE

From Library Services Center

AC 4083 GUN FOR A DINOSAAC 1421AC 1393

AC 1447

AC 1388AC 1456

179

THE GREEN HILLSREQUIEMTHE ROADS MUST

'.:SAUCER OF LONELI

TO THE FUTURE

2I

05480

:ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

Where in place would you go? Would you go into the

pas; or the future? You might choose io write adescriptive brochure far the agency whiCh Bpanaarathese time -space trips..

L

Using what you-know about St. Louis, plan a masstransit system for the city and the country. Illus-

trate your plan with maps and drawings.

Write a story about-your preparations for a trip'into space to visit the planet Mars.

F 367-101 AUTOS, AUTOS EVERYWHEREF DIMENSIONS OF CHANGE 5, MOBILITY:

FROM THERE TO HEREF DIMENSIONS OF CHANGE.6, COMMUNICATIONS:

ONE WORLD MIND .F 271-106 MAN AND MACHINE: A ROMANCE GOING UP IN

SMOKEF 367-115 TRIP FROM CHICAGOF 266-103 AN AMERICAN RENDEZVOUSFPL SURVIVAL IN OUTER SPACE

From Library Services Center

AC 4083AC 1421

AC 1393

AC 1447AC 1388AC 1456

179

GUN FOR A DINOSAURTHE GREEN HILLS OF EARTHREQUIEMTHE ROADS MUST ROLLSAUCER OF LONELINESSTO THE FUTURE

296

SCIENE FICTION

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MA

"TV. SOCIETY /THE CITY/GOVERNMENT4

A. -TM student studies societies 6f-the-futurethrough the short story.

B. He reads about Utopian societies

C. He views a society structured absurdly anddifferently from his own.

D. He sees how another world culture might viewEarth society.

E. Using his reading, the student will partici-teinqdiecussions and activities analyti-

cal 4fi4UtUre society.

297

50-SHORT-SCrENCE-FICTION

80

"The Great Judge,"(Definition of Utohere.)

"The Figure," p. 9"Double Take," p."The Ambassadors,""The Martian and t

"The Fly," p. 194"Teething Ring," p.

ACTIVITIES: You are runni2525. Write your campaignpromises relevant to the tilive. This may be presenteon tape, or on paper.

What if...an individual werhis life at will. Might suesta?lished for this purpos

What if...every citizen coua mini-computer to vote on ka

05480

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

GOVERNMENT

es societies OT -1.6:e future

story.

opian societies.

y structured absurdly andhis own.

er world culture might view

, the student will partici-ns and activities analyti-iety.

297, 80

SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TALES

"The Great Judge," p. 272(Definition of Utopia should be presentedhere.)

"The Figure," p. 92"Double Take," p. 165"The Ambassadors*," p. 31"The Martian and the Magician," p. 246

"The Fly," p. 194"Teething Ring," p. 53

ACTIVITIES: You are running for public office in2525. Write your campaign speechlincludingpromises relevant to the times in which you willlive. This may be presented to the class in person,on tape, or on paper.

What if...an individual were allowed to terminatehis life at will. Might suicide parlors beestablished for this purpose?

What if...;every citizen could install in his homea mini-computer to vote on key national issues?

)

SCIENCE FICTION

:GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MA

so

f

;,

181

What if...drugs were diapensbars, just as drinks are nowcocktaiI lounges?

What it ...people were fofstory buildings in the cipeople?

ie

What if...peoplt were paid fsocial utility scale? (Thetherefore, earn as much as t

What if...other means than p,control criminals--such as dthe brain?

Advances in technology bringgames. (The invention of thabout car racing.) Projectifrom what you know, invent aother form of entertainment100 years from now. (Rocket

F 268-102 CITIES IN CRIF 367-102 CITIES OF THEF DIMENSIONS OF

THE CAVE REEXF DIMENSIONS OF

TRANSACTIONSF 169104 BOOMSVILLEFPL FUTURE SHOCK

44,

05480

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

181

What if...ditigs were dispensed in loeal speed-bare, just as drinks are now dispensed in loealcocktail lounges?

Witif...pedOleyere FOrded to-IIVO in 1,000story builiiinga in the_cities?- Would this changepeople?

What if...peop'le were paid for their labor op asocial'utility scale? (The ffewageworker might,therefore, earn as much as the surgeon..)

What if...other means than prisons were,ustd tocontrol criminals--such as drugs or electrodes inthe brain?

Advances in technology bring about new forum ofgames. ,(The invention of the automobile brought'about car racing.) Projecting into the futurefrom what you know, invent a new game, sport orother form of entertainment that may be popular100 years from now. (Rocket Racing?)

F 268-102 CITIES IN CRISISF 367-102 CITIES OF THE FUTUREF DIMENSIONS OF CHANGE 2, SHELTER:

THE, CAVE REEXAMINED

F DIMENSIONS OF CHANGE 3, ENERGY:TRANSACTIONS IN TIME

F 169-104 BOOMSVILLEFPL FUTURE SHOCK

300

SCIENCE FICTION

GOAL AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MAT

V. MARRIAGE AND T FAMILY/VARIANT LIFE STYLES

A. The student experiences- elements of unusual

family structures',..

. He_views a world in which the child controls

the mother.

C: He reads about a cu'lture where chooging amarriage partner is controlled by computer.

;He reads about the laat man and woman on Earth.

E. He participates in claas'activities, utilizingbackground information.

301

AC 1390AC 567

AC 697

AC 1439AC'1416

APPOINTMENT ITHE. COUNTRY 0'1984THE POTTERS 0UNIVERSE

50 SHORT'SCIENCE FICTIONTA

"Talent," p. 256

."Beautiful, Beauti

"Not With a Bang,"

ACTIVITIES: Write a letterWrite it as if it will be se

the 1990's. Try to imaginelike and what kind of advice

182 / 302

05480O

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

FAMILVVARIANT LIFE STYLES

eriences elements of unusualres.

ld in which the child controls

a culture wherelachoosing aer is controlled by computer.

the last man and woman on Earth.

s in class activities, utilizingormation.

AC 1390AC 567

AC 69/AC 1439AC 1416

APPOINTMENT IN TOMORROWTHE COUNTRY OF THE BLIND1984THE POTTERS OF FIRSKUNIVERSE

50 SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TALES

"Talent," p. 256

"Beautiful, Beautiful, Beautiful," p. 88

"Not With a Bang," p. 125

ACTIVITIES: Write a letter to your son or daughter.Write it as if it will be sealed and not opened until

the 1990's.. Try to imagine what their world will belike and what kind of advice you might give them.

SCIENCE FICTION

GOALS AND CONTENFIr ACTIVITIES AND MAT

303 183

Suppose: Science has discovthe sex of an unborn child.

I. What would this do to

A. family sizeB. population size aC. values in societyD. the future of intE. marriage styles

II. Who should control th

A. the individual co,B. the federal goveC. private industry-

to those who can

Suppose: Through gene banksphysical, mental', and persofor your unborn child. Thescholars; athletes, actors,queens, and leaders of histoto you. Design your child,different genetic sources.or defend your choices.

Suppose: Young men, suppose'

appeared tomorrow. How wouYoung ladies, suppose -all t

tomorrow. How would societythis, concentrating on the 81

disappear-technologican ski!and hode-continuing skills

reference, see Philip Wylie

31

05480 t

ACTIVITLES AND MATERIALS

lZ7

303

Suppose: Science has discovered a way to choose

the sex of an unborn child. Discuss:

I. What would this do to life as we know it?

A. family size

B. population size and makeup

C. values in societyD. the future of international relatibns

E. marriage styles

II. ',.Who should control this discovery?

A. the individual coupleB. the federal government--free-to everyoneC. private industry--offer it as a profit

to those who can afford it

Suppose: Through gene banks, you may now select

physical, mental, and personality characteristics

for your unborn child. The genes of all famous

scholars, athletes, actors, statesmen, kings,

queens, and leaders of history are now available

to you. Design your child, using at least five

different genetic sources. Be prepared to explain

or defend4)pur choices.

Suppose: Yoting men, suppose all the women dis-

appeared tomorrow. How would society change?Young ladies, suppose all the men disappeared

tomorrow. How would society change? Discuss

this, concentrating on the skills which woulddisappear-technologican skills with men, culturaland home-continuing skills with women. For

reference, see Philip Wylie's novel THE DISAPPEARANCE.

183 304

SCIENCE FICTION

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MAT

VI. STATES OF THE MIND

A.

B.

The student understands the concept of innerspace,-a .science fiction of the mind.

He sees how "dream" may become reality for thescience fiction writer.

C. He reads about the control of a mind by an alienforce.

He reads about conventional methods of escape-from an ,awful reality*

E.° He takes part in writing and listening activities.

3PIriL

Write a story in which the tmen and women are reversed.the future.

From Library Services Center

AC 1428AC 1445,AC 1441

DWELLERS IN SHELLO 113MORROMARTIAN CHRON

50 SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TA

Tscar," p. 44"Stair Trick," p."Texas Week," p. 1"Built Down Logica"Narapoia," p. 178

"Unwelcome Tenant,

"Altar at Midnight"An\Egg a Month fr

ACTIVITIES: A phobia is anAdvances in technology bringface. What new fears may spylist?

30G

05480

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

stands the concept of innerfiction of the mind.

m" may become reality for theriter.

e control of a mind by an alien

nventional methods of escapelity.

writing and listening activities.

3 05

Write a story in which the traditional rolesofmen and women are reversed. Set your story in

the future.

From. Litrevices Center

AC 1428AC 1445AC 1441

DWELLERS IN SILENCEHELLO TOMORROWMARTIAN CHRONICLES

0

50 SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TALES

"Oscar," p. 44"Stair Trick," p. 67"Texas Week," p. 113"Built Down Logically," p. 227"Narapoia," p. 178

"Unwelcome Tenant 73

"Altar at Midnight," p. 131"An Egg a Month from All Over," p. 230

ACTIVITIES: A"phobia is an irrational fear.Advances in technology bring new fears for men to

face. What new fears may space travel add to thelist?

3013

SCIENCE FICTION

GOALS AND CO 'TENT ACTIVITIES AND MA

VII. EDUCATION

A. The student views the educational needs of asociety different froth his own.

B.' He reads about the origins of speech.

C. He reads about a future "bookless" education.

D. He designs an educational system.

307

'Try to represent, by drawinof-consciousness story, theyear 2195.

F 270-121 OMEGAF 356-114 THE RED HALF ASTRALIS

From Library Services Cente

AC 1434 NIGHTFALLAC 1462 REPORT ON T

50 SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TA

"Prolog," p. 170

"The Fun They Had

-ACTIVITIES: Discuss the gochildren learning at home winstead of in schools as th

185

It may be possible some dayor "math pills" to learn wior illustrate the possible

Discuss some possible classin schools of the future.Survival in Outer Space, Th4

05480

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

4

Jews the educational needs of arent from his own.

t the origins of speech.

t a future "bookless" education.

educational system.

/307185

Try to represent, by drawing, collage or a stream-Of-consciousness story, the mind of a man from theyear 2195.

F 270-121 OMEGAF 356-114 THE RED BALLOONF ASTRALIS

From Librairy Services Center

AC 1434 NIGHTFALLAC V462 REPORT ON THE BARNHOUSE EFFECT

50 SHORT SCIENCE FICTION TALES

"Prolog," p. 170

"The Fun They Had," p. 25

ACTIVITIES: Discuss the good and bad effects ofchildren learning at home with teaching machinesinstead of in schools as they do today.

It may be possible some day to take "French pills ".or "math pills" to learn without effort. Discuss

or illustrate the possible effects.

Discuss some possible classes that be offeredin schools of the future. (Spaceship Mechanics,Survival in OuteriSpace, The Culture of Mars?)

3 CI 8

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

PART II:GRAND

INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS

At the close of the overview, each student will choose a topic from the list below for his group and individual

research project topic.

1.

Tech

gical, biological, and medical

13.

Transpbrtation and communication in the future- -

aances in future man

including ESP

2.

Man's reaction to disaster, whether man-

14.

The city of the future

made or natural

15.

Education of the future

3.

Values, mores, and morals of the future

16.

Leisure, recreation, sports in the future

4.

Marriage and family life or variant life

17.

Occupations and industry in the future

styles in the future

18.

Material possessions in the future

5.

Youth and rebellion in the future

19.

Food and population in the future

6.

Crime and punishment in the future

20.

Equality of the sexes and ethnic groups in the

7.

Religion in the future

future

CAL.

8.

War in the future

21.

Sex in the future

CD

9.

Governmental forms in the future

22.

Fashion in the future

C.D

10.

Ecology and man's reaction to change

23.

Identity of the individual in the future

11.

The concept of utopian societies

24.

Student suggestions, to be teacher approved

12.

Class and society in the future

PROJECT PROCEDURES

All students in the class will participate in the project work and will be responsible for handing in all

assignments in this section.

1. Each student will choose a topic from the list.

2. Students will decide whether to work individually or with others interested in the same topic.

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

3.

Using the overview material, plus magazine articles, newspaper

articles, and other available data, each

student or group will compile characteristicts of his topic intodaei society.

Class discussions and/

or group discussions will focus on

these fiells.

4.

Students, individually or in interest groups, will check with

adults on qualities and characteristics of

life in the past as regards their chosen topic.

For instance, adults might be interviewed about trans-

portation in their childhood, marriage in past generations,

r education in the past.

These interviews

may be taped or written.

The interviewer should includeeuc

data as the interviewee's name, age,

occupation.

He should record any other pertinent informatio .

The questions asked should be carefully

prepared and checked before the interview.

5.

Using the information he has collected about the present

and the past of

.

his

erect area, the student

will try to project into the future of his field.

He may consult THE FUTU

T magazine and other non-

fiction material.

A reference list is appended to this course.

6.

Each student will prepare, in list or in outline form, the surveyof his interest area - -past, present,

and future.

7.

Material mentioned in item 6 may be compiled, duplicated, and

distributed to each student for reference.

8.

Each student will then proceed to his individual project, using

background material, his own science

fiction overview, and supplementary novels in his field.

9.

At the close of the semester, each student will present a

written summary of his research for his

individual project, including a list of the books he read,

the periodical articles and the material he

sent away for.

10.

So that the entire group may benefit, each student

will present an oral report on his project at the

semester's end.

These reports may be organized into panels on similar topics,

and should include any

visual material the student or group created in project

research.

187

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

INDIVIDUAL PROJECTS AND SMALL GROUP PROJECTS

One project or more may be done at th

discrelion of the student and the teacher.

The teacher may select

some projects as being worth more grade

't than others.

- -

1.

A student may create and name a product

f the future.

He should tell what it is, what will be its use,

which age and /or ,societal group will use it.

Then he should create

n advertising campaign for that product.

A newspaper ad, a magazine ad, the script for a-TV ad, and a radio ad script

or taped radio commericial

might be included in this project.

2.

A group of students may draw up a plan for a new city to be bui t somewhere in the United States ina future

year.

It should be populated by about 25,000 persons.

Each p an should i clude:

N,

A.

location of city'

B.

location of business district

C.

location of residRntial areas

D.

location of parks'sand recreation areas

E.

location of and types of mass transit

F.

location of industrial plants, if any

G.

location of airports

4Students should state the year of dtvelopment for their city and be prepared to back

up their decisions

from their readings on the topic.

3.

Students may video-tape a news broadcast of the future, including news, weather, sports, and features.

All

material presented on the program, of course, should be correlated as to time, place, and degree of

technology of the society.

Ok

4.

Students may survey the future thinking of the community on various subjects.

The interviews may be taped,

recorded, and presented to the class..

188-

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

5. 6. 7.

8.

:99

--A

t

lv

10.

11.

12.

Students should elect their own education association

officers and develop .the future curriculum of the

schools.

What will people need to know in Vne future?

How will they be taught?

A student may present an oral report on interesting

phases of his topic.

He should provide the teacher

with a written outline or notes, presenting his sources

of information in correct bibliographical forms.

An srtist may interpret the future in his ownmedium.

He should list books from which he obtained

ideas

and give credit for those ideas in the correct form.

A student may write a scenario, short story, poem, or even a

song to be performed with accompaniment.

He

should base his idea-"A 3004 a.d.

Love Song," etc. -- on material he has read and

should credit the source

for his idea.

Creative writing may be submitted to sci-fi magazines listed

in'TEACHING TOMORROW, a

teacher's guide to sci-fi.

A student could select one of the topics and approach it

through a media presentationslides and music, etc.

Again, his sources should be properly documented.

A radio play or serial based on the future could

be written, scripted, andlacted out with

apprOpriate sound

effects.

Students should check reference materials carefully

for procedure.

The play could be tape-

recorded in.the classroom and presented in this form to

other classes, over the school,public tddress

system or over a radio station (tryKSLH).

The student may devise a role-playing game or create a

board game utilizing his knowledge of his futuristic

topic.

Have students consult such simulation games asECOLOGY, BLACKS AND WHITES, MEN AND WOMEN,

eta., at

the library,

Their game could simulate an imagined

future situation.

A student may collect articles, comics,

ads, and stories which pertain to

tge future from magazines and

newspapers.

He should annotate them with factual

material or quotations from his science fiction

readings

and organize them into subject areas.

fl

189

CAD

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

13.

The student may create an illustrated time line of the past, the present, and the future on one of the topics,

utilizing historical and science_fictional references.

14.'

A student may collage pictures and found objects pertaining to his topic.

He should be prepared to present his

work to a group or to the class.

15.

A newspaper printed in a future year may be produced, offering a news page, an editorial page, a feature

page, and a sports page.

Students might insert illustrations from magazines or draw their own.

Advertising of the future may be inserted.

All material printed, of course, should be documented from

science fiction material.

Papers may be printed on stencils, and duplicated for the Class.

16.

Students may contact a radio station regarding a telephone call-in program on the topic of the future.

The

station could hold an open-lineWith the students as guests; the students could call in their opinions and

tape the show, or an ".expert" fn-the field may be found to respond to'questions.

17.

Students may wish to write an author for specific' information in his area.

Many science fiction authors

personally answer letters, so thia_type of activity shoilld be encouraged.

18.

A student may write a letter to the editor of his newspaper, sharing his futures research.

19.

Students may video-tape a "man-in-the-street" broadcast, interviewing other students about controversial

topics of the future.

20.

A student may write.to various organizations, listed in the appendix, for information about his field/of

interest.

The letter, checked by the teacher for form, would be credited to his specific project.,

21.

Student-suggested topics'may be discussed with the teacher for approval at the beginning of the unit.

190

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

Materials Available from Library Services Center

Audio Cassettes Listed by Topics

I.

Medical/Scientific/Technological

AC 1436

MARIONETTES, INC.

AC 1479

TUNNEL UNDER THE WORLD

II.

War

AC 1405

THE C CHUTE

AC 1593

CONQUEROR'S ISLE

AC 1402

THE DEFENDERS .

AC 1476

THE LAST MARTIAN

III-

Transportation and Communica'tion

AC 1393

AC 1421

AC 4083

AC 1456

AC 1388

AC 1447

REQUIEM

THE GREEN HILLS OF EARTH

GUN FOR A DINOSAUR

TO THE FUTURE

SAUCER OF LONELINESS

TIM ROADS MUST ROLL

-IV.

Society/The City/Government

AC 1416

UNIVERSE

AC 697

1984

AC 1439 .THE POTTERS OF FIRSR

AC 1390 APPOINTMENT IN TOMORROW

AC 567

THE COUNTRY OF THE BLIND

V.

Marriage and the Family

AC 1428

AC '1445

AC 1441

0

DWELLERS IN SILENCE

HELLO TOMORROW

MARTIAN CHRONICLES

Advances in Man

VI. States of Mind

AC 1462

REPORT ON THE BARNHOUSE EFFECT

AC 1434 NIGH "ALL

AC

-ACAC

AC

AC AC

191

VII.-Non-fiction Interviews

32911 INTERVIEW WITH RAY BRADBURY

12060 SCIENCE AND FICTION

5.08

SCIENCE FICTION IN' OUR TIME

32911 AN INTERVIEW WITH POUL ANDERSON

30428 SCIENCE FICTION: ITS FUTURE

33459 URSULA LeGUIN: WOMAN OF SCIENCE FICTION

G.,

C.71

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

--N-diiTsListed by Topics

I.

Medical/Scientific/Technological

II.

War

FANTASTIC VOYAGE

I, ROBOT

DOOR INTO SUMMER'

THE TIME MACHINE

BRAVE NEW WORLD

DEEP RANGE

FARMER IN THE SKY

INVISIBLE MAN.,

STARSHIP TROOPERS,

ALAS, BABYLON

EARTHLIGHT

WAR OF THE WORLDS

ON THE BEACH

CAT'S CRADLE

Transportation and Communication

Advances in Man

THE DEMOLISHED MAN

FROM THE EARTH TO THE MOON

HAVE SPACE SUIT -- WILL TRAVEL

THE GREAT TIME MACHINE HOAX

CROSSROADS OF TIME

QUEST CROSSTIME.

IV.

Societyftk City/Government

THE END OF,ETERNITY

THE NAKED SUN

SPACE MERCHANTS

1984

PLANET OF THE APES

FUTURE SHOCK

MARTIAN CHRONOCLES

V.

Marriage and the Family:

Variant Life Styles

STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND

ORPHANS IN THE SKY

9DUNE

,

GREYBEARD

VI.

States of Mind

192

VINTAGE BRADBURY

2001:

A SPACE ODYSSEY

THE SIRENS OF TITAN

SCIENCE FICTION

.05480

Films, Filmstrips, and Multi=media Kits

Materials available from Audiovisual Services

Films

F 269-169

FLIGHT OF APOLLO 11--A TRIP TO THE MOON

F 273-126

SCIENCE SCREEN REPORT:

EARTH SCIENCE.

MARS--THE SEARCH FOR LIFE BEGINS

F 367-101-

AUTOS, AUTOS EVERYWHERE

F 271-106

MAN AND MACHINE:

A ROMANCE GOING UP IN SMOKE

F 367-115

TRIP FROM CHICAGO

F 266-103

AN AMERICAN RENDEZVOUS

F 268-102

' CITIES IN CRISIS

F 367-102

CITIES OF THE FUTURE

F 169 -104

BOOMSVILLE

F 270-121

OMEGA

F 356-114

THE,RED BALLOON

SCIENCE FICTION:

JULES VERNE-TO RAY BRADBURY

DIMENSIONS OF CHANGE 1:

ECOLOGY:

THE MAN-MADE PLANET

DIMENSIONS OF CHANGE 2:

SHELTER:

THAHtAVE REEXAMINED

DIMENSIONS OF CHANGE 3:

ENERGY:

TRANSACTIONS IN TIME

DIMENSIONS OF CHANGE 4:

FOOD:

AN ENERGY EXCHANGE SYSTEM

193

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

Materials available from Audiovisual Services

Films

DIMENSIONS OF CHANGE 5:

MOBILITY:

FROM THERE TO HERE

DIMENSIONS OF CHANGE 6:

COMMUNICATIONS:

ONE WORLD MIND

Sound Filmstrip

SFS 770-703

COMPUTERS AND THE WORLD OF THE FUTURE

Materials available from the Public Library

Films

STRANGER THAN SCIENCE FICTION

FUTURE SHOCK

WAR OF THE PLANETS

THE UNEXPLAINED

SURVIVAL IN OUTER SPACE

THE YEAR 1999

194

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

BIBLIOGRAPHIES

A General Overview Of The Future

"American Family" (Entire issue).

LOOK, January 26, 1971.

Betts, Robert.

"Genetic Tailoring of a New Generation."

ST. LOUIS GLOBE DEMOCRAT,

June 28; 1971.

"Superhumans Out of a Laboratory."

ST. LOUIS GLOBE DEMOCRAT,

June 28, 1971.

"It"s Possible to Make Another You."

ST. LOUIS GLOBE DEMOCRAT,

June 28, 1971.

Bowers, Faubian.

"The Sexes:

Getting it All Together."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

January 9, 1970.

Cancro, Robert.

"Preserving the Species."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

MaNi 6, 1971.

Clarke, John W.

"Science Fiction and the Finitude ofMan."

WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ALUMNUS,

June, 1971.

Coffin, Patricia.

"Young Unmarried."

LOOK,

January 26, 1971.

Collier, Berner,

"Case for Bio-Feedback Training."

SATURDAY REVIEW, April 10, 1971.

Cousins, Norman.

"From Anathema to Dialogue."

SATURDAY REVIEW, June 5, 1971.

DeMott, Benjamin.

"Looking Back on the Seventies." ATLANTIC MAGAZINE,

February, 1971.

"The New Sexijtentialism."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

July 10, 1971.

Gilluly, Richard.

"New Look at the Meaning of Reality."

SCIENCE NEWS, May 15, 1971.

Grossman, Edward.

"Obsolescent Mother." ATLANTIC MONTHLY,

May, 1971.

Hedgepeth, William.

"Maybe It'll Be Different Here."

LOOK,

March 23,

971.

r).

195

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

Holt, John.

"Sesame Street."

ATLANTIC MONTHIN, May, 1971.

Illich, Ivan.

"The Alternative to Schooling."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

June 19, 1971.

Johnson, Nicholas.

"Test Pattern for Living."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

May 29, 1971.

ME4/i

Kesey, Ken.

SO

IMES A GREAT NATION.

New American Library,

1964.

ONE FLEW OVER THE CUCKOO'S NEST.

New American Library,

1964.

Lansing, Elizabeth.

"Move to Eat Natural."

LOOK,

March 30, 1971.

Lear, John.

"Land:

Making Room for Tomorrow."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

March 6, 1971.

Moskin, Robert.

"Coming Explosion:

Israeli Youth."

LOOK,

June 15, 1971.

Moskowitz, Sam.

SEEKERS OF TOMORROW.

World. Publishing Co., 1966.

CIO

de'. 1

Nathan, Robert.

"Youth, Dollars and Development."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

May 1, 1971.

Poppy, John.

"The Radical Family."

LOOK,

January 26, 1971.

"Rebirth of America"(Entire issue).

LOOK,

January 12, 1971.

Reich, Charles.

GREENING OF AMERICA.

Bantam Books, Inc., New York,

1970.

Rorvik, David.

"Beyond the Pill."

LOOK.

June 15, 1971.

"Testtube Baby is Coming."

LOOK,

May 18, 1971.

Seaborg, Glenn.

"Those Good New Days."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

March 6, 1971.

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

Star, Jack.

"We'll Educate Your Kids or Your Money Back."

LOOK,

June 15, 1971.

"Homosexual Couple."

LOOK,

January 26, 1971.

Troffler, Alvin.

FUTURE SHOCK.

Random House,

New York,

1970.

Totter, Robert J.

"Is. Altruism Dead?"

SCIENCE NEWS,

June 5, 1971.

Vonnegut, Kurt Jr.

CAT'S CRADLE.

Dell,

New York,

1962.

GOD BLESS YOU, MR. ROSEWATERT

Dell,

New York,

1965.

Watriss, W. V.

"Skopje."

SMITHSONIAN INSTTTUTE.

May,

1971.

Watson, James D.

"Moving Toward Cloning Man."

ATLANTIC MONTHLY,

May, 1971.

Co.;

IV

Wheeler, Harvey.

"Rise of the Elders."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

December 5, 1971.

iCD

V

Wolfe, Tom.

ELECTIC KOOL-AID TEST.

Pocketbooks,

New York,

1968.

KANDY KOLORED, TANGERINE FLAKE, STREAMLINE BABY.

Pocket Books, Inc., 1973.

..

I

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

NGES IN FUTURE MAN DUE TO TECHNOLOGICAL, MEDICAL AND BIOLOGICAL ADVANCES

FUTURE TRENDS

Asimov, Isaac.

"Predictions:

Next 100 Years."

FUTURIST,

June, 1988.

Betts, Robert.

"It's Possible to Make Another You."

ST. LOUIS GLOBE DEMOCRAT,

June 29, 1971.

"Genetic Tailoring of a New Generation."

ST. LOUIS GLOBE DEMOCRAT,

June 28, 1971.

"Superhuman Out of a Laboratory?"

.ST. LOUIS GLOBE DEMOCRAT,

Jiine 26, 197V

Bickner, Robert.

"Biological Time Bomb."

FUTURIST,

December, 1968.

iV

Cancro, Robert.

"Perserving the Species."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

March 6, 1971.

Collier, Bernard.

"Case for Bio-Feedback Training."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

June 6, 1971.

Control of Life:

LIFE MAGAZINE EDUCATIONAL REPRINTS:

1.

"Control of Life."

2.

"Gift of Life From the Dead."

3.

"Rebuilt People."

4.

"New Man:

What will He Be Like?"

Ettinger, Robert.

"Body'Freezing."

FUTURIST,

February, 1968.

"Prospect of Immortality."

FUTURIST,

December, 1968.

Etzioni, Amitai.

"Future Choice of Sex of Babies."

FUTURIST,

December, 1968.

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

Frankel, Charles.

THE CASE FOR MODERN MAN.

Beacon,

1969.

Goodman, Walker.

"What Happens When 'Life Begins?"

REDBOOK,

becember, 1965.

Grossman, Ed.

'Obsolescent Mother."

ATLANTIC MONTHLY,

May, 1971.

Gunther, Max.

"The Secret of Life:

Science, Sex, and Tomorrow's Morality."

LIFE MAGAZINE,

June 13, 1969.

Ingraham, Barton.

"Controlling Human Behavior With Electronics."

FUTURIST,

April, 1970.

Janne, Henri.

"Teaching Peotil e to Adapt to Change."

FUTURIST,

June, 1970.

Lessee, Stanley.

"Forecast of Future Health."

FUTURIST,

December, 1968.

Mendell, Jay.

"Can We Give People the Spark of Genius?"

FUTURIST,

June, 1970.

Negovski, V. A.

"Reversal of Death."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

August 4, 1969.

Platt,.Rutherford.

"Controversy Over Test Tube Babies."

GOOD 1HOUSEKEEPING,

February, 1969.

"Can Science Produce Life?"

REDBOOK,

June, 1968.

Prehoda, Robert W.

"How to Defuse the Biological Time Bomb."

FUTURIST.

December, 1968.

" Our Children May Live to Be 200 Years Old." FUTURIST, .February, 1969.

Ratcliffe, J. D.

"New Facts About Human Reproduction."

READERS DIGEST,

December, 1969.

4.

Rorvick, David.

"Beyond the Pill." WOK MAGAZINE,

June 15, 1971.

."The Test Tube Baby Is Coming."

LOOK MAGAZINE,

May 18, 1971.

Rosenfeld, Albert.

"Second Genesis."

LIFE MAGAZINE,

June 13, 1969.

ti

1

199

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

Rosenfeld, Albert. "Future Man:

What Will He Be Like?"

LIFE EDUCATIONAL REPRINTS, #32.

Roslensky, John.

GENETICS AND THE FUTURE OF MAN.

Appleton Century,

1966.

Seaborg, Glenn.

"These Good New Days."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

March 6, 1971.

Wheeler, Harvey.

"Rise of the Elders."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

December 5, 1970.

Watson, James.

"Moving Toward Cloning Man."

ATLANTIC MONTHLY,

May, 1971.

Wolf, Wm.

"Forecast on Future Health."

FUTURIST,

December, 1968.

Yolles, Stanley.

"Prothise of Mental Health."

FUTURIST,

June, 1969.

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

0

MARRIAGE AND FAMILY

Bronfenbrenner, U.

"American Family:

Future Uncertain."

Cancro, R.

"Preserving the Species."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

Clarkson, F. E.

"Family Size and Sex-Role Stereotypes."

TIME,

March 6,

SCIENCE,

December 28,

1971.

January 23,

1970.-

1970.

Coffin, P.

"Amerin Family."

LOOK MAGAZINE, January 26, 1971.

Edwards, R. G. and Fowler, R. E.

"Human Embryos in the Laboratory."

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN,

December, 1970.

Freedlands, N.

"Make Love, Not Babies:

Childlessness."

NEWSWEEK,

January 15, 1970.

Hedgepeth, W.

"Maybe It Will Be Different Here."

LOOK,

March 23, 1971.

Johnson, N.

"Test Pattern For Living."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

May 29, 1971.

Karales, James.

"The Young Unmarrieds."

LOOK,

January 26, 1971.

Kronenberger, J.

"Is the Family Obsolete."

LOOK,

January 26, 1971.

Leiyveld, J.

"Will We Just Say It Happened When The World Overpopulates

Itself Into Extinction?"

NEW YORK

TIMES,

July 19, 1970.

Poppy, John.

"The Radical Family."

LOOK,

January 26, 1971.

Rakstis, T. J.

"Cheaper By the Duo."

TODAYS HEALTH,

May, 1970.

--Starr, Jack.

"The Homosexual Couple."

LOOK,

January 1, 1971.

201

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATIONS

"Coming Revolution in Transportation."

NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC,

September, 1969,

"Communications Satellities, Success in Space."

ELECTRONICS WORLD,

July and August, 1969.

"Mass Urban Transit." WOK, April 20, 1971.

"Space Broadcasting, A Report on the U. N. Conference on the Exploration and Peaceful Use of

Space."

BULLETIN

OF THE ATOMIC SCIENTIST,

March, 1969.

"Toward the Global Village."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

October 24, 1970.

CC

"Transportation and Cities."

SCIENCE NEWS,

January 25, 1969.

Z.71

"U. N. Sees Direct Satellite TV in 1970's"

AVIATION WORLD,

May 5, 1969.

"Urban Transportation Tomorrow."

AMERICAN CITY,

November, 1969.

"Will There be an Electronic Mail Service?"

ELECTRONICS WORLD,

August, 1969.

"Where Money's Really Needed:

Inter-City Transportation."

LIFE,

March 19, 1971..

Also See:

SATURDAY REVIEW Communications Issues

202

Tv

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

FUTURE CITIES

"Building A City in the Ocean."

FUTURIST,

June, 1969.

"Cities Are Finished."

NEWSWEEK,

April 5, 1971.

"Future Obsolescence."

FUTURIST,

April, 1968.

"New Communities."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

May 15, 1971.

"New Shape of America."

LIFE,

January 8, 1971 .

"Nixon Mani for the Future of U. S. Cities and Small Towns."

U. S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT,. 'July 6, 1970.

C")

"Planned New Communities in the U. S. by the Year 2,000."

FUTURIST,

October, 1969.

"Planning."

FUTURIST,

October, 1968.

"Planning for the Second America."

HARPER'S,

November, 1969.

'Tomorrow's Cities:

Go Up, Spread Out, of Start Over?"

CHANGING TIMES,

April, 1970.

"Urban Environment:

Cities Role for People."

SENIOR SCHOLASTIC,

February, 1971.

"World Cities of the Future."

SCIENCE,

November 6, 1970.

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

EDUCATION

Cousins, Norman.

"From Anathema to Dialogue."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

June 5, 1971.

Mick, Ivan.

"The Alternative to Schooling."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

June 19, 1971.

Lear, John.

"Land:

Hiking Room for Tomorrow."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

May 29,,1971.

Life, Editors. ."Rebirth of America."

LIFE,

January 12, 1971.

Holt, John.

"Sesame Street."

ATLANTIC MONTHLY,

May, 1971.

THE FUTURIST MAGAZINE.

Published by the World Future Society, 5501 Lincoln Street,

Bethesda, Maryland, 10034.

"Youth Dollars and Development."

SATURDAY REVIEW,

May 1, 1971. 0

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

SCIENCE FICTION AND NOVELS OF THE FUTURE

OVERVIEW

Asimov, Isaac.

"On Science Fiction."

FUTURIST,

October, 1967.

Clarke, John.

"Science Fiction and the Finitude of Man." WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY ALUMNI-MAGAZINE,

June, 1971.

Franklin, Bruce.

"Fiction of the Future."

FUTURIST,

February, 1970.

Livingston, Dennis.

"Science Fiction and Futurology."

FUTURIST,

June, 1968.

Moskowitz, Sam.

SEEKERS

8F

TOMORROW.

World Publishing,

1966.

TV)

Blum, Ralph.

SIMULTANEOUS MAN.

New York:

Bantam Books Inc., 1970.

CO

Clarke, Arthur.

"A Death and the Senator."

in NINE BILLION NAMES OF GOD,

New

oHarcourt Brace World, 1967.

.CHILDHOOD'S END.

New York:

Ballantine Books Inc., 1953.

Heinlein, Robert.

PODKAYNE OF MARS.

New York:

Avon Books,

1953.

.METHUSALEH'S CHILDREN.

New York:

Signet,

1958.

.BEYOND THIS HORIZON.

New York:

Signet.

Henderson, Zenna.

THE PEOPLE.

New York:

Avon,

1961.

1

205

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

THE PILGRIMAGE.

New York:

Avon,

1963.

Huxley, Aldous.

BRAVE NEW WORLD.

New York:

Bantam Books Inc.,

1942.

Keyes, Daniel.

FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON.

New York:

Bantam Books Inc., 1966.

Pohl, Frederick.

AGE OF THE,PUSSYFOOT.

New York:

Ballantine Books Inc., 1969.

Schoonover, Frank.

CENTRAL PASSAGE.

New York:

Sloane,

1962.

Wyndham, John.

MIDWICH CUCKOOS.

New York:

Ballantine Books Inc.,

1958.

Bellamy, R. S.

LOOKING BACKWARD.

New York:

Harper,

1934.

Benet, Stephen Vincent.

BY THE WATERS OF BABYLON.

New York:

Philosophy and Literature,

1970.

CAD

IND

Blum, Ralph.

SIMULTANEOUS MAN.

New York:

Bantam Books Inc., 1970.

Brackett, Leigh.

LONG TOMORROW.

New York:

Ace Publishing Co., 1955.,

Bradbury, Ray.

OCTOBER COUNTRY.

New York:

Ballantine Books Inc.,

1956.

FAHRENHEIT 451: Ballantine Books,

1972.

Brinton, James.

PURPLE SIX.

London:

Brooks Books,

1967.

Burdick, Eugene.

FAILSAFE.

New York:

Dell Publishing Co.,

1959.

Caldwell, Taylor.

YOUR SINS AND. MINE.

New York:

Dell Publishing Co.,

1965.

Chamberlain, William.

RED JANUARY.

New York:

Dell Publishing Co.,

1964.

Clarke, Arthur.

NINE BILLION NAMES OF GOD.

New York:

Harcourt, Brace and World,

1967.

SCIENCE FICTION

z

05480

Clarke, Arthur.

CHILDHOOD'S END.

New York:

Ballantine Bookftnc.,

1958.

Conklin, Groff, ed.

GREAT STORIES OF SPACE TRAVEL.

New York:

Tempo Books,

1969.

Creasy, John.

THE FAMINE.

New York:

Lancer Books.

Farmer, Phillip Jose.

THE ALLEY GOD.

New York:

Ballantine Books Inc.,

1954.

Forster, E. M.

THE MACHINE STOPS.

New York:

Pocketbooks,

1928.

Frank, Pat.

ALAS, BABYLON.

New York:

Bantam Books Inc.,

1964.

Golding, William.,

LORD OF THE FLIES.

New York:

Capricorn,

1954.

Heinlein, Robert.

PODKAYNE OF MARS.

New York:

Avon,

1963..

GREEN HILLS OF EARTH.

New York:

New American'Library,

1941.

BEYOND THIS HDRIZON.

New York:

SignetBooks,

1965.

STRANGER IN A STRANGER LAND.

New York:

Signet Books,

1961.

METHUSALEH'S CHILDREN

New York:

Signet Books,

1958

Herbert and McCaffrey.

DECISION AT DOONE,

New York :, Dell Publishing Co.,

1967.

Henderson, Senna.

THE PEOPLE.

New York:

Avon Books,

1961.

.THE PILGRIMAGE.

1963.

Huxley, Aldous.

BRAVE NEW WORLD.

New York:

Bantam Books,

1942.

.BRAVE NEW WORLD REVISITED.

New York:

Bantam Books,

1958.

207

SCIENCE FICTION

05486

Knebel, Fletcher.

SEVEN DAYS IN MAY.

New York:

Bantam Books Inc.,

1962.

Lauer, Keith.

OTHER SIDE OF TIME.

New York:

Bantam Books Inc.,

1960.

Miller, Walter J.

CANTIELE FOR LEIBOWITZ, New York:

Bantam Books Inc., -1958.

Nathan, Robert.

WEANS.

New York:

Harper and\Bros. Publidhers,

1960.

Orwell, George.

1984.

New York:

Harcourt Brace and Co.,

1970

Pohl, Frederik.

AGE OF THE PUSSYFOOT.

New York:

Ballantine Books,

1969.

Pohl, Frederik and Kornbluth, Cyril.

SPACE MERCHANTS.

New York:

Ballantine Books Inc.,

19530

Rand, Ayn.

ANTHEM.

New York:

Signet Books,

1946.

Schoonover, Lawrence.

CENTRAL PASSAGE.

New York:

Sloans,

1962.

Skinner, B. F.

WALDEN II.

New York:

MacMillan Co.,

1948,

Shute, Nevil.

ON THE BEACH.

New York:

William Morrow and Co.,

1970.

.IN THE WET.

Sterling, R. J.

PRESIDENT'S PLANE IS MISSING.

New York:

Dell Publishing Co.,

1968.

Stewart, George.

THE EARTH ABIDES.

New York:

Fawcett World,

1971.

Van Vogt, A. E.

CHILDREN OF TOMORROW.

New York:

Ace Publishing Co.,

1970.

Vonnegut, Kurt Jr.

PLAYER PIANO.

New York:

Dell Publishing Co.,

1967

208

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

Vonnegut, Kurt Jr.

SIRENS OF TITAN.

New'York:

Dell Publishing Co.,

1959.

Wells, H. G.

TIME.MACHINE.

New York:

Fawcett World,

1970.

WAR OF THE WORLDS.

New York:

Fawcett World,

1970.

Wylie, Philip.

TOMORROW.

New York:

Popular Library,

1954.

TRIUMPH.

New York:

Fawcett World,

1964.

Wyndham, John.

REBIRTH.

New York:

Ballantine Books Inc.,

1955.

DAY OF THE TRIFFIDS.

New York:

Fawcett World,

1951.

MIDWICH CUCKOOS.

New York:

Fawcett Wohd,

1958.

209

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

..:ORGANIZATIONS AND OTHER SOURCES QF INFORMATION

FAMILY

THE AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF FAMILY RELATIONS.

Educational, counseling, and research organization publishes

FAMILY LIFE; publications list available.

5287 Sunset Blvd., Los Angeles, California 90027.

THE ASSOCIATION FOR FAMILY LIVING.

Several pamphlets and reprints available.

Membership, $5.00, includes

free subscription to publication YOUR FAMILY.

Pamphlets include "Bibliography and Film Guide,". $0.35.

32 W. Randolph St.,

Chicago, Illinois

60601

BUREAU OF FAMILY SERVICES, WELFARE, ADMINISTRATION.

Public assistance to help needy people.

Their material

is available from:

Supt. of Documents, U. S. Government Printing Office,

Washington, D.C. 20402,

and U. S. Dept. of Health, Education, and Welfare, Washington,_ D.

C. 20201.

CHILD STUDY ASSOCIATION OF AMERICA.

Publications list available dealing with children and parent-child

CA

Drelations.

Excellent source.

9 E. 89th St., New York, N. Y., 10028.

LARGE FAMILIES OF AMERICA, INC.

Educational organization devoted to the common interest of responsible

parents and their children in large families.

They re-distribute material published-by others and

publish monthly newsletters (LFA NEWS) for members.

Box 885,

Norwalk, Conn. 06852.

POPULATION

ASSOCIATION FOR VOLUNTARY STERILIZATION,

Research, education, and service in regard to sterilization

as means

of population control.

14 W. 40th St.,

New York, N. Y. 10018

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

POPULATION CRISIS COMITTEE.

Operates a campaign to activate the U. S. government in population control.

1730 E. St., N.W.,

Washington, D. C. 20006.

POPULATION POLICY PANEL, HUGH MORE FUND.

Bibliography, list of organizations, pamphlets available.

60 E.

42nd St., New York, New York, 10017.

UNITED NATIONS', BUREAU OF SOCIAL AFFAIRS.

Statistical, materials on world population trends.

United Nations

Bldg.,:New York, New York, 10017.

MRALITY

SCIENCE RESEARCH ASSOCIATES, INC.

Booklets and materials on moral values available.

259 E. Erie St., Chicago,

Illinois, 60611.

FAMILY LIFE BUREAU, U. S. CATHOLIC CONFERENCE.

Reprints, pamphlets, and bi-monthly bulletin CATHOLIC FAMILY

LEADER,

Guidance for Catholic families; helpful insight for all into, many aspects of family

life.

1312 Mass. Ave., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20005.

PARENTS WITHOUT PARTNERS, INC.

An international, nonprofit, non-sectarian, educational organization devoted

to the interests and welfare of single parents and their

children.

They publish THE SINGLE PARENT

magazine, chapter newsletters, manuals, and pamphlets

of organization instruction.

A number of

regional chapters exist.

80 Fifth Ave., New York, New York,

10011.

ow*

AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION.

Works actively to promote many aspects of civil liberty, including areas

related to race.

Materials available.

156 Fifth'Ave., New York, New York,

10010.

CIVIL RIGHTS DIVISION, U. S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE.

Some sample materials available on legal aspects of civil

rights movement.

Washington, D. C. 20530.

211

SCIENCE FICTION

05480

LEISURE

AFL-CIO RESEARCH DEPT.

Many pamphlets and booklets related to work, leisure, and

autdliation.

815--16th St., N. W.

Washington, D. C. 20006.

NATIONAL RECREATION AND PARK ASSOCIATION.

Citizen's organization concerned with all aspects of free time and its

use.

Publishes PARKS AND RECREATION magazine monthly and various special publications.

1700 Penn Ave.,

H.W.,

Washington, D. C.

20006.

WAR

AMERICAN PEACE SOCIETY.

Established in 1828, the society publicizes the evils of war and works for its abolish-

ment.

Distributes information on world affairs.

1307 New Hampshire Ave., N.W.,

Washington, D. C.

20036.

CARNEGIE ENDOWMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACE.

Catalog of publications available.

They publish INTERNATIONAL

CONCILIATION five times a year. .Their purpose is to study the causes of international war and

practical paths to peace.

United Nations Plaza at 46th St.,

New York, New York,

100017.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, U.S.A.

Statements, reprints, pamphlets, etc.

on war, peace, disarmament, nuclear test ban,

treaties, and related issues.

Publications are available frdm Supt. of Documents, Government Printing

Office, Washington, D. C., 20402.

Washington, D. C. 20520.

NATIONAL RESEARCH COUNCIL ON PEACE STRATEGY.

Reports of scholars on issues related to world peace.

Not a

pacifist organization.

241 W. 12th St.,

New York, New York,

10014.

WORLD PEACE FOUNDATION.

Promotes peace by making facts of international relations, available.

Publishes

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATION.

40 Mt. Vernon St.,

Boston, Mass., 02108.

SCIENCE FICTION

05408

IN-DEPTH ANALYSIS SHEET

PLOT:

1.

What themes or symbols are used by the author to develop his plot?

Threats on human lives?

Overcoming of

earth's culture by alien forms?

Loss of freedom and dignity?

Spiritual or mental. captivity?

Mutations?

Praise of a particular system of values, actions, standards, living conditions?

Minipulations?

2.

Is the plot contrived or awkward?

Is it "soap opera-ish"?

3.

Does the plot follow as a natural consequence from a realistic hypothetical base, extrapolated from a tendency

in the present?

4.

Does the plot go naturally with the characters and setting?

CHARACTERS:

1.

Are the characters mechanically produced or stereotyped, or are they

fully developed individuals exhibiting

genuine emotions and feelings?

Are their actions and thoughts consistent with the demands of plot and

setting?

2.

Is character the focal point or does character tend to be subordinate to the plot and

setting or to disappear

in favor of marvelous scientific inventions and melodramatic events?

Is this lack of characterization

justified?

3.

Are the characters actual human beings or some other life form?

If so, do they have human characteristics?

What makes them different?--attitudes? appearance? values? social context?

emotions?

What are their methods

of communication and propagation,

their techniqUes of acquainting themselves with others or taking them

over?

What significance is there in interaction with other beings?

213

SCIENCE FICTION

05408

SETTING:

1.

Does the setting provide a functional relationship to the other eleMents that make up the book?

2.

Does it demand the suspension of the reader's judgment against the incredible, such as Mechanics, monsters

and biological-anthropological throwbacks?

3.

Does the setting merely provide a place of escape from problems which appear to be unsolved on earth, or

is it a cleverly designed setting that shows imaginative development?

GENERAL CONSIDERATIONS:

1.

Does the author sacrifice people and ideas in favor of events and things?

2.

Does he appear to offer the reader cheap thrills in place of genuine creative imagination and thought-

provoking ideas?

3.

What are his assumptions about life and the nature of mankind?

Are they valid?

Or are they based on

traditional and cliched values and attitudes which are convenient for his present purpose?

4.

Haw does the writer build suspense or involvement?

How complex does the plot get?

5.

What fallacies exist in the writing or premise the author uses?

Are things scientifically impossible?

Theoretically improbable?

Or does the author speculate on the future and its problems by using a future

idea of a current trend?

6.

Do you detect any use of imagery, allusion, symbolism, trite description or cliches?

If so, do these add

or detract from the book?

How?

214

REPORT FORM FOR SUPPLEMENTARY TEXTS

Name

Title:

Period Date

Author: Length of Book:

Date of Publication: Publisher:

BASIC HYPOTHESIS OR ASSUMPTION MADE BY THE AUTHOR:

TIME AND PLACE? LOCATION OF STORY: (Approximate)

7

MAJOR CHARACTERS AND/OR PERSONALITY TYPES: (Analyze in depth per directions)

PLOT SUMMARY: (Detailed summary of plot including an analysis of conflictsand their solutions)

215

MODERN WRITERS

05490

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Writers of your lifetime--not beyond the last twenty years--share their insights with you in the Modern Writers

course.

Their fiction and non-fiction include situations, influenced by alienation, liberation, racism, technology,

environment, and emotional encounters.

A piece of your life is a part of your reading and writing in the course.

For any student interested in the subject.

GOALS

The student becomes familiar with generally recognized American authors of the last two decades and with some of

the modern writers of other countries in the fields of-fiction, non-fiction, drama, and poetry.

He examines current issues as reflected in comtemporary writings.

He becomes more fully acquainted with literary terms and makes them a part of his awn vocabulary.

He reads discriminatingly by questioning sources and methods of information gathering, interpretation, and appli-

cation of the information in non-fiction.

CZ

He reads freely in fiction and non-fiction selected for this course, expanding his reading of authors and issues

examined in class.

He gains practice in writing about the material he reads, relating it to his own life.

'

He takes part in discussions about materials shared by the class and in other oral activities.

217

MODERN WRITERS

05490

Materials

Title

IN PERSON.- Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.

IN PERSON,

TEACHER'S MANUAL.

Harcourt trace Jovanovich, Inc.

IN QUESTION.

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc:

IN QUESTION,

TEACHER'S MANUAL.

Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, Inc.

NATIVE VOICES.

Globe Book Company,

NATIVE VOICES, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

Globe Book Company,

Ck)

LIFE STYLES.

Globe Book Company,

:ID

LIFE STYLES, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

Globe Book Company.

GO ASK ALICE.

Avon Books.

A CHOICE OF WEAPONS.

Harper and Row Publishers, Inc.

THE BIG SEA.

Hill and Wang, Inc.

MALCOLM X SPEAKS.

Grove Press.

THE WAY IT SPOZED TO BE.

Bantam Book Company,

BODY LANGUAGE.

Pacific Books, Publishers.

BOW TO DEVELOP YOUR ESP.

Frederick Fell, Inc.

Use

Students

Teacher

Students

Teacher

Students

Teacher

Students

Teacher

Students

Students.

Students

Students

-Students

Students

Students

MODERN WRITERS

'05490

Materials

Title

WHY AM I AFRAID TO TELL YOU WHO I AM?

Argus'Communications.

WOMAN, WOMAN:

FEMINISM IN AMERICA.

Julian Messner, Inc.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF IVAN DENISOVICH.

Bantam Books, Inc.

BLESS THE BEASTS AND THE CHILDREN.

Pocket Books, Inc.

FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON.

Bantam Books, Inc.

RING OF BRIGHT WATER.

Fawcett Crest Library.

WHEN THE LEGENDS DIE.

Bantam Books, Inc.

Use

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

Students

MODERN WRITERS

COALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

I. FICTION

A. Ile student understands and appreciatesa variety of writing

4 techniques.

1. He understands the use of point o

view; the omniscient author.

2. He studies examples of flashbacktechniques.

3. He examines examples of the useof first person.

4. He realizes the effective ess o

figurative speech.

5. He reads stories that offer g d

examples of charactezation.

6. He recognizes an ironic situatio

7. He studies the roles and styles of

dialogue.

8. He learns to reed fictional works

employing stream of consciousnesstechnique.

220

1.1

FS FORMS OF LITE

FS 760-405 INTERPRETATIOSHORT STORY

FS 760-403 LATE 19th ANDDEVELOPMENT

FS 760-404 MODERN DEVELO

LIFE STYLES "The Blazing

"Roseanne of"The Day of t

'ClearingC earing in t

"A Field of Ill

"The Blazing"Ttfe Secret L

"The Blood of

"Clearing in

"The Secret L

313

tic

. 05490

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

t understands. and appreciatesof writing techniques.

erstands the use of oint ofthe omniscient autho

dies examples of flashbackques.

ines examples of the usest person.

lizes the effectivenessoftive speech.

ds stories that offer goodvs of characterization.

ognizes an ironic situation.

dies the roles and styles of

ue.

rns to read fictional worksing stream of consciousnessque.

.342 220

FS FORMS OF LITERATURE: THE SHORT STORY

FS 760-405 INTERPRETATION AND EVALUATION OF THESHORT STORY

FS 760-403 LATE 19th AND EARLY 20th CENTURYDEVELOPMENT ,,

FS. 760-404 MODERN DEVELOPMENT

LIFE STYLES "TheElazing Star," p. 3

"Roseanne of Yesterday," p..24"The Day of the Bullet," p. 61

"Clearing in the Sky," p. 43

"A Field of Rice," p. 205

"The Blazing Star," p. 3"The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," p. 144

"The Blaod of Martyrs," p. 220,

"Clearing in the Sky," p. 43

"The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," p. 144

343

MODERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

t

B. The student e.-=',,:nes aspects of theme,becoming aware .f motivational andpsychological developments in people.As a result he has a better understandingof those he meets in his own life.

344221

NOTE: IN LIFE STYLES: A COLeach story iMany questiocussion, butbasi for wr,

the end of equestions anparisons ofvocabulary fforcreative

LIFE STYLES

SL

SL

At the endinvited to rchanging th

At the end-Invited toform of a pfollawing'tFOR ALGEO0

At the end-asked to at

TWENTIETH CAND SELF

MAN'S SEARC

345

05490

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

t examines aspects of theme,ware of motivational andcal developments in people.\,

It he has a better understandinge meets in his own life.'

341

4

221

NOTE: IN LIFE STYLES: A COLLECTION OF SHORT STORIES,each story is, followed by questions.Many questions are'intended for dis-cussion, but some can be used as the

0basis for written assignments. At

the end of each unit are additionalquestions and suggestions for com-parisons of stories within the unit,vocabulary for study, and suggestionsfor creative writing experiences.

LIFE STYLES

SL

SL

At the end of Unit I the student isinvited to retell one of the stories,changing the point of view.

At the end of Unit III the student is

invited to try creative writing in theform of a progress report or diary,following the model offered by FLOWERS

FOR ALGERNON, p. -489

At the en4 of Unit IV the student isasked to attempt a dramatization, p. 244.

TWENTIETH CENTURY FICTION: ALIENATIONAND SELF DISCOVERY

MAN'S SEARCH FOR IDENTITY

345

MODERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

1. He reads stories expressing as theirtheMe the difficulty of understandinganother person.

2. He examines as a theme the refusal toface one's real feelings and commun-icate them to others.

3. He analyzes the hnportance of friend-f4ship as a theme.

4. He reads stories expressing exper-iences in different types of lovingrelationships.

5. He identifies in his reading themestree ng learning to cope with sorrowa overcome fear.

3W

li am

it*

IN QUESTIONPERSON

"The Men in t"My Father 'Si

IN PERSON "The Liar,"

IN QUESTION

LIFE STYLE

"The Passing

"Yes, Young D"The Song of"Celebration,'

"Seventeen Sy"Sucker," p.

"The Blazing"Roseanne of

RING OF BRIGHT WATER

IN PERSON "Showdown wit','Sometimes a

"The Rat," p.

GO ASK ALICEBLESS THE BEASTS AND THE CHIA DAY IN THE LIFE OF IVAN DEN

. FPL, GO ASK ALICE

222347

05490

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

s stories expressing as theirhe difficulty of understandingperson.

ines as a theme the refusal toe's real feelings and ,commun-hem to others.

yzes the importance of friend-s theme.

s stories expressing exper-in different t pes of lovingnships.

tifies in his reading themeslearning to cope with sorrow

rcome fear.

4

'346222

IN QUESTIONIN PERSON

IN PERSON

IN QUESTION

LIFE STYLE

RING OF BRIGHT

IN PERSON

"The Men in the Orchestra," p. 141"My Father Sits in the Dark," p. 22

"The Liar," p. 28

"The Passing," p. 47

"Yes, Young Daddy," p. 73"The Song of Rhodanthe," p. 88"Celebration," p. 125

"Seventeen Syllables," p. 116"Sucker," p. 148

"The Blazing Star," p. 3"Roseanne of Yesterday," p. 24

WATER

"Showdown with Callie," p. 34"Sometimes a Lonely Business," p. 147"The Rat," p. 174

GO ASK ALICEBLESS THE BEASTS AND THE CHILDRENA DAY IN THE LIFE OF IVAN DENISOVICH

FPL GO ASK ALICE

347

MODERN WRITERS'

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES

6. He reads of-characters establishingvalue systems for themselves.

O

7. He reads of man's emotional needsas a theme.

8. He examines codes by which men liveand die as a theme.

9. He reads of man's exploitation ofhis fellow man as a theme.

C. The student expandsand issues examinedone work of fictionsupplementary booksing.

his reading of authorsin class by selectingfrom the availablefor reading and review-

IN QUESTION

NOTE:

FPL

SL 872-806SL 872-807SL 872-800SL 872-801

"Say It with"Chee's Daugh"What Money C

While not a wA CHOICE OFas an examplevalues._

. THE WEAPONS 0

HUMAN VALUESHUMAN VALUESMAN AND HIS VMAN AND HIS V

BLESS THE BEASTS AND THE CHI

LIFE STYLES "The Secret L"Flowers for

"The Blood of"Enemy Territ

WHEN THE LEGENDS DIE

LIFE STYLES \'"The Scapegoa

FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON

05490

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ds of characters establishingsystems for themselves.

P41

ds of man's emotional needsheme.

mines codes by which men livee as a theme.

ds of man's exploitation ofllow man as a theme.

t expands his reading of authorsexamined in class by selecting

f fiction from the availableary books for reading and review-

348 223

IN QUESTION

NOTE:

FPL

SL 872-806SL 872-807SL 872-800SL 872-801

"Say It with Flowers," p. 200"Chee's Daughter," p, 218"What Money Can Buy," p. 54

While not a work of fiction, Gordon Parks',A CHOICE OF WEAPONS can be introduced hereas an example of the theme of personalvalues.

THE WEAPONS OF GORDON PARKS

HUMAN VALUES IHUMAN VALUES IIMAN AND HIS VALUES IMAN AND, HIS VALUES II

BLESS THE BEASTS AND THE CHILDREN

LIFE STYLES "The Secret Life Of Walter Mitty," p. 144"Flowers for Algernon," p. 152

"The Blood of Martyrs," p. 220rrEnemy Territory," p. 195

WHEN THE LEGENDS DIE

LIFE STYLES "The Scapegoat," p. 249

FLOWERS FOR ALGERNON

349

M3DERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AN

II. NON FICTION

A. The student considers current issuesand problets as reflectedlran contempo-rary writings.

1. He recognizes alienation as a majorpersonal and social problem and asa major theme in 20th century writ-ing.

2. He reads non-fictional materialstreating socio-economic issues.

F 164-107 HANGMAN

SL 871-800SL 871-801

NO MAN IS ANNO MAN IS AN

NATIVE VOICES "An Editorial"Brownsville"Children," p"Joey: A 'Mec"There Is No

IN QUESTION "Barrio Boy,""No Handouts"The Dream of"In T"Time," p. 17"Uprooted Chi"Money," p. 4

NATIVE VOICES "Not Poor, Ju"Brownsville"Soul Food,""Notes of a N"The White Ra"The Explanat

"Leter from B"Counters in"Buffalo Gras

THE WAY IT'S SPOZED TO BE

F 272-137 THEDEHUMANIZ

05490

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

considers current issuesas reflected in contempo-.

:nizes alienation as a major1 and social problem and astheme in 20th century writ-

a non - fictional materialssocio-economic issues.

35 0

F 164-107

SL 871-800SL 871-801

NATIVE VOICES

IN QUESTION

HANGMAN

NO MAN IS AN ISLAND INO MAN IS AN ISLAND II

"An Editorial Lost in a News Item," p. 179"Brownsville Kitchen," p. 21"Children," p. 181"Joey: A 'Mechanical Boy,"' p. 190"There Is No News from Auschwitz," p. 200'

"Barrio Boy," p. 7

"No Handouts from Anybody," p. 67"The Dream of the Poor," p. 70"In T is Sign," p. 161"Time," p. 174"Uprooted Children," p. 193"Money,"p. 46

NATIVE VOICES "Not Poor, Just Broke," p. 1"Brownsville Kitchen," p. 21"Soul Food," p. 127"Notes of a Native Son," p. 130"The White Race and Its Heroes," p. 141"The Explanation of the Black Psyche," p.151"Leter from Birmingham Jail," p. 160"Counters in the Game," p. 215,"Buffalo Grass," p. 219,

THE WAY IT'S SPOZED TO BE

F 272-137 THE DEHUMANIZING CITY

351

MODERN, WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AN1

3. He reads about technology and work.

4. He reads non-fictional treatment ofthe problems of environment.

5. He reads contemporary non-fictionthat explores male and female rolesand how they are changing.

^1.

6. He reads articles concerning psychicexpansion.

r-

0,-r.;;,,

225

IN QUESTION "Report from"A Day in the

"The Artifici"Letter to So

NATIVE VOICES "The Mud Daub"The Death of"Needless Hav"The Haunted"The Case Aga

THE BIG SEA

IN QUESTION

SLFPL

WOMAN, WOMAN:

NATIVE VOICES

"And What Am"Teenagers TaDialogue fr

"The Single F"The Men in"from 'A Midd

MAN AND WOMANTHE EMERGING

FEMINISM IN

"Dbvil Dancer"Man and theDestinies,

HOW TO DEVELOP YOUR ESP

r0

05490

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

about technology and work.

non-fictional treatment ofems of environment.

contemporary non-fictionores male and female roleshey are changing.

articles concerning psychic

3 l2225

IN QUESTION "Report from Engine Co. 82," p. 2"A Day in the Life of Diane Adler,R.M." p.18

"The Artificial Universe," p. 88"Letter to Society," p. 147

NATIVE VOICES "The Mud Dauber',I'cp. 31"The Death of a Tree," p. 35"Needless Havoc," p. 40"The Haunted Dump," p. 51"The Case Against Man," p. 60

THE BIG SEA

IN QUESTION

SLFPL

"And What Am I Going To Do Next Year?", p.62"Teenagers Talk about Themselves, A

Dialogue from THE NEW FEMINISM," p. 104"The Single Father," p. 113"The Men in the Orchestra," p. 141"from 'A Middle American Marriage,'" p. 177

MAN AND WOMAN: MYTHS AND STEREOTYPES I AND IITHE EMERGING WOMAN

WOMAN, WOMAN: FEMINISM IN AMERICA

NATIVE VOICES "Devil Dancers of Ceylon," p. 83"Man and the Porpoise: Two Solitary

Destinies," p. 207

HOW TO DEVELOP YOUR ESP

35:3

MODERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

7. He examines the importance ofcommunication in interpersonalrelationships as presented innon-fictional writings.

8. The student reads contemporary materialon identity, a major modern theme.

0

9. He enjoys works of humor.

B. He identifies the aughor's attitudetoward his subject.

1. He recognizes pride and anger.

2. He identifies anger and fear.

3 5 4

IN PERSON "Self Survey,"Showdown wit"from BODY"How Do You"The Ef1ecta"Family Party

NATIVE VOICES "Kola, the Be

BODY LANGUAGE

IN PERSON "A Good Ream)"Self Survey,"To Become a

NATIVE VOICES "Mown Pelta"Memories of"Brownsville

F 171-123 CONFORMITY

WHY AM I AFRAID TO TELL YOU

NATIVE VOICES "An Affix for"Graffiti Liv"The One and"A Ride Throu

NATIVE VOICES "Not Poor, J

"Notes of a

05490

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

amines the importance ofnication in interpersonalionships as presented inictional writings.

tudent reads contemporary materialentity, a major modern theme.

oys works of humor.

fies the aughor's attitudes subject.

cognizes pride and anger.

entifies anger and fear.

3M4

IN PERSON

NATIVE VOICES

BODY LANGUAGE

IN PERSON,

NATIVE VOICES

F 171 -123

"Self Survey," p. 33"Showdown with Callie," p. 34"from BODY LANGUAGE" p. 40"How Do You Rate as a Friend," p. 56"The Effects of Love," p. 68"Family Party," p. 118

"Kola, the Bear," p. 226

"A Good Reason for Being," p. 7"Self Survey," p. 11."To Become a Person," p. 14

"Mouse Pelts," p. 10"Memories of Andther Fair," p. 17"Brownsville Kitchen," p. 21

CONFORMITY

WHY AM I AFRAID TO TELL YOU 'WHO I AMT*-

NATIVE VOICES "An Affix for Birds," p. 103"Graffiti Lives," p. 108"The One and Only W. C. Fields,." p. 115"A Ride Through Spain," p. 76

NATIVE VOICES "Not Poor, Juat Broke," p. 1

"Notes of a Native Son," p. 130

3 5 ri

MODERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

3. He recognized alarm.

4. He notes loving pride.

C. He characterizes the author's affectedstance toward his reader, using theauthor's wording as a clue.

1. He recognizes "the teacher."

2. He notes "the prophet."

3. He recognized "the critic."

4. He identifies "the moralist."

D. He identifies methods of developmentused in writing: narration, descrip-tion, exposition, argumentation.

E. The student explores the fears, hopes,and expectations expressed by a

writer in the essay form.

F. The student studies characteristics ofstyle present in the essay.

1. The student names the sources andmethods the author used to gatherinformation. The student explainswhy he accepts or rejects thisinformation as accurate and valid.

"Needless Hav

"Kola, the Be

"The Mud Daub

"An Editorial

"Graffiti Liv

"Letter from

NATIVE VOICES, TEACHER'S GUI

05490

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ognizes alarm.

es loving pride.'

erizes the author's affectedand his reader, using theording as a clue.

ognizes "the teacher."

es "the prophet."

ognizes "the critic."

ntifies "the moralist."

ies methods of developmentiting: narration, descrip-sition, argumentation.

t explores the fears, hopes,ations expreised by athe essay form.

t studies charaoteristics ofent in the essay.

udent names the sources ands the author uses to gathertion. The student explainsaccepts or rejects thistion as accurate and valid.

30

227

"Needless Havoc," p. 40

"Kola, the Bear," p. 226

"The Mud Dauber," p. 31

"An Editorial Lost in a News Item," p. 179

"Graffiti Lives," p. 108

"Letter from Birmingham Jail," p. 160

NATIVE VOICES, TEACHER'S GUIDE, pp. 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

3 i7

a-

of'

MODERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

2. The student identifies the influencesa writer's cultural, national, geo-graphical, and personal background haveon= lis works.

3. The student explains the effect thatbiographical information about theauthor has on his opinion of theauthor's work.

4. The student identifies another pieceof an author's writing by recogniz-ing its similarities to that which hehas studied.

5. The student points out phrases andwords that affect the tone thewriter employs.

6. The student identifies a belief thatunderlies a point of view in anauthor's essay, such as: "All lifeis intrically tied together."

7. He realizes that great ideas andtheir expression begin with themost common of us.

8. The student writes a paper explain-ing why he. does or does not agreewith or accept an author's beliefthat underlies an essay.

ri 8

NATIVE VOICES "The Case Agai

"Graffiti Live.

-4 ,

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

05490

t identifies the influencescultural, national, geo-

, and personal background haveks.

t explains the effect thatal information about theon his opinion of the

ork.

t identifies another pieceor's writing by recogniz- .

ilarities to that which hed.

t points out phrases andaffect the tone theloys.

t identifies a belief thata point of view in anssay, such as: "All lifelly tied together."

hat great ideas andession begin with the

of us.

t writes a paper explain-does or does not agreecept an author's belieflies an essay.

3 ri

NATIVE VOICES ,"The Case Against Man," p. 60

"Graffiti Lives," p. 108

MODERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

9. The student writes a paper explain-ing in what ways a particular selec-tion changed his view on the subject.

G. The student expands his reading of 'authorsand issues examined in class by selectingone non-fictional book from the supple-mentary texts for reading and reviewing.

III. POETRY

A. The student examines poetic form.

B. He examines themes in modern poetry.

MALCOLM X SPEAKS

FS 771-722 BLACK FORAMS,

FS AMERICA: POET

1. He understands the pride in theiridentity which individuals learn to

IN PERSON "Young Soul,"

feel and recognizes "identity" as atheme in poetry.

IN QUESTION "The Young Gi"The Struggle

2. He deals with interpersonal relation-ships and learning to know others asthemes in contemporary poetry.

IN PERSON "The Real Math"It's Raining"Friend," p."Stronger Lest)"The Passing,"I Thought of

IN QUESTION "A Woman's Co"For Every Ta"About Americ"Customs and

3. He identifies a search for selfas a theme.

IN QUESTION "Robert Whitm"Karma Repair"Lying in a

Pin

300 229

Farm in

05490

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

t writes a paper explain-t ways a particular selec-ed his view on the subject.

,pands his reading of authorsmined in class by selecting .

nal book from the supple -for reading and reviewing.

amines poetic form.

emes in modern poetry.

ands the pride in theirhich individuals learn toecognizes "identity" as aoetry.

th interpersonal relation-learning to know others ascontemporary poetry.

ies a search for self

360 229

MALCOLM X SPEAKS

FS 771-722

FS

IN PERSON

IN QUESTION

IN PERSON

IN QUESTION

IN QUESTION

BLACK POEMS, BLACK IMAGES

AMERICA: POETRY OF A NATION

"Young Soul," p. 6

"The Young Girl's Song," p. 92"The Struggle Staggers Us," p. 146

"The Real Math," p. 17"It's Raining Love," p. 38"Friend," p. 44"Stronger Lessons," p. 46"The Passing," p. 48"I Thought of You Today," p. 67

"A Woman's Complaint," p. 128"For EVery Tatter," p. 168"About American Indians," p. 170"Customs and Culture," p. 230

"Robert Whitmore," p. 59"Karma Repair Kit: Items) 1-4," p. 209"Lying in a Hammock at William,,Duffy'sFarm in Pine Island, Minnesota," p. 231

301

MODERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES

4. He analyzes dealing with life's'joys,sorrows, and fears as themes in poetry.

IN PERSON "Oye Mundo /S.

"One Morning,"This 18 Just"First Song,""Celebration,,

"I Shall Go aStones and

"The Legenda"The Whipping"Hunger," p."If There Be"Song," p.-16"Urban Dream,"Life for MyGood," p. 1

"The Man Who"Checklist of

5. He reads poems in which wisheshopes and dreams are theme ideas.

IN PERSON "Drealms," p."I Got a Tail"who knows if"Faces," p. 2

IV. Drama-the student reads exerpts from con- SL 873-807 COPING WITH Ltemporary plays. SL 873-808 COPING WITH L

IN PERSON

IN QUESTION

"Scene froth 4,

"From Act I,

"Scene from S"From MERMAID"What Time Is

r 9 I)

05490

,CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

yzes dealing with life's joys,, and fears as themes in poetry.

s poems in which wishes,nd dreams are theme ideas.

reads exerpts from con-

3 r 9)

IN PERSON

IN PERSON"

SL 873 -807

SL 873-808

"Oye Mundo/Sometimes," p. 108"One Morning," p. 113"This Is Just To Say," p. 117"First Song," p. 122"Celebration," p. 135"I Shall Go and Touch My Fingers toStones and a Tree," p. 134

"The Legendary Storm," p."The Whipping," p. 155"Hunger," p. 165"If There Be Sorrow," p."Song," p. 168"Urban Dream," p. 183"Life for My Child Is Simple and IsGood," p. 185

"The Man Who Attracts Bullets," p. 187"Checklist of Fears," p. 188

"Dreams," p. 197"I Got a Tailor-Made Coat," p. 206"who knows if the moon's," p. 221"Faces," p. 222

COPING WITH LIFE ICOPING WITH LIFE II

IN PERSON "Scene from 417," p. 199"From Act I, A TOUCH OF POET," p. 100

IN QUESTION

("Scene from STREAK 0' LEAN," p. 47"From MERMAID AVENUE IS THE WORLD," p. 131"What Time Is It?," p. 191

t G 3

MODERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

V. Writing and Speaking-The student writesand/or delivers orally critical evalu-ations of selected readings from non-fiction.

. 's

a

3134

ACTIVITIES: The following aractivities recommended An the

IN PERSONessay, p. 16

° column, p.-19written conversation, p. 36dramatic"situation, p. 37short story, p. 55dialogue, p. 61 .

231

IN QUESTIONletter, p. 34dialogue, p. 74creative writing, p. 101letters, p. 139short story, p. 159

NOTE: The writing acbooks, IN QUESinclude suggeaother oral act

NATIVE VOICES, TEACHER'S GUID

WRITING ABOUT ONESELF,

A particularjoy, etc.

Support or refis skin deep,

05490

g-The student writesfly critical evalu-readings from non-

3(34

231

ACTIVITIES AND TATERIALS

ACTIVITIES -: The following are suggested writtenactivities recommended in the course's basic texts:

IN PERSONessay, p. 16column, p. 19written conversation,dramatic situation, pshort story, p. 55dialogue, p. 61

greeting card, p. 105creative writing, p. 121

p. 36 creative writing, p. 135 .37 dialogue, p. 161

creative writing, p. 169short stories, pp. 179,189,223

IN QUESTIONletter, p. 34dialogue, p. 74creative writing, p. 101letters, * 139Short story, p. 159

NOTE:

diary, p. 171short story, p. 185story/play, p. 197play; 238

The writing activities in the above twobooks, IN QUESTION and IN PERSON, alsoinclude suggestions for discussion andother oral activities.

NATIVE VOICES, TEACHER'S GUIDE

WRITING ABOUT ONESELF, pp. 6-8

A particular incident that caused sorrow,joy, etc.

Support or refute Maxims such as "Beautyis skin deep"

MDDERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

G

Focus on topinew neighbol

Self-analysisshy, frank,

Philosophy-of

WRITING ABOUT OTHER P

Revealing a pthrough herand actions

WRITING ABOUT ONE'S

Ethnic feasts

Ethnic cultur

Favorite famdead relat

WRITING ABOUT HUMAN

An incident'about a (f

An incident 11was found

An incidentabout your

31>

p05490

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

0)))

Focus on topic such as "moving to anew neighborhood"

Self-analysis of one's character traits:shy, frank, etc.

Philosophy-of-life essay

WRITING ABOUT OTHER PEOPLE, pp. 8-9

Revealing a person's dominant impressionthrough her/his appearance, speech,and actions

WRITING ABOUT ONE'S BACKGROUND, pp. 9-10

Ethnic feasts and religious services

Ethnic cultural language differences

Favorite family story about a living ordead relative

WRITING ABOUT HUMAN RELATIONSHIPS, pp. 10-11

An incident that changed your feelingsabout a (friend)

An incident in which a "lost" personwas found through the effort of others.

An incident that made you feel differently

about yourself with others

8 7

gf-

MODERN WRITERS

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

368233

WRITING ABOUT OUR EC

Essay that creports ofwent

A study of wor Communi

The future o

WRITING ABOUT PREJUD

Reaction to

A personal a

A critique o

An Essay arg

your point

WRITING THROUGH CA

Using detailaids such Idevelop im

I

mymy

SPEAKING EXERCISES,

Panels

Individual t

Response to

Class discus

05490

rCONTENT

233

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

WRITING ABOUT OUR ECOLOGICARISIS, pp. f2-13

Essay that covers newspaper and magazinereports of mistreatment of our environ-

ment

A study of waste disposal -- home, scho,1or community

The future on this planet

WRITING ABOUT PREJUDICE, pp. 13-14

Reaction to essay read

A petsonal anecdote

A critique of society

An Essay arguing or persuading others to

your point

WRITING THROUGH CAREFUL OBSERVATION, pp. 14-15

Using details, careful diction, rhetoricalaids such as simile and metaphor,develop impressions on topics such as:

my favorite lakemy backyard at home

SPEAKING EXERCISES, SUGGESTIONS:

Panels

Individual talks

Response to outside speaker

Class discussion

3 f) 9

CONIC SPIRIT

05540

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Comic Spirit explores the nature of humor, emphasizing satire and irony, which range from the light-

hearted to the serious.

Study leading humorists and some well-known comedians, caricaturists, and

cartoonists.

Create comic material of your own relating to the reading you enjoy.

Comic Spirit is

for you who are interested in what is humorous and why.

GOALS

The stu

nonficti

"it reads humorous writing

drains, and poetry.

He examines supplementary material

CAZ

material he studies, and attempts

by well-known authors, mostly American, in the fields of fiction,

,such as graphics, and radio and TV programs, writes about the

evaluative'and creative writing.

235

COMIC SPIRIT

05540

-Materials

Title

a

CUTLASS AND RAPIER.

Scholastic Book Services, Inc.

SATIRE: STUDENT LOG.

Scholastic Book Services, Inc.

Use

Student's

-4;l$tudents

SATIRE: TEACHING GUIDE.

Scholastic Book Services, Inc.

Teacher

THE SATIRIC VOICE.

Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Inc.

Students

THE SATIRIC VOICE, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

Holt, Rinehart & Winston, Inc.

Teacher

THE COMIC SVI4T.

McDougal, Littell & Company.

Students

Students

THE MOUSE THAT ROARED.

Bantam Books, Inc.

IT ALL STARTED WITH COLUMBUS.

McGraw Hill Book Company.

4

MAD SAMPLER, 1973.

Warner Paperback Libfary.

Students

Students

Scholastic Book Services, Inc.

Class Set

JOKES AND CARTOONS:KIT 46699 (28 titles).

.BASEBALL-LAUGHS

CAPTAIN ECOLOGY, POLLUTION FIGHTER

CARTOONS -0F - THE -MONTH

CHANNEL CHUCKLES

CHICKEN-FRIED FUDGE AND OTHER CARTOON DELIGHTS

CLASSROOM CHUCK

S

THE DICTIONARY OF BLOOPERS AND BONERS

EMMY LOU

FOR LAUGHING OUT LOUD

GRIN. AND BEAR IT

236

COMIC SPIRIT

05$

I

Materials

Title

Use

JOKES AND CARTOON'KIT, continued,

Scholastic Book Services, Inc.

Students.

HAIR TODAY- -AND CONE TOMORROW

JEST IN PUN

JOKES AND MORE JOKES

LAUGH YOUR HEAD OFF

LAUGHS UNLIMITED

MARMADUKE

6

MARMADUKE RIDES AGAIN

MORE CLASSROOM CHUCKLES

,

MORE MARMADUKE

101 ELEPHANT JOKES

PUN-ABRIDGED DICTIONARY

REBEL RIDES AGAIN

11)

SCHOOL IS...BY THE PEOPLE IN ROOM 222

SILLY SIGNS

TRUE CLASSROOM FLUBS AND FLUFFS

YOUR OWN JOKE BOOK

IDUV'E GOTTA BE JOKING

237

.4

COMIC SPIRIT

1

6554Q

NOTES ON TEXTS USED IN COMIC SPIRIT

The teacher might begin the course with SATIRE-STUDENT LbG.

At the same time CUTLASS AND RAPIER should be

used, although it is primarily designed as a more involved development of the STUDENT

LOG.

A very explicit

teacher's manual, TEACHING GUIDE FOR SATIRE, is provided to

cover both books.

CUTLASS AND RAPIER is an inclusive and challenging collection of various

types of satire.

THE SATIRIC VOICE contains additional material on satire.

The teacher's guide accompanying this book provides

answers ta questions posed in the text plus suggestions for compositions.

THE MOUSE THAT ROARED is a short novel of a satiric nature.

Supplementary material on this novel is included

in the TEACHING GUIDE FOR SATIRE.

THE COMIC SPIRIT contains writings that display a variety of types of humor,

ranging from "Tomfoolery" to "Dark

Comedy" and concluding with "Essays on the Comic Spirit."

IT ALL STARTED WITH COLUMBUS, spoofs incidents from American History.

THE MAD SAMPLER is a composite of selections from a magazine familiar to students.

JOKES AND CARTOONS KIT includes twenty-eight small books intended primarily for recreational

reading.

1

238

COMIC SPIRIT

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES

I. Reading and Study

A. .The student reads humorous writings by

well-known authors.

B. He becomes aware that an optimistic andhumorous attitude toward life sometimesmakes privation and suffering bearableand examines the idea thatlumOr carriesthe thread of truth as man okes fUn at

human foibles and laughs at)himself.

- C. He differentiates between farcical andfantastic elements as they appear in,,literature. He becomes well acquaintedwith the concepts of sarcasm, satire,irony, exaggeration, nonsense, under::statement, allegory, absurdity, insult,pun, mockery, and dark comedy.

374239

Farce: THE MOUSE THAT

Fantasy: "The Secret LTHE COMIC SPI

Sarcasm:

Satire:

Irony:

"War Is Kind,""Status Symbol"The Devil's

p. 166

"The Latest Dp. 82

"Thomas Gradg"Miss Kinderg

RAPIER, p.

"War Is Kind,"APO 96225,""I Can't ThinCUTLASS &

Exaggeration: "The Ransom oSPIRIT, p.

05540

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

y

reads humorous writings byauthors.

aware that an optimistic andtitude toward life sometimestion and suffering bearables the idea that humor carriesof truth as man pokes fun ates and laughs at himself.

tiates between farcical andlaments as they appear in

He becomes well acquaintedncepts of sarcasm, satire,geration, nonsense; under-allegory, absurdity, insult,y, and dark comedy.

3 7 4239

Farce:

Fantasy:

Sarcasm:

Satire:

Irony:

THE MOUSE THAT ROARED

"The Secret Life of Walter Mitty," p. 105THE COMIC SPIRIT

"War Is Kind," CUTLASS & RAPIER, p. 107"Status Symbol" CUTLASS & RAPIER, p. 61"The Devil's Dictionary," THE COMIC SPIRIT,

p. 166

"The Latest Decalogue," CUTLASS & RAPIER,

p. 82"Thomas Gradgrind," CUTLASS & RAPIER, p. 66

"Miss Kindergarten America," CUTLASS &RAPIER, p. 84

"War Is Kind," CUTLASS & RAPIER, p. 107"APO 96225," CUTLASS & RAPIER, p. 121"I Can't Think What He Sees in Her,"

CUTLASS & RAPIER, p. 128

Exaggeration: "The Ransom of Red Chief," THE COMICSPIRIT, p. 93

8 75

COMIC SPIRIT

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

Q,

,e1

D. He examines cartoons, caricatures,films, and radio presentations tosupplement his readings in liter-ature.

E. He is encouraged to watch and evaluateTV programs on the basis of conceptsabout comedy which he has gained fromthe course.

Nonsense: "Jabberwocky,"

Allegory: "The Dog and tp. 34 THE

Suggested forFARM (Book isbut it may be

Absuridity: Limericks, THE

Insult:

Pun:

Mockery:

Dark Comedy:

Russell Baker,

IT ALL STARTED

Film 371-130:

Dorothy ParkerBarthelme, T

F 160-109 MUNROF 272-137 THE DEHUMANIZIF 373-100 THE CROCODILEF,71-130 BILL COSBY ONF',271-133 THE CATERPILLAF FLOWER POPSFPL THE GOLDEN AGE

3713 877

05540

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

cartoons, caricatures,radio presentations tohis readings in liter-

raged to watch and evaluateon the basis of conceptsy which he has gained from

3 7to

Nonsense: "Jabberwocky," THE COMIC SPIRIT, p. 27

Allegory: "The Dog and the Wolf," CUTLASS & RAPIER,p. 34 THE MOUSE THAT ROARED

Suggested for further reading: ANIMALFARM (Book is not supplied. for this course,but it may be used.)

Absuridity: Limericks, THE COMIC SPIRIT, p. 10

Insult: Russell Baker, THE COMIC SPIRIT, p. 204

Pun: IT ALL STARTED WITH COLUMBUS

Mockery: Film 371-130: BILL COSBY ON PREJUDICE

Dark Comedy: Dorothy Parker, Oscar Wilde, DonaldBarthelme, THE COMIC SPIRIT, pp. 164-169

F 160-109 MUNROF 272-137 THE DEHUMANIZING CITY AND HYMIE SCHULZF 373-100 THE CROCODILEF 371-130 BILL COSBY ON .PREJUDICEF 271-133 THE CATERPILLARF FLOWER POPSFPL THE GOLDEN AGE OF COMEDY

3 77

.COMIC SPIRIT ,

`,GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

II. Writing and Speaking

a

A. He writes about the materials, he reads andattempts creative writing based on theseforms of humor.

B. He participates in discussion and makes"oral presentationS.

III. He develops his appreCiation of literature asa pleasurable part of life.

3 7 8

Cassettes: available from Libschool's librarian

AC 1844.

AC 1767AC 1851AC 5854AC 12256

AC 1815

THE GAG WRITERFOCUS ON FREDKEEPING THEMTHE NATURE OFTHE NATURE OFREMINISCENCES

Spotlight)AC 5150 THE STING OF B

Voices)AC 429 THE WIT OF FRE

Radio Comedy

CHARLIE MCCARTTHE GREAT GILDTHE BURNS ANDTHE JACK BENNYREq,SKELTONAMOS, 'N ANDY/L

MIRACLE ON 34t

Suggestions for writing assigSTUDENT LOG, and THE SATIRIC

241 ;3 79

NTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

Ong

Cassettes: available from Library Services Center (Askschool's librarian)

AC 1844AC 1767AC 1851AC 5854

AC 12256

AC 1815

ut the materials he reads andilve writing based on these

es in discussion and makestions,

ppreciation of literature ast of life.

241.

378

AC 5150

AC 429

Radio Comedy

THE GAG WRITER (Studies in Humor)FOCUS ON FRED ALLEN (American Humorists)KEEPING THEM LAUGHING (American Humorists)THE NATURE OF COMEDY (American Humorists)THE NATURE OF SATIRE (Studies In Humor)REMINISCENCES OF VAUDEVILLE (Show BusinessSpotlight)

THE STING OF BLACK HUMOR (Modern LiteraryVoices)

THE WIT OF FRED ALLEN

CHARLIE MpCARTHY SHOW/FIBBER MCGEE & MOLLYTHE GREATNGILDERSLEEVE/OUR MISS BROOKSTHE BURNS AND ALLEN SHOW/MY FRIEND IRMATHE JACK BENNY PROGRAM/LIFE OF RILEYRED SKELTONAMOS 'N ANDY/LUM AND ABNERMIRACLE ON 34th 'STREET (Christmas Program)

Sugkestiorts for writing assignments are made in SATIRE-STUDENT LOG, and THESATIRIC VOICE.

ti

379 -Ta

COMIC SPIRIT

05540

SPECIAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CLASS STUDY

THE COMIC SPIRIT:

f

'The Secret Life of Walter

Mittyf,:

p. 105

"The Ransom of Red Chief," p. 93

Russell Baker on Insult, p. 204

Dorothy Parker, p. 164; Oscar Wilde, p. 165; Donald Barthelme, p. 169

CUTLASS & RAPIER:

"Griffy; the Cooper," p. 8

"The Pig," p. 9

"The Still Alarm," p. 27

'/he Idiot," p. 26

"The Grown-up Problem," p. 22

Hypocrisy as the butt of humor:

Injustice as the butt of humor:

Audacity:

Tongue-in-cheek:

Irony:

Ignorance in our leaders:

"The Latest Decalogue," p. 82

"Thomas Gradgrind," p. 66

"Miss Kindergarten America," p. 84

"Peanuts Cartoon, p. 11

"Forenoon of an Honest Financial Racketeer m p. 91

"Ballad of the Landlord," p. 99

INV

"The Selling of Tono-Bungay," p.s86

(Humor lies in the audacity of the lies told to the public

and in the outrage prepetrated.)

"The Selling of Tono-Bungay," p. 86

"War is Kind," p. 107

"APO 96225," p. 121

"I Can't Think What He Sees in Her," p. 128

"The Leader," p. 56

COMIC SPIRIT

05540

SPECIAL RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CLASS STUDY: CONT'D.

CUTLASS & RAPIER:-

Man's foolish fascination with TV:

Organized society as the butt of humor:

Mechanization of society as the butt of humor:

Man's blindness:

Graphics which satirize:

TUE SATIRIC VOICE:

"The Dispos.

=w: n," p. 5

"An Open Letter to the

if New York,"

p. 18

"Letter from a West Texas Constituant," p. 26

The Vertical Negro Plan," p. 38

"Mars Is Ours!" p. 62

"Who's Passing for Who?" p. 65

"There Will Come Soft Rains," p. 76

"Illustration," p. 49

"Sacre do Printemps," p. 45

"All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace," p. 44

"The Owl Who Was Gad," p. 54

"The War Prayer," p. 108

62, 72, 73, 79, 80, 90, and others

Parodies:

"You Are Old. Father William," Robert Southey, p. 44

re Old, Father William," Lewis Carroll, p. 45

"The Passio

Shepard to His Love," p. 46

"Love Under the Repu

:ns," p. 48

"The American Man: What of

? ",p. 52

ob

IJ

4 COMIC SPIRIT

05540

SUGGESTIONS FOR OUTSIDE READING FOR STUDENTS

Author

Armour, Richard.

Title

IT ALL STARTED WITH HIPPOCRATES.

ITT ALL STARTED WITH MARX.

THE CLASSICS RECLASSIFIED.

Bench ley, Robert.

THE BENCHLEY ROUNDUP.

LOST AND FOUND.

Buchwald,-Art.

HAVE I EVER LIED. TO YOU?

Clemens, Samuel T.

Hyman, Mac.

Kerr, Jean.

Kipling, Rudyard.

Leacock, Stephen.

McKenney, Ruth.'

Mersand, Joseph E., ed.

Smith, H. Allen.

Publisher

McGraw-Hill Book Co:, 1966.

McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1958.

McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1960.

Harper and Row Publishers, Inc.

Dover Publications, Inc., 1970.

Crest, Fawcett, World, ).973.

THE ESTABLISHMENT IS ALIVE AND WELL IN WASHINGTON.

Crest, Fawcett, World, 1973.

A CONNECTICUT YANKEE IN KING ARTHUR'S COURT.

NO TIME FOR SERGEANTS.

PLEASE DON'T EAT.THE DAISIES.

THE SNAKE HAS ALL THE LINES.

STALKY AND COMPANY.

LAUGH WITH LEACOCK; A COL

eTION OF TIE BEST

WRITINGS OF S. LEACOCK.

Dodd, 1960.

Random House, 1954.

Crest BOoks, Fawcett WOrld

Library, 1971. (drama)

Crest Books, Fawcett World

Library, 1971. (drama)

Macmillan Publishing CO,., 1962.

Apollo Editions, Inc., L973.

MY SISTER EILEEN.

Harcourt Brace JovanoviCh, Inc.,,

1968

THREE COMEDIES OF AMERICAN FAMILY LIFE by

Washington Square Pres$

Hart, Moss & Kaufmann, George S.

THE BEST OF H. ALLEN SMITH.

Pocket Books, Inc., 197$.

DESERT ISLAND DECAMERON.

Popular Library, Inc., 1.973

COMIC SPIRIT

05540.

SUGGESTIONS FOR OUTSIDE READING FOR STUDENTS:

CONT'D.

Author

Thurber, James

White, E. B.

Title

THURI6CARNIVAL.

THURBER'S DOG

THE SECOND TREE FROM THE CORNER

White & White (Katherine), eds.

SUBTREASURY OF AMERICAN HUMOR.

Wodehouse, P. G.

JEEVES.

LAUGHING GAS.

MOST OF P. G. WODEHOUSE.

PSNMTH IN THE CITY.

PSM1TH JOURNALIST.

SOMETHING NEW

THANK YOU, JEEVES.

THE WORLD OF JEEVES, Vol. 1 and 2

245

,

Publisher

Harper. and Row PublisherS, Inc.,

1945

Simon and Schyster1.1969,

o

Harper and Row Publishers, Inc.,

1954.

Putnam's Sons, 1962:

Beagle Books, 1972.

Beagle Books, 1972.

Simon and Schuster, Inc,, 1969.

Penguin Books, Inc., 1971.

Penguin Books, Inc., 19/1.

Beagle Books, 1972

British Book Center, 1956.

Manor Books, Inc., 1973;

7

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

05550

COURSE DESCRIPTION

,.

In your study of Afro-American

literar6re

you will emphasize

the relationship of Black writers and.their works

.

.

to social and historical movements and reflect upon

the

experience.

If you enjoyed Black Writers, are

.-of advanced standing, and are seeking an intensive experience

with literature, you will find this course

interesting and challenging.

For the college capable.

4

GOALS

a

The student gains a sense of the historical tradition and aesthetic worthof literature written by Black Americans.

The' student considers the range of critical attitudes toward these

works.

9

The student compares and contrasts the wide spectrum of views presented inBlack literature.

The student reevaluates American literary history in the light of the qualityand thought of Black American

literature.

The student becomes familiar with Black literature emerging from Africa

and the Caribbean as well as from the

-.1;

'United States and develops a sense of the psychological unity developing

in peoples of African descent throughout

the world.

Cf

The-student discovers themes in Black literature common to the interests of Black people.

The student develops skills in critical reading and analysis

of various genre.

-The student gains a sense of the literary style and techniques

of major Black writers.

1

111

r-

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

05550

Materials

Code

Title

VBE

VOICES FROM THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: AFRICAN AND AFRO-AMERICAN LITEpTURE. Ginn and

VOICES FROM THE BLACK EXPERIENCE: AFRICAN AND AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE:

TEACHER'S GUIDE.

Ginn and Co.

[

Use

Co. Students

tc,

Teacher

TBN

THE BLACK NOVELIST,

Charles E. Merrill Publishing Co.

Students, Teacher

MBP

MODERN BLACK POETS: A,COLLECTION OF CRITICAL ESSAYS, Prentice-Hall,

Inc.

Students, Teacher

RAL

BLACKAMERICAN LITERATURE: 1760 TO THE PRESENT, Glencoe Press.

Students, Teacher

MANCHILD IN THE PROMISED LAND. American Book Company.

Students

MANCHILD IN THE PROMISED LAND/BROWN, TEACHER-STUDENT PACKAGE. American Book OPilipany, Teacher

z-1

GO TELL IT ON THE MOUNTAIN. American Book Company.

GO TELL IT ON THE MDUNTAIN/BALDWIN, TEACHER-STUDENT PACKAGE. Ameiican Book Cckapany.

TO BE YOUNG, GIFTED, AND BLACK. Ame ican Book Company

TO BE YOUNG, GIFTED, AND BLACK/HANSB RRY, TEACHER-STUDENT PACKAGE. American Book Co.

INVISIBLE MAN. American Book Company.

INVISIBLE,MAN/ELLISON, TEACHER-STUDENT PACKAGE. American Book ComOsny.

I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS. American Book Company.

(1)

--T----

I KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGS/ANGELOU, TEACHER-STUDENT PACKAGE,' American Book Co.

TO BE A SLAVE . American Book Company..

0 BE A SLAVE/LESTER, TEACHER-STUDENT PACKAGE. American Book Company.

Students

Teacher

Students

Teacher

Students

Teacher

Students

TeaCher

2

Students

Teacher

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

05610

Materials

Title

WHY WE CAN'T WAIT.

American Book Company.

WHY WE CAN'T WAIT KING, TEACHER - STUDENT PACKAGE.

American Book Company

GEMINI: AN EXTENDED AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL STATEMENT ON MY FIRST TWENTY-FIVE YEARS

OF BEING A BLACK POET.

Viking Press%

SOLEDAD-BROTHER: THE- PRI-SON LPTTFRS OF CFORGR JACKSON_

Rentam Books, Inc,

THE END OF WHITE WORLD SUPREMACY: FOUR SPEECHES OF MALCOLM X.

L. C. Bryant, Inc.

tek

249

i'Use

Students

Teacher

Students, Teacher

I

'

,Students, Teacher

Students, Teacher

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT

a

ACTIVITIES A

I. The student faMiliarizes himself w h t--developm ent arid contlnwityof Blew 7literature from the early slave n rrAtiveto current-w .

A. The student realizes that the literaryhistory of the Black Ameri an isinseparable from the history of theUnited States.

44

1. The student underst

7(

nds that'Blackliterature develop :d from the per-sonal experiences pf Black Americansand their readtio s to those ex-periences.

2. The student omPrehends historicevents that/affected the writings of,Black authcirs,:

1

B. The student understands' the style andform of early Black literature in theU. S.

3870

AFS

VBE

AFRO - AMERICAN

OVERVIEW--

-"Time Lines,261, 477

"Sympathy,":p"Preface to a

p. 187,

BAL "George Moses"from NARRATIDOUGLASS,"

"Dialogue EntDutiful Se

VBE "Our WretchedIgnorance,"

BAL "from WALKER'pp. 69-80

"The Meaningp. 81

388

ATURE 05550

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

iliarizes himself with thecontinuity of Blackthe early slave narrative

realizes that the literarythe Black American is --,

from the history of thees.

dent understands that Blackure developed from the per-xperiences of Black Americansit reactions to those ex-ea.

udent comprehends historicthat affected the writings of

authors.

understands the style andly Black literature;in the

3R7

AFS

BAL

VBE

BAL

VBE

BAL

AFRO - AMERICAN LITERATURE I-II: ANOVERVTW

"Time Lines," pp. 1,. 43, 105, 108,177,261, 477

"Sympathy," p. 165,"Preface to a Twenty Volume Suicide Note,"

p. 187

"George Moses Horton,""form NARRATIVE IN THEDOUGLASS," p. 45

"Dialogue Entitled theDutiful Servant," p.

pp. 101-103LIFE OF FREDRICK

Kind Master and the708

"Our Wretchedness in,Consequence ofIgnorance," p. 155

"from WALKER'S APPEAL, in Four Articles,"pp. 69-80

"The Meaning of the Fourth for the Negro,"p. 81

3R8

AFROAMERICA1s1 LITERATURE,

GO AS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

1. The student investigates the aril'literaryNtradition of the Africanslave.

\

-,

VBE "Folksong,' p

2. He reads and studies the early slavenarrative, folk tale, sermon, andspiritual.

II. The student sees the relationship andrelevance of Black literature to otherAmerican literary works.

389 251

SFS-270-104 BLACK EXPERIE

BAL "from THE INTLIFE-OF-OLAVASSA, THE

The Slave Nar

Spirituals,

FolW.Sermon,

"from CLOTELA NARRATIVESTATES ,"

F 173-120 LEGEND OF JO

VBE Spirituals,Folktales, pp

p

Folksong, "Jo

F 365-124 SLAVERY

:390

'ERATURE 05550

ND CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

student investigates the oralary -tradit toil of- the ;Afri-eart

e

,11

eads and studies the early slaveative, folk tale, sermon, anditualz

sees the relationship and -

Black literature to othererary works.

389 251

VBE "Folksong," p. 28I"Folktalc,"-p. 29

SFS 270-104

BAL

BLACK EXPERIENCE: NEGRO FOLKLORE

"from THE INTERESTING NARRATIVeOF THELIFE OF OLANDAH EQUIANO, OR GUSTAVUSVASSA, THE AFRICAN," p. 12

The Slave Narrative, pp. 45-68

Spirituals, pp, 111-115

Folk Sermon, pp. 115-135

"from CLOTEL OR THE PRESIDENT'S DAUGHTER,A NARRATIVE OF SLAVE LIFE IN THE UNITEDSTATES," p. 94

F 173-120 LEGEND OF JOHN HENRY

VBE Spirituals, pp. 26-27Folktales, pp. 31-36, pp. 43-44Folksong, "John Henry," p. 42

F 365-124 SLAVERY

30

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES

\ AThe student realizes that the developmentof Black literary tradition correspondsto the social, political, and economichistory of the United States.

1. The student becomes aware ofemergence of Black writersduring the Harlem Renaissance.

3 9

BAL

F 272-162

THE NEW NEGROfrom GOD'S It

Claude McKay,Countee Cu 'leFenton Joh o

Frank Mars alPOETRY BY AMESterling A. B

Toamer,ngston Hugh"Soul Gonefrom "Montap.,383

ArnA Bontemps

TBN "The Negro Rethe Harlem

MBP "The New Negrp. 18

SFS 769-467 THE HARLEM RE769-468 THE HARLEM RE

//X PART II

CONTENT

t realties that the developmentterary tradition correspondsial, political, and economic

_States

dent becomes aware ofce of Black writersthe Harlem Renaissance.

391

BAL

F 272-162

TBN

map

SFS 769-467769-468

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

205

THE NEW NEGRO, p.p"from GOD'S TROMMONES,"y. 200Claude McKay,Countee Cullen, p. 208Fenton Johnson, p. 212Frank Marshall Davis, p. 215POETRY BY AMERICANS: JAMES WELDON JOHNSONSterling A. Brawn, p. 218Jean Toomer, p. 235Langston Hughes, p. 255

Soul Gone Home," p. 256from "Montage of a Dream Deferred,"

p. 383Arne Bontemps, p. 387

"The Negro Renaissance: Jean Toomer andthe Harlem Writers of the 1920's," p.150

"The New Negro Poet in the Twenties,"p. 18

THE HARLEM RENAISSANCE AND BEYOND, PART ITHE HARLEM RENAISSANCE AND BEYOND,

PART II

392

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

2. The student becomes aware of theconcerns of Black writers in the'30's and '40's.

SIN

MBP

BAL

3. The student becomes aware of the breakwith literary tradition which hascharacterized the writers of the NewBlack Renaissance in the '60's and'70'8.

. The student realizes that techniques,tileiMk,,and form in Black literature

del pond to the literary and intel-lectual trends in other American

III. The student recognizes the wide spectrum ofviews presented in Black literature. Hecompares and contrasts selected points ofview.

253

"The Black Ae:Forties, rangy

"Down By theMelvin B. Till"In the Mecc4tRobert Hayde

BAL "bay of AbsenBob Kaufman,LeRoi Jones,-

MBP "Baraka as Po

BAV Julia Fields,Nikki Giovann

TBN "The DevelopMArtist," p.

BAL Phyllis Wheat'Countee CulleClaude McKay,from PINKTOES,

SFS 771-722 BLACK POEMS, B

SFSBAL 0

-AFRO-AMERICANS"from BLACK NO

394

TUBE 05550,

CONTENT

udent becomes aware of thes of Black writers /in the

and '40's.

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

dent becomes aware of the breakterary tradition which haserized the writer's of the Newehaissance in, the '60's and

xealizes that techniques,form in Black literatureto the literary and intel-nds in other American

cognizes the wide spectrum of'd in Black literature. Heoutrasts selected points of

3 9 3 253

MBP

BAL

BAL

"The Black Aesthetic in the Thirties,.Forties, and Fifties," p. 34

"Down By the Riverside," p. 263Melvin B. Tolson, p. 399 4_1A

" "In the Mecca," p. 413Robert Hayden,_ p. 389

"Day of Absence," p. 491Bob Kaufman, p.-516LeRoi Jones, p. 522

MBP "Baraka as Poet," p. 127

Julia Fields, p. 530Nikki Giovanni, p. 532

BAV

TBN

BAL

"The Development of the Black RevolutionaryArtist," p. 134

Phyllis 10eatley, pp. 9-12Countee Cullen, pp..208-212Claude McKay, pp. 205 -208from PINKTOES, by Chester Himes, P. 448

SFS 771-722 BLACK POEMS; BLACK IMAGES

SFSBAL

AFRO-AMERICANS PEAK FOR THEMSELVES"from BLACK NO MORE," p. 243

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

A. The student understands that Blackwriters have used their wcirks tofurlllet -s-aciat -and -protttical chamger.

1. He indentifies and discusses thosewriters who saw the Black man asachieving total equality and in-tegration intoAmerican Society.

2. He identifies} and discusses thosewriters who expounded views ofBlack nationalism and Black power.

3

SOLEDAD BROTHER: THE PRISON

VBE "Of Mr. Bookeand Others,

-RAt "fitrin UP PROM

"from THE SO"Letter from

WHY WE CAN'T WAITTHE END OF WHITE WORLD SUPMALCOLM X

VBE "Booker T. an"My Dungeon S"Dignity of

BAL THE NEW NEGROVBE "I Have a Dre

SFS 770-489

SFS

SAARCH FORLUTHER KING

CIVIL DISOBED

BAL "The White RaVBE "Lazarus, C

"The black Re

SFS

F 269-105

SEARCH FOR T

BLACK POWER:

II

MATURE 05550

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

t understands' that Blacke used their works toJai and political change.

entifies and discusses thoses who saw the Black man asing total equality and in-ion into American,Society.

ntifies and discusses thoses who expounded viewa ofnationalism and Black pottier.-

3 P,

SOLEDAD BROTHER: THE PRISON LETTERS OF GEORGE JACKSON

VBE "Of Mr. Booker T. Washington andand Others," p. 192

BAL "from UP PROM.SLAVAY, tr. 136"from THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK," p."Letter from BirM Jintham City ail," p. 456

WHY WE CAN'T WAITTHE END OF WHITE WORLD SUPREMACY: FOR SPEECHES OFMALCOLM X .

VBE

BALVBE

SFS 770-489

SFS

BALVBE

SFS

'F 269-105

"Booker T. and W. E. B.,",p. 200"My Dungeon Shook," p. 203"Dignity of Man," p. 220THE NEW NEGRO, p. 179"I Have a Dream," p. 217

SEARCH FOR THE BLACK IDENTITY: MARTINLUTHER KING I, II

CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE /'

"The White Race and Its Heroes," p -. 477"Lazaruq, Come Forth," p. 146"The BlaCk Revolution," p. 250

SEARCH FOR THE BLACK IDENTITY, MALCOLM X

BLACK POWER: THE. SPOKESMAN

v.- 4

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

3. He identifies and dificussis thosewriters who see the Black man'ssurvival as separate from Whitesociety and dependent upon unityof Blacks throughout the world,

4. He identifies and discusses thosewriter's who feel that the purposeof'literature is not to brigg aboutsocial or political change nor todiscuss racial issues but to pre-sent universal themes.

B. The student campares'the various view-points and attitudes of writers ofBlack literature.

1. He considers Black literature notonly as an account or commentaryon Black life within a White"society but also a protest againstthat life.

2. The-student becomes aware of thepurpose of. more recent writers- -to awaken pride in Black cultureand history.

C. The student learns to listen to, grasp,and appreciate the ideas of those withwhom he may not agree.

3 9 '7 255

BALVBE

"The Future A"The Black Ps

SFS 769-468 HARLEM RENAIS

VBE "The Ethics o"The Black Ps

VBE

SFS 769-514

"Poem (for dcp. 247

"If We Must D

BLACK IS BEA

TURE 05550

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

tifies and discussis those BALwho see the Black man's VBE1- as separate from Whiteand dependent upon unity

ks throughout the world.

tifies and discusses thosewho feel that the purposerature igOnot to bring aboutor political change nor toracial issues but to pre-

iversal themes.

"The Future As I See It," p.. 191"The Black Psyche," pp. 5-10

SFS 769-468 HARLEM RENAISSANCE AND BEYOND, PART 2

compares the various view-attitudes of writers ofature.

iders Black literature not VBE "The Ethics of Living Jim Crow," p. 171an account or commentary "The Black Psyche," pp. 5-10

k life within a Whitebut also a protest againstfe.

dent becomes aware of theof more recent writers- -

en pride in Black culturetory.

learns to listen to, grasp,ate the ideas of those withnot agree.

255

VBE

SFS 769-514

"Poem (for dcs 8th graders - 1966-67),"p. 247

"If We Must Die," p. 248

BLACK IS BEAUTIFUL

t

F

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

IV. -The student discovers themes in Blackliterature common to the interests ofBlack people.

A. He recognizes the theme of the questfor self definition and self deter-mination.

B. He examines themes of alienation fromAfrica and rejection by Western Civili-zation.

C. He reads on the theme of Africa and herheritage.

D. He examines the themes of childhood,love, marriage, life, and death.

t`i 9 1.)

vit

BAL "Vive Noir!"

VBE "We Wear the"I, Too, Sing

VBE "The Negro Sp

VBE "Nikki Rosa,""Loneliness,""Otto," "Eppi"ieme Get Was"When Sue Wea"St. Louis B1"The Wife of"Anticipation]"Law of the G"Prayer to Ma"Thank-You,"Go Down Deat

PRE 05550

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

overs themes in Blackn to the interests of

es the theme of the questfinition and self deter-

themes of alienation fromejection by Western Civili-

the theme of Africa and her

the themesQof childhood,age, life, and death.

399

BAL "Vive Noir!" p. 435

VBE "We Wear the Mask," p. 11"I, Too, Sing America," p. 201

VBE "The Negro Speaks of Rivers," p. 22

VBE "Nikki Rosa," p. 189"Loneliness," p. 104"Otto," "Eppie," "Rudolph," pp. 60, 61"Some, Get Wasted," p. 69"Wheil Sue Wears Red," p. 105"St. Louis Blues," p. 107.,-"The Wife of His Youth," p, 109"AnticipatiOn," p. 116"Law of the Grazing Fields," p. 120"Prayer to Masks," p. 202"Thank-You, Mam," p. 36"Go Down Death," p. 167

400

AiRO AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND"CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

E. He reads expressions of personal moods.

F. He reads on the realities'of "the Blackexperience" and Black people's reactionsto that experience.

He reads on the theme of liberatidn ofBlack people.

H. He selects for personal reading severalmajor works by Black authors. Heanalyzes these works, stressing themesand other major aspects of literaturethat interest'him.

V. The student gains a sense of the literarystyles and techniques of major Black writers.

A

401257

VBE

VBE

"Kitchenette"Sympathy,""Dreams," p.

"For A Lady"Incident,""Some Get Wa"Mother to"Cross,"""Haircuts n"Crowns and"The Boy Who

VBE "Remembering"Fredrick D"Lazarus Cam"Sing Me a"Warning," p.

MANCHILD IN THE PROMISED LAGO TELL IT ON THE MOUNTAINTO BE YOUNG, GIFTED, AND BLAINVISIBLE MANI KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SWHY WE CAN'TVAIT

SFS 773-723 ODYSSEY OF RI

40

05550

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ressions of personal moods.

the realities of "the Blackand Black people's reactionsrience.

the theme of liberation ofe.

for personal reading severalby Black authors. Hese works, stressing themes:jor aspects of literaturet him.

s a sense of the literaryiques of major Black writers.

401257

VBE

VBE''

VBE

"Kitchenette Building," p. 190"Sympathy;" p. 165"Dreams," p. 187

"For A Lady I know," p. 170"Incident," p. 170"Some Get Wasted," p. 69"Mother to Son," p. 59"Cross," p. 59"Haircuts and Paris," p. 207"Crowns and Garlands," p. 153"The Boy Who Painted Christ Black," p. 208

"Remembering Nat Turner," p. 143"Fredrick Douglass," p. 161,.p. 145"Lazarus Come Forth," p. 146 -"Sing Me a New Song," p. 244"Warning," p. 226

MANCHILD IN THE PROMISED LANDGO TELL IT ON THE MOUNTAINTO BE YOUNG, GIFTED, AND BLACKINVISIBLE MANI KNOW WHY THE CAGED BIRD SINGSWHY WE CAN'T WAIT

SFS 773-723 ODYSSEY OF RICHARD WRIGHT

402

'44

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACT TIES AND

A. He studies in depth several novelsby Black Americans and discusses andwrites about their employment of suchelements as setting, plot, theme, tone,mood, and style.

B. The student analyzes poems by BlackAmericans and discusses form, rhythm,language, mood, and imagery.

C. The student considers tlle range ofcritical attitudes toward Blackliterature.

1. Tie student reads critical essayson Black literature and the Blackexperience in literature.

V,*

403

BAL "fr INVISIB"fr CANE," p"fr BEETLE C"fr GO TELL"froM A DIFFE"frOm BLACK NO

ACTIVITY: These exclerpts mayin the selection c4 a completlist of supplementary books.

FPL PAUL L. DUNBAR

BAL

VBE

SFS

SFS

Paul Lawrence.PoetryOf authMari Evans, p.

Don L. Lee, p.Sonia Sanchez,DarOin Turner,

SCHOLASTIC BLAJPOETRY I AND

THE POETIC VOII, II

ACTIVITY: These essays shouldnovels and poetry read in preParts A and B

05550

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATTRI.A0,.

n depth several novelsricans and discusses andtheir employment of suchsetting, plot, theme, tone,yle.

analyzes poems by Blackd discupses form, rhythm,04, and imagery.

considers the range ofitudes toward Black

ent reads critical essaysliterature and the Black

ce in literature.

403

'BAL "from INVISIBLE MAN 1' p 321

"from CANE," p.. 236 -."'. . .

"from BEETLE CRE7,"'p. 310"from GO TELL IT N THE MOUNTAIN," p. 349"from A DIFFERENT DRUMMER," p. 438"from BLACK NO MORE," p. 244

ACTIVITY: These excerpts may provide incentive or directionin the selection of a complete novel to be read from thelist of supplementary books.

FPL

BAL

VBE

SFS

SFS

PAUL L. DUNBAR: AMERICA'S FIRST BLACK POET

Paul Lawrence Dunbar, p. 172Poetry of authors included, pp. 516-532Mari Evans, p. 433

Don L. Lee, p. 246Sonia Sanchez, p. 247Darwin Turner, p. 241

SCHOLASTIC BLACK CULTURE PROGRAM: BLACKPOETRY I AND II

THE POETIC VOICE OF THE BLACK EXPERIENCEI, II

ACTIVITY: These essays should be correlated with thenovels and poetry read in preparation of Objective V,

Parts A and B

404

AFRO-AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES,t4

TBN

MBP

"The Art of FEllison),"

"The PoliticsInvisible

"The Dark Haup. 72

"How Bigger W"The Novels o"Everybody's

"Religion inp. 57

"I Do Not Ma"A Poet's Ody"Robert Hayde

2. The student reads and analyzes andessays and articles by Black

TBN "The Literary"The Negro Wr

Americans. He concentrates ondiscussions of controlling idea,supporting details, theme, etc.

Compensatio"The Negro Wr

p. 191"Notes on a N

3. The student compares the analyzescritiques presented in these essaysto his own. Recognizing his awnbiases, he evaluates the points-of-view of the essayists.

MBP "Paul LawrencSymbol," p.

4. He contrasts many views in Blackliterature through discussionsand writing assignments.

405259

05550

fONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ent reads and analyzes andnd articles by Blacks. He concentrates onone of controlling idea,ng details, theme, etc.

ent compares the analyzess presented in these essays

Recognizing his ownhe evaluates the points-of-the essayists.

mats many views in Blackre through discussionsing assignments.

405259

TBN

MBP

TBN

MBP

"The Art of Fiction: An Interview (RalphEllison)," p. 205

"The Politics of Ellison's looker;Invisible Man as Symbolic History," p. 88

"The Dark Haunted Tower of Richard Wright,"p. 72

"How Bigger Was Born," p. 166"The Novels of James Baldwin," p. 111"Everybody's Protest Novel," p. 218

"Religion in the Poetry of Langston Hughes,"p. 57

"I -Do Not Marvel, Countee Cullen," p. 069"A Poet's Odyssey; Melvin B. Tolson," p. 84"Robert Hayden's Use of History," p. 96

"The Literary Ghetto," p. 227"The Negro Writer--Pitfalls andCompensations," p. 197

"The Negro Writer--Shadow and Substance,"p. 191

"Notes on a Native Son,"'p. 231

"Paul Lawrence Dunbar; The RejectedSymbol," p. 33

4018

AFRO1AMERICAN LITERATURE

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

V/. The student becomes familiar with Black. literature emerging from Africa and theCaribbean as well as from the United

'.States attd senses the unity developingin peoples of African descent throughoutthe world.

A. He evaluates Black authors' writings aboutthe United States, particularly theirreactions to the Black American exper-ience.

B. He compares and contrasts the life ofthe Blacic man in these cultures to thelife of the Black man in America.

C. He explores the expressions of thesewriters on the theme of unity ofBlack people everywhere.

407

VBE

F 358-102

VBE

"Africa," p."To Africa,""Sierra Leone"The Jewels o"Totem," p. 2"Piano and .D

"Homecoming,""The Renegade

"New York;" p"African in L"The Blacks,""Ndesse or BI

BLACK AND WHI

"Coffee for t"The Bench,""The Park,."

"Moshedb," p."Glory to Mos"Martyrs," p."Song for Ces"The Black R

408

TURE 05550

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

comes familiar with Blackrging from Africa and theell as from the Unitedses the unity developingAfrican descent throughout

t4es Black authors' writ gs aboutStates, particularly heirto the Black American exper-

`4.

syand,contrasts the life ofman in these cultures to the '

e Black man in America.

s the expressions of thesethe theme of unity ofle everywhere.

407

44-

VBE "Africa," p. 87"T9 Africa," p. 88"Sierra Leone," p. 90"The Jewels of the Shrine," p. 45"Totem," p. 22"Piano and Drums," p. 93"Homecoming," p. 94"The Renegade," p. 95

"NeW York," p. 97"African in Louisiana," p. 99"The Slacks," p. 12-"Ndesse or Blues," p. 23

F 358-102 BLACK AND WHITE IN SOUTH AFRICA

VBE "Coffee for the Road," p. 235"The Bench," p. 213."Tie Park," p. 226"Moshesh," p: 131"Glory to Moshesh," p. 131"Martyrs," p. 180"Song for Cesaire," p. 244"The Black Revolution," p. 250

408

AFRO-AMERICAN

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES

D. He discusses the identification ofBlack Americans with African dress,language, and education.

E. The student broadens, through hisreading,' his understanding of theuniversality of emotions and oftheir literary expression.

F. The student shows awareness of.themescommon in Black literature that re-late, to the interests of Black peopleeverywhere.

409

261

VBE "The Negro Sp"Outcast," p.

BAV pp. 409-413

VBE

VBE

"Chants pour"Season," p."Bindeh's Gif"The Judge's"The _Suitcase"Spirit of th

"Vanity," p.,"Vultures," p"Spirits Unch

.410

TENT

05550

ACTIVITIES AND.MATERIALS

the identification ofas with African dress,education.

oadens, through hisr,understanding of the

bf emotions and ofexpression.

ows awareness.of themesek literature that rertereets of Black people

409,

261

VBE

BAV

VBE

VBE

r

"The Negro Speaks of Rivers," p. 22"Outcast," p. 100pp. 409-413

"Chants pour Naett," p. 103"Season," p. 1.03

"Bindeh's Gift," p. 125"The Judge's p. 62

"The Suitcase,"4. 78"Spirit of the *Ind,"

"Vanity," p. 178"Vultures," p. 186.

"Spirits Unchaine . 249

410

AFRO!-AMERICAN LITERATURE

05550

Audio Cassettes Available through Library Services

Center

(Your school librarian will order these

upon request.)

Cassette No.

Title

AC 5314

A GWENDOLYN BROOKS TREASURY

Ato

AC 35229

CONTEMPORARY BLACK WRITERS

AC 8287

JAMES BALDWIN DISCUSSES TELL ME HOW LONG THE TRAIN'S

BEEN GONE WITH COLUMNIST ROBERT CROMIE

AC 12603

LANGSTON HUGHES: BLUES

POE1,

AC 22871

LANGSTON HUGHES: SOCIAL POET

AC 35228

LIFT EVERY VOICE

AC 35266

MAYA ANGELOU

AC 28621

THE SPIRIT OF MALIK

AC 5089

THE STREETS OF HARLEM: BLACK AUTHOR CLAUDE BROWN ANALYZES THE

URBAN GHETTO

AC 28968

WED KILLED MALCOLM X?

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Do you want help in improving the cormnunication skills you will need to get and keep a job?

If you are in

Grade 10 or above, have a fair command of the mechanics of English, and desire to improveyour writing and

speaking to meet the demands of your anticipated career, this course is for you.

Secure language effective-

ness that may help you in the world of work.

GOALS

The student broadens his/her concepts about the world of work through a variety of career-preparatory reading

activities.

The student satisfactorily completes various writing assignments related to careers.

The student listens effectively and communicates orally through

a variety of activities which will be useful

in his or her future work.

The student demonstrates adequate spelling skills.

F\3

The student grows in knowledge of words, in vocabulary, and in ability to-use words appropriately.

NOTE:

This guide is meant to help you.

It is not intended to be a schedule for you nor a synopsis of what your class

"must have covered" by the end of the course.

Since you who are teachers are closest to your students' points

of awareness and to their needs, you will use the guide a& a source of information and direction, not of mandates.

You will determine your students' needs and select activities that will-help them meet those needs.

For your

convenience, the guide lists topics, materials, and outside resources that will be helpful.

263.

CAREER ENGLISH

05610

Materials

Code

Title

Use

SC

SPEAKING OF COMMUNICATION.

Scott, Foreman and Company.

Students, Teacher

,

VE

VOCATIONAL ENGLISH, BOOK THREES.

Globe Book Company, Inc.

Students

VOCATIONAL ENGLISH, BOOK THREE, TEACHER'S GUIDE.

Globe Book Company, Inc.

Teacher

FYF

FORMS IN YOUR FUTURE.

Globe Book Company, Inc.

Students

FORMS IN YOUR FUTURE, TEACHER'S -GUIDE.

Globe Book Company, Inc.

Teachet

HELLO WORLD! A CAREERS EXPLORATION PROGRAM (Series of 9 booki). Field Publications.

Students

PUBLIC SERVICES

TRANSPORTATION

COMMUNICATI

HEALTH SERVIC

ENVIRONMENTAL ONTROL

BUSINESS SER

ES

TECHNICAL SER

FOODAND LODGING SERVICES

MARKETING

EEW

ENGLISH THE EASY WAY, Third Edition.

South-Western Publishing Co.

MANUAL, ENGLISH THE EASY WAY, Third Edition. .South-Western Publishing Co.

Students

Teacher

CCONTACT: A TEXTBOOK IN APPLIED COMMUNICATIONS, Second Edition.

Prentice-Hall, Inc.

Teacher

HWFIP

HOW TO WIN FRIENDS AND INFLUENCE PEOPLE.

McGraw-Hill Book Company.

Students

ROGET'S POCKET THESAURUS.

Pocket Books, Inc.

'Students

+61

CAREER ENGLISH

05610

-_,

Materials: Teaching Aids

Title

a

SCOPE VISUALS 13:

GETTING APPLICATIONS RIGHT.

Scholastic Book Services, Inc.

OCCUPATIONAL EXPLORATION KIT, SRA.

Science Research Associates, Inc._

Use

Students

7Students

CAREER ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

I.. The student broadens his/her concepts aboutthe world of work through a variety of career-preperatory reading activities.

A. The student learns about differing require-ments for acquiring and working in variouskinds of jobs. He explores, for a numberof jobs:

qualificationsdutiesRay

personal irritationsfuture advancement

.opportunitiespersonal gratifications side benefits

B. The student understands the terminologyused in various tests and examinations.

1. The student demonstrates his compre-hension skills by interpreting readingsabout various careers.

2. The student demonstrates his/her func-tional literacy by correctly carryingout written instructions.

C. The student synthesizes readings about

psychological principles of dealingwith people and applies some of theseprinciples through role-playing inimprovised situations.

4 1 5 266

VE "Gain Readin"Getting thepp. 23-39

SRA OCCUPATIONAL EXPLORATIF 372-117 MAKING IT IN

HELLO, WORLD! A CAREERS EXPSRA OCCUPATIONAL EXPLORATIF FINDING THEF 271-170 GETTING A PF 268-135 \ YOUR JOB: A

SFS 766-448 TESTING, TES

HELLO, WORLD! A CAREERS EXPSRA CAREER EXPLORATION KIT

C

SC

"Detecting E141

4 1 6

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

roadens his/her concepts aboutwork through a variety of career-eading activities.

nt learns about differing recitire-acquiring and working in various

jobs. He explores, for a number

at ions personal irritationsfuture advancementopportunities

gratifications side benefits

nt understands the terminologyarious tests and examinations.

tudent demonstrates his compre-on skills by interpreting readingsvarious careers.

tudent demonstrates his/her func-1 literacyby correctly carryingritten instructions.

t synthesizes readings about

icdl principles of dealingle and applies some of thesea,through role-playing ind 'situations.

41 5 266

VE "Gain Reading Skill," pp. 1-21"Getting the Most from Your Newspaper,"pp. 23-39

SRA OCCUPATIONAL EXPLORATION KITF 372-117 'MAKING IT IN THE WORLD OF WORK

HELLO, WORLD! A CAREERS EXPLORATION PROGRAM (9 Books)SRA OCCUPATIONAL EXPLORATION KITF FINDING THE RIGHT JOBF /71-170 ' GETTING A-PROMOTIONF 268-135 YOUR JOB: APPLYING FOR IT

SFS 766-448 TESTING, TESTING, TESTING (2 Parts)

HELLO, WORLD! A CAREERS EXPLORATION PROGRAM (9 Books)SRA CAREER EXPLORATION KIT

0

C "Detecting Errors in Reasoning," pp. 130 -141

SC

4 1 6

CAREER ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

1. After watching or participating inimprovisations of business situations,the student explores the motivationsof the characters portrayed.

-2. The student integrates ideas andinformation gained from his readingabout personal interaction principlesinto his various course (and/or work)activities.

a. After participating in an improvisedbusiness situation, the studentidentifies nonverbal clues (voicepitch, clothing, gestures, environ-ment, movements) that turn peopleon or off.

b. The student demonstrates responsi-bility by turning in assignmentson time.

c. The student demonstrates initiativeby obtaining charts, graphs, forms,etc., used in a particular job andby explaining to the class how theyare used.

d. The student demonstrates ability to'empathize with people,by writing hisspeculations on possible motivationsbehind certain of their statements.

4 1 7 267

VE "Don't Get P'HWFIP pp. 56-63; 6

HWFIP

SC

SC

pp. 110-117"Nonverbal M

VE "What CausesVE "GeneralizatiHWFIP pp. 1-15; 17-

"Listening,"

4 8

05610

ID CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

,watching or participating. inisations of business situations,udent explores the motivationscharacters portrayed.

udent integrates ideas andtion gained from his readingpersonal interaction principlesis various course (and/or work)ties.

ter participating in an improvisedsiness situation, the studententifies nonverbal clues (voicetch, clothing, gestures, environ-nt, movements) that turn peopleor off.

e student demonstrates responsi-lity by turning in assignmentstime.

e student demonstrates initiativeobtaining charts, graphs, form,c., used in a particular job andexplaining to the class how they

e used.

e student demonstrates ability topathize with people by writing hiseculations on possible motivationshind certain of their statements.

417 267,&

VEHWFIP

HWFIP

SC

SC

VEVEHWFIP

"Don't Get Personal," pp. 202-204pp. 56-63; 63-65

pp. 110-117"Nonverbal Messages," pp. 32-33

"What Causes It?" pp. 205-207"Generalization," pp. 195-198pp. 1-15; 17-25; 46-51"Listening," pp. 52-57

4 1 8

CAREER ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

D: The student identifies various functionsand purposes of social security, employ-ers' compensation, pension, and insuranceplans.

E. The student learns to'use various libraryresearch skills and library resources andthen uses them to gather information whichwill be useful in his/her career.

II. The student satisfactorily completes yar'iouswriting assignments related to careets.

A. The student analyzes various letter forms:business, friendly, and application.

B. The student writes business letters, orders,replies, applications, and resunle attach-ments in accepted and acceptable forms.

C. The student demonstrates skill in the basicmechanics of writing by correctly trans-cribing a dictated letter or message.

1. The student looks for spelling mistakesin his writing and corrects his errors.

4 1 9

*ft

NOTE: Call the Social Securecent information and mateprograms. Phone:(622-4671

SC "InvestigatiVE. "Using the L

"Parts of th"Classificat"The Card Ca"Reference B"Using the L

.VE "Usage," pp.EEW "Usage"F 272-169 ENGLISH ON

C "Sob Applica

vg "Business LetC. "Business Let

VE "Apostrophes,1EEW "Spelling, An

pp. 167-1681

4201

05610

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

identifies various funCtionss of social security, employ-sation, pension, and insurance

learns to use various libraryills and library resources andhem to gather information whichful in his/her career.

isfactorily completes variousents related to careers.

analyzes various letter forms:riendly, and application.

writes business letters, orders,plications, and resunle- attach-cepted and acceptable forms.

demonstrates skill in the basicf writing by correctly trans-ictated letter or message.

ent looks for spelling mistakesriting and corrects his errors.

41)

NOTE: Call the Social Security Administration forrecent information and material on social insuranceprograms. Phone: 622-4671

SC

VE

C

VE

EEWF 272-169

C

VEC

VEEEW

"Investigation Process," pp. 130-143"Using the Library;" pp. 83-103"Parts of the Book," p. 86"Classification," p. 91"The Card Catalog," p. 94"Reference Books," p. 101"Using the Library," pp. 168-179

"Usage," pp. 41-70"Usage"ENGLISH ON THE JOB: WRITING SKILLS N

"Job Application, Letters, etc.," pp.11-37

"Business Letters," pp. 105-127"Business Letters," pp. 63-89

"Apostrophes," pp. 71-79"Spelling, Antonyms, Synonyms,"pp. 167-168

420

CAREER ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES

2. The student looks for punctuationmistakes in his.writing andcorrects his etrors.

3. The student looks for grammaticalerrors in his writing and correctshis errors.

D. The student writes out the meanings ofcommonly used abbreviations. 0

E. The student successfully completesvarious business forms (job appli-cations, employee's withholding,checking account, savings account,loan insurance,.credit card, mailorder and income tax).

F. The student learns and practicedoutlining.

I. He writes a topic outline.

2. He writes a sentence outline.

G. The student writes clear and concisesentences and develops these sentencesinto unified paragraphs on any career&related topic.

421

O

269'

EEW "Punctuation,

EEW

EEW "Popular Abb

VE

FYF

"Industrialpp.' 23

p. 4, 11,.15"Savings," p"Loans," O."Credit," pp

SCOPE VISUALS 13: GETTING

C "Outlining,"

EEW "Writing Senpp. 157-16

422

05610

CONTENTfr ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

dent looks for punctuatioa in his writing ands his errors. '.

dent looks forygrammatieS1in his writing and corrects

writes out the meanings ofed abbreviations.

successfully completesinesa forms (job-appli-loyee's.withholding,

count, savings account,nce, credit card, mailncome tax).

learns and practices

es a topic outline.

tea a sentence outline.

t writes clear and conciseand develops these sentencesed paragraphs on any career-

pic.

421

269

EEW

EEW

EEW

VE

FYF p. 4, 11, 15,19, 33-41, 43

"Savings," pp. 55-59"Loans," p. 65'Credit," pp. 73-77

SCOPE VISUALS 13: GETTING APPLICATIONS RIGHT

C

"POnctuation," pp. 169-108

"Popular Abbreviations," p. 170; p. 176

"Industrial and Business Forms,"pp., 215-235

EEW

"Outlining," Chapter 14, pp. 193-211

"Writing Sentences and Paragraphs,"pp. 157-166

422

CAREER ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

H. The student writes a satisfactory sum-mary of short readings, business meet-ings, or seminars..

I. The student practices writing reportsthat might be required in aeveraldifferent job situations, completewith a listing of the sources of hisinformation.

III. The student listens effectively and commun-icates orally through a variety of activ-ities which will be useful in his or herguture work.

(S.

A. The student, practices the skills nec-essary to react appropriately to goodand bad questions and approaches ininprovised interviews.

B. The pupil gains experience in speakingand listening within a group.

1. The student demonstrates ability toexpress clearly and support logicallyhis or her ideas in a class panel orpersonal discussion.

423

- C pp: 3:8688,_C "Notetakimi,'

C "Short Report"Memo," p. 23"Formal Repor

VE "Usage,"HTWFIP pp. 25-29EEW "Usage,"F COMMUNICATIONF REPORTING AND

ACTIVITY: Student acts outa partibular job. Tape recopersonal di:itique.

F 268-135 YOUR JOB: APSC "The InterviVE "The InterviC "Employment I

"Making Inte

C

SC"Meetings," et"The Small Gro

"Attitudes Tpp. 24-25

424

05610

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS_

t writes A satisfact SUM-ort readings, business,eet-eminars:

t.practices writing reportbe required in severaljob situations, completeting of the sources of hig-n.

steno effectively and commun-through a variety of activ-ll'be useful in hip or her

t practices the skills nec-react appropriately to goodestions and approaches ininterviews.

gains expetiencejn speakinging within a group.

dent demonstrates ability toclearly and support logicallyher ideag in a class panel or1 discusdion.

423

C

C.

pp. 186-188"Notetaking," pp. 180, 186, 189, 190, 191

---C1-----'"--"Short Reports," pp. 230-248"Memci "Thp,/132

\,vFormal Reports," pp. 249-292,sN

VEHTWFIPEEWF

F

"usiage,"

pp. 25 -29

"Usage,COMMUNICATION BY VOICE AND ACTIONREPORTING AND EXPLAINING

ACTIVITY: Student acts out an,..improvlsed interview fora particular job. Tape tecord it and splay it back forperponal critique.

+1

F 268-'135

SC

VEC

C

SC

0

4

YOUR JOB: APPLYING FOR IT"The Interview," pp. 50-65"The Interview," pp.269-273"Employment Interview," pp. 38 -48"Making Interviews," pp. 154-159

"Meetings-," etc.'pp. 160-167"The Small Group Experience," pp. 67-91

"Attitudes Toward CommunicatiOn,"pp. 24-25

421

CAREER ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT 7- ACTIVITIES

2. The student demonstrates his or herability to use standard English indaily classroom verbal exchange.

3. The student shows his awareness ofthe importance of speaking to thetopic by doing so.

4.. The student shows his awareness ofthe importance of speaking conciselyby doing so.

5. The student develops listeningtechniques to aid his concentration.

a. The student shows awareness ofcertain shock words and phrasesthat stop his thinking by dis-cussing words-that make himangry.

b. The student courteously reassuresan excited speaker that he islistening closely by repeating whathe understands to be the speaker'spoint before giving his own (thestudent's) thoughts on the topic.

4 2 5

271

C pp. 2-5

C "Oral ReportiSC "The Group Le

pp. 82-85

SC pp. 84-85

SC "Effective R

42

05610

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

udent demonstrates his or hery to use standard English inclassroom verbal exchange.

udent shows his awareness ofportance of speaking to theby doing so.

udent shows his awareness ofortance of speaking con rely

ng so.

udent develops listeningques to aid his concentration.

e student shows awareness ofrtain shock words and phrasesat stop his thinking by dis-ssing words-that make himgry.

e student courteously reassuresexcited speaker that he is

stening closely by repeating whatunderstands to be the speaker's

int before giving his own (theudent's) thoughts on the topic.

1125

271

C pp. 2-5

C "Oral Reporting," pp. 212-229SC "The Group Leader and Participant,

pp. 82-85

SC pp. 84-85

SC "Effective Receiving," pp. 45-49

426

0

CAREER ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT- ACTIVITIES A

C. The student shows knowledge ofparliamentary procedure, vocabulary,and practices (chairperson, quorumssecretary, point of clarification,making a motion, seconding a motion,discussing the issue, moving thequestion, roll call vote, nomination,adjournment).

D. The 'student uses his or her voice6ffectively in various conversationalsettings and improvisational activitiesin class.

1. The student demonstrates a friendlymanner when talking with classmates.

2. The student demonstrates positive waysof handling' criticisms.

o

3. The student demonstrates positive waysof giving suggestions and criticism.

4. The student prictices correct. andappropriate ways to make introductions.

E. The student demonstrates basic salesapproaches in improvised situations.

427'11

VE "ParliamentarC "Serving on t

pp. 142-.153SC "Parliamentsr

F

F

C

SC

HWFIPSC

HWFIP

ENGLISH ON THENGLISH op

(Both filmspp. 49, 54, 6"Kinds of Int

pp. 29-35"Conflict and

pp. 37145

HWFIP pp..37-45SC "Criticism;"

ACTIVITY: Make up introductstudents.

C pp. 49-54, 61

HWFIPF 372-117 MAKING IT IN

05610

TENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

haws knowledge of.procedure, vocabulary,

(chairperson, quorum,int of clarification,on, seconding a motion,e issue, moving theI call vote, nomination,

ses his or her voicen various conversationalimprovisational activities,

nt demonstrates a friendlyen talking with classmates.

nt demonstrates positive waysng criticisms.

nt demonstrates positive wayssuggestions and criticism.

nt practices correct andto ways to make introductions.

emonstrates basic salesimprovised situations.

427

VEC

SC

F

F

CSC

HWFIPSC

HWFIP

HWFIPSC

"Parliamentary Procedure," pp. 129-147"Serving on the...Committee,"

pp. 142-153"Parliamentary Procedure," pp. 169-188

ENGLISH ON THE 'JOB: READING SKILLSENGLISH ON THE JOB: LISTENING AND SPEAKING

(Both films may be shciiwn together)pp. 49, 54, 61"Kinds of Interviews," pp. 50-65

pp. 29-35"Conflict and Communication," pp. 146-152

pp. 37-45

pp. 37-45"Criticism," pp. 118-120

ACTIVITY:, Make up introductions to be acted out by thestudents.

C

HWFIPF 372-117

pp. 49-54, 61

MAKING IT IN THE WORLD OF WORK

428

CAREER ENGLISH

GOALS AND. CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

F. The ,student demonstrates basic skillsin^handling telephone calls.

1. The student learns to modulate her orhis voice when using the telephone.

2. The.student.enunciates and speaksclearly and distinctly when using thetelephone.

3. The student projects a pleasant andielpful attitude over the phone.

,IV. The Student demonstrates adequate spellingskills.

A. The student reviews spelling rules.

1. She/he reviews specific spellingrules such as the use of ie and thedoubling of consonants following shortvowels.

2. She/he reviews the rules for formingplurals.

3. She/he reviews the rules for formingthe possessive case.

429

C P. 55, 60,.61

ACTIVITY: Plan improvised tostressing pleasant voice, to

SC

SC

EEW

EEW

EEW

EEW

EEW.EEW

pp. 111-113

pp. 111-113

"Lists of Fre.p. 22, 66, 1196, 218

"Spelling Prac"Spelling Rul

"ie or ei wor

"Plural Nouns,

"Nouns and th"Possessive P

273 43

C p. 55, 60, 61

ACTIVITY: Plan improvised telephone conversations,stressing pleasant voice, tone, inflections and dicti n.

LS

05610

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

emonstrates basic skillselephone calls.

nt learns to modulate her orwhen using the telephone.

nt_ennnciates and speaksnd'aistinctly when using the

nt projects a pleasant andttitude over the phone.

strates adequate spelling

eviews spelling rules.

Jews specific 'spellinghas the use of ie and theof consonants following short

ews the rules for forming

iews the rules for formingssive case.

429 273

SC

'SC

EEW

EEW

EEW

EEW

EEWEEW

pp. 111-113

pp. 111-113

"Lists of Frequently Misspelled Words,"p. 22, 66, 120, 133, 143, 155, 157,196, 218

"Spelling Practice," p. 217"Spelling Rules,'! Back Cover

"ie or ei words," p. 156

"Plural Nouns," pp. 31-34

"Nouns and the Possessive Form," pp. 35-39"Possessive Pronouns," p. 52

430

CAREER ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

B. The student reviews the correct spelling ofcommonly misspelled words.

V. The student grows in knowledge of words,vocabulary, and in ability to use wordsappropriately.

A. The student recalls the meanings ofwords on a list of homonyms, antonyms,and synonyms.

B. The student demonstrates knowledge ofthe meaning of used roots,suffixes, and prefixes.

C. The student demonstrates knowledge of- commonly used but difficult words.

D. The student demonstrates initiative inenlarging his vocabulary by developinga glossary of terms used in his se-lected career topic.

E. The student uses the dictionary pro-ficiently.

F. The student uses context clues to de-fine words.

G. The student tit:telt a thesaurus to find the

precise word for his purpose.

VEEWW

pp. 167-169,"Lists of Frep. 22, 66,196, 218

VE pp. 149-179

ACTIVITY: See suggested voc

VE

EWW

"Homonyms and"Synonyms," ppp. 24-40, 88

196, 200

pp:158-166

ACTIVITY: Given selected wooldictionary, note respelliniparts of speech. Have etudePractice locating several wo

ROGET'S POCKET THESAURUS

431 432

05610

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

t reviews the correct spelling ofisspelled words. -

s in knowledge of words,in ability to use words

t recalls the meanings oflist of homonyms, antonyms,

t demonstrates knowledge ofof commonly used roots,

and prefixes.

t demonstrates knowledge ofBed but difficult words.

demonstrates initiative inis vocabulary by developingof terms used in his se-er topic.

uses the dictionary pro-

uses context clues to de-

t use' a thesaurus to find the

d for his purpose.

431

VEEWW

pp. 167-169, 170-172"Lists of Frequently Misspelled Words,"

p. 22, 66, 120, 133, 143, 155, 157,196, 218

VE pp. 149-179

ACTIVITY: See suggested vocabulary list at end of guide.

VE

EWW

"Homonyms and Antonyms," p. 167, 169, 172"Synonyms," pp. 173-179pp. 24-40, 88, 120, 134, 143, 156, 168,

196, 200

VE pp. 158-166

ACTIVITY: Given selected words to locate in thedictionaiy, note respellings, diacritical markings;parts of speech. Have student identify entry words.Practice locating several words together with class.

ROGET'S POCKET THESAURUS

432

CAREER ENGLISH

05610

RESOURCE AGENCIES AND ORGANIZATIONS

For outside speakers On consumer complaints that deal with employers and business practices, contact these

agencies:

BETTER BUSINESS BUREAU OF GREATER ST. LOUIS

915 Olive Street

OFFICE OF CONSUMER AFFAIRS

3511 Lindell Boulevard

CONSUMER SPECIALIST

(FDA)

For information dealing with volunteer positions available contact these organizations:

PROJECT ROUNDHOUSE.

154 Umrath Hall, Box 1068

Washington University

VOLUNTARY ACTION CENTER

910 Olive Street

241-3100

534-1134

622-5021

863-0100, Ext.3120

241-7520

For information concerning job rules and services regulated by the government, contact these groups:

SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION

UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT FEDERAL INFORMATION CENTER

GOVERNMENT RESEARCH INSTITUTE

For information concerning the legal rights of employees, call:

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY COMMIOSION

AMERICAN CIVIL LIBERTIES UNION OF EASTERN MISSOURI

For employment information,contact:

NEIGHBORHOOD YOUTH CORPS (Student part-time jobs)

URBAN LEAGUE OF ST. LOUIS

275

210 N. 12th Street

1420 Market Street

812 Olive Street

1015 Locust Street

8011 Clayton Road

6105 Delmar Boulevard

4401 Fair Avenue

622-4671

622-4106

241-3063"

622-5571

721-1215

-727-4700

389-0040

4:3

CAREER ENGLISH

05610

VOCASULARY,WORDS RELATED TO THE WORLD OF WORK

acknowledge

bankruptcy

controversial

frivolous

'Miscellaneous

revise

adjourn

beneficiary

cordial

guarantee

mortgage

rural

administrator

bi-monthly

corporation

guidance

municipal

salary

admittance

biweekly

co-signer

hospitalization

occupational

secretary

advancement

budget

credit

incarcerate

patient

security O

affidavit

capital

debit

indicate

patron

semi-monthly

affluent

certificate

debts

inflation

percentage

semi-skilled

agency

claim

dedfictible

ingenious

personnel

simultaneously

altercation

clique

depreciation

installment

persuasive

surmount

alternative'

collateral

depression

interest

potential

synchronize

ambiguous

commend

dexterity

intimidate

prerequisite

tactful

annual

commentator

'disposition

jurisdiction

profession

technology-

anonymous

commercial

economize

legible

qualifications

truly

apathy

compensation

employee

,liability

recession

Urban

appointment

compile

enclosed

lien

register

valid

appeal

compulsory

equivocate-

management

rehabilitate

velocity

,aptitude

.compute

exempt

manual

residential

veto

assistant

concentrate

extracurricular

mechanics

resume

vocation

avocation

consumer

flammable,

merge.

retail

wholesale

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

05620

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Do you plan to attend college?

If so, College Prep English is the course for you.

It will help prepare you

for college entrance examinations and advanced course work by providing actual practice with tests given in

past years.

You will have access to information on colleges and financial' aids.

For students in Grades 11

or 12, before college entrance testing.

GOALS

The student becomes aware of the many factors involved in choosing a college.

He learns of the scholarships and grants available to persons of his eligibility.

He becomes aware of the importance of understanding'what he reads as he tAkes tests or prepares assignments.

He becomes familiar with various aspects of college entrance tests and practices with examples from tests

similar to those he will take.

He improves his listening skills.

He learns to speak correctly and effectively by taking part in a variety of speech activities.

He increases his vocabulary skills through careful and deliberate word study:

He expresses himself effectively through his Writing.

He becomes proficient in using library resources to obtain information.'

277

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

05620

Mater ials

Code

Title

WENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COM POSITION, FIFTH COURSE (WARRINER'S). Harcourt, Brace

Jovanovich, Inc.

Use

Students

ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION, FIFTH COURSE, TEACHER'S MANUAL (WARRINER'S).

Harcourt,

Teacher

Brace

Jovanovich, Inc.

BCEE

BARRON'S HOW TO PREPARE FOR COLLEGE ENTRANCE EXAMINATIONS, Seventh Edition- Barron's

Students, Teacher

Educational Series, Inc.

CB

COLLEGE BOUND: A GUIDE TO COLLEGE AND CAREER PLANNING. Barron's Educational Series,Inc.

Students, Teacher

LCG

LOVEJOY'S COLLEGE GUIDE, 12th Revision. Simon and Schuster, Inc.

Students, Teacher

LSG

LOVEJOY'S SCHOLARSHIP GUIDE, Revised Edition.

Simon and Schuster, Inc.

Students, Teacher

BPAC

BARRON'S PROFILES OF AMERICAN COLLEGES.

Barron's Educational Series, Inc.

Students, Teacher

-,

HPACT

BARRON'S HOW TO PREPARE FOR THP'AMERICAN COLLEGE TESTING PROGRKM,

Barron's Educational

Students, Teacher

Series, Inc.

HTS

HOW TO STUDY, Collier-Macmillan, Ltd.

Students,, Teacher

WRP

WRITING RESEARCH PAPERS: A-COMPLETE GUIDE. Scott, Foresman and Company.

Teacher

WIT

ENGLISH GRAMMAR AND COMPOSITION, FIFTH COURSE: TEACHING TESTS (WARRINER'S).

Teacher

Harcourt, Brace

Jovanovich, Inc..

TROGET'S POCKET THESAURUS.

Pocket Books, Inc.

Students, Teacher

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

I. The Student becomes aware 'of the many factor6invOlved,bn choosing a college.

A. The student discovers that the locationof a college influences his choice.

B. The student understands the admissionsrequirements of various colleges.

C. He considers the courses offered in'hisareas of interest.

D. The student learns to be selective in hischoice of a College. He learns what the"rating." of a college means.

4 3 7

279

SFS COLLEGE? IT

ACTIVITY: Invite a counselone of the colleges to comecolleges, admissions polici

CB

BCEE

LCGBPAC

"Two Year Coalso pp. 2

"College Setpp. 6-11

SFS WHAT TO EXPE

BCEE p. 2, pp. 56CB pp. 106-113,LCGBPAD "Admissions5-1.

HPACT "Getting hit

.LCG

BPAC "Programs of

SFS DIFFERENT WA

CB "What Is Meap. 27

LCGBPAC

43 8

SR 05620

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

comes aware of the many factorsposing a college.

t'discoVers that the locationge influences his choice.

t understands the admissionsto of various colleges.

rs the courses offered in hisntereat.

tlearns to be selective in hisa college. He learns what the

f a college means.

437

279

SFS COLLEGE? IT'S UP TO YOU!

ACTIVIT't: Invite a counselor or a representative fromone of the colleges to come in to speak to the class oncolleges, admissions policies and procedures, etc.

CB

BCEE

LCGBPAC

SFS

BCEECBLCGBPAD "Admiss one:," p. xii

HPACT "Ge g Into College," pp. 1.41

"Two Year Colleges," pp. 86-87,also pp. 22-32

"College Selection and Application,"

pp. 6-11

WHA TO EXPECT AT COLLEGE

P. L,pp.. 10

pp. 568-580-113, 145-154

LCGBPAC 'Programs of Study," p. x

SFS. D RENT WAYS TO GO'TO COLLEGE

CB t Is Meant by an 'Accredited College'?p. 21

7

LCGBPAC

9

ro

438

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

GOALS-AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

E. The student considers costs--the tuitionand other expenses of colleges.

F. The student finds out how to obtaininformation on and applications forthe colleges he would like to attend.

II. The student learns about types of. financialaid available and how to apply fbr them.

. The student becomes aware of the scholar-0-ships emigrants available to persons of

49 his eligibility.

B. He becomes familiar with various kindsof loans availableto college students.

C. The student gains,insight into work-study programs available to collegestudents.

4

0

C39

CB pp. 12 -19, 88LCG "Costs," pp.BPAC "Expenses,"

CB

- LCGBPAC

LCSGCB pp. 12-19

"Scholarship

"What does th"Applying for

LCG

LCG .

BPAC "Expenses,"CB "ScholarshipLCSG

LCSGCBLCG

"Borrowing fo

.";

SFS DIFFERENT WAYSBPAC "Earning Whil

. CB "Earning WhilLCSB

410

05620

ONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

considers costs--the tuitionpenses of colleges.

finds out how to obtainon and applicapions forhe would like to attend.

s about types of financiald how to apply for them.

becomes aware of the scholar-ants available to persons ofity.

amiliar with various kindsilable to college students.

c

sains insight into work-available to college

Lp

4 3 9

CB pp. 12-19, 88-105LCG "Costs," pp. 15-19BPAC "Expenses," pp. x-xi

CB "What does the College Catalog Reveal;" . 28"Applying for Admission," pp. 114-143

LCGBPAC

LCSGCB

LCG

LCGBPACCBLCSG

LCSG'

CBLCG

pp. 12-19

"Scholarship Apportunities," pp. 88 -89

"Expenses," pp. x-xi"Scholarship Opportunities," pp. 88-99

r--

"Borrowing fOr College Expenses," pp. 100-101

SFS DIFFERENT WAYS TO GO TO COLLEGEBPAC "Earning While Learning," p. xiCB "Earning While You Learn," pp. 102-105LCSB

410t

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH/

GOALS. AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES

III. The student becomes aware of the importance,Of understanding what he reads as he takestests or prepares assignments.

A. He reads and. interprets main ideas inpassages of various kinds and lengths.

. The student identifies the order ofevents in passages of various kindsand lengths.

2. The studdnts answers questions abouttime relationhhips in passages ofvarious kinds and lengths.

3. The student identifies events insample passages set in the future.

B. The student identifies,the details whichsupport the main idea of a selection.

C. The student draws' inferences from thefacts given in the selection,

D. The student understands the relation-ships between words in analogies inorder to make-judgments or draw con-.clue lens-w--(ffe-recognizes the many

kinds of analogies.)

441281

W "Reading CompHPACT "Reading Comp;

CBEE '"Binding thepp. 167-169;

CB "ReadingHTS

CBHTS

"Reading Skil

CBEE "Finding Specthe Passage:

CB "Reading Skil'

CBEE , "Finding ImplInferences

W "Fallacy of tCBEE "The Word Rel

pp. 160-165

442

05620

CONTENT0.

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

comes aware of the impoitanceng what he reads as he takesres assignmqnts.

nd interprets main ideas inf various kinds and lengths.

udent identifies the order ofin passages of various kinds

ngths.

udent8 answers questions aboutelationships in passages ofs kinds and lengths.

udent identifies events inpassages set in the future.

t identifies the details whiche main.idea of a selection.

t draws inferences from then in the selection.

t understands the relation-een words in analogies inke judgments or draw con-(He recognizes the many

nalogies.)

441281

HPACT-

CBEE

CBHTS

CBHTS

CBEE

CB

CBEE

CBEE

"Reading Comprehension," pp. 670-676"Reading Comprehension," pp. 115-130

"Finding the Central Thought of a Passage,"pp. 167-169

"Reading Skills," pp. 172-174

"Reading Skills," pp. 172-174

"Finding Specific Detail Mentioned inthe Passage," pp. 169-171

"Reading Skill," pp. 172-174

"Finding Implications and DrawingInferences from the Text," pp. 171-173

"Fallacy of the False Analogy," pp. 703-707"The Word Relationship Question,"pp. 160-165

44244.

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

E. The student distinguishes fact fromopinion.

IV. The student becomes familiar with variousaspects of college entrance examinations.

A. He practices answeringfrom the PSAT.

B. He practices answeringfrom the.SAT.

C, He practices answeringfrom the ACT.

sample questions

aample questions

sample questions

D. He practices for achievement tests.

V. The student improves his littening skills.

A. He listens with a purpose.

1. He listens to acquire information.

2. He listens to evaluate information.

"k 3

HTS

HTSHPACT,

BCEECB

"Reading Wit

"Taking Exam"College Ent"College Dir"College Ent

SFS 766-448 TESTING, TES

BCEE

BCEE

HPACT

BCEE

BCEEBCEE

HTS,

CB

W

"What Is the

"'Practice SA"The VerbalTest," pp.

"English Usa"Practice AC"What Is the

"Achievement"What Are Ac

"Learnitig "Th

"How Lecture"Taking Notes

"Learn How topp. 225-230

05620

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

distinguishes fact from

omes familiar with variousege entrance examinations.

s answering sample questionsAT.

s answering sample questionsT.

s answering sample questions

for achievement tests.

his-listening skills.

with a purpose.

ens to acquire information.

ens to evaluate information.

4 ;3

}ITS "Reading With a purpose." pp. 53-56

HTS "Taking Examination6," pp. 140 -159HPACT "College Entrance Exams," pp. 13-37

a. BCEE "College Directory," pp. 568-580.CB "College Entrance Examinations." pp. 155-163

SFS 766-448 TESTING, TESTING, TESTING (2 Parts)

BCEE "What. Is the PSAT/NMSOT?" p.'12

"

BCEE

HPACT.

BCEE

BCEEBCEE

"Practice SAT TESTS" ! pp. 308 -338."The Verbal Part of the Scholastic, AptitudeTest," pp. 441-450

"English Usage Part of ACT" pp. 48-146"Practice ACT Tests," pp. 441-450"What Is the'ACT?" p. 13

"AchieVement Tests; English," pp. 411-423"What Are Achievement Tests?" p. 13

"Learning Through Listening," pp. 94 -108

CB "How Lectures Are Prepared," p. 171"Taking Notes," p. 171

W "Learn How to Evaluate a Speech,"pp. 225-230

114 1

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

3. He listens to determine commonfallacies in reasoning.

4. He listens to get the speaker'smain ideas.

B. The student listens in group dis-cussions.

1. The student listens to others inthe group to increase his abilityto understand, to interpret, toevaluate, and to respond to theirideas.

2. He listens to the ideas and argu-ments of others to help him thinkconstructively.

3. In listening to others, he respectstheir right to their opinions al-though he may differ with thoseopinions. Q.

VI. The student -riltit-to speak -correctly andeffectively by taking part in a variety ofspeech activities.

A. The student improves his pronunicationAnd enunciation.

4452-83

W "Clear Thinki

CB "Taking Notes.

ACTIVITY: Have the studentspart in a formal or an info

4,4

"The College"Usage," pp."Publid Speak

"Enunciation,

44

LSH 05620

11 CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

atens to determine commonies in reasoning.

tens to get the speaker'sideas. h

t listens in group dis-

udent listens to others inoup to increase his abilityerstand, to interpret, tote, and to respond to their

tens to the ideas and argu-of others to help him thinkctively.

tening to others, he respectsright to their opinions al-he may differ with those

ns.

arn8 to speak correctly andtaking part in a variety of

ies,

t improves his pronuilicationation.

CB

"Clear Thinking," pp. 698-712

"Taking Notes," p. 171

. ACTIVITY: Have the students choose a topic and takepart in a formal or an informal discussion of it.

283

"The College Interview," pp. 204-212"Usage," pp. 72-193"Public Speaking," pp. 213-245

W "Enunciation," pp. 234-241

4 "A o

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

B. The student gives oral reports.

C. The student participates in groupdiscussions.

D. The student gets some experiencein making prepared speeches.

VII. The student increases his vocabularyskills through careful and deliberateword study.

A. The student practices using con-textual clues to derive the mean-ing of words.

B. The student reinforces his use ofsynonyms, antonyms and homonyms.

C. The student demonstrates his know-ledge of prefixes, suffixes, and roots.

417

284

6

CB "The Group Inl"Group Study,!

W "Learning topp. 213-225

ACTIVITY: Construct a "Speeincluding such criteria as dposture .and content, etc.

WBPAC

HPACTHTS

W

"Vocabulary,"'"Glossary ofxix

"Vocabulary,""Building You

pp. 299-305pp. 667-669

pp. 663-667p. 291

ROGET'S THESAURUS

W "Word Analysi

443

'SR

P CONTENT

nt gives oral reports.

nt participates in groupns.

nt gets some experienceprepared speeches.

ncreases his vocabularyh careful and deliberate

nt practices using con-lues to derive the mean-rds.

t reinforces his use ofantonyms and homonyms.

nt demonstrates his know-refixes, suffixes, and roots.

447

05620

'ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

284

CB

W

"The Group Interview," p. 151"Group Study," p. 170

"Learning to Speak Well in Public,"pp. 213-225

ACTIVITY: Construct a "Speech Evaluation Chart"including such criteria as diction, enunciation,posture and content, etc.

WBPAC

HPACTHTS

W

"Vocabulary," pp. 296-318"Glossary of Collegiate Terms," pp. xvi-

xix"Vocabulary," pp. 132 -146"Building Your Vocabulary," pp. 69-77

pp. 299-305pp. 667-669

W pp. 663-667p. 291

ROGET'S THESAURUS

W "Word Analysis," pp.-306 -318

413

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

VIII. The student expresses himself effectivelyAthrough his writing.

A. The student writes clear, concisesentences that are grammatically

ROGET'S THESAURUS

HTS "Preparing WrW pp. 320-544

W "Spelling," ppp. 320-378

Correct. "Parte of Spe"The Parts of"Usage," pp."Mechanicsh:

"Capitalize"Punctuatio

B. The student learnp.methods of paragraphdevelopment and writes examples of eachtype.

"The Paragrap"Facts," p. 3"Examples," p"Inpident," p"Comparison o"Reasons," p."Definition,""Combination"The Whole Cs

C. The student expresses his personal opinionsin his essays.

W. "Exercises in

F 271-177 EFFECTIVE WRIT

D. The student reviews the forma of letterwriting as he writes for informationfrom a college.

449

W "Letter Writi"The Business"The Letter o

t)4'285

[SH 05620

h) CONTENT

expresses himself effectivelyriting.

ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ROGET'S THESAURUS

HTS "Preparing Written Material," pp. 121-139W pp. 320-544

ant writes cleii, concise W "Spelling," pp. 603-628s that are grammatically pp. 320-378

"Parts of Speech," pp. 1-22"The Parts of a Sentence," pp. 23-69"Usage," pp. 72-193"Mechanicsfi:

"Capitalization," pp: 546-560"Punctuation," pp. 561-602

nt learns methods of paragraph W "The Paragraph," pp. 380-405nt and writes examples of each "Facts," p. 385

"Examples,",p. 385"Incident," p. 386"Comparison or Contrasts," p. 387"Reasons," p. 388"Definition," p. 389"Combination of Methods," p. 389"The Whole Composition," pp. 406-435

nt expresses his personal opinions W. "Exercises in Writing Prose," pp. 436 -445

says.F 271-177 EFFECTIVE WRITING: REVISE AND IMPROVE

nt reviews the forms of letter W "Letter Writing," pp. 509-544

as he writes for information "The Business Letter," pp. 522-544

liege. "The Letter of Application," p. 539

45-o

285

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

GOALS AND CONTENT ACTIVITIES A

E. The student acquires skill in taking classnotes from lectures and written inform-ation.

P. The student learns the technique ofwriting a research paper.

1. He selects and limits his subject.

2. He prepares a working bibliographyon cards.

3. He prepares his thesis statement.4. He writes his preliminary outline.5. He reads, takes notes on cards.

6. He prepares his final outline.

7. He writes the first draft.8. He footnotes correctly and prepares

a bibliography in the form given inthe textbook.

4

4 51

FS

CB

HTS

IMPROVING YO

"Notetaking,"pp. 486-491"Taking Notes

ACTIVITY: Have the studentsa recorded speech, story, or

WRPpp. 473-508

"Selecting anpp. 474-477

"Preparing a

"Stating Your"Preparing Pr"Taking Notes

pp. 486-489"Assembling NOutline,"

"Writing the 4"Footnotes, Bi"Sample Reseed

ACTIVITY: Students write athe correct forms for outlinibibliography.

452

, 05620

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

acquires skill in taking classlectures and written inform-

learns the technique ofese8rch paper.

cts and limits his subject.

ares a working bibliography

ares his thesis statement.es his preliminary outline.

, takes notes on cards.

ares his final outline.

es the first draft.notes correctly and preparesography in the form given intbook.

451

FS

CBWHTS

IMPROVING YOUR STUDY SKILLS

"Notetaking," p. 171pp. 486-491"Taking Notes," pp.'78-93

ACTIVITY: Have the students practice taking notes froma recorded speech, story, or discussion.

WRPW

W

pp. 473-508

"Selecting and Limiting a Topic,"pp. 474-477

"Preparing a Working Bibliography," p. 478

"Stating Your Purpose," p. 484"Preparing Preliminary Outline," pp. 484-486"Taking Notes and Preparing Note Cards,"pp. 486-489

"Assemblirig Note Cards, Preparing FinalOutline," p. 490

"Writing the First Draft," pp. 491-492"Footnotes, Bibliography," pp. 492-500"Sample Research Paper," pp. 5011508

ACTIVITY: Students write a short research paper, usingthe correct forms for outlining, footnoting, andbibliography.

4 ,2

COLLEGE PREP ENGLISH

4

GOALS AND,CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND

tX, The student becomes proficient in usinglibraty reiources to _obtain information.

1

to

0 45.

W.

287 -

pp. 249-295"Clatsificatio"Card Catalogu"Parts of a BQ"Reader's Guid"Vertical Fil"Reference Boo

454,

SH 05620

CONTENT ACTIVITIES AND MATERIALS

ecomes proficient in usingices to obtain informatioo.

ti

2'87

W. pp. 249-295"Classification," pp. 248-251 ,

"Card Catalogue," p. 251"Parts of a Book," pp. 256-263"Reader's Guide," pp. 260-263"Vertical File," pp. 263-264"Reference Books," pp. 265-295

4